(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Quincy Sun Jan - June 1992"

ISSUE (SI MISSING 



NOT 



AVAILABLE 

l\loT puSL}sye0''yAh^.7,i99'?' 



Inaugural Stori 



69120 






es 10-11 





VOL. 24 No. 1( 



Thnrsday, January 9, 1992 




30$ 




SCOND TERM OATH is given to Mayor James Siieets by City Cleric Jolin GUlis at 
inaugural ceremonies at Nortli Quincy High Sciio<d auditorium. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 

Applaud Education Focus; 
Anxious About FY 93 Budget 

Officials React Favorably 
To Mayor's Address 



By ROBERT 
BOSWORTH 

A random sample of 
city officials surveyed by 
The Quincy Sun responded 
favorably to Mayor James 
Sheets' second inaugural 
address Monday. 

City councillors, state 
representatives and school 
committeemen surveyed 
gave the mayor high marks 
for his education emphasis 
and fiscal honesty in light 
of an anticipated $4 
million shortfall in FY 93. 

Some offlcials, who 
agree FY 93 could be the 
most difficult in recent 
years, said they are 
anxiously awaiting the 
mayor's proposals for 
govenmient restructuring. 
Others had their own ideas 
on how close the shortfall 



next year. 

Officials reacting to the 
mayor's address: 

Council President 
Charles Phelan: "It was 
a vety uplifting speech in 
some very dark, dark times 
for the city. He's looking 
at ways to deal with the 
city budget problems. The 
city council has been 
talking the last two years 
about doing some 
consolidations and 
combining some 

departments and I think 
that was a good part of the 
mayor's speech today. 

"I think you'll find a lot 
of support on the city 
council on that. I'm very 
happy he's focusing on 
education. I think those 
are extremely important 
issues and I'm very 



pleased with the speech 

overaU." 

As for his own thoughts 

on saving money next 
year, Phelan replied, "I 
think we should look at 
combining, especially in 
the school department, 
some of the administrative 
functions such as the 
purchasing department. 
We have two purchasing 
departments, do we really 
need two purchasing 
departments? 

"I think other city 
departments, in terms of 
the fire and the police, we 
have a tremendous 
overlapping in the 
emergency dispatch that I 
think that could be 
combined and worked into 
one. It would have to be 

(Cota'donPagell) 




LISTENING INTENTLY TO Mayor James Sheets' inaugural address are (fk-ont) Rep. 
Steve Tobin, State Inspector General Robert CerasoU, Senator Paul Harold, former 
Ward 3 Councillor John Lydon, former Ward € Councillor Joanne Condon and City 
Solicitor Steve McGrath. At rear are Norfolk County Sheriff ClifTord Marshall, Rep. 
Michael Morrissey and former Ward 6 Councillor Dennis Harrington. 

{Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 



At Second Term Start: 

Sheets Sees 

$4-M Shortfall 

But No Override 

By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

The City faces a $4 million budget shortfall in FY 93 Mayor James 
Sheets declared Monday as he was sworn into a second two-year term in 
the North Quincy High School Auditorium. 

After taking the oath of 



office from City Clerk 
John Gillis before some 
400 state and local 
officials, department 
heads, city employees and 
invited guests. Sheets 
based his budget 
projection of an 
anticipated 10 percent or 
$2.9 million reduction in 
local aid and soaring fixed 
costs such as employee 
insurance, retirement 
benefits and workers 
compensation. 

To close the expected 
$4 million budget gap in 
the FY 93 budget which 
begins July 1, Sheets 
proposed four courses of 
action: 

•30 municipal positions 
which have become 
vacant through attrition 
will remain unfilled or cut, 
saving approximately $1 
million. 

•Continue pursuing 
major tax delinquents. 
During FY 91, the city 
recovered $1.4 million in 
delinquent tax money. 

•Continue to search out 
new revenue sources. 

•Recommend major 
reorganization of 
department structure. 

Sheets, who did not 
offer any specific 
proposals regarding new 
revenue sources and 
department reorganization, 

said he would not 
recommend a Proposition 
2 1/2 override. Instead, he 
called on all city 
departments and officials 
to work together to meet 



Major Points Of Mayor 
Sheets' Inaugural Address 

•Projects $4 M Deficit Iii FY 93 
Due To Anticipated $2.9 M Cut 
In Local Aid and Rising Fixed Costs 
•To OflEselSlKWtfall, Sheets Will Freeze 
Or ElJWiftStte Fitnding For 30 Municipal Jobs; 
•Porsiie M^l&r Tasi Delmquems: 
*S«iitd» 0«tN«sw R«vem» Sotifces; 
•Recot»me»d Dep^utmetstReocgamzation. 
•Will Not Recommend»Pro|> 2 Ift Override. 
•Pursue RevitdlJ«atieft Of Quincy Center, 
Wollastoti And North Quincy Business Areas. 
•Pursue Funding For Old Colony Commuter 
RaS Station a«d Ceosstown Connector. 
•Recommettd M^or Administrative 
Reorgankatioti For Qtso^ Pirtjlic Schools. 
•Find More Rcsoorces For Teaching 
A«d Cwrricoltan Imimwemem. 
*P«^*08e FjfOgr»n To Oeanup O'ty Beaches. 
*0)ttvert West Quincy Landfill 
Into AReot««H<J^a|i FiK^iUty. 



the economic challenges 
of the next fiscal year. 

"We must remember 
that it isn't the revenue 
shortfall or the budget that 
will make the difference in 
1992. It is our collective 
commitment to take 
charge of our own 
destiny," he said. 

During his 33-minute 
address, the mayor also 
noted other top priorities 
for the next two years, 
including improving the 
city's school system, 
revitalizing the city's three 



business districts and 
enhancing the physical 
environment. In addition, 
be recounted some notable 
achievements, such as 
recycling, the budget 
turnaround at Quincy 
Hospital and the ever- 
growing Quincy College. 

On education, the 
mayor said his 
administration will 
concentrate on making the 
city's school system "first 
rate." He did not offer any 
specifics, saying only, 

(Confd on Page JO) 



Third Quarter Property 
Tax Bills Due Feb. 3 



Property tax bills for the 
third quarter of fiscal 1992 
were mailed Dec. 26 and 
will be due Monday, Feb. 
3, aimounces Quincy Tax 
Collector Dana Childs. 

Payments received in 
the collector's office after 
Feb. 3 will be assessed a 
late charge of 14% back to 
Feb. 3. Childs said 
payments are considered 
late if received after Feb. 



3, regardless of the 
postmark date. 

Property owners who 
have not received a bill 
should contact the 
collector's office Monday 
through Friday between 
8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. 

New owners since Jan. 
1, 1991 are advised that 
tax bills for 1992 are 
issued in the name of the 
old owner. They should 



obtain a copy of the bill 
from the old owners or the 
tax office. 

The Board of Assessors 
also reminds taxpayers 
that applications for 
abatements must be filed 
by Monday, Jan. 27, 1992 
and applications for 
exemptions must be filed 
by March 26, 1992. Also 
sq)plications for abatement 
of personal property tax 
must be filed by Jan. 29. 



PUga 2 Qnlncy Son Thiinday, Janaary 9, 1992 



Cheney Forming First 
Night Committee In Quincy 



Councillor Michael 
Cheney announces he is 
forming a committee 
which will examine the 
feasibility of establishing a 
First Night Celebration in 
Quincy. 

Cheney said there are 
several communities who 
have modeled their First 
Night after Boston which 



is typically a non- 
alcoholic family 
celebration whereby locd 
residents get together in a 
festive atmosphere and 
enjoy the performing and 
non-performing arts while 
bringing in the New Year. 

Many communities 
have events such as choral 
groups, small theatre 



Grand Opening 
SHIPYARD DINER 

South Street (next to Shipyard) 
Under New Management 
Breakfast & Lunch 
Served Daily 



Breakfast: Mon-Fri 6 am-11 am 
Sat-Sun 7 am-1 pm 
Specials $1.99 & up 
Lunch: Mon-Fri, 11 am-3 pm 
Specials $2.75 & up 
Fish & Chips $3.95 



Take Out & Kiddie Menu Available 



Full Service Oil Change 



$16 



Reg $21 90 

C<ill Oi'itlcr For Dct.iili. 

With this coupon only. 

Expircs 1/1 5/92 



Carbureted Maintenance Tune-Up 



M<«4g^ 



■ M tyt MtfnO) higher 

Includes: Performance 
& Emisaoru Analysis 
Install new resistor plugs 
Adjust: timing, idle, fue^ 
mixture, where possible 
Inspect sensors, belts, hoses 
&Nters. 

Plus Sparks Triple Guarantee 
see details tielow. 




groups that put on skits, 
individual performers such 
as mimes, as well as 
traditional holiday music, 
ice sculptures and a 
variety of children's 
activities throughout the 
evening. 

Cheney said he hopes 
to get the business 
community involved in 
this project. 

"We have a city that 
we can be proud of and a 
downtown that is the 
perfect setting for a First 
Night Celebration," said 
Cheney. "Quincy is a 
family community and our 
downtown is a most 
appropriate setting for this 
event." 

He also noted Quincy 
has failed to tq> into the 
many Quincy residents 
who are both from the 
performing and non- 
performing sectors. Anyone 
wishing to serve on this 
planning committee or 
otherwise become 
involved with Quincy 's 
First Night may contact 
Councillor Cheney at bis 
City Council Office at 
773-1380, ext. 341. 

Cheney is the chairman 
of the City Council's 
Tourism Committee and it 
is his hope that a First 
Night Celebration will 
enhance the city's 
increased efforts in 
attracting tourists to 
Quincy. 



«15«»OFF 



P 

■ inc 

■ PIlL _ 

■ Plus Cooling System Fliish up to 2 gal. of antifreeze] 

H CM OeMr For OecMb.VMttitNi coupon only. 

MC«nnot be uteJ m conjunolon wWh my eihef olfcf . Ei^lret 1/1 5/t2 



Winter 
Package 

bxludes Any Sparks TUn^^lp 
I Pkjs OIL luhSTk Flltar up to 5 qts. ofl 0W30 oil 



I 



$500 OFF 

On Any Brake Reivur 

CjlDe*rFarOealk.\MlMNi coupon only. Expires 1/15/92 




OURHVIEOUMUNTEE 

Mbk Out ailHn quoMl* tM prin you pw. 
MicOinmMl or woMd mmkckrOT 

RMlsnMMK uv wonliwwlMSfor ^H 
12Mnlicr12in)iiiiM.MI«0M*i ■ 



I 
1 



■H QUINCY - 770-4933 , _ ■ 

■ 664 Washington St, Rte. 3A ® I ■ 
" — (across ffrom The Ship Yard) lai " 



Hours: M F 8 6 • iM. 8 4 




/" 



Is College In Your Future? 

• Are you reevaluating your life or career? 

• Do you want to do something for yourself? 

• Would a Part-Time College program help 
you attain your goals? 

At Quincy College you can begin your Associate's Degree or 
Certificate program this month by going part-time, either days or 
evenings, in one of our many degree programs. With 28 Majors 
and Concentrations to choose from you will be able to find a 
program to help you meet your goals. Financial Aid and 
Childcarc are available. Our convenient Quincy Center location 
mak^s getting to college by bus, car or the red line easy. 



Classes begin January 21 



For more information contact the 
Admissions Office at: 

(617) 984-1700 
1-800-698-1700 

34 Coddington Street, Quincy, MA 02 1 69 
The South Shore's Community College 




QUINCY 
COLLEGE 



New City Hall Phone System 
Begins Operation Monday 



By STEVE KAVANAGH 

City Hall's new 
telepbooe system is 
scheduled to go on line 
Monday. 

"Everything's on target. 
The conversion will be this 
weekend," said Robert 
Brennan, head of Quincy's 
Data Processing 



One way the new 
system will improve 
service is to allow the 
public to dial a specific 
city department directly. 
The present system 
requires all calls to go 
through the city's 
switchboaid at 773-1380. 
A listing of individual 



Department. Brennan said department phone numbers 
he spoke with NYNEX will be listed in future 



officials this week and was 
told that the phone 
company is ready to do the 
conversion. 

The new system will 
not go into effect until 
Tuesday or Wednesday for 
the Fire Department 
because of major rewiring 
that has to be done, 
Brennan said. 

The phone company is 
conducting training all this 
week for 350 city 
employees in the use of 
the new system. 

Quincy will be 
converting its phone 
service to New England 
Telephone's Centrex 
system. City and phone 
company officials estimate 
the city will save 
approximately $65,000 a 
year or about $5,000 per 
month. The savings will 
total about $450,000 over 
the course of the seven- 
year pact. 

Presently, if a resident 
calls the City Hall 
switchboard after 4:30 p.m. 
there is no answer. 



editions of the telephone 
book and will also be 
mailed out with resident's 
water bills. The new 
listings will also be 
advertised in The Quincy 
Sun. 

Centrex is simple to 
update which means new 
technology and equipment 
can easily be applied to 
the digital system. 

Features of the new 
system include 25 "call 
processing" numbers for 
many city departments. 
For example, Brennan 
said, if a resident calls the 
Recreation Department a 
recording will instnict the 
caller to press "1" for 
information on the 
Lincoln-Hancock pool, "2" 
for vacation-week gym 
programs, "3" for the city 
tennis tournament, etc., or 
"9" to speak to a 
Recreation Dept. 
employee. 

Each school in Quincy 
will be able to leave 
various messages for 
parents and students 



including "no school" 
announcements, 
information on PTQ 
meetings, social and 
spoiling events, etc. 

Brennan said residents 
will be able to dial for 
infonnation 24 hours a day 
although most departments 
and the main switchboard 
will still operate during 
normal 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 
hours. Callers dialing from 
a rotary telephone will still 
be connected to an 
operator during normal 
business hours. Callers 
who don't know which 
department they want 
should call City Hall's new 
main number, 376-1000. 

The new system will 
also allow city 
departments, such as fire 
and public works, to list 
emergency numbers 24 
hours a day— seven days a 
week. 

Quincy Hospital and the 
Police Department will 
keep their present systems. 

Brennan said that the 
schools, Quincy College, 
libraries. Fire Department 
and City Hall each have 
separate systems and will 
be consolidated. 

The new system will 
also include a "Voice 
Mail" feature for most 
department heads, each 
City Councillor and the 
School Committee. Voice 
Mail works like an 
answering machine. 



$229,597 In Wiring During December 



Inspector Thomas Purpura. 
There were 59 
certificates of approval to 
the Massachusetts Electric 
Comoany and $3,848 in 



permit fees. 

In addition, there were 
285 inspections, 72 defects 
noted, 37 reinspections 
and three fire calls. 



The Quincy Wire 
Department issued 136 
permits for an estimated 
$229,597 in wiring during 
December, reports Wire 

QHS Parent Advisory Council Meeting Jan. 14 

The Quincy High Tuesday, Jan. 14 ai 7:15 All parents and teachers 
School Parent Advisory P™- "^ the Pride Room of 
Council will meet Quincy High. 



are welcome to anend. 



AFFORDABLE FAMILY PLANNING CARE 

• CONVENIENT SCHEDULES • SLIDING FEE 

• COMPLETE CONFIDENTIALITY • RESPONSIVE HEALTH TEAM 

• PREGNANCY TESTING AND COUNSELING 

• AFFORDABLE BIRTH CONTROL SUPPLIES 




QUINCY FAMILY PLANNING 

OUR NEW LOCATION IS: 

148 PARKINGWAY 

QUINCY, MA 02169 

(617)773-7331 



HEALTH CARE OF SOUTHEASTERN MASSACHUSETTS. INC 




SAME DAY SLIDES 

(E-6 PROCESS) 
only at 

Photo Quick of Quincy 

1363 Hancock St. 
Quincy Center 

472-7131 



Thnnday, Juauaj 9, 1992 Qnlocy Son Pag* 3 



Quincy Bay Inn Hearing 
Continued Until Jan. 28 



By STEVE KAVANAGH 

A decision will be 
handed down by the 
License Board Jan. 28 
regarding charges that the 
Quincy Bay Inn served 
alcohol to minors and to 
intoxicated individuals 
Sept. 24, 1989. 

Assistant City Solicitor 
James Timmins is 
handling the city's case 
against the nightclub 
which revolves around the 
tragic death's of two 19- 
year old Quincy men that 
night. 

Daniel Ward and 
Shawn Qancy died when 
Clancy lost control of his 
car and crashed on Route 
3A in Hingham. Both were 
legally intoxicated and 
had been seen drinking 
earlier at Aquarius 
Nightclub at Quincy Bay 
Inn. 

The License Board 
hearing had been delayed 
pending the outcome of 
the criminal case against 
the nightclub. 

The hearing was 
continued when Michael 
Traft, an attorney 
representing the families 
of Ward and Clancy, 
submitted documents 
relating to the case which 
board members requested 
a chance to review. 

"The corporate entity 
(of Quincy Bay Inn) 
admitted to sufficient facts 
on two counts of serving 
intoxicated individuals," 
Timmins said. 

"This decision in the 
Dedham Court should 
trigger disciplinary action 
by the board," Timmins 
said. 

Attorney for Quincy 
Bay Inn, Brian Gilligan 
argued that the License 
Board is different from a 
court of law and that the 
same standards do not 
always apply. 



"The question for the 
board is did a violation of 
a statute occur?" Timmins 
said. 

The defendants 
admitted in court that a 
statute was violated, 
Timmins said, and it is the 
License Board's duty to 
make a decision now. 

The charge of serving 
underage individuals was 
more controversial. 

A video tape was 
played which showed 
Ward brandishing an ED to 
the doorman at Aquarius. 
A fake ID was found in 
Ward's possession at the 
accident scene. Clancy 
was visible on the t^ but 
the tdpc shut off before he 
could be filmed showing 
identification to the 
doorman. Clancy's regular 
driver's license, stating he 
was 19, was found in his 
possession at the accident 
scene. 

Traft contends that 
Qancy did not have a fake 
ID that night and the 
nightclub was negligent in 
admitting him. 

Quincy Liquor 

Inspector, Det. Sgt. 
Richard Laracy, told the 
board he bad been at the 
nightclub that night and 
that he observed the 
doorman doing his job 
properly. 

While he was there 
"Everyone was carded 
(checked for ID)," Laracy 
said. 



Ward and Clancy 
visited Aquarius that night 
with a group of four other 
friends. Laracy said that 
the other four men had 
fake IDs. 

An investigation led 
Laracy to believe that 
many of the IDs were 
being obtained by North 
Quincy youths through a 
connection in the 
Watertown Registry of 
Motor Vehicles office. 

Ward's fake license 
identified him as Brendan 
Walsh. An investigation 
revealed that there were 
seven activities on 
Walsh's license between 
April 1987 and Dec. 1990. 
Walsh claimed his waUet 
had been stolen, Laracy 
said. 

The activities on the 
license included a name 
change, two amended 
licenses, two duplicate 
licenses, a Uquor ID and a 
dupUcate liquor ID. 

Laracy also discovered 
that Gancy's older brother, 
Donald, bad six activities 
on his license in a short 
time period. They included 
three amended licenses, a 
dupUcate, a liquor ID and 
a duplicate liquor ID. 

""The only charges I 
brought against Quincy 
Bay Inn in court were for 
serving intoxicated 
persons," Laracy said. He 
said he would have been 
"laughed out of court" if he 
had pursued the underage 
charges. 




TEL 328-1700 



FASFIICN QUALITY CLEANERS 

LAUNDRY - DRY CLEANING - ALTERATIONS • STORAGE 



WEODING GOWNS A SPECIALTY 



PETER LIO 
Owner 



87 BILLINGS HD. 
NO. OL'INCY. MASS. 



You can do better 

at Colonial Federal with 

a new car loan! 



20% OONjr. oj 






loao o< »1"' ( -M interest 



monWW 



rssss 



rrr-Tr' 



AUrnnwciM 



qpffi^^wn^ 




mSUREO FOIC 



COLONIAL FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK 

QUINCY 15 Beach Street 617-471-0750 

EAST WEVMOUTH Corner of Middle & Washington Streets 617-331-1776 
HOLBROOK 802 South Franklin Street 617-767-1776 ^/>>w 

WANEHAM Cranberry Pla^a SOS 295- > 776 t£J 




STATE LOTTERY EMPLOYEES recently donated $175 and more than 300 pounds of 
food to the Quincy Community Emergency Food Center. State Treasurer Joseph 
Malone, second ft-om right, presents the checl( to Carolyn Remy, director of the 
Emergency Food Center, at the Lottery's Braintree headquarters. Also on hand are, 
from left, Mary Woods and Tom McTigue, Lottery employees; and Eric Turner, 
executive director of the Massachusetts State Lottery. 



Atlantic Fish & Lobster 

Fresh Fish & Shellfish 
Fried Foods - Daily Specials 

Live Lobsters 

Retail & Wholesale 

Homemade Fish & Clam Chowder 
Open 7 Days a Week 

148 Granite St. 
774-1122 In The Fruit Basket Store 




% 



Jake And Josh Share Enthusiasm. 
And Gynboree Plays It Up! 



At GYMBOREE, your first 
experience of FUN is FREE! Come 
to our OPEN HOUSE the week of 
January 7 and try out over 40 pieces 
of spedally-built play equipment, 
meet the tescher 
and play with YOUR CHHD GETS MORE OUT Of ChIIDMOOD AT 

"sr GyihABORec 



GYMBOREE is the world leader 
in paient/diild play programs, featur- 
ing five age-£4)propriate levels for 3 
months through 4 year olds. Come play 
it up! 

OPEN HOUSE: 

January 7-11, 

Join Us! 

1992 Cymborff Corporation 



Braintree 

Emmanual Parish 

519 Washington St. 

Frl..Jan.10 

3mos.,-16mo8. 9:30 am 

1Yr.-4Yr8. 10:30 am 

Sal. Jan. 11 
3mos.-16mos. 2:30 pm 
1Yr.-4Yrs. 330 pm 



(617)449-3994 



V 



HInaham 

CentralJr. High 

220 Central SL 

Tues..Jan.7aLSat..Jan.11 

3mos-16mos. 9:00 am 

12mox.-30mo8. 10:00 am 

2Yrs.-4Yr8. 11«)am 



Page 4 Qulncy Son Thnnday, January 9, 1992 



Opinion 




USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co . Inc 

1372 Hancock St . Ouincy. Mass 02169 

Henry V. Bosworlh Jr , Publisher 
Robert H Bosworth. Editor 



30< par copy. $12.00 par yaar by mail In Quincy 
$14.00 par yaar by mail outside Quincy. $17.00 out of state 

Telephone 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 
Second class postage paid at Boston, Mass. 

Postmaster Send address change to 
The Quincy Sun, 1372 Hancock St , Quincy, Mass 02169 



The Ouincy Sun assumes no frnanctal responsib.lily for 
lypographica! errors in advertisements but will reprint that 
part ol an advercserrent in which the typographical error 
occurs 



'Sh^- 



•Night In Jair 

At Norfolk County 
Correctional Center 



Sheriff Clifford 
Marshall will sponsor a 
'Night In Jail" and "Jail 
and Bail" Friday, Jan. 17 
at the Norfolk County 
Correctional Center, 200 
West St. (Route 135), 
Dedham. 

The event will serve as 
a training exercise for the 
Norfolk County Sheriffs 
Office staff and a 
fundraiser for various 
community organizations, 
civic and fraternal groups. 
The program is designed to 
promote awareness of the 
daily operations of the 
Norfolk County 

Correctional Center. 

Single accommodations 
for the "Night in Jail' are 
available first-come, first- 
serve. A $25 participation 
fee will be used to cover 
any costs associated with 
the evening. Remaining 
proceeds will benefit the 
Norfolk County Drug aixi 
Alcohol Awareness 
Program. 



'Jail and Bailers' will 
participate in all 'Night in 
Jail' programs until their 
'bail-out' time between 10 
and 11 p.m. In addition to 
the $25 participation fee, 
the 'bail-out fee' may 
benefit the Norfolk County 
Drug and Alcohol 
Awareness Program or a 
favorite charity. The 
sheriff's department 
suggests the Leukemia 
Society of America; 
Muscular Dystrophy 
Association, Mass. 
Hospital School and 



'Friends 


of Kevi; 


McNulty.' 




Space 


is limited. 


Contact 


the Sheriffs 


public 


information 



department at 617-329- 

6730 exts. 204 or 212 to 
obtain a 'mock summons' 
detailing the procedures 
for this event. 

Deadline to return 
'summonses' to the 
SheriCTs Office is Monday, 
Jan. 13. 




IMlEDWft' 

OFMASSACHUSETTS BA^ 



t Medically 
Speaking 

by MkbaelM. Bakerman, M.D., PA.CC 



THE SERIOUS PAIN 
OF TENSION HEADACHES 



Headaches are more 
often the butt of jokes than 
subjects for serious 
attention. Yet tension 
headaches, the kind that 
occur at times of physical 
or emotional stress, hit 
most of us at one time or 
another, and can be 
devastating. People who 
suffer severe, frequent 
tension headaches shoukj 
get professional help. 
Because many long-time 
sufferers are heavy users 
of painkillers, treatment 
may include a weaning 
away from those drugs 
plus a prescription for 
antidepressants or muscle 
relaxants. Warm-water 
soaking, stretching 
exercises, heating pad 
sessions, and massaging 
of tense muscles may also 
be suggested. The key to 



long-term prevention of the 
headaches is to discover 
the triggers that bring them 
on, then finding ways to 
cope. 

P.S. Tension headache 
suffers tend to repress 
anger and are often either 
highly competitive or 
chronically depressed. 

Reducing the stress in 
your life can help prevent 
many medical problems 
from developing. If you 
would like to learn more 
about how you can modify 
your lifestyle to help ward 
off heart disease, call 
COMPREHENSIVE CAR- 
DIAC CARE at 472-2550. 
Office hours are by 
appointment at 101 Adams 
St. Suite 24, in Quincy. I 
am affiliated with Quincy 
Hospital and South Shore 
Hospitals. 



S"^ 




Sunbeams 

By Henry Bosworth 



And, the Next Mayor? 






In politics today is also tomorrow and this year is 
already next year, too. 

On Monday, for example, there wa s Mayor Jame s 
Sheets with his right hand raised tak- 
ing his second term oath of office 
from City Hall Clerk John Gillis. 

The setting was different. Instead 
of at City hall or the Quincy Vo-Tech 
gym, the inaugural ceremonies were "SHEETS 
held for the ftfst time at the North Quincy High School 
auditorium. 

But politician watchers were once again tuned in on 
their usual thought channel and political quiz program: 
Is The Next Mayor Also Here Today? 

Well, if the next mayor is coming out of the City 
Council — where they usually come from — who will 
it be? 
Two names mos t mentioned a s potential mayoral 

candidates are 
Tim Cahill and 
Mike Cheney. Po- 
litical observers 
think they are al- 
CAHlLL CHENEY ready on a may- 

oral collision course and will square off against one 
another down the road. 

Possibly in 1993 if Sheets decides four years is 
enough of Excedrin headaches that go with being the 
city's chief executive and tires of trying to pull a fiscal 
rabbit out of the hat to cure the city's fmancial woes. 
And if times do get worse — and many experts still 
believe they will — he just might decide to let someone 
else pick up the torch and run with it. 

And there's the increasingly restless voters an in- 
cimibent mayor has to contend with. Three and four- 
term mayors may be a thing of the past unless one fmds 
a gold roiae under City Hall. There are signs of voter 
attimde ah-eady shifting to giving a mayor two terms 
and then next batter up. 

Any other possibilities in the present City Council? 
Chuck Phelan as the new City Co uncil president 
could put himself in a strong position 
the next two years. The City Council 
presidency is the city's second most 
powerful elective office and consid- 
ered by many as the springboard to the 
mayor's office although Uiat is not 
always so. phelan 

Of the holdover councillors from 1991, probably 
Ted DeCristofaro is the only one who doesn't have 
mayoral fantasies. 

Patricia Toland who once said 
she was not interested in being mayor 
has changed her mind. She wouldn't 
mmd being Quincy's first woman 
mayor. 

TOLAND 








KOLSON FABRIZIO CHRETIEN 

And, Larry Chretien, Tom Fabrizio and Peter Kolson 
no doubt wouldn't mind someday to be His Honor if the 
right opportimity came along. 

And how about newcomer 
Bruce Ayers? Ward 6 has never pro- 
duced a mayor. Could he someday be 
the fu-st? He is considered a rising 
bright political star. 

If the next mayor were to come 
AYERS out of the School Committee there 







would be some heavy betting on Dan 
Raymondi. 

Raymondi, in a stimning political 
comeback, topped the School Com- 
mittee field in both the preliminary 
and fmal elections last fall. 

He says his interest is being a good raymondi 
School Committeeman and tackling the challenges of 
that job. But observers looking at his gung-ho come- 
back, feel he also has other things on his mind. Like, 
they think, another crack at the mayor's office. 

He lost to Frank McCauley in 1 98 1 . But he would be 
a sd-ong candidate if he decided to give it another shot 
in 1993 or 1995. 

School Committeeman Ron Mariano who was 
elected state representative in the Third 
Norfolk Dishict's special election to 
succeed Robert Cerasoli last fall, is 
another potential mayoral candidate. 
But he and Raymondi would not run 
against one another. 

MARUNO 

Anyway, last Monday wasn't just Monday. And this 
isn't just 1992. It is already tommorrow and 1993 to 
politician watchers. 

□ 

YOU'D HAVE TO say that Tom Nutley carried out 
his Ward 6 City Council duties right to 
the very end. 

Nutley dashed off a letter dated 
Dec. 31 to MDC Commissioner Ilyas 
Bhatti expressing concerns over "the 
mounting piles of debris on Wollaston 
Beach." NUTLEY 

"I assume," he wrote, "that you are thinking in terms 
of a spring cleanup, bp» ^ im worried that people upon 
observing the debris and also assuming a spring cleanup 
might just use the beach this winter to dump their 
rubbish, old furniture, etc. which would not only create 
a larger problem but could result in an increase in 
rodents, etc. in this residential area." 

Q 
IF THERE WAS a Quincy Courage Award, our 
nominee would be Sean Barry who made his political 
debut — and an impressive one at that 
— in last fall's School Committee 
race. 

Sean, who is 27, has been waging a 
tough fight to save his right leg since 
1986, after a bout with cancer. A se- 
vere infection reared up in his leg 
implant last October after a bad fall. ^^"^ 

Sean came home from Massachusetts General Hos- 
pital for the holidays but has been re-admitted. The leg 
has to be amputated — probably this week. 

"I'm doing fme — for now," he says. "I'm upbeat 
but ... I'll know better when it's over." 

Sean says he'll be ready for the surgery after a 
special from Barry's Deli: a honey ham sandwich with 
Swiss cheese on an onion roll. 

"If you only knew what he' s been through," says his 
mother, Jeanne. "It's been so traumatic for him. "But 
he has faced it." 

Sean, a journalism major graduate, hopes to go into 
that field in the fuhu-e and already is returning to the 
political field. 

He's a candidate for the Ward 5 Democratic City 
Committee in the March Presidential primary. 

"And if Icould have made it, I'd be in New Hampshire 
right now campaigning for Tom Harkins for Presi- 
dent." 

Best of luck Sean. A lot of prayers are with you. 




To Focus On Community Input 

Ayers: 1 Want To Be 



There For The People' 



Thursday, Januarj 9, 1992 Qolncy Sun Page 5 



Quincy's 
Yesterdays 



By ROBERT 
BOSWORTH 

Bruce Ayers won't be 
wading into his new 
position as Ward 6 
councillor. The new 
freshman councillor is 
diving into political waters 
head first 

Ayers, who was sworn 
in with Quincy's other 
elected officials Monday, 
already has a three major 
issues which demand his 
immediate attention: the 
reconstruction of the 
Quincy Shore Dr.-East 
Squantum St. intersection; 
possible rezoning of the 
Jordan Marsh parcel in 
Squantum; and the future 
use of the former Best Buy 
building on Quincy Shore 
Dr. 

Although Ayers's 
transition to Ward 6 
councillor will be fast and 
furious because of those 
issues, he is ready to 
accept the challenges of a 
fiesbman councillor. 

"I'm excited," he said 
three days before his 
swearing in. "I'm looking 
forward to working with 
the mayor, the other 
councillors and most 
importantly the people of 
my ward mainly because 
no one knows the ward 
better than the people who 
live here." 

Ayers, who wiU turn 30 
in April, succeeds former 
Ward 6 Councillor Thomas 
Nutley who he defeated 
last November. 

Looking ahead to the 
next two years, Ayers has 
set short and long-term 
goals as Ward 6 
councillor. In the short 
run, he hopes to establish 
an open line of 
communication for his 
constituents. 

"I'm trying to establish 
an open line of 
communication with my 
constituents," he said, 
pointing out he will soon 
set up office hours at his 
business, Ayers Bros. 
Handicap Conversion 
Center, off East Squantum 
St. 

The hours, he says, will 
be held a few different 
weekday nights not to 
conflict with other city or 
community meetings. 

"I want to be a 
communicator. I want to 
have a good relation with 
the ward. People want to 
be kept informed of what's 
going on. Community 
meetings are very 
important. I also want to 
be a watchdog for them by 
watching out for their 
interests." 

By keeping 

communication lines open 
and meeting with 
constituents, Ayers hopes 
to act on and resolve 
community issues with the 
help and support of Ward 6 
residents. 

For example, Ayers 
intends to set up separate 
community meetings on 
the intersection 

reconstruction project. 




NEW WARD 6 Councillor Bruce Ayers examines a blueprint for tlie reconstruction of 
tlie Quincy Shore Dr.--East Squantum St. intersection. The intersection project is one 
of three major issues the fk-eshman city councillor will l>e addressing early in his first 



term. 

Jordan Marsh rezoning 
issue and the future of the 
Best Buy site before 
voting on them. He'll also 
meet with the proper 
representatives and 
officials for more ii^ut. 

Ayers "inherited" one 
of the issues, the proposed 
rezoning of the Jordan 
Marsh site, from Nutley. 
The former councillor 
proposed the 10-acre site 
be rezoned from Business 
B to Planned Unit 
E>evelopment last month. 

In proposing the 
change, Nudey said PUD 
would allow the 
community to provide 
public input to any 
significant change, or 
expansion, to the Jordan 
Marsh warehouse building 
and adjoining property to 
protect the qusdity of life 
and property values in the 
area. 

Ayers will soon meet 
with representatives from 
Jordan Marsh, councillors- 
at-large. Planning Director 
Richard Meade and the 
community to discuss the 
proposal and the pros and 
cons of the Business B and 
PUD zoning categories. 

"Jordan Marsh has 
always been a good 
neighbor and one of the 
city's biggest taxpayers. 
I'd like to give them a 
chance to sit down and air 
their concerns. 

"Then I'll meet with the 
directors of the community 
associations and the 
residents. I don't want to 
make a zoning change 
without community input 
and without understanding 
the pros and cons of each 
zoning classification." 

Ayers said he hopes to 
schedule meetings on 
Jordan Marsh, as well as 
the intersection 

reconstruction and Best 
Buy site, in the next few 
months. The first meeting 
could be held by the end 
of the month. 

"I'd like to start these 
meetings in January but 
we have the Best Buy 
issue and intersection 
project going on so it will 
be a busy first half of the 
year. I want to give each 
project the time it needs to 
do a thorough research 
job." 



(Quincy Sun photo by Robert Boswortk) 

The Quincy Shore Dr.-- handicap conversion 

is a community 



East Squantum St. 
intersection reconstruction 
could begin in the spring. 
According to Ayers, three 
proposals have been 
drafted and will be brought 
up at a future meeting. 

The plan which seems 
to have the most support 
from local officials calls 
for a small islaixl or barrier 
in the middle of East 
Squantum St. from the 
Quincy Shore Dr. 
intersection past the 
entrance to Dunkin Donuts. 
The island would prevent 
motorists who travel north 
on Quincy Shore Dr. and 
take a right onto East 
Squantum St. from cutting 
across East Squantum St. 
and entering the donut 
shop, thereby eliminating 
any traffic tie-ups on East 
Squantum St. 

All three plans call for 
the MDC side of East 
Squantum St. to be 
widened to accommodate 
the increased traffic 
created by the MWRA's 
Squantum ferry. The 
project will be financed by 
a $1.3 million mitigation 
package signed by the city 
and MWRA last year. 

As for the Best Buy 
site. Ayers said one 
proposal under 

consideration is a 
Walgreen 's moving into 
the front section of the 
building. The rear may be 
used to expand the 
adjoining liquor store. 

"Residents are 
concerned about traffic, 
lighting and creating jobs. 
They also want to know if 
there is a need for the 
proposed store. People 
want jobs.and this would 
be a great opportunity for 
the Best Buy site to get 
back on its feet," Ayers 
said, adding, "We'll hold 
more meetings on that, 
too." 

The freshman councillor 
will have the distinction of 
serving as the first 
chairman of the council's 
new Handicapped Affairs 
Committee. The 

committee was created by 
new Council President 
Chuck Phelan. 

The appointment is 
right up Ayers's alley. 
Besides managing the 



center, he 
access monitor for the 
state's Office of 
Handicapped Affairs. 

The new committee 
will be responsible for 
ensuring that new 
buildings in Quincy, as 
well as existing structures 
which undergo more than 
$50,000 in changes, meet 
the requirements spelled 
out by the Americans With 
Disabilities Act. 

Requirements include 
handicapped parking, 
curbcuts, sidewalk ramps 
with hand rails, fire alanns 
and handicapped 

accessible bathrooms with 
proper faucets and toilets. 

When Nick's 

Restaurant, corner of 
Granite and Whitwell Sts., 
was being built, Ayers met 
with the owner to explain 
the new requirements. In 
turn, the owner complied 
as the building was 
constructed. 

"It didn't interfere with 
his building. It woriced out 
well. 

"To the average person, 
the requirements don't 
seem like a big deal but if 
you're in a chair. . . it can 
be frustrating because they 
can't go into places 
because they're not 
handicapped accessible." 

In addition, the 
committee will explore 
federal and state grants 
which fund such items as 
house lifts. 

Phelan also appointed 
Ayers chairman of the 
council's Public Works 
Committee. "I'm looking 
forward to working with 
(former chairman and 
Ward I Councillor) Peter 
Kolson and Public Works 
Commissioner David 
Colton." 

As for long-term goals, 
Ayers said be wants to 
improve the quality of life 
in Ward 6 as well as woik 
with other offlcials to 
bolster public safety and 
education. 

The people of Ward 
6 want good schools, safe 
streets and hope for a 
bright and healthy future. 

"I want to protect 
people's interest in the 
ward and be there for the 
people when they need 
me. 



Mcintosh Bows Out 
Of 'Plan E' Dinner 

Mayor David S. Mcintosh and Mayor Francis X. Collins 
of Salem were to have been the featured speakers at a dinner 
honoring City Manager William 
J. Deegan Jr. at the Masonic 
Temple. 

But Mcintosh withdrew at the 
last minute, saying that while he 
had nothing against Deegan, he 
suspected that the dinner would- 



Jan. 8-14 

1953 

39 Years Ago 



be little more than a rally for the controversial Plan E. 

"I have every reason to believe that this will be a testimo- 
nial, not to the city manager, but to Plan E," said the Mayor. 
"I am against Plan E." 

MODERNIZE CENTRAL 

Rudolph Lofgren, assistant school superintendent for 
maintenance, suggested that three major changes could be 
made in Central Junior High School to make it usable for the 
next 15 years. 

He listed the changes as additional toilet facilities on all 
three floors, moving the cafeteria to die basement, and 
replacing the 47-year-old boiler. 

COST OF FENCING 

Heniy F. Nilsen, superintendent of engineering, esti- 
mated it would cost $64,000 to fence in the Quincy quarries 
and the fences would not be effective in keeping out young- 
sters. 

The city owned 24 quarries and was considering the 
purdiase of Reld and V^de Quany, where the body of the 
long-missing Daimy Mattson was found recently. 

Nilsen saidit would cost between $115,000 and$l 60,000 
to fill in Held and Wilde. 

BRADFORD REJECTED 

The School Committee, citing a long-standing policy 
against naming buildings for living persons, declined to 
name the newly enlaiged Trade School for former Mayor 
William A. Bradford. 

But Qty Historian William C. Edwards pointed out that 
the Waiaid School in West QuiiKy was named on March 28, 
1855, six years before its namesake, Solomon Willaid, died. 
QUINCY-ISMS 
difford O. Mason of 164 Crabtiee Rd., Squantum, a 
retired businessman, took over as temporary executive vice 
president of the Quincy Taxpayers Association ... Five of 
seven new vehicles in Quincy's fleet of snow-fighteis ar- 
rived shortly before a northeaster deposited 12-18 inches of 
snow on the city, the heaviest since 1945 ... Baked stuffed 
lobster was $1.50 at the Maple Cafe, 6-8 Maple St., G. 
Ronald Aluisy, proprietor ... Three men were certified by 
Civil Service for appointment to a $3,300 vacancy on the 
Quincy Fire Department, Robert E. Miller, 191 Taffrail Rd, 
Gemiantown; Leonard P. LeBlanc, 483 Hancock St., North 
Quincy, Patrick J. McAuley, 10 Beechwood St, Quincy 
Point ... Quincy Detectives Warren Corbett and John 
Rtzgerald were in Livermore Falls, Maine to bring back a 
man suspected of passing bogus checks in Quincy ... Jane 
Russell and Groucho Marx were starring in "Double Dyna- 
mite" at the Lincoln Theater in Quincy Point ... The Hathomar 
Club of the First Baptist Church, Wollaston, held a party at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. George Alexander, 1 1 7 Everett St, 
to swap unwanted Christmas presents ... The Quincy High 
School basketball team fell behind 34-12 at halMme, its 
poorest first half in five seasons, and bowed to Chelsea, 60- 
41 ... J. Everett Robie was elected clerk of the Quincy Trust 
Co ... Acting Police Chief William Ferrazzi assigned Patrol- 
man Edward F. Gentile to the detective bureau and the same 
day Gentile arrested a North Quincy youth wanted for a $ 19 
robbery at the Norfolk Flower Shop, 287 Hancock St ... Mrs. 
Anna Carlson was installed as chairman ci Skandia Lodge, 
Vasa Order of America ... Workers at the Bethlehem Steel 
Co.'s Fore River Ship were urging the Wage Stabilization 
Board to approve a full $2 an hour wage rate for first class 
mechanics ... Hamburger was 49 cents a pound and o^magas 
were 29 cents a dozen at Mohican Market, 29 Chestnut St ... 
Herbert A. Brecht of 22 Samoset Ave., Merrymount, was re- 
elected president of the Shipbuilders Cooperative Bank ... 
Preparations were being made to dedicate the Snug Hatbiv 
School in Germantown, the first elementary school built in 
Quincy since 1929 ... Roberta A. Sealund, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Walter H. Sealund of 83 Shawmut Sl, West 
Quincy, made her first flight as a stewardess for Colonial 
Airlines ... SgL George R. Reardwi of 144 Farrington Sl, 
Wollaston, arrived in Seattle aboard the Navy transport 
Marine Adder from the Far East. 



Page ( Qnlncy Sua Thursday, Januarj 9, 1992 




Marie's 
Kitchen 



H\ MAKII .1. DOIIMIMO 



Diane's Meat Stuffed Peppers 



I can certainly tell the holidays are 
over because I put all the Christmas 
table cloths away and our "funds are 
low." So I take to the kitchen where it's 
just waiting for the activity of normal 
cooking to begin again. Here is a great 
recipe for stuffed pef^rs given to me by 
a friend, Diane. They were a welcome 
change from all of the hoUday fare. 

DIANE'S MEAT 
STUFFED PEPPERS 
6 large peppers, either green, red, 
yellow or combination 

(or the ones on sale) 
1/4 cup olive oil 
1/2 cup chopped onion 
3/4 Lb beef, turkey, pork or veal 

(or a combination) 
3/4 cup parmesan or romano cheese 

2 cups cooked rice 

3 Tbsps parsley 



STEP Program To Be Held 
At Point Congregational Church 



The South Shore and 
Coastline Councils for 
children will provide an 
"Early Childhood STEP 
Program" for mothers and 
fathers, grandparents and 
other adults responsible for 
caring for children up to 
six years of age. 

STEP stands for 
"Systematic Training for 
Effective Parenting," 
which is a nationwide and 
popular parenting program 
followed by more than two 
miUion parents. 

A series of seven 
sessions will be provided 
by the Quincy Point 
Congregational Church, 
Washington St. and 
Southern Artery, beginning 
on Thursday, Jan. 9 and 
continuing each Thursday 
evening to Feb. 20 from 
7:30 to 9 p.m. in the 



church's social hall. The 
series will be led by 
trained volunteers from the 
South Shore and Coastline 
Councils for Children. 

Topics for the seven 
classes include: 

"Understanding Young 
Children," "Understanding 
Young Children's 
Behavior," "Building Self 
Esteem in the Early 
Years," "Communicating 
with Young Children," 
"Helping Young Children 



Learn to 
"Effective 



Cooperate," 
Discipline," 



and "Nurturing Emotional 
and Social Development." 
The fee for the program 
is $45 per family. This 
includes a 150-page book, 
"Parenting Young 
Children." Some 

scholarship help may be 
available through the 

Council for Children. For 
more information, call the 
council at 471-4606 or the 
church at 773-6424. 



Mr., Mrs. Martin Millane Jr. 
Parents Of Daughter 



Martin and Noreen 
Millane of Belmont are 
parents of a daughter, 
Catherine Noreen, bom 
Nov. 9 at Newton- 
Wellesley Hospital. 



Grandparents are Mr. 
and Mrs. John F. Maimix 
of Quincy and Mr. and 

Mrs. Martin Millane Sr. of 
Quincy. 



YMCA 100th Anniversary 
Open House Saturday 



salt and pepper to taste 

3 Tbsps red wine (optional) 

3/4 cups tomato juice (or leftover 

tomato sauce.) 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Trim the 
stems from the peppers and remove 
seeds. 

In a large skillet, heat the oil and add 
the onion and garlic. Saute until 
transparent. Add the meat and stir until 
blended. Stir in the remaining ingredients 
(except the tomato juice or saute). Let 
cool slightly and then stuff the peppers 
with the mixture. Place the peppers on a 
greased baking dish and pour the tomato 
mixture around them. Bake until tender 
(about 30 to 40 minutes). Baste 
occasionally with the liquid from the pan 
if needed. When I stuff peppers, I 
sometimes cut them in halves for easier 
cooking, but either way is fine. Thanks 
Diane! 



The South Shore 
YMCA wiU hold its 100th 
anniversary open house 
Saturday, Jan. 11 from 9 
a.m. to 8 p.m. at the 
YMCA, 79 Coddington St. 

The open house will be 
a free day of fun and 
activities and classes for 
adults and children of all 
ages. 

Special events will 
include the "Outrageous 
Obstacle Course" at 11 
a.m., for children ages five 
to 15. Prizes will be 
awarded in this activity. 
Also for children, a 
morning of aits and crafts, 
face painting, sports, 
games and fun with 
Sunshine the Clown is 
scheduled from 9 a.ii to 



nooa 

For adults, several free 
fitness classes are 
available to try, including 
aerobics at 9 a.m. and 
10:30 a.m., and STEP 
aerobic classes at noon 
and 4 p.m. 

People of all ages can 
participate in the 
Treadwall Competition at 
1:30 p.m. The treadwall is 
a vertical climbing wall. A 
demonstration will be held 
at 1 p.m., with the 
competition beginning at 
1:30 p.m. Prizes will be 
awarded to the winners. 

A juggling 

demonstration at 1 p.m 
will be followed by free 
juggling instruction. 

The YMCA will also be 
open to the public for 



regular activities, 
including use of the pool 
and gym. There will be 
adult lap swim periods 
from 12:30 to 3 p.m. and 
6:30 to 8 p.m. and youth 
and family swimming from 
4 to 6:30 p.m. The gym is 
open for basketball from 
noon to 1 p.m. 

Tours of the facility will 
be available all day, and 
door prizes will be given 
out throughout the open 
house. Several YMCA 
activities may be 
observed, including youth 
karate from 9 a.m. to 1 
p.m. and youth basketball 
from 9 to 10:30 a.m. 

For more information, 
call NataUe Norton at 479- 
8500. 



Daniel Camacho Named 
YMCA Youth Of The Year 



The South Shore 
YMCA, 79 Coddington St., 
has named Daniel 
Camacho of Stoughton as 
the YMCA Youth of the 
Year. 

Camacho, a junior at 
Stoughton Senior High 
School, has been involved 
in the YMCA for five 
years as a camper at 
Camp Burgess for Boys 
and as a volunteer. 

Last summer, Camacho 
was a counselor-in-training 
at Camp Burgess, the Y's 
resident camp located on 
Cape Cod. He has also 
been part of a volunteer 
maintenance effort called 
Teen Camp Crew. The 
group has dedicated many 
volunteer hours at camp, 
especially in the aftermath 
of Hurricane Bob. 

According to Tim 
Millbern, executive 
director of the YMCA 
Camping Services 
Division, "Danny is a 
leader at camp, and is 
well respected by both his 




DANNY CAMACHO accep«8 the YMCA Youth of the 
Year Award from George Atkinson, YMCA Board 
President, while his grandmother looks on. 



peers and counselors. We 
are very pleased to have 
the opportunity to honor 
Danny as our Youth of the 
Year." 

Adds Ralph Yohe, 
YMCA general executive 
director, "Danny 
represents the best of 
YMCA camping. From a 
young, nervous camper 
five years ago, Danny has 



grown into a positive, 
happy and well-rounded 
young man. His volunteer 
experience will be an 
important one, and the 
skills he has acquired at 
camp will serve him well 
in the future." 

Camacho received his 
award at the YMCA's 
recent recognition event, 
Celebration '91. 




United Quincy Alliance 
Meeting Jan. 15 

Thomas. 



The United Quincy 
Alliance of the United 
First Parish Church will 
meet for dessert 
Wednesday, Jan. 15 at 1 
p.m. in the parish hall. 

Hostesses will be 
Louise Hall and Jean 



RECEPTION HALLS 



KH120-SEAT 

OBOOVnailEAR 

MARMABAY. 

THOUWTTDBE 

AMBJAI 



Thes 



t'sout 



: function foom «i Amelia's | 

has become one of Boston's 

moil popular spots (or u«d 

dings, showcn, corporate 

iTwrtings. andg^-togethcrs 

of all kinds We feature an 

I extensive menu al affordable j 

prices We cwerlook Manna 

Bay and the Boston skyline 

We'd like to make your next 

functMn really fly. 

|l Please eaO 617-471 1453. 



AME-LI 



i Vctoiy Rd. No Quincy. MaI 



JLORISTS 



Flowers by Helen 

367 BILLINGS ROAD 

WOLLASTON. MASSACHUSETTS 02170 

Flowers For All Occasions 

Specializing in Weddings 

471-3772 

Certified Weddmq Consultants 



Quint's 
Florists 

761 So Artery 
Quincy 

773-7620 



MUSIC 






PHOTOGRAPHER 



Photography , 

679 Hancock Street Quincy 

(Wollaston) 

479-6B66 



KjONEYMOON 
SPECrALISTS 



tJ!i* 



BAKERY 



O'BRIEN'S 
BAKERIES 

9 Beale Street 
Wollaston 
472-4027 



Speaker for the program 
following the social hour 
will be Janet ElUs of the 
Office of Discrimination, 
Quincy. 

Guests are welcome. 

Emblem Club Meeting 

Quincy Emblem Squantum St. 

Members were asked to 
remember to bring socks 
and towels for the detox 
center. 

Mr., Mrs. John Meade 
Parents Of Daughter 

m/,h'"',/o"'* ^^'*o^'»h Dec. 20 at South Shore 
Meade. 10 Bittern Rd., are 

parents of a daughter, bora Hospital, Weymouth. 



The 
Club was scheduled to 
meet Wednesday, Jan. 8 
(yesterday) at 7:30 p.m. at 
the Elks Home, 440 East 



JEWELRY 



C^OlSOn Fine Jewelry 

Quality and Integrity a Tradition 

The Coletti Family Al - Dave - Mat1< 

730 HANCOCK ST., WOLLASTON 02170 786-7942 




Rockin into the 90's" 
D.J. STEVE KAVANAGH 



Music for all Occasions 



"Music for people who 

take their fun seriously r 

773-4936 



Thursday, January 9, 1992 Quincy 8m PlifC 7 



Social 




WILLIAM GARDNER and DIANE ROSSI 



Diane Rossi Engaged 
To William Gardner 



Mr. and Mrs. William 
Rossi of Long Island, N.Y. 
announce the engagement 
of their daughter, Diane 
Marie, to William K. 
Gardner Jr. He is the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. WiUiam K. 
Gardner of Quincy. 

Miss Rossi is a 
graduate of Smithtown 
High School and Fisher 
Junior College. She is 
employed as a sales 
representative for Carole 



Little Designer Qothing in 
the Boston area. 

Mr. Gardner is a 
graduate of Archbishop 
Williams High School and 
received his B.S. in 
business administration 
and finance from Suffolk 
University. He is employed 
as a portfolio accountant 
for Brown Brothers 
Harriman and Company. 

A June wedding is 
planned. 



Big Sister Asian Program 
Expanding To Quincy 



The Greater Boston 
Sister Program will meet 
Tuesday, Jan. 21 from 6 to 
7:30 p.m. at the South 
Shore Big Sister Office, 77 
Parkingway, Quincy 
Center. 

The group, which 
already has an Asian 
program in the Boston 



area, is expanding its 
services to Asian girls in 
Quincy and Randolph. 
Through the Big Sister 
Program, girls ages 7-15 
are matched to adult 
female role models. 

For more information 
call Mary Ann Maguire or 
Helen Du at 328-1061. 



NQ Senior Citizens 
Meeting Jan. 9 



The North Quincy 
Senior Citizen's Club 
meeting, scheduled for 
Jan. 2, has been postponed 
until Thursday, Jan. 9 at 



Community United 
Methodist Church, 40 
Beale St. 

A Whist Party will be 
held the following week, 



12:30 p.m. at the Quincy Jan. 16 at 12:30 p.m. 

Mr., Mrs. Gary MacNeill 
Parents Of Daughter 

Gary and Nicole daughter, bom Dec. 20 at 
MacNeill, 152 Barham South Shore Hospital, 
Ave., are parents of a Weymouth. 






I 







(6t'i '567- t594 ■ 



MR. and MRS. BRIAN CHRISOM 

Kathleen Flaherty Wed 
To Brian Chrisom 



Kathleen Flaherty, 
daughter of Mrs. Joseph 
Flaherty of Merrymount, 
was recently married to 
Brian Chrisom, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Peter Chrisom of 
Milton. 

A Nuptial, candlelight 
ceremony was officiated 
by Fr. Bryan Parrish of 
Quincy at Regis College 
Chapel, Weston. A 
reception followed at 
South Shore Country Gub, 
Hingham. 

The bride was given in 
marriage by her brother, 
Brian Flaherty of Atlantic 
Beach, Fla. 

Patricia Patten of 
Merrymount served as 
Matron of Honor for her 
sister. 

Bridesmaids were 
Maureen Berry of Milton, 
Susan de Varennes and 
Patricia McCart, both of 
Quincy, all sisters of the 
groom; Mary Amaru of 
Westwood and Carol 
McGlone of Weymouth. 

Brendan Chrisom of 
Portland, Maine, served as 
Best Man for his brother. 

Ushers were Peter 



Chrisom, Jr., of Milton, 
Sean Chrisom of Milford, 
and Kevin Chrisom of 
Dorchester, all brothers of 
the groom; Darrell Baker 
and Gregory Sexton of 
Milton; Christopher Beny 
of Milton, brother-in-law of 
the groom; and Philip 
Amaru of Westwood. 

The bride is a graduate 
of Sacred Heart High 
School, Weymouth, and 
Regis College. She is 
employed as an account 
manager by Conventures 
Public Relations, Boston. 

The groom is a graduate 
of Milton High School and 
Norwich University. He is 
employed as an account 
representative by Scott 
Paper Company of 
Philadelphia. 

Following a wedding 
trip to Negril, Jamaica, the 
couple is residing in 
Quincy. 



WELCOME WAGON 

WANTS TO f^- 

VISIT YOU 

WITH 

GIFTS -^ivw 




ALLFREETOYOU 

If you've become engag- 
ed, are a new parent or 
moved, I'd like to call on 
you with gifts in my 
basket, information and 
cards you can redeem 
for more gifts at local 
businesses. Free to you 
and a helpful way to 
learn answers to your 
questions. 

BARBARA MENDEZ 
479-2M7 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-3100 




MR. and MRS. JOHN COLUNS 

Eileen Miller Wed 
To John Collins 



Eileen Miller, daughter 
of Edward and Eileen 
Miller of WoUaston, was 
recently married to John 
Collins, son of Robert and 
Dorothy Collins of 
Dorchester. 

A Nuptial Mass was 
celebrated at Sacred Heart 
Church, North Quincy, and 
was officiated by the Rev. 
Cornelius Heery. A 
reception followed at 
Lantana, Randolph. 

Karen Miller of 
Wollaston served as Maid 
of Honor for her sister. 

Bridesmaids were 
Kathleen Mulligan of 
Brockton, Sheila LeBlanc 
of South Boston and Judy 
Miller of Lyndonville, Vt. 

Junior Bridesmaid was 
Amy Collins of Barre, Vt. 
Caitlyn Miller of 
Lyndonville, Vt. was 
Flower Girl. 

Robert Collins of 
Randolph ser\'ed as Best 



Man. 

Ushers were Timothy 
Collins of Barre, Vt., 
Stephen Miller of Quincy 
and Edward Miller of 
LyndonviUe, Vt. 

Jr. Usher was Daniel 
Collins of Randolph. 
Andrew Collins of Barre, 
Vt., served as Ring Bearer. 

The bride is a graduate 
of North Quincy High 
School and Newbury 
College. She is employed 
as an assistant branch 
manager by South Boston 
Savings Bank. 

The groom is a graduate 
of Christopher Columbus 
High School, Dean Junior 
College and Northeastern 
University. He is employed 
as supervisor of shipping 
and receiving for 
Northeastern University. 

Following a wedding 
trip to Hawaii the couple 
is residing in Plymouth. 





Winfield 
^ Gift Emporium 

After Christmas 
Clearance 

25%-50% OFF 
All Merchandise 



Hours: Tues-Sat. 10:00 am-5:00 pm 

Open Sunday 12-5 pm 

Closed Mondays 

853 Hancock St, Quincy 479-9784 



MONDAY SPECIAL ,v 

WASH • CUT • BLOWDRY 

HERS *20 ; 



TUES. & THURS. 
BLOW CUT SPECIAL 

I 11^7 I O Includes 



WEDNESDAY SPECIAL 

PERM SPECIAL ^ - ^^^ ,„ 

UNIPERM ^42"" ' 



GOLDWELL 
FOAM PERM 

All specials performed by one of Russell's staff 
Russell Edward's 



Long hair 
slightly higher 



Includes Shampoo 



Long hair 

slightly higher 

Complete 



Complete 
slightly higher Nail Tipping and Overlay S60 
lor longer hair sculptured Nails $60 

ff Pedicures 525 

-Body and Facial Waxing Available" 



^^/ui/^//i/Y> r"-/?^ r///// ^/uY^ 

OPEN 9-5 DAILY AND WED & THURS EVENINGS At\i-r\ 

Corner Hancocl< Chestnut Sts . 1 Mipio St , Ouincy 472-1 060 



Page 8 Quincy Sim Thursday, January 9, 1992 



Arts/Entertainment 



Holidays In Quincy Celebration 




SHARON GREEN, a teacher at Beechvood Music 
School, Wollaston, plays the harpsichord at the "Holidays 
in Quincy" celebration at the Josiah Quincy House. 



ALICIA D'OYLEY, a student at Beechwood Music School 
in Wollaston, plays the harpsichord while Rachael 
Gammie watches at the "Holidays in Quincy" celebration 
at the Josiah Quincy House. 



Quincy Art Assn. Classes Begin Jan. 13 



The Quincy Art School Ave., will begin its 
Association, 26 High eight-week winter 



HOMEMADE 
ICE CREAM CAKES ft PIES 



! 



"There's No Taste 
Like Homemade" 

68A Biningt Rd. 
N. Quincy. MA 

472-8558 



schedule Monday, Jan. 13. 

Classes include oil, 
watercolor and pastel 
painting, calligraphy, 
portraiture and heirloom 
Oriental rugs. 

Children's classes will 
be held on Tuesday 
afternoons and Saturday 



moimngs. 

One day workshops will 
be held for floral and still 
life oil painting and 
sweatshirt painting. 

For information and to 
register call Margaret 
Claffey, class coordinator, 
at 77(V2482. 



Oil Painting 
Demoiistration Jan. 14 



The Quincy Art 
Association will hold its 
monthly meeting and oil 
painting demonstration 
Tuesday, Jan. 14 at 7:30 
p.m. at the River Bay 
Club, Brackett St. 

Featured artist will be 
Anet Paglierani of 




214 Washington Street • Quincy, MA • 847-3940 



Vf\t^^^^ 



SV^Vf 



SV 



tO^ 



Pitcher of Beer 

(60 oz) 
& 

Cheese Pizza 
Only $5.95 

2 Person Minimum 
Mon-Friday after 4:00 
Saturday & Sunday 
All Day 



Cheese Pizza 
$1.00 

BBQ'd Wings 
$1.00 

Sundays Only 
12-9 



Wollaston, who teaches 
locally in her home studio 
and at Braintree Art 
Association. Her paintings 
are known locally and 
throughout New England 
atKl the West Coast. 

The pubUc is invited. 



CINEMAS 

Quincy Fair Mall 
1/10-1/16 



HAND THAT 
ROCKS CRADLE-R 

11i«0- 2:10- 4:30- 7:30- 10M 

|PRINCE0FTIDES-R| 

12:15 -SM-T.-OS-tdO 



Ilast boy scout-pgI 

11:40- 2n0- 4:25 -10:10 



FATHER OF 
THE BRIDE-PG 

11>«5- 2«S-4:20- 7dO- lOM 



(Take Out Excluded) 
Formerly Brittany's 



HOOK-PG 

12:10 -anS-TKW- 8:50 

ADDAMS 
FAMILY-PG-13 

1 2M - 2:10 - 4^45 - 7:30 - 8 A) 



BUGSY-R 

12:10 -3.10- 7:00 -e«0 



MY GIRL-PG 

11ul8-2M-4:30-7:20 



J 



CAPE FEAR-R 

7:10-10XK) 



Bargain Matinees 

First Three Shows 

$3.75 

773-5700 



JUSTIN GRAEBER, a student at Beechwood Music 
School in Wollaston, plays the harpsichord while Adam 
Graeber, Bobbj Woods and their piano teacher, Sharon 
Green, watch at the "Holidays hi Quhtcy" celebration at 
the jMiah Quincy House. 

Free Faculty Concert 
At Beechwood Jan. 15 



The Music School of 
the Beechwood 

Community Life Center 
will sponsor an open house 
and free faculty concert 
Wednesday, Jan. 15 at 7 
p.m. at the center, 225 
Fenno St., Wollaston. 

The concert is open to 
the public and will feature 
faculty members Bob 
Scott, classical guitar; 
Bob Melpignano, guitar, 
Eniko Konye, voice; Les 
Arbuckle, saxophone; 
Marilyn Haverly, piano; 



Michael Feldman, piano; 
Teny Sinskie, piano; Hire 
Honshuku, flute; and 
Susan Bill, viola. 

Parents are encouraged 
to bring children to 
acquaint them with the 
different instruments and 
music classes available at 
Beechwood. A reception 
will follow the concert to 
give everyone the 
opportunity to meet the 
musicians and ask 
questions. 

For more information 
call 471-5712. 



New Senior Classes Begin 
Today At Fenno House 



A new series of 
Thursday classes for senior 
citizens wUl be held at the 
Fenno House, 540 
Hancock St., beginning in 
January. 

Knitting, crewel and 
embroidery classes will 
begin today from 10 a.m. 
to noon and will continue 
on a weekly basis. 




A line dance class will 
begin Thursday, Jan. 16 
from 11 a.m. to noon and 
also will be held every 
week at the same time. 

Senior citizens from 
Quincy who are not 
residents of the Fenno 
House are welcome to 
attend. There will be a 
minimal charge for each 
class. For more 
information call Phyllis 
Bogosian at 773-5483. 

O'Brien Towers 

Flea Market 

Jan. 11 

O'Brien Towers will 
hold a flea market and 
cake sale Saturday, Jan. 
11 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 
at 73 Bicknell St., 
Germantown. 

Furniture, clothes, 
housewares and chances 
on various articles will be 
featured. Refreshments 
will also be sold. 

The pubUc is welcome. 

&•¥• Qm and Money 
Shop Locally 



Anniversary Mass Sunday 



Thnnday, January 9, 1992 Quincy Sun Page 9 



'Father Bill': 40 Years As A People's Priest 



By STEVE KAVANAGH 

St. John the Baptist 
Church is expected to be 
overflowing Sunday 
afternoon for a tribute to 
"Father BUI." 

The Rev. William R. 
McCarthy, Pastor, a 
beloved "people's priest" 
will be honored at a 12:30 
p.m. Mass and party 
celebrating his 40th year 
as a priest. 

Fr. McCarthy's ext- 
ensive involvement in 
church and community 
activities have made those 
40 years pass quickly. He 
has made an impact, 
directly or indirectly, on 
the lives of a countless 
number of people. 

"Times go by very fast. 
Hopefully we've served the 
three parishes I've been in 
(St. Rose in Chelsea, St. 
Gregory's in Dorchester, 
and St. John's) to the best 
of our ability. I've enjoyed 
serving those three 
parishes. There are great 
people in all of them," he 
said. 

Fr. McCarthy is best 
known for his work aiding 
homeless people. He has 
often dug into his own 
pocket to help pay rent for 
others down on their luck. 

Father Bill's Place, 
named after Fr. McCarthy, 
opened in 1989. It is the 
first major shelter for 
homeless people on the 
South Shore. The shelter 
wa§ established by the 
Quincy Interfaith 
Sheltering Coalition, a 
group of Quincy's clergy 
organized in 1984. 

He helped get approval 
to have the shelter located 
in the former Registry of 
Motor Vehicles building 
behind the police station. 
The shelter opened in 1989 
and provides a place to 
stay for 65 people. St. 
John's provides an 
additional 20 beds in the 
basement of it's school 
building. 

Prior to that Fr. 
McCarthy and the 
Coalition attempted to 
create a shelter at the 
National Guard Armory on 
Hancock Street. Plans for 
that site fell through and 
"That's when we put 'em in 
the basement of St. John's 
School," Fr. McCarthy 
recalled. "But at that time 
it was only funded for the 
winter months." 

A site was found at 
Quincy Hospital but it 
turned out to be temporary 
when construction on the 
new hospital wing began. 
At that point a shelter for 
men was set up at 
Wollaston Lutheran 
Church and for women at 
Quincy Point 

Congregational Church 
until Father Bill's Place 
opened. 

"It's been a privilege 
and an honor woiking with 
Fr. McCarthy in regards to 
issues pertaining to the 
homeless," said Joe Finn 
who took over as 
Executive Director of the 
Coalition in March and 
manages Father Bill's. "I'm 
very impressed with his 




YOUNG FATHER BILL--Fr. William McCarthy as he 
looked Jan. 10, 1952, the date of his ordination by the late 
Cardinal Richard Gushing. 



concern for the poor and 
disenfranchished. He is 
really a humble man. He 
doesn't do these things to 
draw attention to himself." 

Finn's office is located 
at Father Bill's Place and 
he notes that Fr. McCarthy 
is no stranger to the 
shelter. 

"He shows up here on 
numerous occasions. He 
drops off donations and he 
always wants to know 
what's going on," Finn 
said. "He's not involved 
with the day-to-day 
operation but in many 
ways he sets the spirit here 
which is for dealing with 
people as individuals with 
individual problems." 

Fr. McCarthy also 
works with other programs 
to help provide housing for 
the needy including 
Caritas, a non-profit 
organization backed by 
local developers which 
provides low-income 
housing. 

"With Caritas we try to 
pick up (purchase) 
permanent housing for the 
working poor," Fr. 
McCarthy said. 

At St. John's, Fr. 
McCarthy has been 
instrumental in the 
purchase by the church of 
three nearby houses to 
help those less fortunate. 
One is a boarding house 
for eight women who were 
previously homeless. 
Another is for unwed 
mothers-to-be; and the 
other is a two-family for 
low income families. 

Quincy developer and 
businessman Peter 
O'Connell has worked 
with Fr. McCarthy in the 
past to provide housing for 
people with low incomes. 

"He is a man for 
others," O'Connell said. 
"That is truly what Bill 
McCarthy is all about. His 
life is dedicated to helping 
people in need... many 
times putting himself at 
risk either personally or 
financially," he said. 



Fr. McCarthy said he 
began helping people find 
housing after being 
appointed to the Quincy 
Housing Authority in 1978. 
O'Connell was one of the 
first people to help Fr. 
McCarthy. 

"While I was at the 
Housing Authority a lot of 
people came to us without 
housing. We were putting 
people into hotels... they 
were a lot cheaper back 
then... and putting people 
into subsidized housing. 
Mr. O'Connell purchased a 
house for a family which 
was subsidized by the 
QHA," Fr. McCarthy said. 

The man who appointed 
Fr. McCarthy to the QHA 
was then Mayor Arthur 
T o b i n , now Clerk 
Magistrate at Quincy 
District Court. 

"When the Housing 
Authority vacancy occured 
I talked to him about it 
and he was very interested 
in helping people like he 
always was," Tobin 
recalled. 

"I tell him he's a 
walking saint. Recently a 
young single mother was 
in court and she bad 
problems with alcohol or 
drugs and she said she had 
no one to turn to. Fr. 
McCarthy talked to her 
and helped her with money 
and bills. She came back 
to visit at Christmas and 
told us she has put her life 
back together because Fr. 
McCarthy interceded," 
Tobin said. 

"He doesn't ask anyone 
who they are or where 
they're from," Tobin said. 
"He just helps them. He 
believes that's what he's 
supposed to do as a priest" 
Regional Bishop 
Daniel Hart has known Fr. 
McCarthy since 1945 
during their days together 
in the seminary before 
they were ordained. Fr. 
McCarthy was ordained in 
1952 by Cardinal Richard 
Cushing and Hart was 
ordained in 1953. Bishop 




,.«**««»*»-?«■ 



Z^mm^^ 



•*^^ 



FATHER McCarthy TODAY~Fr. William McCarthy stands in front of St. John's 
Church. He was assigned to St. John's Parish nearly 15 years ago, Feb. 1, 1977. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 



Hart will be attending the 
Mass for Fr. McCarthy on 
Sunday. 

"I was a year behind 
him at the seminary and 
used to drive home with 
him to the Merrimack 
Valley area (Fr. McCarthy 
grew up in Haverhill)," 
said Bishop Hart. 

"He is a wonderful 
pastor. He is the kind of 
pastor who really cares 
about people. There are 
many examples of that in 
the different ways he helps 
people. 

"He's been a hard- 
working priest all the time 
in his 40 years and he's 
beloved by the 
parishioners. In fact, at a 
meeting I attended 
recently at St. John's, 
many of the parishioners 
asked that he be 
nominated for Monsignor," 
Bishop Hart said. 

Congressman Brian 
Donnelly, a Dorchester 
native, knew Fr. McCarthy 
while he was at Donnelly's 
parish, St. Gregory's. In 
fact Fr. McCarthy married 
Donnelly and his wife 
Ginny and baptized their 
daughter. 

"Father Mac literally 
embodies what a priest 
means. He never thinks of 
himself but only of serving 
others. There are not many 
people in the world like 
him," Donnelly said. 

"At St. Gregory's he ran 



a mini Father Bill's. He 
was caring for homeless 
people before it became a 
public issue and before 
people were aware it was 
a problem," Donnelly said. 
"When he left (St. 
Gregory's) people were 
crushed." 

"I lived with him for 12 
years and I know him like 
a brother," said the Rev. 
Daniel Graham, pastor of 
St. Joseph's Parish. Fr. 
Graham served with Fr. 
McCarthy as an associate 
pastor at St. John's. "In 
addition to being 
colleagues we were good 
friends. 

"I've always known him 
to be a hard working 
priest, a tireless worker, 
always giving of his time 
and energy," Fr. Graham 
said. 

"His big thing is caring 
for the poor. We used to 
tell him he had to cut back 
(giving his money) and 
he'd say, 'yes, yes,' and 
then turnaround and put up 
a homeless family in a 
hotel," Fr. Graham 
recalled. 

"Before it became 
'fashionable' to help with 
the plight of the homeless 
he was a key figure in 
recognizing and working to 
solve the problems of 
those in need," Fr. Graham 
said. 

"He was always kind 
and hospitable to the 



priests and the staff at St. 
John's. For a pastor you 
couldn't ask for more," Fr. 
Graham said of his fiiend. 
"He has served the church 
well for 40 years." 

Rabbi David Jacobs of 
Temple Beth El worked 
with Fr. McCarthy during 
the Interfaith Coalition's 
early years. 

"The wonderful thing 
about Fr. McCarthy is his 
sensitivity towards poor 
people," he said. "I've 
never met anyone who 
understands what it is like 
to live in deprivation as he 
does. 

"There is an 
unbelievable kindness in 
that man," Rabbi Jacobs 
said. 

The Rev. Dr. Sheldon 
Bennett of United First 
Parish Church credits Fr. 
McCarthy with being a big 
factor in establishing the 
Quincy Interfaith 
Sheltering Coalition as a 
significant group in the 
city. 

"It was largely due to 
his commitment and vision 
that the Coalition is the 
success that it is in serving 
the community," Rev. 
Bennett said. 

The two men have also 
worked together on the 
Woodward School Board 
of Supervisors. 

"He was very helpful to 
me when I came to 

tC.imi'd I III Page 17) 



Page 10 Quiocy Sun Thursday, January 9, 1992 

Charles Phelan Council President 

'I Vow To Look At 
Proposals With A 
Very Critical Eye* 



By ROBERT 
BOSWORTH 

Ward 5 Councillor 
Charles Phelan, 

unanimously elected the 
new City Council 
president at inauguration 
ceremonies Monday, 
called on bis council 
colleagues to re-establish 
budget priorities and 
eliminate duplicate city 
services. 

Phelan, who is 
beginning his third term as 
Ward 5 councillor, 
succeeds Ward 2 
Councillor Ted 

DeCristofaro who was 
council president the past 
two years. 

He was nominated by 
Councillor Patricia 
Toland, who said Phelan 
has a "quiet competence" 
which is widely respected 
by residents in Ward 5 and 
beyond. In seconding the 
nomination. Ward 3 
Councillor Lawrence 
Chretien said Phelan is a 
"well-liked, respected and 
trusted city official" who 
makes "good, solid 
decisions." 

In his address, Phelan 
said he intends to convene 
a conference of the 
chairmen of the council's 
major committees to 
examine proposals for 
consolidation among city 
departments. 

"As an example, we 

should look at combining 

similar functions carried 

out both at City Hall and 

within the school 

department. In addition, I 

firmly believe that the city 

should move to combine 

the emergency dispatch 

function of our police ^ 

fire departments, both as a 

public safety measure and 

to free up more firefighters 

and police officers around 

our city." 

Phelan said one of his 
top priorities will be 
monitoring noise and other 
effects created by MWRA 
operations in city 
neighborhoods. "We must 
not allow the MWRA to 
run roughshod over Quincy 
residents," the new council 
president said. 

In addition, Phelan said 
he and other elected 
officials must continue to 
speak out strongly against 
the ever increasing 
financial burdens brought 
on by the MWRA's rising 
sewer and water user fee 
assessments. 

"Many of our r)eighbors 
are suffering unbearable 
financial burdens, which 
are only heightened by 
increasing sewer and water 
user fee assessments posed 
by the MWRA. As 
elected officials, we must 
continue to speak out 
strongly for residents 
against this unfair burden. 

"In this regard, I 
strongly support, and urge 
your support, for Sen. 




NEW CITY COUNCIL President Charles (Chuck) Phelan 
calls on hb colleagues to re-establish budget priorities 
and eliminate duplicate dty services. 



(Paul) Harold's biU which 
would reasonably limit 
MWRA fee increases. As 
council president, it will 
be a major priority of mine 
to work with fellow 
councillors to address 
residents' concerns 
regarding noise and other 
effects of MWRA 
operations in our 
neighborhoods." 

Although he 

acknowledged the 
importance of revitalizing 
the Quincy Center, 
Wollaston and North 
Quincy business centers, 
Phelan said he will 
strongly resist any 
proposal, including the 
siting of a commuter rail 
station in Quincy Square, 
which disregards the 
important and legitimate 
neighborhood concerns of 
residents "who deserve 
every consideration. 

"I vow to look at 
proposals such as the 
crosstown coimector and 
the restoration of 
commuter rail with a very 
critical eye. And, if 
commuter rail is to come 
to Quincy, we must insist 
on guarantees, protections 
and benefits to Quincy 
residents as well as sound 
barriers to guard against 
noise and a firm 
agreement that there will 
be no nighttime 
transportation of fieight." 

In addition, Phelan 
aimounccd the formation 
of a new council 
committee, the committee 
on Handicapped Affairs. 
Chaired by new Ward 6 
Councillor Bruce Ayers, 
the new committee will 
address "the concerns of 
citizens who are 
physically challenged." 



Ayers, who succeeds 
former Ward 6 Councillor 
Thomas Nutley, was sworn 
in Monday with the city's 
other eight councillors. 

The new council 
president has also renamed 
the existing disposal 
committee to include 
recycling to emphasize 
Quincy's commitment to 
furthering recycling efforts 
for both environmental aixl 
cost-savings reasons. 

Phelan, who is the son 
of a Quincy police officer 
and graiKlson of a Quincy 
firefighter, said he is proud 
to continue his family's 
tradition of pubUc service 
to Quincy. He pledged to 
work cooperatively with 
the mayor, his staff, city 
departments and fellow 
councillors "to reach 
consensus on critical 
issues facing our city. 

"I will be open to ideas 
and suggestions, and as a 
ward councillor, I am 
keenly aware of the types 
of neighborhood concerns 
that ward councillors face. 
I know, that they will find 
me to be receptive to their 
needs." 

Looking ahead to the 
challenges facing city 
government, Phelan said, 
"With your continued 
support and god's blessing 
and guidance, I am 
confident that as city 
council president I can set 
a positive and successful 
course for the city council 
during the next year." 

The council held its 
organizational meeting 
and re-elected Jeanne 
Reardon clerk of 
committee. 

Jeanne Reaidon was re- 
elected the City Council's 
cleik of committee. 




TAKING OATHS ARE new Ward 6 CounciUor Bruce Ayers, Councillors at-large Tim 
Cahlll and Michael Cheney and Ward 3 Councillor Lawrence Chretien. 

Sheets Sees 
$4-M Shortfall 

But No Override 

{Cont'd from Page 1) 

"There must be major 
changes in the 
administrative structure 
and process." 

In the weeks and 
months ahead. Sheets said 
he will recommend major 
administrative 
reorganization for Quincy 
public schools. 

"Reorganization will be 
designed to make more 
resources available for 
teaching and curriculum 
improvement~thus 
preparing us for the 
educational challenges in 
the 21st century." 

Regarding 
revitalization, the mayor 
said he intends to pursue 
the renewal of the Quincy 
Center, Wollaston and 
North Quincy business 
districts. 

Planning Director 

Richard Meade has begun 

formulating a plan to 

market Quincy's excess 

commercial space. The 

Planning Partnership, 

under the Quincy Plan, 

should be actively 

marketing vacant retail 

space as eaiiy as ^ril or 

May. 

The mayor said he will 

immediately begin 

"aggressively pursuing" 

funding for an Old Colony 

Commuter Rail Station in 

Quincy Center and a 

bridge which would link 

the Osco/Grossman's retail 

areas with the Parkingway. 
"Infrastructure is 
absolutely necessary if we 
are to prepare for major 
new retail facilities and 
the certain expansion of 
tourism," be said. 

To improve the city's 
environment. Sheets said 
he will propose over the 
next year a program to 
ensure that "both the 
eastern and western 
frontiers of our city are 
preserved for recreational 
use." 

By the end of 1995, the 
mayor said he hopes the 
city's bays and beaches 
are fi^e from disease and 
pollution. He also wants 
to convert the West 
Quincy landfill area into a 
recreational facility. 
Sheets said the facility. 




MAYOR JAMES SHEETS delivers his second term 
inaugural address at North Quincy High School 
auditorium. (Quincy Sun photos by Tom Gorman) 

which would feature a golf program continues to be 

course, soccer and successful. Since it 

baseball fields, would be began, the program has 

constructed and managed saved the city $1 million 

privately with the city's i° disposal fees by 

share of the proceeds put collecting 11,000 tons of 

back into the park glass, plastics and 

department to improve newspaper and conversed 

existing park facilities. 102,00() trees, 42 million 

Reflecting on his first gallons of water 

two years in office, Sheets On the down side, 

said it has been "the best economic difficulties have 

of times and the worst of posed great chaUenges for 

times." city government. 

On the plus side, the 

mayor mentioned Quincy Over the last two years, 

Hospital. After falling to a ^^^^ ^^ ♦<> Quincy has 

$3.5 million deficit in FY been cut $9.7 million 

89, the health care facility while property taxes and 

is on the verge of breaking fee revenues have dropped, 

even this year and is Those two factors have 

expected to post a profit in been the main contributors 

1992. to the city's budget 

Quincy College has problems. 



also experienced growth, 
with enrollment climbing 
11.5 percent the past two 
years to 3,800 fiiU and 
part-time students. The 
municipally-managed 



In addition, water and 
sewer assessments have 
skyrocketed while the 
number of full and part- 
time municipal jobs cut 



institution has a surplus of has reached' 208 

nearly $2 million. Last Expenses for school and 

year, a new campus municipal departments 

opened in Plymouth. have been curtailed 5.2 

Quincy's recycling percent. 



Mary Collins New School 
Committee Vice Chairperson 

'We Want Our Students 

Mentally, Physically 

And Morally Healthy' 



Thandaj, Jaauarj 9, 1992 Qulncy Son Page 11 



New School Comminee 
vice chairperson Mary 
Collins says the city has 
an obligation to provide 
the best education possible 
to all city students as well 
as help them deal with 
societal and other 
problems. 

"I am committed to 
close monitoring of the 
school budget and to 
insuring that we improve 
our curriculum and 
develop our staff. Quincy's 
chief goal is the best 
education possible to all 
our students. 

"If that means that all 
of the problems students 
bring to school must be 
taken care of in this school 
system, I am in favor of 
that, also. 

"It's time that the 
community realize that 
better educated students 
are the responsibility of 
every citizen, business 
person, social service 
agency, church and 
synagogue. I am 

extremely pleased today 
that Mayor (James) Sheets 
has made education one of 
his t(q) priorities. 

"It takes many people 
to educate a child. I hq>e 
that the entire city of 
Quincy will join the 
School Committee and 
take that task on as their 
top priority for 1992." 

Collins was 

unanimously elected vice 
chairman for the third time 
in her 14 years on the 
School Committee 
Monday at the city's 
inauguration ceremonies in 

the North Quincy High 
School auditorium. 

Collins, who was first 
elected to the School 
Committee in 1978, 
thanked her colleagues for 
their vote of confidence. 
Since that time, the school 
system has undergone 
many changes, she said, 
especially in the wake of 
sharp funding reductions. 

"The percentage of the 
city budget attributed to 
the operation of the 
schools has dropped 
drastically since I was first 
elected in 1978. Although 
our school population has 
decreased, our 

responsibilities to the 
community have increased 
tenfold. 

la 1978, "The schools 
had no programs for teen 
mothers, suicide 
prevention, child abuse, no 
multi-cultural programs. 




NEW SCHOOL COMMITTEE Vice-Chairwoman Mary 
Collins tells audience at Inaugural ceremonies that the 
city has an obligation to provide the best education 
possible to all students. 

minimal drug prevention 

programs, no breakfast 

program and no AIDS or 

anti- violence curriculum. 
"These programs were 

begun because, although 

the numbers of students 

have decreased, the 

problems that students 

bring to school have 

increased, reflecting the 

radical changes in our 

society over the last 10 

years. 

"As the influence of the 

family and church have 

lessened, problems have 

grown and social service 

agencies have not been 

able to keep up with the 

pace, so more and more of 

the problems are being 

cared for by the schools," 

Collins said. 

The new vice chairman 
said the school system 
should focus on making its 
students "mentally, 
physically and morally 
healthy. "I want 

our students prepared for 
work, for school and for 
life when they leave the 
Quincy public schools. 
But the school days are 
only so long and when we 
teach students about all 
the things I mentioned 
earlier, we shorten the 
time to teach them 
English, history and 
mathematics. 
"We want our students 



to do well in state and 
national tests. We want 
them to get a good job or 
go on to college well 
prepared for the challenges 
they will face." 

She also said Quincy 
has many educational 
accomplishments, some 
recognized and others 
unnoticed. 

"Quincy has a Blue 
Ribbon School (Broad 
Meadows Middle School) 
and the state teacher of 
the year (Ron Adams) and 
the only municipally 
operated two-year college 
in the state. I believe we 
have other Blue Ribbon 
schools and many 
excellent teachers— they 
just haven't been formally 
recognized yet." 

In other School 
Committee news, Stephen 
Durkin, Daniel Ramondi 
and Linda Stice were 
swom-in to a four-year 
term by Mayor James 
Sheets who is also school 
committee chairman. 

Acting School Supt. 
Eugene Creedon was 
elected secretary of the 
School Committee, 
replacing Dr. Robert Ricci 
who will step down later 
this month. 

Tefta Burrelli was re- 
elected cleik of the School 
Committee. 

By ROBERT 
BOSWORTH 



16th Inauguration For Gillis 



Monday's inauguration 
ceremony was the 16th for 
City Qeik John Gillis. 

Since he became city 
clerk in 1959, Gillis has 
sworn in seven Quincy 
mayors. They are: 



Amelio Delia Chiesa McCauley (1982, 84, 86, 




NEW SCHOOL COMMITTEE members Dan Raymondl and Linda StIce take their 
oaths at inaugural ceremonies. 




CITY CLERK John Gillis swears In Jeanne Reardon as clerk of City Council 

(Quincy Sun photos by Tom Gorman) 

Officials React Favorably 
To Mayor*s Address 



(I960, 62, 64); James 
Mclntyre (1966, 68 and 
70); Walter Hannon (1972, 
74); Joseph LaRaia 
(1976); Arthur Tobin 
(1978, 80); Francis 



88) and James 
(1990, 92). 



Sheets 



Hannon, Tobin and 
McCauley attended 
Monday's inauguration. 



(Cont'd from Page 1) 

something worked out by 
both the fire aiKi police but 
I think with the enhanced 
911 system coming on line 
within a year fi-om now 
that this would be the 
opportunity to put in one 
combined dispatcher. I 
don't know if we would 
actually save personnel 
but it would certainly 
relieve police and 
firefighters to be out on the 
street, not to be tied down 
to the fire bouse or the 
police station." 

Ward 2 Councillor 
and immediate past 
council president Ted 
DeCristofaro: "I was 
very, very pleased to hear 
some of the things the 
mayor said in his inaugural 
and I honesUy believe he 
has the best intentions and 
I believe many of them 
will come to fruition. He's 
worked very, very hard 
with the council, with the 
school committee and 
other city agencies and I 
believe that the closeness 
he has with them will 
certainly pay off in the 
next two years." 

As for his own budget 
ideas, DeCristofaro said, "I 
think the main thing that 
(the mayor) talked about 
is coordinating some of the 
different departments 
between the school 
department and the city of 
Quincy and I think at this 
time it's probably about 
the only area that can be 
coordinated to eliminate 



some positions or to help 
cut the deficit. Other than 
that, there's really nothing 
as far as I can see right 
now." 

State Rep. and School 
Committeeman Ronald 
Mariano: "The mayor 
comes for a educational 
background, he's a 
teacher, he's very sensitive 
to the needs of the kids in 
the city so it was really 
good to hear him make it a 
priority. I think that we do 
have a lot of work that's 
got to be done. He 
highlighted a couple of our 
real success stories, the 
Broad Meadows School 
and the teachers of the 
year that we have in our 
system but we're facing 
budget cuts again and 
programs are being 
questioned and an awfiil 
lot of tough decisions are 
going to have to be made. 
"I'm looking for the 
mayor to provide some 
solid leadership and get us 
in the direction that I think 
we all want to be in." 

As for ways to save the 
school department money, 
Mariono said, "The last 
two budget sessions I 
proposed cuts in the 
vocational-technical 
school to the tune of about 
$200,000. I don't beUeve 
we're going to be able to 
do that again so I am very 
concerned in how we're 
going to raise money this 
year. 

"I firmly believe this 
(school) budget that we 



have now is really a bare 
bones budget. We have to 
severely question where 
we're going to get any 
increase revenues, any 
monies we need." 

Rep. Steve Tobin: "I 
think be focused properly 
on the fact that the city's 
going to have to make 
some fundamental changes 
in the delivery of services 
and the restructuring in the 
departments because as 
we saw the state is not 
going to be increasing 
local aid and he even 
mentioned a figure of 
about a 10 percent cut in 
local aid. I would say that 
is speculative but I'm 
pleased that he would take 
a scenario that is as bad 
case as that and try to 
balance Quincy's budget 
from a worst-case point of 
view. That way, if things 
get better, Quincy's in a 
better position. 

"His focus is based on 
reality and he's got his eye 
on the ball and he's the 
right guy for the job for the 
next two years." School 
Committeeman Daniel 
Raymond! : "I think it's 
important that we continue 
on with the mayor's goals 
of restructuring and 
reorganizing so that there 
are reductions in the 
budget that have to take 
place within the school 
department budget that 
they're in areas farthest 
removed from the 
classroom experience with 

(Cont'd on Page J7) 



Page 12 Quincy San Thursday, January *9, 1992 

*A New Look' Sermon Topic 
At Covenant Congregational 



At the 10:45 a.m. 
worship service Sunday at 
the Covenant 

Congregational Church, 
Whitwell and Granite Sts., 
Rev. Kirk Johnson, co- 
pastor with Rev. Kathleen 
Graves, will preach on "A 
New Look For A New 
Year." 

The choir, directed and 
accompanied by Richard 
Smith, minister of music, 
will sing an introit and two 
anthems. 

Sunday School, with 
classes for all ages, 
nursery through adult, will 
begin at 9:30 a.m. During 
the worship service, a 
nursery is available for 
children age four and 
younger. For children up to 
age 12, there is junior 
church. 

Immediately following 
the service, coffee will be 
served in the fellowship 
hall downstairs. Volunteers 
are needed to serve for 



both January and February. 

Activities for the week 
are: Covenant week of 
prayer, with meetings on 
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. at the 
church, Wednesday at 
7:30 p.m. at the home of 
Florence Anderson, and 
Thursday at 6:30 p.m. in 
the church. The senior 
adult luncheon and 
program will begin at 
11:30 a.m. Thursday, choir 
rehearsal is at 7 p.m. and 
Covenant Community, a 
Bible Study and prayer 
group, meets at 9:30 a.m. 
on Saturday. 

Coming events include 
the all church winter 
retreat Jan. 19-20 at 
Pilgrim Pines in New 
Hampshire and the annual 
business meeting Jan. 26. 
The worship service Jan. 
19 wiU begin at 10:45 a.m. 
and there will be Sunday 
School at 9:30 a.m. 

For more information 
call the church office at 
479-5728. 



Lord's Supper At 
Squantum First Church 



The First Church of 
Squantum began the new 
year by observing the 
Lord's Supper. 

The Rev. Dr. Gene 
Langevin preached on the 
subject "The Mystery 
Made Known." Assisting 
the pastor with the 
Communion elements 
were Deacons Sandra 
Concannon, Andrew 
Ogilvie, Tom Klock, 
Barbara Walter and 
Richard Hendry. 

Scripture readers were 
Ian MacRitchie, Emily 
Zaebring, Tom 

Williamson, Craig 
Zaehring and Louise 
Randall. 

The Chancel Choir sang 



and pianist Janet 
Williamson and organist 
Mary Ruth Scou 
accompanied carols sung 
by the congregation. 

Greeters were Jack and 
Ruth Westerbeke. Ushers 
were Katrina Sorrentino 
and Roberta Sheehan. 
Fellowship hour after the 
service was hosted by Joan 
Hansen and Janet Sumner. 

Sunday School starts at 
9:30 a.m. The Sunday 
worship service begins at 
10:30 a.m. A nursery for 
infants and child care for 
children through the eighth 
grade are available. 
Teenagers meet Saturday 
mornings at 8:30 a.m. and 



Sunday 
pjn. 



afternoons at 2 



lAYERS^ 

CAN WE HELP YOU 

DRIVING EQUIPMENT FOR THE 
PHYSICALLY CHALLENGEO 



Bruce Ayers 



HANDICAPPED VANS 



• Ntw a Uttd Vans tor 

fnoditicalions 

• Used Demos 

• All popular lifts 

• Hand controls 

• Raised roots 

• Drop floors 

• Whcatchair T)«-downt 

• Power Seat 

• Handicap Rental Vans 



Call or write lor 
tree broctiure 




440li Hast Sfiiianlum Sirrcl 
Quint y. \f f 02171 



:i2H-oor>6 




Religion 



^Baptism' Sermon Topic 
At United Methodist 

American Red Cross will 
speak on AIDS. That 
evening at 6 p.m. the 
junior high youth 
fellowship will meet. 

Events for the week 
include an open recreation 
hour in the gym at 7 p.m 
as well as a meeting of the 
Committee on Education 
and Teachers on Monday; 
the Memorial & Gifts 
Committee will meet at 7 
p.m. and the Christian 
Serenity Support Group 
will also meet on Tuesday; 
the senior high fellowship 
meets at 7 p.m. on 
Wednesday; the pastor's 
Bible class meets at 10 
a.m., the bell ringers at 
6:30 p.m. and the senior 
choir at 8 p.m. on 
ThuRday. 

A rummage sale will be 
put on by the Finance 
Committee Saturday, Jan. 
18 and donations will be 
accepted the week of Jan. 
12. 

Robert Johnston To Speak 
At Point Congregational 



"Baptism: A Sign And 
Grace" will be the sermon 
of the Rev. Harry Soper Jr. 
at the 10 a.m. worship 
service at Quincy 
Community United 
Methodist Church, 40 
Beale St. WoUaston. 

Greeter will be Lillian 
Warner. Ushers will Be 
Kenneth Melville and 
Donald Hunter. Scripture 
reader will be Kelley 
Carrillo and hostesses at 
the fellowship hour will be 
Anne Giger, Florence 
Hunter, Shirley Poore and 
Annie Ohman. 

Sunday School will 
meet after the pastor's 
Young Disciples message. 
Church facilities are 
handicapped accessible 
and child care is provided. 

Following the service, 
the Committee on 
Missions and Christian 
Outreach will host a soup 
and sandwich luncheon. A 
special guest from the 



Robert 
chairman 
Stewardship 
will give a 



Johnston, 

of the 

Committee, 

sermon on 



"Empowering The People 
Of God" at the 10 a.m. 
worship service Sunday at 
Quincy Point 

Congregational Church, 
Washington St. and 
Southern Artery. 

He will be assisted by 
his wife, Carol, who will 
serve as liturgist. Mrs. 
Johnson is a member of 
the Diaconate. 

The acolyte will be 
Matt Hourin, a member of 
the 1992 Confirmation 
class. Glenn McGhee, 
music committee 
chairman, will present 
"Time With the Children" 
during the morning service. 



The Chancel Choir will 
sing. Donna Baione will be 
the soloist. Dr. Herman 
Weiss is church organist 
and choir director. 

There is designated 
parking for the disabled, a 
chairlift to the sanctuary, 
large print bulletins and 
devotional guides, a new 
hearing system for the 
hearing impaired, a walker 
and wheelchair. 

Church School classes 
for infants and nursery age 
to grade nine are from 10 
to 11:15 a.m. Parents may 
register their children in 
the Church School with 
superintendent Debbie Tait 
on Sunday mornings or by 
calling the church school 
office at 773-6424. 



Assembly For Life Bus From 
Sacred Heart Church Jan. 19 



A bus will leave the 
parking lot of Sacred Heart 
School, Hancock St., 
North Quincy, Sunday, 
Jan. 19 at 3 p.m. for the 
Assembly for Life which 
will take place in the 
Main Ballroom of the 
Sheraton Boston Hotel at 



I SUBSCRIPTION FORM 

FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAIL TO 



€%U.±3 



Loyfi^a*^ 



1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 



NAME 



STREET 



CITY- 



STATE 



ZIP- 



CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 



L 



( ) 1 YEAR IN QUINCY 

( ) 1 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY 

( ) 1 YEAR OUT OF STATE 



$12.00 
$14.00 
$17.00 



) CHECK ENCLOSED 
) PLEASE BILL ME 



the Prudential Center 
beginning at 4 p.m. 

Cardinal John 

O'Connor, Archbishop of 
New York and Chairman 
of the Pro-Life Activities 
Committee of the National 
Conference of Catholic 
Bishops, will be the 
featured speaker. 

The bus will arrive back 
in North Quincy at about 7 
pjn. 

Cost is $4 and the 
public is invited to attend. 
For more information 
and/or reservation, call 
328-7095. 




SPECIAL SPOONS - Shown with Sidewalk Sam at 
downtown Crossing are Irene Ekiund, Sr., Bernadette 
Noonan, Linda and DanieUe Smith, and AUda and Donna 
Bertrand of St. Joseph School in Quincy. They presented 
him with over 250 spoons that were decorated by the 
students and faculty of St. Joseph's for Project Bread, 
Santa's Kitchen. This is the fourth year the school has 
paHicipated in decorating the spoons. A $10 donation Is 
made for each spoon by two major corporations to feed 
the hungry. Later the spoons are sold at all Filene's 
basements. 

'A New Vision' 
Sermon Topic At Bethany 



The Rev. Roger 
Ketcham will preach a 
sermon on the topic "A 
New Vision" at the 10 a.m 
worship service Sunday at 
Bethany Congregational 
Church, Spear and 
Coddington Sts., Quincy 
Center. 

Scripture reader will be 
Heather McLain. The 
Chancel Choir, directed by 
Gregory Flynn, organist, 
will sing and violinist 
Rosemary Way will play. 

A feature of this 
Sunday's worship service 
will be the dedication of a 
new pulpit parament in 
memory of the late Phoebe 
Sands. Greeters will be 
Joyce and Nicholas Spear. 



Hosting the fellowship 
hour in Allen Parlor after 
the worship service will be 
William and Helen Lipp. 

Church School classes 
are held at 10 a.m. in the 
parish house. The weekly 
Bible study group will 
meet at 8:30 a.m. in Room 
3 of the parish house with 
Rev. Ketcham leading a 
discussion of the weekly 
Bible reading. Child care 
is provided for infants 
during both hours. 

Bethany Church offers 
Dial-A-Prayer, 24 hours a 
day at 773-4500. The 
church is accessible to the 
physically handicapped 
with a ramp provided on 
the Spear St. side of the 
building. 



'Self-Reliance' Sermon 
Topic At First Parish 



This 
Sheldon 
minister, 
sermon 



Sunday Dr. 

W. Bennett, 

will give the 

"Self-Reliance" 



during the 10:30 a.m. 
worship service at United 
First Parish Church 
(Unitarian Universalist). 

Linda Gesche, soprano, 
will be guest soloist and 
will sing solos by Bacon 
and Vaughn Williams. 
Norman Corey, music 
director, will accompany 
and will also play organ 
selections by Brahms, 
Reger, and Bruckner. 

Visitors are welcome 
and are invited to the 
social hour following the 
service. Priscilla 



Kutchmanich and Elaine 
Sincavage will host the 
social hour. Matt Malloy 
and Dot Close will usher. 

Sunday at 7 p.m.. Dr. 
Bennett will lead a 
discussion in the on-going 
series "Understanding the 
Bible from a Liberal 
Perspective." Future dates 
are Jan. 26, Feb. 9 and 23. 

Historic First Parish, 
"Church of the 
Presidents," is located at 
1306 Hancock St. in 
Quincy Square, opposite 
City Hall. Church school 
and child care are 
provided (Brenda Chin, 
director). For more 
information call 773-1290. 



Quincy PAC Meeting Jan. 16 



The Quincy Chapter I 
Parent Advisory 

Committee will meet 
Thursday, Jan. 16 at 7:30 
p.m. at the Lincoln- 
Hancock School, Water 
St. 



J 




FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 

20 Greenleaf St., Quincy 

Cordially invites you and 

your family to attend 

Sunday Services at 10:30 am 

Sunday School is tield at 

the same time 

Wednesday Evening 
Meetings begm at 7:30 p m 

Child Care is available both 
Sunday and Wednesday 

Come and hear how Bible truths heal. 



Guest speaker Ellie 
Blute will discuss 
homework. Parents will 
receive practical ideas 
about homework that they 
can use with their children 
at home. 

All parents are 
welcome to attend. For 
more information call 
Linda Demeo at 328-1971. 



HOUGHS NECK 

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

310 Manet Av« 

Worahip Sam -10:30 am 

Sunday School 

8:30 am & 10:00 am 

Dr. Pater V. Coraa 

Rav. M. Alicia Coraa 

"Evmry Sundmy te 

W»leomm Smdmy" 

479-2855 



Obituaries 



Thursday, January 9, 1992 Qulncj Sun Page 13 



Phyllis L. Sealund, 66 

Worked At Squantum Air Station 

She lived in Quincy for 
47 years. 



A funeral service for 
Phyllis L. (Klages) 
Sealund, 66, of Quincy, 
was held Jan. 4 at the 
Deware Funeral Home, 
S76 Hancock St. 

Mrs. Sealund died Jan. 
2 at Quincy Hospital. 

She was a former 
employee at the Squantum 
Air Station in the 1940s 
and 19S0s. 

She was an avid 
beachgoer at Nickerson 
Beach and also enjoyed 



She is survived by her 
husband, Edwin D. 
Sealund; a son, Ross D. 
Sealund of Quincy; a 
daughter, Laurie Sealund 
Keezer of Dunstable; a 
brother, George L. Klages 
of Boston; two sisters, 
Barbara King of 
Cleveland, Ohio and 
Patricia Klages of Boston; 
and three grandchildren. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 



gardening. 

Velma L. Kelley, 84 

Worked For N.E. Telephone 

Bom and educated in 
Quincy, she lived there 
most of her life. 

Wife of the late 



A funeral Mass for 
Vehna L. (Crotty) KeUey, 
84, of Quincy, was 
celebrated Jan. 4 at St. 
John the Baptist Church. 

Mrs. KeUey died Dec. 
31 at Scituate Manor 
Nursing Home. 

She was a former 
supervisor for New 
England Telephone and 
worked for the company 
for 40 years before retiring 
in 1970. 

She was a past 
president of Penn's Hill 
Senior Citizens and a 
member of St. John's 
Ladies Sodality, the 
Telephone Pioneers of 
America and the South 
Shore Council of St. 
Anthony's Guild. 



Clarence J. Kelley, she is 
survived by a daughter and 
son-in-law, Charlotte K. 
Gillis and Raymond F. 
Gillis of Scituate; three 
sisters, G. Nina McAuliffe 
of Pembroke, Irene M. 
Robde of California and 
Rita M. Buckner of 
Florida; two grandchildren, 
a great-grandchild, and 
several nieces and 
nephews. 

Burial was in Mt. 
WoUaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for 
Funerals, 1 Independence 
Ave. 



Catherine Comer, 85 



A funeral Mass for 
Catherine (Mullen) 
Comer, 85, of Quincy, was 
celebrated Dec. 4 at 
Sacred Heart Church. 

Mrs. Comer died Jan. 1 
at Quincy Hospital. 

She was a former 
chambermaid at the Ritz- 
Carlton Hotel in Boston, 
where she worked for 25 
years before retiring two 
years ago. 

She was a member of 
the Sacred Heart Sodality 
and the American Legion 
Auxiliary in Hyde Park. 

Bom in Ireland, she 
lived in Dorchester before 
moving to Quincy 18 years 
ago. 

Wife of the late John J. 
Comer, she is survived by 
three sons, Quincy Public 
Housing Director John 



"Jake" Comer of Quincy, 
William M. Comer of 
Hingham and James J. 
Comer of Milton; three 
daughters, Mary Theresa 
Pecevich and Imelda 
Gemmel, both of Quincy, 
and Patricia A. Comer- 
Swarts of New York; a 
sister, Delia Gleckel of 
New York; 35 

grandchildren and 11 
great-grandchildren. She 
was the mother of the late 
Thomas A. Comer. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 333 
Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to Sacred Heart Parish, 
386 Hancock St., Quincy, 
MA 02171. 



Thomas H. Happeny, 86 

Former Professional Dancer 

A funeral service for Stallkar Lumber Co 
Thomas H. Happeny, 86, 
of Quincy, was held Jan. 3 
at the Sweeney Funeral 
Home, 74 Elm St. 

Mr. Hs^peny died Dec. 
31 at Quincy Hospital after 
a brief illness. 

He was a former 
professional dancer in 
Boston. He also wrote 
articles on silent movies 
for regional publications 
and maintained close 
relationships with friends 
from the early movie 
industry. 

He worked at the Fore 
River shipyard and for 
Jordan Marsh, Old Colony 
Sand and Gravel, and the 

Doris Spargo, 77 



A native of Prince 
Edward Island, he lived in 
Charlestown and 

Dorchester before moving 
to Quincy. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Eileen (Gerrier) 
Happeny; a son, Arnold H. 
Happeny of New York 
City; and two daughters, 
Barbara T. Happeny of 
Quincy and M. Lois Ridge 
of Braintree. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Donations may be made 
to the Alzheimers 
Foundation, 1 Kendall 
Square, Cambridge, MA 
02139. 



A funeral service for 
Doris (Lantz) Spargo, 77, 
of Braintree, formerly of 
Quincy, was held Dec. 31 
at the Hamel, Wickens 
and Troupe Funeral Home, 
26 Adams St. 

Mrs. Spargo died Dec. 
28 at Quincy Hospital. 

She was a retired 
secretary for South Shore 
Bank and former employee 



Bom in Bane, Vermont, 
she lived in Quincy before 
moving to Braintree 14 
years ago. She attended 
school in Quincy. 

She is survived by her 
husband, William J. 
Spargo; a son, William J. 
Spargo Jr. of Connecticut; 
a daughter, Shirley D. 
O'Meara of Weymouth; 
six grandchildren and three 
great-grandchildren. 

Burial was in Mt. 
WoUaston Cemetery. 



of Gilchrist Department 
Store. 

Juanita Teggy' Sherman, 66 

A funeral service for Judson Sherman-Rose of 



service 
Juanita "Peggy" (Carter) 
Sherman, 66, of Quincy, 
was held Jan. 3. 

Mrs. Sherman died Jan. 
2 at the Presidential 
Nursing Home. 

She was a native of 
LaGrange, N.C. 

She is survived by her 
husband, attorney 
Nathaniel M. Sherman; a 
daughter, Ethel Sherman 
of Quincy; and a grandson, 

Walter J. Feeley, 66 

A funeral Mass tor F. Feeley, 



Quincy. 

Burial was in Sharon 
Memorial Park. 

Memorial week will be 
held through Sunday 
evening at the home of 
Ethel Sherman, 6 Squanto 
Rd. 

Donations may be made 
to the Multiple Sclerosis 
Society, 400 Totten Pond 
Road, Waltham, MA 
02154. 



Gladys M. Lovell, 84 



A funeral Mass for 
Gladys M. (Kilcup) 
Lovell, 84, of Quincy, was 
celebrated Jan. 4 at St. 
Joseph's Cburdi. 

Mrs. Lovell died Dec. 
31 at South Shore Hospital 
in Weymouth. 

A native of Canada, she 
lived in Dorchester before 
moving to Quincy 18 years 
ago. 

Wife of the late John F. 
Lovell, she is survived by 
three sons, John F. Lovell 
Jr., Francis J. Lovell and 
Gerald C. Lovell; and 
three daughters, Gladys M. 
McCleary, Ellen T. 



Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 
Hancock St. 



785 



Walter J. Feeley, 66, of 
Quincy, was celebrated 
Jan. 3 at Sacred Heart 
Church. 

Mr. Feeley died Dec. 30 
at home after a brief 
illness. 

He was owner of Feeley 
Wrecking for 33 years. 

He served in the 
merchant marine for 15 
years and at age 66 
reentered to serve in the 
Persian Gulf War as a 
second pumpsman aboard 
the American Osprey. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Barbara G. (Mateik) 
Feeley; two sons, Walter 
J. Feeley Jr. and Michael 



both of 
Maryland; three daughters. 
Colleen A. Feeley and 
Heather D. Feeley, both of 
Quincy, and Helen M. 
Feeley of Rockland; a 
brother, James Feeley of 
Boston; three sisters, Anna 
Anastas and Dorothy 
Hudson, both of 
Dorchester, and Marie 
Riley of Newton; and three 
grandchildren. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to the Hospice of the 
South Shore, lOO Bay 
State Drive, Braintree, 
MA 02184 



Mahaney 
Williams. 

Burial 
Joseph's 
Taunton. 



and Ruth 



was in St. 
Cemetery, 



CHRISTIAN CIOH • SOPHIA LOREN • JOAN COLLINS • VUARNET • PIERRE CAROiN 




Jn OPTICAL & 

• D* HEARING AIDS^jl 

1361-A Hancock St., Quincy Sq. Sf 
773-3505 • 773-4174 ^ 

"a^^ $499 

Complete 

30 Day Trial 2 Yr. Warranty 

FREE VALIDATED PARKING 



$499 



1 YEAR WARRANTY j 

ON ALL FRAMES 

HAISTON • AVANT GARDE • OSCARDELARENTA t YVES SAINT i AURFNT 



John V. McAuliffe Jr., 68 

Co-Owner Of Plumbing Company 



A funeral Mass for John 
V. McAuliffe Jr., 68, of 
Quincy, was celebrated 
Dec. 31 at St. Ann's 
Church. 

Mr. McAuliffe died 
Dec. 27 at Quincy Hospital 
after a brief illness. 

He was the co-owner of 
the McAuliffe and Burke 
Plumbing Supply 

Company for many years 
before retiring four years 
ago. 

He graduated from 
Thayer Academy in 
Braintree and Holy Cross 
College and did graduate 
work at Harvard 
University, the University 



of Massachusetts at 
Boston and Boston 
University. 

He was an Army 
veteran. 

Bom in Quincy, he was 
a lifelong resident of the 
city. 

He is survived by two 
sisters, Elizabeth 
Humphreys of East Dennis 
and Dorothy Blancbard of 
Weymouth; a friend, Janet 
B. Mann of Quincy; and 
many nieces and nephews. 

Burial was in Mt. 
WoUaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 



Helen F. DeNicola 

Active In Charity Work 



A funeral Mass for 
Helen F. (Torrey) 
DeNicola of Braintree was 
celebrated Dec. 27 in St. 
Thomas More Church, 
Braintree. 

Mrs. DeNicola died 
Dec. 21. 

She was the wife of the 
late Remo DeNicola, co- 
owner of the former South 
Shore Television and 
Appliance in Quincy. 

She was an active 
participant in many 
charities in the area. 

She is survived by a 
son, Dennis DeNicola of 
Indiana; two daughters, 
Paula Pompeo of 



Weymouth and Linda 
Presutti of Braintree; two 
brothers, Russell Torrey of 
Norwell and Arthur Torrey 
of New Hampshire; a 
sister, Ruth Winske of 
Duxbury; and seven 
grandchildren. 

Burial was in Mt. 
WoUaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Bolea- 
Buonfiglio Funeral Home, 
116 Franklin St. 

Donations may be made 
to the Alzheimer's Disease 
Support Group of the South 
Shore, 557 Main St., 
Hingham, MA 02043. 



Susane Ward, 79 



A funeral Mass for 
Susane (Power) Ward, 79, 
of Quincy, was celebrated 
Jan. 4 at St. John the 
B2q)tist Church. 

Mrs. Ward died Dec. 31 
at Randolph Crossing 
Nursing Home. 

Bom in Newfoundland, 
she was educated in 
Canada and lived in 
Milton before moving to 
Quincy. 



She is survived by her 
husband, John P. Ward; a 
daughter, Mercedes M. 
Harkins of Quincy; and a 
sister, Mary B. Fennessy 
of Randolph. 

Burial was in Milton 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for 
Funerals, 1 Independence 
Ave. 




0. Scott Deware 



A THOUGHT F0« THE WEEK 



A Nmv YMr is h*r«. Th* 
old y*ar probably had 
momonfa of faar, diatraaa, 
disappolntmant and 
unfulflilad hopas. 



But you had daya of good chaar, baauty, 
variety and happinaaa too. it ia tha uaual 
pattarn of life. 

Thara la raally no uaa in mourning Itta paat 
yaar or tha yaara bafora. Tha Naw Yaar ia 
hara for all of ua. it givaa all of ua a chance 
for new hopas, naw dreams, naw indlvlduaia If 
wa mates It so. it givaa ua a new chance to 
have good Intentiona; a chance to have 
whole-hearted instead of haif-haartad 
reaolulion to do better, it ghrea ua a chance 
to live better through guidance from tha Good 
Boole and the counsel therein. It gives ua a 
chance to good thinga; write long delayed 
lettere, live cheerfully with i>ew understanding 
and concern for othera. It givae us a chancs 
to have naw enthuslaam. 

it la a God given opportunity for all of ua. 
Can you thinic of any reaaon why any one 
should not at leaat try to make the most of it? 

Deware Funeral Home 

576 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 

472-1137 

Member of the "New England Funeral Trust" 

and your Suburban Boston Pre-Noed 

funeral specialist 

Serving Aii Raiigiout Faiths 

Services Rendered To Any Distance 



Page 14 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 9, 1992 



Sun Sports 



North Makes Quincy Its 4th Straight Victim 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

The North Quincy boys' 
basketball team, after 
winning its own Christmas 
tournament, won its fourth 
straight game and 
improved its record to 4-1 
with a 54-44 victory over 
Quincy last week. 

The loss, the third 
straight for the Presidents, 
dropped them to 2-4. 

North Quincy will play 
at Bridgewater-Raynham 
Friday night at 7 and will 
host Barnstable next 
Tuesday night at 7. 

Quincy will be home to 
host Taunton Friday night 
at 7 and will be at Silver 
Lake Tuesday at 7. 

Ted Stevenson's North 
team raced out to a 12-0 
lead against Quincy. The 
Raiders led, 38-27 at 
halftime but John 
Fraceschini's Presidents 
cut the gap to five points 
late in the game. 

Sean Donovan and 
Desmond Bellot, who have 
been outstanding all 
season long for North, had 
IS and 12 points 
respecrively and Chris 
Olson had five points and 
12 rebounds. 

Dave Jolley, enjoying a 



fine season, led Quincy 
with 21 points and Steve 
Loud contributed 10. 

North Quincy defeated 
Boston Latin, 66-59, to 
win its Christmas 
tournament as Tim 
Johnson scored 14 of his 
16 points in the first half 
and Matt Flynn went 8 for 
8 from the foul line in the 
final minute. 

Donovan had 13 points, 
including a vital three- 
pointer with two minutes 
left and Bellot, the 
tournament's MVP, scored 
12 for the Raiders. 

Olson chipped in with 
11 points and Johnson 
finished with 8 rebounds. 

In the opening round 
North edged Stougbton, 
68-65, as Donovan scored 
19 points and Bellot 16. 
Stoughton's Jamie 
McGarry had a 
phenomenal night with 34 
points. 

Bellot, Donovan and 
Flynn were named to the 
aU-toumament team. 

In its previous game 
Quincy lost to Cathedral, 
71-65, in the consolation 
game of the Boston 
College High Christmas 
tournament. The Presidents 




Senior Brian Sullivan of 
Quincy, who broke his 
thumb last year, will be a 
key player for the Don 
Bosco High School 



basketball team this 
season. 

Tom Cavanaugh 
feels the team could have 
a successful year. 



Dondero On Curry 
Basketball Team 



Freshman Jennifer 
Dondero, a 5-1 guard, is a 
member of the Curry 
College's women's 



basketball team is 
expected to fit in well into 
coach Richard Kelly's 
fast-paced plan of attack. 



Quincy, North Winter 
Home Sports Schedule 



Jan. 8 Through Jan. 14 



Wednesday, Jan. 8 

NQHS Girls Basketball vs. Silver Lake, 
Freshmen 3:15 p.m., JV 5:30 p.m., Varsity 7 p.m. 

QHS Hockey vs. Silver Lake, Varsity 5:30 p.m., 
JV 6:40 p.m. 

•Dual Wrestling Meet vs. Silver Lake, 7 p.m 
QHS. 

Friday, Jan. 10 
•QHS Boys Basketball vs. Taunton, Freshmen 
3:15 p.m., JV 5:30 p.m.. Varsity 7 p.m. 
•NQHS Girls Basketball vs. Bridgewater- 
Raynham, Freshmen 3:15 p.m., JV 5:30 p.m.. 
Varsity 7 p.m. 

Saturday, Jan. 11 
•NQHS Hockey vs. Bridgewater-Raynham, JV 
6:40 p.m.. Varsity 7:45 p.m. 

Tuesday, Jan. 14 
•NQHS Freshmen Boys Basketball vs. Archbishop 
Williams, 3:30 p.m. 

•NQHS Boys Basketball vs. Barnstable, JV 5:30 
p.m.. Varsity 7 p.m. 

•QHS Girls Basketball vs. Silver Lake, Freshmen 
3:15 p.m., JV 5:30 p.m.. Varsity 7 p.m. 
•NQHS Boys Swimming vs. Durfee, 4 p.m. 



QUINCY tri-captain Steve Loud is sandwiched Iwtween 
North Quincy's Tim Johnson, left, and Luke Sheets as he 
goes up for a shot. 

bad bowed to Htcbburg in Jolley and Robbie Kane 
tbe opening round. scored 16 points each for 



NORTH QUINCY'S Tim Johnson goes up for a basket in 
the Raiders' win over Quincy. 

(Quincy Sun photos by Tom Gorman) 

Quincy. Kane, a standout named to tbe all- 
all season long, was tournament team. 



Sullivan In Key Role At Bosco 



North Girls Breeze By Quincy 



Tbe North Quincy girls' 
basketball team rebounded 
from its only loss of the 
season to defeat winless 
Quincy, 46-24, last week 
to improve its record to 4- 
1. The lost; dropped the 
Quincy girls to 0-5. 

The North girls played 
Silver Lake last night 
(Wednesday), will host 



Bridgewater-Raynham 
Friday night and will play 
at Barnstable next 
Tuesday. All are Old 
Colony League games. 

The Quincy giris will be 
home to host Taunton 
Friday and will play at 
Silver Lake Tuesday in 
league games. 

North Quincy (2-0 in 



the league) 

trouble with 

senior 

White, 

scorers 

scored 



had httle 
Quincy as 
forward Cindy 
one of the top 
in the league, 
a game-high 14 
points. The North girls, led 
by the outstanding defense 
of junior Regina Murphy, 
held Quincy to nine points 
in the second half. 

Kim Marsden, who has 



had an excellent season, 
led Quincy with 15 points. 

Following wins over 
Braintree, Plymouth and 
Marshfield (in the opening 
round of the North 
Christmas tournament), 
North suffered its first loss 
of the season to East 
Boston in the tournament 
finals. 



K. of C. Foul Shooting Contest Jan. 17 



Grand Knight Frank 
Langille of the North 
Quincy K. of C. announces 
the local competition of 
the statewide K. of C. 

basketball foul shooting 
contest will be held 
Friday, Jan. 17 at the 
Atlantic Middle School on 



Mollis Ave., North Quincy. 

Girls 10-14 will shoot 
from 7 to 8 p.m. and boys 
10-14 will shoot from 8 to 
9:15 p.m. 

Any boy and girl 10-14 
as of Jan. 1 is eligible to 
take part. Each will shoot 
15 foul shots with the 
winners advancing to 



district and, hopefully, to 
regional and r^ate finals. 

The contest is being 
held in conjunction with 
the Sacred Heart youth 
basketball program and 
will be supervised by K. of 
C. free throw chairman 
Mark Jaehnig. 



Registration will be 
held at the door on the 
night of the competition. 

There is no registration 
fee. Awards will be 
presented. 

For more information 
call Jaehnig at 472-3311. 



Recreation Dept. Trip To Pat's Peak Jan. 19 



The Quincy Recreation 
Department will sponsor a 
one-day ski trip to Pat's 
Peak Ski Area in 
Henniker, New Hampshire, 
Sunday, Jan. 19, 
announces Director Barry 
Welch. 

The trip is open to 
Quincy residents age 10 
through adult. Those under 
10 may attend if 
accompanied by an adult. 



Family groups are 
encouraged to attend. 

Cost, which includes 
round trip coach bus and 
all-day lift tickets, is $34. 
Reduced rates for rental 
equipment and optional 
lessons can also be 
arranged. 

The trip will be 
supervised by the 
Recreation Department 
staff. 



Registration will begin 
today (Thursday) at the 
Recreation Office, 100 
Southern Artery, and 
continue weekdays from 9 
a.m. to 4 p.m. as long as 
openings exist. 

Pat's Peak has 14 trails 
and slopes, a triple 
chairlift to the summit, 
two double chairlifts, two 
T-bars and one J-Bar. 
Uphill capacity is 6,000 



persons per hour. 

The elevation is 1,400 
feet. It has a main lodge, 
ski school, ski shop, 
nursery, lunch room and 
ski patrol. 

Participants are urged 
to register early as 
previous trips have been at 
capacity and enrollments 
are limited. 

For more information, 
call 773-1380 ext. 204. 



Girls' Hockey Clinic Jan. 10 



The Quincy Youth Girls 
Hockey Team is 
sponsoring its third ice 
hockey clinic for girls age 
12 and younger, Friday, 
Jan. 10 at 6:40 p.m. at 
Quincy Youth Arena. 



Thirteen giris attended 
the first clinic, 26 turned 
out for the second and 
more are expected Friday. 

Registration begins at 
5:45 p.m. A parent or 



guardian (18 or older) 
must be present, girls must 
have a completed 
individual membership 
registration form required 
by USA Hockey, the fee is 
$5 and proper equipment, 



hockey skates, helmet 
with face shield, gloves 
and stick are required. 

For information call 
Mary EUen at 847-4246 or 
Jean at 288-7692. 



'' '»TCt»»»^* . rt * .. 



W,/ M anoO 



Hockey 



Thnnday, January 9, 1992 Qnincy Son Pag* 15 



North Edges 
Falmouth 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

The North Quincy 
hockey team edged 
Falmouth. 1-0, last 
Saturday to improve its 
record to 4-2, but the 
Raiders have a rough road 
ahead of them the rest of 
the season. 

Coach Tom Benson lost 
his leading scorer, Mike 
DesRoche, for the rest of 
the season after he 
suffered torn knee 
ligaments in a loss to 
Marshfield. 

North (2-1 in the Old 
Colony League) played at 
Weymouth last night 
(Wednesday), will host 
Bridgewater-Raynham 
Saturday night '1 7:50 at 
the Youth Arena and will 
meet Quincy next 
Wednesday at 6:40 at the 
Youth Arena in what 
should be one of the best 
games of the season. 
Quincy was 3-1-3 going 
into last night's game with 
Silver Lake. 

Sophomore Jim 
Sapienza scored the only 
goal in the win over 
Falmouth with Sean 



Vemetta and John Gladu 
assisting. 

Junior goalie Sean 
Conley was outstanding as 
he came up with more 
than 30 saves. 

In their previous game 
the Raiders had lost to 
unbeaten Marshfield, 5-1. 
The Rams are 7-0 and 
must be setting some sort 
of record for shots on goal. 
North goalie Dennis 
Ruggere has 44 saves. In 
previous games Marshfield 
had a phenomenal 79 shots 
and more than 50 shots on 
goal. 

Earlier North Quincy 
has defeated Rockland for 
the second time, 6-3. 

"The boys have been 
playing excellent hockey 
and, although we will 
certainly miss Mike 
DesRoche, one of the top 
scorers in the league, we 
have other boys who can 
score and I think we will 
be all right," said Benson. 
"Dennis Ruggere has been 
outstanding in goal and 
Sean Conley played a 
superb game in goal in the 
win over Falmouth." 



A 'Tying' Week 
For Presidents 



Quincy 's hockey team, 
off to its best start in 
years, finished off a 
"tying" week by scoring 
late to tie Bridgewater- 
Raynham, 3-3, last 
Saturday. 

It was the Presidents' 
third tie of the week and 
improved its record to 3-1- 
3. 

Quincy hosted Silver 
Lake last night 
(Wednesday), will be at 
Weymouth Saturday night 
at 7:20 and will meet 
North Quincy next 
Wednesday at 6:40 at the 
Youth Arena. This should 
be a fine game as North 
took a 4-2 record into last 
night's game at 
Weymouth. 

Scott MacPherson, 
again one of the top 
scorers in the Old Colony 
League, gave the 
Presidents their tie with B- 
R as he completed a hat 
trick at 9:46 of the third 
period. Jimmy Smith 
assisted on the goal. 

B-R had taken a 3-2 
lead with a goal at 1:26 of 
the final period. 

Shane Abboud and 
Sean McArdle assisted on 
MacPherson 's other two 
goals. The three goals 
gave him 17 points on 12 
goals and five assists. 

Steve MacPherson had 
another excellent night in 
goal with 25 saves. 

"Bridgewater-Raynham, 
like most of the other 
teams we play, was a good 
deal bigger than our kids 
and tried to outmuscle us," 
said Quincy coach Bob 
Sylvia. "But our greater 



speed more than makes up 
for our lack of size. The 
kids are doing a great job 
and I am very pleased with 
results so far." 

In their previous game 
the Presidents again came 
from behind late in the 
game to tie Boston Latin, 
3-3. Latin had previously 
handed Quincy its only 
loss. 

Jeff Craig's five-foot 
wrist shot with 2:26 left in 
the game gave Quincy the 
tie. John Lewis assisted on 
the goal. 

Latin jumped off to a 2- 
lead in the opening 
period but Smith scored 
twice in the second period 
to knot the count with 
MacPherson and Jamie 
Schatzal assisting on the 
goals. 

Steve MacPherson had 
20 saves in another fine 
perfomiance. 

The third game last 
week resulted in a 2-2 tie 
at Falmouth. MacPherson 
scored a goal and also 
assisted on Craig's goal. 

In an earlier game 
Quincy rolled over Revere, 
8-3, in a non-league game 
as freshman goalie Mark 
Smith had an outstanding 
game in his first start and 
had 20 saves. 

Schatzal put Quincy on 
the board early in the 
game with "the other" 
Scott MacPherson, no 
relation to the top scorer, 
having an assist. Abboud 
and McArdle had other 
goals in the opening period 
with McArdle and Abboud 
assisting on each other's 
goals. 
By TOM SULLIVAN 




THE WEST QUINCY ELKS won the Quincy Youth 
Football League cheerleading competition recently. The 
squad performed a modern, '50s- style dance routine 
choreographed by Kim Lincoln. Kneeling, 1 to r, co- 
captain Suzanne Civitarese, Michelle Zaborowski, co- 



captain Lynne Garland, captain Nicole Sheffer, and 
Nicole Forti. Standing, 1 to r, Kim Lincoln, coach 
Christine Miele, Christina Cicci, Sheri Coats, Karen 
Mezzetti, Kcrri Speranzo, Nicole Ciraolo, coach Heather 
Meaney, and advisor Rose Elder. 

(Photo by Skip Stevens) 



Track 



North Girls Too 
Much For Quincy 



The North Quincy girls' 
track team improved to 2-1 
with an easy 69-21 victory 
over Quincy, which fell to 
0-3. 

Karen Leary was 
North's top performer with 
a come-£rom-behind win in 
the 1000 over Quincy 's 
Sarah Edwards, who led 
the entire race only to be 
beaten down the stretch. 
Leary also led off the 
winning mile relay team, 
beaming up with fireshman 
Laura Blaikie, Katie 
Gustafson and Elisabeth 
O'DonneU. 

Quincy 's Amy Dunn 
was a triple winner, taking 
the high jump, 300 and 
anchoring the 4X176 relay 
team, just holding off 
North's Susarme Hamilton. 
Her winning leap of 4-10 
in the high jump qualified 
her for the state 
championships. 



Although Quincy had 
only eight girls with 
several from both school 
out with the flu or injuries. 
North coach Geoff 
Hennessy had words of 
praise for the Quincy 
squad. "Every kid on that 
team did their very best 
and never gave up," he 
said. Hennessy was also 
proud of his own squad 
with 59 of the 69 points 
scored by underclassmen, 
including six freshmea 

North's other winners 
were Amy Wong in the 50 
(6.7), Chrissy Herman, 50- 
yard hurdles (8.7); 
Melanie Gaziano, 600 
(1:47.7); Sonia Olmedo, 
mile (6.18.8); Kate 
McNamara, two-mile 

Saw Gat and Monay 
Shop Locally 



(13:53.0); Trish 

McNamara, shot put, (26-1 
1/2). 

Quincy 's 4X176 relay 
team of Kelly Stewart, 
Amy Galman, Terry 
O'Neil, and Dunn won in 
1:40.6. 

Taking second place for 
North were Hamilton, 50; 
Mary Ellen Eddy, 300; 
O'DonneU, 600; Blaikie, 
mile; Kristy Kabilian, two- 
mile; Hamilton, high 
jump; and Anh Ho, shot 
put 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



"KICKS FOR KIDS" 

Brand Name Children's Footwear 

10% OFF Already Low Prices 

with this Ad 
Rte 18 South Weymouth 
(Across from Factory Paint) 

Mon-Sat10-5 331-8028 

Expires 1-31/92 



Always Buying 
New & Old 

TAJ 

COIN, 

STAMPS 

and 

SPORTS CARDS 

9 Maple St., 
Quincy, MA 02169 

479-1652 

Craiq)!^ Line of Sillies 



Quincy seconds were 
taken by Galman, 50 
hurdles; and Edwards, 
1000. 

Placing third for North 
were Katy Deady, 50; 
Alyssa Cobban, 50 
hurdles; Lisa Flynn, 300; 
Ursula Feutado, 600; 
Gustafson, 1000; Stacey 
Flynn, mile; Deady, high 
jump; and Tracey Gross, 
shot put 

Quincy had no third 
place finishers. 

1 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

J 



^^Treat Your Car To Something 
t Special This New Year 






NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-3100 



I- 



BLOW OUT OIL CHANGE 

^9-95 ^''^^^ 

Premium Quality Lube, Oil, Filter 
14 Point Safety Inspection 

^i?J!l?J^i ^m,mm Expires 1/31/92 

"THE BLUE AND WHITE BUILDINGS''^ " 



PETAR'S , ERIC'S 

AUTOMOTIVE AUTO BODY 

(617)786-9080 (617)472-6759 

324-330 Quincy Ave., Quincy 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



Page 1( Quincy Sun Thursday, January 9, 1992 



Youth Hockey Jamboree 



Johnson, Green, Burgin Winners 



Johnson Motor Parts 
blanked Granite Auto 
Electric, 6-0, in the Squirt 
House League jamboree. 

Sean Dooley had two 
goals and Kevin Cellucci, 
John Healy, Jeff Glynn and 
Chad Fitzpatrick one each. 
Dooley, Jim Paquette, 
Spike Bertucci and Mike 
Whalen had assists. Goalie 
Nick Pizziferri record the 
shutout. 

Green Environmental 



defeated Doran & 
Horrigan, 5-1, as Pat 
Kenney scored twice and 
Brian Quinn, Matt Holt 
and Paul Burke once each. 
John Barron had two 
assists and Quinn and Tom 
Gouthro one each. Chris 
Lumaghini scored for 
Doran and Jeff Brophy and 
Steve Quinn assisted. 

Burgin Plainer edged 
the Quincy Sun, 4-3, as 
Paul Markarian scored two 



goals and Ron Gamel and 
John Katsarikas one each. 
Tommy SuUivan had two 
assists and Scott 
MacDonald and Didier 
Alther one apiece. Sean 
Garvey, Pat Grogan and 
Joey Ardagna scored for 
the Sun and Garvey had an 
assist. 

Johnson met Green 
Tuesday night and Burgin 
Platner will play the Sun 
Friday at 5:30 in the 
semifinals. 



Harold, Samoset, 
Neponset Move On 



The Paul Harold Club 
edged Purdy's Ice Cream, 
5-4, in Mite House League 
jamboree action. 

Jordan Virtue and Adam 
Smith had two goals 
apiece and Richard Stone 
one. The score was tied at 
the end of regulation play 
and Virtue's second goal 
won the shootout 
competition for the win. 
Danny Randall had two 
assists and Ryan Graeber, 
Jimmy Kelly, Conrad 
Leger, Scott Markarian 



and Mike Campanale one 
each. John Segalla had a 
bat trick and Joe Cox the 
other goal for Purdy's and 
Jim Chioccio, Ken 
Reichel, Joey Cuiuiingham 
and Steve Segalla had 
assists. 

Samoset Pharmacy 
blanked Balducci's, 6-0, 
with goalie Patrick 
O'Donnell recording the 
shutout. Mark Gibbons had 
two goals and Matt 
Kenney, John Alves, Matt 
Glynn and Bill McKeon 



Colonial, Marina Taxi 
In Pee Wee Showdown 



Colonial Federal and 
Marina Bay Taxi were 
scheduled to meet 

Tuesday night for the Pee 
Wee House League 
jamboree championship. 

Colonial Federal 
blanked New England 
Deli, 2-0, and Marina Bay 
topped Keohane's, 9-3, in 
the opening round games. 



Goalie John Laukkanen 
recorded the shutout for 
Colonial Federal and Jim 
Hasson and Joe Bracken 
scored the goals. John 
Haddad had two assists 
and Hasson one. 

Matt Radzevich and 
Mark Glynn had hat tricks 
for Marina Bay and Jason 
Snaith, Tim Lewis and 



Dennis Allen had a goal 
each. Allen, Lewis and 
Matt Langille had two 
assists apiece and Snaith, 
Radzevich and Justin Doty 
one each. Justin Whitman, 
Brian Beaton and John 
Masone scored for 
Keohane's and Steve 
McMahon and Andre Nagy 
had assists. 



Squirt A's Win, Tie 



The Quincy Squirt A 
team defeated Westwood, 
6-3, and tied Dedham, 5-5, 
in recent youth hockey 
action. 

Michael Ryan scored a 
hat trick in the win over 
Westwood and Bobby 



Harvey, Mike Sullivan and 
Chris Haidul also scored. 

Ryan scored three more 
goals against Dedham and 
Pat McGann and Harvey 
also netted goals. Billy 
Connolly and Mike 
Sullivan bad assists. 

Chris Cartbas was 



excellent in net and MarL 
Hawes, Mark Foster, Matt 
Allen, Betsy Stone, Derek 
McTomney, Billy Norris, 
Mike Fitzpatrick, Mike 
Powers and Sean Maiming 
also were outstanding. 

Quincy's record now 
stands at 9-3-1. 



Squirt B*s Cruise By Canton 



Quincy's Squirt B 
hockey team defeated 
Canton, 5-2, with Jeff 
Langille playing an 
outstanding game in goal. 

Chad Fitzpatrick, Ryan 



Swimming 



Barrett, Steven Ford, Paul 
Markarian and Patrick 
Kenney scored the goals 
and Mike Welch and 
Markarian has assists. 

John Barron, Kevin 
Regan, Jimmy Sullivan, 



Joey Ardagna and Sean 
Haidul provided excellent 
back checking and Brian 
Nolan, Billy Griffin and 

Shaun Slattery played 
outstanding defense. 



The North Quincy boys' 
swim team defeated 
Milford, 101-82, and Blue 
Hills Regional, 97-71, to 
improve its record to 3-1. 

The wins can be 
attributed to fine 
oerformances by the 
underclassmen, especially 
juniors Erik Delorey and 
Jim Flaherty along with 
fi^shmen Jackie Lei and 
Dan Bermingbam. 

North' winners were 
Mike Ploof, Dan Reilly, 
Barry Canavan, Erik 
Delorey, Lei, Flaherty, 
William Lee and Mike 



North Boys Defeat Milford 

KeUey. 



Second place finishers 
were Bermingbam, Tom 
Meade and Nader 



Sidahmed. 

Placing third were Alan 
Norse, John Aliberti and 
Erik Oster. 



jainfoh6 J& 



INSURANCE Ai;FNr V.IN( 

"Be Sure Now - Not Sorry Later" 

OUR NEW LOCATION IS: 
62 DERBY STREET. HINGHAM, MA 

PO BOX 522 ACCORD STATION 02018-0522 

Rear BIdg., behind SHEARSON & LEHMAN 

(OFF RTE 3. EXIT 15 NEXT TO HINGHAM PLAZA) 

TEL: (617)740-4070 

COME BY AND VISIT OUR NEW OFFICE 




one each. Ryan Barry had 
three assists and Alves, 
Matt Miller, Kenney, 
McKeon and Gibbons one 
each. 

Neponset Valley topped 
Lydon-Russell, 4-1, on 
goals by Pat Clifford, Matt 
Conso, Shaun Lynch and 
Shawn Richardson. 
Clifford, Steve Price, 
Mike Sullivan, Andy 
Booker, Lynch and Joe 
Callahan had assists. Mark 
Giese scored for Lydon 
and Matt Minicucci 
assisted. 



llllllllllllllllll 



FIRST TIME HOMEBUYERS - Eileen and Robert Scott Hines (center) with their five 
children in front of their new home with Judy Farmer of The Cooperative Bank (far left) 
and Veronica Collins, Assistant Planner and Coordinator of the First Time Bomebuyers 
Program for the City of Quincy (far right). 

City, Co-operative Bank Program 
Helps First Time Homebuyers 



The aty of Quincy has 
developed a First Time 
Homebuyer Program to 
help low and moderate 
income families afford a 
home of their own. 

The First Time 
Homebuyer Program, 
designed as a joint effort 
of the City of Quincy, The 
Co-operative Bank of 
Concord, and the 
Massachusetts Housing 
Partnership, provides 
potential bomebuyers with 
the assistance that they 
need to afford the down 
payment and monthly 
payments on a home. 

The program offers 
qualified homebuyers a 
conventional mortgage and 
a subsidized second 
mortgage with a maximum 
of 95% financing without 
the added cost of private 
mortgage insurance. In 
addition to lower down 
payment requirements and 
flexible underwriting, the 
subsidized second 
mortgage helps to lower 
monthly payments. 

Properties eligible for 
the program must be 
located in Quincy and 
have sale prices of 



$125,000 or less. Income 
limits range from $26,600 
for a single person 
household and increase to 
$50,150 for a family of 
eight. Borrowers must have 
3% of the purchase price 
as a down payment made 
up of their own funds. The 
remaining 2% can be 
donated by the City from 
Community Development 
Block Grant Funds, or 
other sources. 

The Co-operative Bank 
offers other financing 
incentives that relate to 
the first time borrowers' 
needs such as interest rate 
reduction, elimination of 
points, and reduced 
attorneys' fees. 

The second mortgage 
program is administered by 
the Massachusetts Housing 
Partnership. The borrower 
pays only interest on the 
second mortgage for a ten 
year term. 

Robert Scott Hines, his 
wife Eileen, and their five 
children are one of the first 
homeowners to take 
advantage of the First 
Time Homebuyer Program. 
They contacted Veronica 
Collins, assistant planner 
for the City of Quincy and 



coordinator of the program 
who interviewed and 
prequalified the Hines 
family for their loan. They 
subsequently met with 
Judy Farmer, mortgage 
representative of The Co- 
operative Bank and 
appUed for their mortgage. 
The family moved into 
their new home just in 
time for the holidays. 

David Bradbury, 
chairman and CEO, said 
"the bank is very excited 
to be involved in such a 
beneficial program that 
assists families in 
attaining their goal of 
home ownership. Such 
worthwhile ventures 
clearly show that a 
partnership of public and 
private interests can work 
together to increase 
affordable housing 
opportunities for first time 
homebuyers." 

The Co-operative Bank 
of Concord, with assets of 
$629 million is a state 
chartered, FDIC insured 
co-operative bank with 
headquarters in Acton and 
13 retail banking offices in 
Middlesex, Norfolk and 
Plymouth counties. 



Quincy 
Hospital 

presents 
an educational program 

STOMACH 
PROBLEIVIS 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 1992 
7:00 P.IVI. 

Quincy Hospital 
114 Wtiitwell Street, Quincy, MA 

Everyone complains of stomach problems at one time or 

crxjther. Eric Cohen, gastroenterologist and internist at 

Adams Medical Associates, will speak about symptoms 

of common stomach problems and the types of 

treatment available. 

Ttiis Quincy Hospital Wellness Wednesday program 
is offered free of ctiarge as a public service. 

Advance registration is required. 
Call (617) 773-6100. Ext. 4016 to reserve a place r)ow. 



'Father BiU': 

40 Years As 

A People's Priest 



Thursday, January 9, 1992 Quincy Sun Page 17 



(( onl'il from I'lifiv '>) 

Quincy," said Rev. 
Bennett, chairman of the 
Board of Supervisors. "I 
am very grateful for all he 
has done and for the 
support and commitment 
he has shown with the 
leadership of the 
Woodward School." 

Rev. Bennett said Fr. 
McCarthy's involvement in 
so many different 
organizations is why his 
effects on the city 
transcend the church. 

"In a quiet behind the 
scenes way be has 
contributed to the quality 
of life, not only at St. 
John's, but in the entire 
city of Quincy. His 
ministry goes beyond St. 
John's Parish," said Rev. 
Bennett. 

The R«v. Cornelius 
Heery, pastor at Sacred 
Heart Church has known 
Fr. McCarthy for many 
years. 

"Fr. McCarthy is the 
Mother Theresa of the 
South Shore. He reaches 
out to the poor. 

"The Lord said if you 
love the poor your 
salvation is assured," 
Heery said. 

"We in the North 
Quincy section of the city 
admire what goes on at St. 
John's," he said "Although 
they like to come down to 
Sacred Heart and spy on 
us once in a while," Fr. 
Heery joked. 

"I hope we'll all be 
together for his 50th," Fr. 



Heery said. 

In addition to his woiic 
with the poor Fr. McCarthy 
has done extensive work at 
St. John's. 

Fr. McCarthy also 
revitalized the parish's idle 
parochial school building. 
It is now used for various 
purposes including a Drop- 
In Center for teens, CCD 
classes, an adult center for 
seminars and classes, and 
a Catholic literature 
library. The basement is 
also used as a shelter for 
homeless people when 
there is an overflow at 
Father Bill's Place. 

Fr. McCarthy also 
directed many physical 
improvements at St. 
John's, including 
renovation of the 
downstairs hall which was 
dedicated to former St. 
John's pastor. Bishop 
Joseph Maguiie. 

Another improvement of 
which Fr. McCarthy is 
proud of was the 
installation of an elevator 
to provide handicapped 
access to the church. 

Under Fr. McCarthy, St. 
John's became the pilot 
parish for RdA, a program 
for converting adults of 
other faiths to 
Catholicism. 

A popular idea initiated 
by Fr, McCarthy are the 
Masses held at the senior 
citizen housing 

complexes. Granite Street, 
Town Brook and Sawyer 
Towers each week "for 
people who can't get out 
and get to church," Fr. 



McCarthy said. 

Another trademark of 
Fr. McCarthy is that he 
tries to make church 
services a positive 
experience for 

parishioners. Now many of 
the Masses at St. John's 
include music. 

"I like to make the 
celebration of Mass 
uplifting to the people," he 
said. 

"I try to communicate 
to parishioners that they 
own the parish. It belongs 
to them, not the priests." 

In the past he has been 
involved with the plaiming 
of Quincy's 200th 
Anniversary Celebration of 
the United States 
Constitution. He also 
worked with the city to try 
to prohibit video games in 
Quincy. 

In addition to his work 
at St. John's Fr. McCarthy 
has used his talents to help 
with fund raising efforts at 
Quincy Hospital, 
Woodward School, Caritas 
and Father Bill's Place. 

"I feel that the people 
in Quincy have been most 
cooperative and supportive 
in my ventures, especially 
the parishioners at St. 
John's." 

Fr. McCarthy would not 
reveal whether he has any 
plans for retiring soon. 

"1 have three more 
years to serve on my term 
(his third six-year term at 
St. John's)," he said, "And 
then we'll see how things 
are going health- wise." 




SECOND AND THIRD graders from the Squantum School were among the invited 
guests attending the Mayor-City Council-School Committee inaugural ceremonies at 
North Quincy High School. 

Squantum School Students 
Attend City Inauguration 



Officials React Favorably 
To Mayor's Address 



t(.t>nl'il friHii Pnfv Hi 

teachers and the learning 
that's going on in the 
classroom. To that extent, 
I suppose like other 
(School Committee) 
members I'm anxiously 
awaiting what exactly his 
program is and how that 
affects the dollars in the 
school department budget. 
"I was pleased that he 
is focusing in on the 

administrative and those 
areas that are not directly 
related to the classroom 
experience." 

Asked whether he has 
own ideas for trimming the 
school department budget, 
Raymondi replied, "I do 



and in the next few weeks 
I'll be talking about them." 

Councillor Michael 
Cheney: "I think it was 
positive, upbeat and I look 
forward to working 
diligently on making sure 
some of those plans are 
fulfilled and we succeed in 
the city of Quincy. 

"It's going to be very, 
very challenging because 
of the fiscal situation and 
with the environmental 
situation there's going to 
be a lot happening in 
Quincy so hopefully it will 
be fun." 

As for his ideas on 
closing the expected $4 
million budget gap in FY 
93, Cheney said, "I'U be 



proposing some of my own 
ideas probably within the 
next few mondis." 

Ward 6 Councillor 
Bruce Ayers: "The 
mayor brought up a lot of 
good points, especially 
utilizing the limited 
amount of money we have. 
I'm glad to hear the 
emphasis is going to be 
put on education and he 
noted some good facts on 
recycling. 

"I'm looking forward to 
working with the mayor 
and the other councillors 
to come up with different 
areas that we might be 
able to create money for 
the budget." 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-3100 



Cyril P. Morrisette 

American Legion Post No. 294 

54 Miller St., Quincy 
MEAT RAFFLE 

Monday, January 13th, 7 pm 
Free Admission 



Students from Mrs. 
Barbara Arnold's second 
grade class and Dr. Diane 
Willard's third grade class 
from the Squantum school 
attended the City of 
Quincy Inauguration 
ceremonies of the mayor. 
City Council and School 
Committee Monday at 
North Quincy High School. 

Mrs. Arnold's class has 
been involved in learning 
activities relating to many 
aspects of city government 
over the last several 
months. 

During the recent city 
elections, the students 
wrote to many candidates 
expressing their ideas and 
sharing information. Mayor 
James Sheets, Ward 1 
Councillor Peter Kolson, 
School Committee 
member Linda Stice, and 
School Committee 
candidate Joann Bragg 

Sav« Gat and Monty 
Shop Locally 

tJg<SAL NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 
#91A0211-A1 
Bristol, ss. 

Probate Court 

To the father of parts 
unknown, father of Michael 
Brandon McDonald now 
Michael Charles Cook as 
changed by petition for 
change of name, of Norton 
in said County, a minor. 

A petition has been 
presented to said Court by 
William Charles Cook, II and 
Anne M Cook his wife, of 
Norton in said County, 
praying for leave to adopt 
said Michael Brandon 
McDonald now Michael 
Charles Cook. 

If you desire to object 
thereto you or your attorney 
should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Taunton before ten o'clock 
in the forenoon on the 
twenty-seventh day of 
February 1992, the return 
day of this citation. 

Witness, Ernest 
Rotenberg, Esquire, First 
Judge of said Court, this 
thirteenth day of December 
1991. 

ROBERT E. PECK, 
Register 
12/31.91 1/9,16/92 



paid personal visits to the 
classroom and discussed 
topics such as recycling, 
city government, 
citizenship and ecology 
with the students. 

The class also received 
letters from Councillor-At- 
Large Michael Cheney, 
former Ward 6 Councillor 
Thomas Nutley, Ward 3 



Councillor Larry Chretien, 
Ward Six Councillor 
Bruce Ayers and his 
mother Mrs. Beverly 
Ayers, and School 
Committee candidate 
Margaret King. 

More letters may be 
forthcoming from other 
elected officials and 
candidates. 



AGNITTI 

INSURANCE 

AGENCY, INC. 

Uet us give you a 
conr^petitive quote on your 

AUTO, homeowner, business, 

Anthony L. Agnitti life and health 

- Registry Service 
• Free Ndtary Service • Time Payments 
• Fully Computerized 
• Quotes By Phone 

21 Franklin St. 

Quincy, 02169 770-0123 







iiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiii^^ 

commoi^ealthof 
massachusetts the 

trial court the 
probate and family 

COURT 
NORFOLK DIVISION 

Docket No. 91 P2890GI 

NOTICE OF 

GUARDIANSHIP 

OF MENTALLY ILL 

To HAZEL R. USHER of 
QUINCY in said County and 
all persons interested in the 
estate of HAZEL R. USHER 
and to the Massachusetts 
Department of Mental 
Health, a petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that JOAN C. USHER of 
QUINCY in the county of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
guardian of mentally ill with 
surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
January 29, 1992. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of 
said Court at Dedham this 
twenty-seventy day of 
December, in the year of our 
Lord one thousand nine 
hundred and ninety-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

1/9/92 



mmmfmfimfffmimmjmm 



'^iiiiiiliiiill 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS THE 
TRIAL COURT THE 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT 
NORFOLK DIVISION 

Docket No. 89P2773G1 

NOTICE OF 

GUARDIANSHIP 

OF MENTALLY ILL 

To LOUISE G. BURNS of 
QUINCY in sakl County and 
all persons interested in the 
estate of LOUISE G. 
BURNS and to the 
Massachusetts Department 
of Mental Health, a petition 
has been presented in the 
above-captioned matter 
praying that SALLY LUCAS 
of HYANNIS in the county of 
BARNSTABLE be appointed 
guardian of mentally ill with 
surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
Februarys, 1992. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of 
said Court at Dedham, this 
eleventh day of November, 
in the year of our Lord one 
thousand nine hundred and 
ninety-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 
1/9/92 



Page 18 Qolncy Sun Thursday, January 9, 1992 



;:t.iOAiiiiiiiii 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS THE 
TRIAL COURT THE 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT 
NORFOLK DIVISION 
Docket No. 91 P2560E1 
Estate of JERALD JOSEPH 
BODNER AKA: JERALD J. 
BODNER late of QUINCY In 
tfie County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that ANDRE 
CORBEAU of QUINCY in the 
County of NORFOLK and 
MARK E. ZIMERMAN of 
NEW YORK in the State of 
NEW YORK be appointed 
executors named in the will 
without surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before 10:00 
in the forenoon on January 
15, 1992. 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the 
Court, on motion with notice 
to the petitioner, may allow) 
in accordance with Probate 
Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of 
said Court at Dedham, the 
sixth day of December, one 
thousand nine hundred and 
ninety-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUQHES 
R«glstw of Probate 
1/9/92 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS THE 
TRIAL COURT THE 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 
NORFOLK DIVISION 
Docl<etNo.89P1977F1 
NOTICE OF FIDUCIARY'S 
ACCOUNT 

To all persons interested 
in the estate of Edith 
Bumham Williamson late of 
Squantum in said County, 
deceased. 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. P. 
Rule 72 that the first and 
final account(s) of Gunnar 
Thornton as Executor (the 
fiduciary) of said estate 
have been presented to said 
Court for allowance. 

If you desire to preserve 
your right to file an objection 
to said account(s), you or 
your attorney must file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before the twenty-ninth day 
of January, 1992, the return 
day of this citation. You may 
upon written request by 
registered or certified mail to 
the fiduciary, or to the 
attorney for the fiduciary, 
obtain without cost a copy 
of said account(s). If you 
desire to object to any item 
of said account(s), you 
must, in addition to filing a 
written appearance as 
aforesaid, file within thirty 
days after said return day or 
within such other time as the 
Court upon motion may 
order a written statement of 
each such item together 
with the grounds for each 
objection thereto, a copy to 
be served upon the fiduciary 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. P. 
Rules. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of 
said Court, this thirtieth day 
of December 1991. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUQHES 
REGISTER 
1/9/92 



iiiHiiiiiiiiifiiii 



Six Liquor Stores Suspended 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS THE 
TRIAL COURT THE 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT 
NORFOLK DIVISION 

Docket No. 91 P2885E1 

Estate of JOHN E. 

JOHNSON late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that NATALIE 
P. JOHNSON of QUINCY in 
the County of NORFOLK be 
appointed executrix named 
in the will without surety on 
the t>orKl. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney shouki file a written 
appearance in sakj Court at 
Dedham on or before 10:00 
in the forenoon on February 
5, 1992. 

In addition you shouki file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the 
Court, on motion with notice 
to the petitioner, may allow) 
in accordance with Probate 
Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of 
said Court at Dedham, the 
thirtieth day of December, 
one thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-one. 

-mOMAS PATRICK HUQHES 
Raglatof of Probate 
1/9/92 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS THE 
TRIAL COURT THE 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 
NORFOLK DIVISION 

Docket No. 89P1 81 8E1 

NOTICE OF 

FIDUCIARY'S ACCOUNT 

To all persons interested 
in the estate of Ralph J. 
Andrews late of Quincy, in 
said County, deceased. 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. P. 
Rule 72 that the first and 
final account(s) of Marion L. 
Andrews as Executrix (the 
fiduciary) of said estate 
have been presented to said 
Court for allowance. 

If you desire to preserve 
your right to file an objection 
to said account(s), you or 
your attorney must file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before the twenty-ninth day 
of January, 1992, the return 
day of this citation. You may 
upon written request by 
registered or certified mail to 
the fiduciary, or to the 
attorney for the fiduciary, 
obtain without cost a copy 
of said account(s). If you 
desire to object to any item 
of said account(s), you 
must, in addition to filing a 
written appearance as 
aforesaid, file within thirty 
days after said return day or 
within such other time as the 
Court upon motion may 
order a written statement of 
each such item together 
with the grounds for each 
objection thereto, a copy to 
be served upon the fiduciary 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. P. 
Rules. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of 
said Court, this thirtieth day 
of December 1991. 

THOMAS PATRK:K HUQHES 
REGISTER 

1/9/92 



By STEVE KAVANAGH 

The City License Board 
slapped a one-day 
suspension on six package 
stores which served a 
minor during a Quincy 
Police Department "sting" 
operation last November 
and adopted strict 
penalties for stores who 
serve minors in the future. 



The board voted 5-0 to 
follow assistant city 
solicitor James Timmins' 
recommendation of a one- 
day suspension and to 
develop guidelines for 
future offenses. 

Police Chief Francis 
Mullen proposed a 
"progressive discipline 
procedure" which was 



iiiiil,::NOTICi::: 



CITY OF QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBUC WORKS 

55 SEA STREET, QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 02169 

TELEPHONE (61 7) 773-1 380 

FAX (61 7) 471 -5460 

INVITATION TO BID 

The Department of Public Works for the City of Quincy, 
Massachusetts, will receive sealed bids for the installation 
of new water mains along Sea Avenue, Island Avenue, 
Dimmick Street and Sea Street and Bittern Road, sections 
of streets until 10:00 local time on Friday January 31, 
1992, at the Office of the Commissioner of Public Works, 
55 Sea Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 02169, at which 
time and place the bid will be publicly opened and read 
aloud. 

The Work under this Contract includes, but is not 
necessarily limited to the removal of approximately 5,900 
feet cf existing water mains of different sizes and 
installation in the same trenches of approximately 20 feet 
of new 20-inch Ductile Iron (D.I.) water mains; 3,000 feet 
of new 12-inch D.I. watermain; 3,100 feet of new 8-inch 
D.I. water main; 200 feet of new 6-inch D.I. water main; 
100 feet of new 4-inch D.I. water main, including all valves, 
fittings, hydrants, connections to existing water mains, 
permanent service connections, appurtenances, 
temporary service lines and all the related work inckJental 
thereto. 

All work of this Contract shall be completed within three 
hundred and thirty two (332) calendar days. 

A non-refundable deposit of $50.00 in cash or check, 
payable to the city of Quincy, will be required for each set 
of Contract Documents. 

Bidders requesting Contract Documents by mail shall also 
include a separate non-refundable check payable to the 
City of Quincy in the amount of fifteen ($15.00) dollars per 
set to cover the costs of shipping and handling. 

The Contract Documents may be obtained after January 
10, 1992 at the Office of the Commissioner of Public 
Works, 55 Sea Street, Quincy, MA 02169 during the 
business hours of 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM and 1:00 PM to 
4:00 PM 

Each bid shall be accompanied by a bid security in the 
amount of five percent (5%, of the value of the bid in the 
form described in the Information for Bkklers. 

The Successful Bidder must furnish a one hundred 
percent (100%) Construction Performance Bond and a one 
hundred percent (100%) Construction Payment Bond with 
a surety company acceptable to the Owner. 

The bidding and award of this Contract shall be in full 
compliance with Mass. General Laws, Chapter 30, Section 
39M, as last revised. 

Bidders attention is called to the requirements as to 
conditions of employment to be observed and minimum 
wage rates to be paid, as determined by the Commissioner 
of Labor and Industries under the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Law, Chapter 149, Sections 26 to 
27D, inclusive. 

No Bidder may withdraw his bid within thirty F(30) days, 
Saturdays, Sundays and legal holidays excluded, after 
the actual date of the opening of the bids. 

Equal Employment Opportunity, Minority Business 
Enterprise (MBE) and Women's Business Enterprise 
(WBE) policies of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
and the City of Quincy are applicable to this Contract The 
goals for this project are: 

1 . The Contractor shall maintain on this project a not 
less than ten (10%) percent ratio of minority employee 
manhours to total manhours in each job category. 

2. A minimum often (10%) percent MBE participation 
and five (5%) WBE participation by state-certified MBEs 
and WBEs. The bidder shall submit completed MBE/WBE 
forms with the bkJ. 

Failure to comply with these requirements may be deemed 
to render a proposal non-responsive. No waiver of any 
portion of these provisions will be granted. 

The City of Quincy has residency requirements for 
workers which provides for local preferences in hiring on 
City-supported construction projects. 

The Owner reserves the right to waive any informality in or 
to reject any or all Bids if deemed to be in their best 
interests. 

James A.. Sheets, Mayor 
Davkl A. Cotton, Commisskxier of Publk; Works 
1/9/91 



approved by the board, 4-1. 

The new policy calls for 
a 7-day suspension for a 
first offense and 30-day 
suspension for a second 
offense. Suspensions must 
be served on consecutive 
days exclusive of Sundays. 
Stores which commit a 
third offense will face a 
hearing before the board 
regarding a revocation of 
license. 

"We have to send a 
message (to package store 
employees). You have to 



wmmmmm 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS THE 

TRIAL COURT THE 
PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT 
NORFOLK DIVISION 
Docket No. 91 P2876E1 
Estate of EUNICE M. 
REDMAN late of QUINCY In 
the County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 
A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that CHRISTINE 
E. REDMAN-LEBLANC of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK and GERARD M. 
REDMAN of QUINCY in the 
County of NORFOLK and 
DENISE CASSIDY of 
CANTON in the County of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
administrators with the will 
annexed without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney shoukJ file a written 
appearance in sakJ Court at 
Dedham on or before 10:00 
in the forenoon on February 
5, 1992. 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the 
Court, on motion with notice 
to the petitioner, may allow) 
in accordance with Probate 
Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of 
said Court at Dedham, the 
thirtieth day of December, 
one thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 

1/9/92 



make identification!" 
Mullen said. 

Board Chairman John 
Gillis voted against the 
new guidelines. While not 
disagreeing with Mullen's 
proposal Gillis said, "Each 
individual case is different. 
There can be mitigating 
circumstances." 

The six stores who will 
have their licenses 
suspended Wednesday, 
Jan. 22, are Old Colony 
Liquors, 519 Southern 
Artery; Previte's Market, 
72 Sumner St.; McNieces, 
205 West Squantum St.; \ 
Neck Package Store, 1183 
Sea St.; Shop 'N' Save 
Liquors, 20 Independence 
Ave.; and Fleishman's 
Liquors, 603 Washington 
St 

"These were isolated 
incidents. There was not a 
pattern of activity here," 
Timmins said. "But we 
want to put the package 
stores on notice." 

LEGAL NOTIci 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS THE 
TRIAL COURT THE 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT 
NORFOLK DIVISION 

Docket No. 90P1298-GI 

To Gertrude L. Grindle 
and the Massachusetts 
Department of Mental Health 
and to all persons interested 
in the estate of Gertrude L. 
Grindle of Braintree in oaid 
Court, mentally ill person. 

A petition has been 
presented to said Court for 
license to sell at - private 
sale - certain real estate of 
said ward for her 
maintenance - And praying 
that the petitioner may 
become the purchaser of 
said real estate. Which is 
situated in Quincy in said 
County, in accordance with 
the offer set out in said 
petition. 

If you desire to object 
thereto you or your attorney 
should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham before ten o'clock 
in the forenoon on January 
15, 1992, the return day of 
this citation. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, Rrst Judge of said 
Court, this December 9, 
1991. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER 
1/9,16,23/92 



LEGAL NOTICE 



INVITATION FOR Rins 

CITY OF QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

1 305 HANCOCK WT., QUINCY, MA 021 69 

Invites sealed bids/proposals for furnishing and delivering 
to the City of Quincy: 

Quincy College: 

Microcomputers 

& Printers January 28, 1 992 @) 1 0:00 AM 

Detailed specifications are on file at the office of the 
Purchasing Agent, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy 02169. 

Bids must state exceptions, if any, the delivery date and 
any allowable discounts. 

Firm bid prices will be given first consideration and will be 
received at the office of the Purchasing Agent until the 
time and date stated above, at which time and date they 
will be publicly opened and read. 

BkJs must be in a sealed envelope. The outside of the 
sealed envelope is to be clearly marked, "BID ENCLOSED" 
with time/date of bkl call. 

The right is resen/ed to reject any or all bids or to accept 
any part of a bkJ or tfie one deemed best for the City. 

James A. Sheets, Mayor 
Robert F. Denvir, Jr., Purchasing Agent 
l/fl/82 * ^ 



Thursday, Jaaoary 9, 1992 Qnlncy Sua 





EVEKYBOOrS MARKETPUCE 



HALLS FOR RENT 

Newly Renovatw) 
Sons o( Italy Social Canter 
Qoldan Lion Suite 
Capacity - 300 
Venetian Room 
Capacity • 140 
Call 471-IMO 



TF 



HALL FOR RENT 

North Quincy K of C 

Building 

5 Hollis Avenue 

For information please call 

328-5967 



HALL FOR HIRE 

Weddings, Showers, 

Meetings, Banquets 

Elks Home. 440 E Squantum St 

Ouirify 

472-2323 

TF 



HALL FOR RENT 

(completely remodeled) 

Houghs Neck Post No 380, 

American Legion, 1116 Sea St 

47a-6149 

TF 



SHOOTERS PUB 
FOR RENT 

Available for any occasion. A 
setting reminiscent of an Old 
English Pub. 4 antique Bil- 
liard tables, dart boards. For 
more information call 

472-0771 1/30 



HALL FOR RENT 

Fumace Brook Golf Club. 
Small groups, 50-90. 
Contact Mai Holm 

472-8466 2« 



YOU NEED IT BAD 

I NEED TO 
PAY MORTGAGE! 

Loon Mountain 
Luxe Ski Condo, 
pool, amenities, * 

Cable TV. 

$275 Week 
$195 Weekend 

479-1603 



1/9 



STORE FOR RENT 

Cheap Rent $490 

Retail or Office 

65 Billings Rd. 

North Quincy 

734-8172 



i/» 



liiSiiiv 



Thank You 

St. Jude 

For Giving Me Back 

My Family 



M.A.V. 1/9 



HOLY SPIRIT 
Thank You 



B.R. 

1/16 



THANK YOU 
ST. JUDE 



M,M. 1/9 



Thank You 
St. Jude 

For Favors Granted 



B.M.H. 1/16 



Thank You 
St. Jude 



C.aM. 1/9 



WANTED TO BUY 

Old woodwo>1(ing tools, planes, 
chisels, surplus hand tools; all 
trades. Precision machinist tools. 
Also wanted: oti l>ooks, paintings, 
frames, antiques, estate kxs. 

1-617-558-3839 -b- 



WANTED: 

Actors for TV Commer- 
cials; movie extras and 
game show contestants. 
Many needed. Call 1 -805- 
682-7555 ext.T-3806. 3^9 

HELPWANfTEO^ 

AIRUNES NOW HIRING 

Travel Agents, Flight At- 
tendants Mechanics, etc. 
Entry level and up. Sala- 
ries to $105K. Call 1 -805- 
682-7555 ext.A-3654.3n» 



TRAVEL FREE or on a 

shoestring. Air couriers 
needed - also overseas 
and cruiseship help 
wanted. Call 1-805-682- 
7555 Ext. F-3844. ano 



POSTAL JOBS 
AVAILABLE! 

Many positions. Great 
benefits. Call 1-805- 
682-7555 ext. P-4029 

3/19 



GOVERNMEIiTJOBS 

NOW HIRING in your 
area. $16,000-$68,000. 
CalM -805-682-7555 ext. 
J-3865 for current federal 

list. 3/19 

FOR SALE 

REPOSSESSED & IRS 
FORECLOSED HOMES 

available at below market 
value. Fantastic savings. You 
repair. Also S&L bailout prop- 
erties. Call 1-805-682-7555 
ext. H-6705 for repo list your 
area. 3/i9 



SEIZED CARS 

tnjcks, boats, 4 wheelers, 
motorhomes, by FBI, IRS, 
DEA. Available your area 
now. Call 1-805-682-7555 

ext. C-6368 3/19 



SNOW BLOWER 

Ariens 6 Horse Power 
Snow Blower. Got wet 
in storm $200. 
472-6489 



1/9 



PERSONALS 



Thank You 

St. Jude 

For Favors Granted 



C.F. 1/9 







United W^ 

II bringi oullhebe^lin all of us. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 

route. 

Telephone: 

471-3100 



Caprpet & Upholstery 

Cleaning by JK&K 

"Winter Speciar 
25% OFF 
with this Ad 

• Dry Foam Method 

• Better than Steam 

• Leaves No Residue 

• No Shrinking 

• Fully INsured 

Call 471-6319 



1/30 



CLEANING 
Old Fashioned Way 

Home, Ofice, Apts. 
Exc. Ret. Reas. Rates. 
Marilda 436-6570 



1/2 



B&G CLEANING CO. 

Will clean attics, 
houses, cellars. Snow 
shoveling etc. We're 
bonded. 
Call 479-9158 w 



LEGAL NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT 
NORFOLK, ss. 

91 P2002-G1 

To M. Rita Carr also 
known as Mary Rita Carr, 
the Massachusetts 
Department of Mental Health 
and to all persons interested 
in the estate of M. Rita Carr 
also known as Mary Rita 
Carr of Quincy, in said 
County - mentally ill person. 

A petition has been 
presented to said Court for 
license to sell at - private 
sale - certain real estate of 
said ward for her 
maintenance. 

If you desire to object 
thereto you or your attorney 
should file a written 
appearance in sakl Court at 
Dedham before ten o'clock 
in the forenoon on February 
5, 1992, the return day of 
this citation. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Judge of said 
Court, this December 31, 
1991. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER 

1/9/92 



i^i^i^ 




EXPERT 

LAMP REPAIR 

I RfWMMG 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO. 

472-2177 

755 SOUTHERN ARTERY 
QUINCY TF 

MtSCBLLANlEuS^ 
BINGO 

North Quincy K of 

Wad., 7 pm - Hwd Cmr6t 

Prlz**>8nack« 

Rolaxod AtmoophMW 

RofrMhmonto. Paifcing 

Call 328-9822 2/1 3 

■ ■.■■•.■■■.■:■:■.■.■.■■?.•.■.■•■.■.-■ 

WORD PROCESSING IS IN 

DfeMANb l i&MU M6ftE 

QUICKLY AND THOROUGHLY 

WITH PRIVATE INSTRUCTK>NSI 

CALL WORD CONNECTIONS 

(617)84»-8002 

LaavamMMO* 

All Call* promptly ratumad. 2/6 



LEGAL NOTICE 



COMMISSIONERS 
NOTICE TO CREDn"ORS 
OF INSOLVENT ESTATE 
TO PRESENT CLAIMS 
Estate of Alfred E. 
O'Connor late of Quincy, 
Norfolk County, 

Massachusetts, 
deceased, represented 
insolvent. 

The subscribers, 
having been appointed by 
the Probate Court for said 
County, commissioners to 
receive and examine all 
claims of creditors against 
the estate of sakj Alfred E. 
O'Connor that creditors of 
said estate have up to 
April 30, 1992, to present 
and prove their claim 
against said estate, and 
that they will meet to 
examine the claims of 
creditors at the offices of 
Edward H. Masterson, 
Esquire, 21 McGrath 
Highway, Suite 301, 
Quincy, Massachusetts 
02169, at 2:00 pm on the 
24th day of January, 1 992. 

EDWARD H. MASTERSON 
LEONAROLLEWM 

12/31/91 1/9,16792 



LARRY'S 
HOME REPAIR 

• Carpenters 
• Painters 

• Decorators 
General Contractor 
20 Years Experience 
Licensed • Insured 
Interior-Exterior Painting 
Scroll Ceiling 
All Home Repairs 
Small or Large 

659-7471 328-8735 

TF 

BABYSITTER 

Will babysit in your 
home 3 days a week. 
Good references. 
Call Catty 773-9397 1/» 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS THE 

TRIAL COURT THE 
PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT 
NORFOLK DIVISION 
DOCKET NO. 91 P2855A1 
Estate of OLA SIRONI late 
of QUINCY In the County of 
NORFOLK 

NOTICE 
A petition has been 
presented in the 



A & T Vacuum 

» 14.95 Overhaul Special 

on any vacuum 
» Sewing machine repairing 

* VCR repairing and cleaning 

* Sharpening 

(Kisson, knivM. etc ) 

» Oreck XL Vacuums 
I Electroluxw/power nozzle 
$150 
• Used Vacuum's $45 & up 
27 Beale St. 
Wollaston 
479-5066 



Your Soutti Short 

HoMtquartars 

For 



Appliance 
Service 

ON ALL 
MAJOR 
APPLIANCES 



HANCOCK TIRE 

& APPLIANCE 

115 Franklin St , So Quincy 

4/2-1710 

TF 




captioned matter praying 
that STEPHEN L. SIRONI of 
HANSON in the County of 
PLYMOUTH be appointed 
administrator of said estate 
without surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in sakJ Court at 
Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
January 29, 1992. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of 
said Court at Dedham. the 
twenty-seventh day of 
December, in the year of our 
Lord one thousand nine 
hundred and ninety-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

1/9/92 



WALLPAPERING 

Frank Montani 
Highest Quality Workmanship 
and Service. Neat, clean, 
professiional; reasonable 
rates; ceilings painted. Please 
above- leave message 698-9472 2/6 



RUBBISH REMOVAL 

Complete cleanouts-attics- 
cellars-garages-yards. Re- 
moval of appliances-boilers- 
oil tanks-water heaters. Fast 
Service-re£isonable 472-0877 

1/B 



SNOWSHOVEUNG 

Driveways & walks etc. 
Sanding also available. 
Reliable service. Quincy 
770-4593 or 508-584-6227 

1/16 



ATTICS & 
BASEMENTS 

Cleaned for 

Next to Nothing I 

773-7797 



1/9 




I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

I 
I 
I 
I 




MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN, 1372 Hancock SL, Quincy, MA 02169 
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment must accompany order. 



INDEX 



a Sarvicas 

D For Sala 

D Autos 

a Boats 

a For Rant 

D Wantad 

O Halp Waniad 

O Pats, LIvastock 

D Lost and Found 

a Raal Estata For Sale 

a Raal Estata Wantad 

O MIscallanaous 

a Work Wanted 

a Antiques 

a Coins a stamps 

a Rest Homes 

Instruction 

Day Care 

a Personal 

a Electrical A Appliances 



RATES 
IWEEK 
S-7WEIKt 

•-12 wecKt 

13 WEEKS 

ORMOIIE 



a $5.00 for one insertion, up to 20 words, IDS for each additional word. 

a $4-60 per insertion up to 20 words for 3-7 insertions of the same ad, 
IDS each additional word. 

a $4.30 per insertion up to 20 words for 8-12 insertions of the same ad. 
10s mors each sdditional word. 

a $4.00 per insertion up to 20 words for13 or more insertions of the 
same ad, lOS each additional word. 



D Enclosed is $ 

In The Quincy Sun 



.for the following ad to run 



-weeks 



COPY: 



NO NCniNO WNJ. Bf MAOI AT THM COlilTNACT RATE IN THC CVCNT OP CANCIUATION. 
DIAOUNt: MONDAY. SMPJl PtEABI INCLUDE YOUR PHONi NUMBER IN AO. 



1 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

!i 



Pagt 20 Qaincy San Thnnday, January 9, 1992 



i ► 




niankM Thank Yliu. 









Financial contributions are necessary to mal^e the annual Quincy Christmas Festival ^ 
programs successful. Without the support of the businesses and organizations ^ 
listed In this advertisement, these festive events would not be possible. 



Christmas feshvalcommittee 



The 40th Consecutive 



Christmas Festival Parade Brings 
Santa And Over 250,000 Viewers 




"s. ,., 





WOODWARD SCHOOL'S "Take Us Back" was decorated in a 1950's 
theme, winning the Father Thomas Tiemey Trophy for the best overall float 
and the M 000.00 cash prize. 



THE QUINCY FIREFIGHTERS float "40 Years In The Fire Service" won 
the second place *SOO.0O cash award. The float featured a replica of an old 
fire engine. 



SHOWN BELOW ARE THE MAJOR SPONSORS OF THIS YEAR'S 
40th ANNUAL CITY OF QUINCY CHRISTMAS PARADE. 



JheEatriot 




% 

% 
% 



THE CHRISTMAS FESTIVAL COMMITTEE AND A GRATEFUL VIEWING PUBLIC THANK THESE ORGAN IZATIONS AND 
BUSINESSES THAT CONTRIBUTED FINANCIALLY IN SUPPORT OF THE 1991 CHRISTMAS FESTIVAL SEASON 
PROGRAMS ... WITHOUT WHOM THE EVENTS WOULD NOT HAVE BEEN POSSIBLE... . Manet Management Assoc. 



• BayBank 

• Burke Distributing Co. (Miller, Miller Lite) 

• The Boston Five 

• George F. Bryant VFW Post 61 3 

• Colonial Federal Savings 

• Campanelli Industries 

• Bank of Boston 

• N.Q. Business & Professional Assoc. 

• Presidents Place Associates 



• Keohane Funeral Home 

• The Cooperative Bank 

• The Quincy Savings Bank 

• The Quincy Sun 

• South Boston Savings 

• The South Shore Bank 

• SS & B Realty 

• Shawmut Banks 

• QCBPA 



>WJDA 

• Stop & Shop Supermarkets 
Bradlees Dept. Store 

> Continental Cablesystems 

• Quincy Rotary Club 

> State VFW Ladies Auxiliary 

> Jack Conway Real Estate 

> Barry's Deli/Ship Haven Rest. 

> Wollaston Credit Union 



i^ Christmas i^ Santa's i^ Nativity ^ Santa's 
Lighting Arrival Pageant Mailboxes 



Christmas Parade 
Grand Marshals 



"\ 







Rex Trailer 

A television celebrity who, for many 
years, provided family entertainment 
with his well-known "Boom-Boom 
Boomtown" program. 



Luis Tiant 

The star pitcher of the Boston Red Sox 
diTing the 1970's ... famous for his 
twist and twirl style of pitching. 



Jake Comer 

A former National Commander of the 
American Legion, an accomplishment 
of no easy feat. Mr. Comer is a native of 
Quincy. 



% 
% 
% 
% 
% 
% 
% 

i^ The Annual i^ Elementary j6 

Awards Event School Christmas ? 

Poster Contest J 

(Quincy Shh photos by Thomas Gorman) O & 

easorisQnjreetinqs \rj'^ 



Christmas Festival 



Committee Members 



George F. White, Kathy Bubas, Ann Morrill, Bill 
Morrill, Mary Blood, Mike Demasi, Laurel Peddie, 
Frances Flynn, Mike McFarland, Tom McFarland, 
Bernie Reisberg, Gloria Noble, Bob Noble, Rita 
Kelleher, Jack Nigro, Andrea White, Agnes Trillcott, 
Herb Fontaine, Chief Francis Mullen, Ray Cattaneo, 
Tony Siciliano, Joe Pearson, Alfred Petta, John 
Noonan, Pat Toland, Bryant Carter, Kevin Cook, 
Gene Healey, Mary Jane Fandel and Ed Fiddler. 




From the 




Oj\7i) 






For Outstanding Community S' 

Frank Kearns Sun 'Citizen Of Year' 



Frank J. Kearns, 79, 
of Quincy, a community 
activist and advocate 
for the city's elderly, 
homeless, needy and 
poor, has been selected 
The Quincy Sun's 1991 
"Citizen of the Year." 

Kearns, of 162 West 
Elm Ave., who began a 
"second career" in 
local community 
service after retiring 
from the U.S. Postal 
Service in 1977, was 
selected from 34 
nominees submitted by 
Sun readers. 

An 11 -member panel 
representing the city 
made the flnal selection 
from those 41 
nominations. 



The award was 
established in 1985 to 
annually honor an 
individual for 

outstanding community 
service or a special 
achievement. 

Kearns joins the six 
other award recipients. 
They are, in the order of 
their selection 
beginning in 1985: 

Anthony Siciliano, 
deputy director of 
Quincy Emergency 
Management (fonnerly 
Civil Defense); Ruth 
Wainwright, long-time 
community volunteer; 
the late Richard J. Koch 
Sr., a leader in 
community and 
charitable causes; 



Martin Finnegan, 
coordinator of Project 
Impact, a program 
which helps youngsters 
deal with substance 
abuse; Clara Yeomans, 
long-time 

environmentalist and 
charter member of the 
Quincy Conservation 
Commission; and 
Gerald Gherardi, a 
contributor to many 
charities and service 
organizations. 

Kearns was 

nominated by Fr. Jack 
Ahern of St. Ann's 
Church in Wollaston. 
In his nomination 
ballot, Ahern noted 
Kearns' dedication and 
service to the area's 



elderly and homeless. 

When told that Fr. 
Ahern had nominated 
him, Kearns replied, 
"He's a terrific guy. I 
like him very much. 
I'm glad to hear that." 

Surprised by the 
recognition, Keams said 
he is honored by the 
panel's selection. "It's 
an honor to receive this 
award from the panel 
and The Quincy Sun. 
This means a lot to 
me." 

Sun Publisher Henry 
Bosworth congramlated 
Kearns for his 
community activism 
and involvement on 
behalf of the city's 

Cont'd on Page 5 




FRANK KEARNS 





VOL. 24 No. 17 



Thursday, January 16, 1992 




30$ 



While At U.S. Conference Of Mayors 

Sheets To Lobby In D.C. For Quincy Plan 




By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

Mayor James Sheets will travel to Washington, D.C, next week to attend 
the U.S. Conference of Mayors and while in the nation's capital, the mayor hopes 
to start his lobbying for his downtown revitalization plan. 

commuter rail station, deal with policies for 



oJ!J!c^SSn^^DGE Past President Robert Parker, left, and Nathan Rosenhek, 
Master of the Lodge, present Mayor James Sheets with a "Say No To Drugs and 
Alcohol" entry mat. The mat, measuring three feet by five feet, will be placed in the 
foyer of the City Hall annex. SimUar mats will be placed outside Qumcy's 15 public 
schools. (Quincy Sun photo by Robert Bosworth} 

Masons Donate Anti-Drug 
Door Mats To Public Schools 



"If my schedule 
permits, I'll do some 
lobbying for the crosstovra 
connector and Old Colony 
commuter rail station 
projects. This is a 
preliminary trip which will 
give us some preliminaiy 
contacts," the mayor said. 

As far as contacts. 
Sheets said he hopes to 
meet with key officials 
from the Department of 
Transportation and the 
AFL-CIO labor union. If 
possible, the mayor said 
he will meet with Cong. 
Brian Donnelly and aides 
for Senators Ted Kennedy 
and John Kerry. 

The east-west crossway 
connector, which would 
link Route 3A with the 
Burgin Parkway, carries an 
esrimated $25 to $30 
million price tag. The 



which the mayor hopes to 
locate in Quincy Center, 
would cost an estimated 
$5 to $15 million. 

Sheets said federal and 
state funding are needed 
for both projects, the key 
infrastructure elements to 
his Quincy Plan. City 
revenue would not be 
spent on the projects, he 
said. 

Sheets will attend the 
three-day conference 
which begins next 
Tuesday, Jan. 21 and 
return to the city next 
Friday, Jan. 24. He called 
the winter conference 
"important" since the 
nation's mayors will 
discuss urban funding 
policies. 

"It's an important 
conference because it will 



urban funding for cities. 
Because of the cuts in 
military spending, the role 
of mayors across the 
country becomes more 
important," he said. 

Sheets is a member of 
the Committee for Urban 
Development and 
International Development. 
"It will be an active 
schedule," he said 
Tuesday, looking ahead to 
next week's three-day 
conference which will be 
chaired by Boston Mayor 
Ray Flynn. 

Sheets does not expect 
the U.S.S. Lexington to be 
on his lobbying agenda. 
He said his administration 
has been kept up to date 
on the aircraft carrier's 
future whereabouts. He 

(Cont'd on Page 20) 



The Quincy Lodge of 
Masons want the city's 
youth to walk all over 
it.. ..Well, sort of. 

Tuesday morning Lodge 
officials presented Mayor 
James Sheets an entry mat 
with the message, "Say No 
To Drugs and Alcohol." 
The blue mat with white 
lettering which also 
displays a bold anti-drug 
symbol was presented by 
Nathan Rosenhek, Master 
of the Lodge, and Robert 
Parker, a Past Master of 
the lodge. 

The mayor's mat will be 
placed in the front foyer of 
the City Hall annex. 
Fifteen similar mats will 
be placed at each Quincy 
public school. The school 
mats will be done in the 
individual colors of each 
school. 

The mats measure three 



feet by five feet are made 

of a synthetic fabric called 

olefin 

each, 

supplied by Pioneer Mfg. 

Co. 



DARE Program. 

Sheets praised the 

Valued at $116 Masons for their gift and 

the mats were support for the DARE 

program. "The people of 

Quincy appreciate the 



Chinese New Year 
Celebration Approved 



The mat presentation is Masons' support and 

part of the Masonic sensitivity toward the 

support of the Drug and needs of the young people 

Alcohol Awareness or of this city. 

Tire, Appliance 
Collections Begin 



Responding to a new 
state solid waste 
regulation banning tires 
and major appliances from 
landfills and incinerators, 
the city's trash hauler has 
begun separate collections 
of tires, refrigerators, 
washers, dryers and ranges 
once a month. 

During the second full 
week (the week beginning 



with the second Monday,) 
BFI will pick up the 
aforementioned items 
curbside on the same day 
as regular trash collection. 
Collections will be 
done by a separate packer 
truck and taken to a 
transfer station in 
Cambridge for processing 
so that they may be 
recycled into other 
oroducts. 



By STEVE KAVANAGH 

Quincy residents will 
get a chance to celebrate 
the New Year a second 
time. 

The License Board 
approved a request for a 
Chinese New Year 
celebration for Saturday, 
Feb. 8 ft^om 11 a.m. to 2 
p.m. The celebration is 
being sponsored by the 
Chinese Language School 
of Quincy. 

The celebration will 
feanire a "Lion Dance." A 
request for permission to 
use firecrackers on New 
Year's Eve, Feb. 3, and 
New Year's Day, Feb. 4, 



was denied at the 
recommendation of Fire 
Chief Thomas Gorman. 

Peter Jae, principal of 
the Chinese Language 
School, told the board tiiat 
tiie Lion Dance features a 
group of about 10 people 
which visits businesses 
and performs a dance 
ritual to bring good fortune 
for the coming year. 

The highlight of the 
dance is "Plucking The 
Green" in which the hon 
"eats" an envelope full of 
money which is placed 
over the door. Jae said the 
proceeds from the dance 
will go towards expenses 
for the celebration and to 



the Chinese Language 
School. He also told the 
board he would inform 
them of the magnitude of 
the celebration after he 
finds out how many 
businesses will be 
participating. 

The Chinese celebrate 
the Lunar New Year ba3ed 
on the moon. The 
celebration is also known 
as the "Spring Festival." 
Festivities get underway 
on the eighth day after the 
last moon of the year until 
the 15th day of the first 
moon of the New Year. 
1992 will be the Year of 
the Monkey. 



Page 2 Quinry Sun Thursday, January U, 1992 



Stooges Cafe Seeking 
Downtown Move 



By STEVE KAVANAGH 

The owners of Stooges 
Cafe want to move their 
tavern from its present 
location at 3 School St. 
towards the center of 
Quincy Square at 1546 
Hancock St. 

The move would give 
Stooges a big increase in 
the occupancy limit, to 
228 persons, and improve 
the bar's parking situation. 

The License Board 
continued the hearing on 
the request for two weeks. 

The new location would 
be in the 3,800 sq. ft. 
building formerly occupied 
by Posh Beauty Salon. 
Stooges' entrance would 
not be on Hancock Street 
but in an adjacent alley 
near the Hancock Parking 
Lot. The vacant Miller's 
Shoe Store fronts the 



building. 

Police Chief Francis 
Mullen said he is 
concerned about adding to 
existing problems in that 
area of Hancock Street. 

Eileen Cohen, 

executive director of the 
Quincy Center Business 
and Professional 

Association, said some 
members have contacted 
her about the Stooges 
proposal and are 
"concerned about security" 
in the area. Cohen said 
QCBPA members she 
spoke with are not against 
expaiisioD by Stooges. 

"I would like to see it 
as more of a restaurant- 
type operation," Mullen 
said. "Increasing the 
seating and just putting 
more bodies in there 
drinking leads to disaster." 



SHIPYARD DINER 

South Street (next to Shipyard) 

770-3545 

Under New Management 

Breakfast & Lunch 

Served Daily 

Breakfast: Mon-Fri 6 am-11 am 
Sat-Sun 7 am-1 pm 
Specials $1.99 & up 
Lunch: Mon-Fri, 11 am-3 pm 
Specials $2.75 & up 
Fish & Chips $3.95 



Take Out & Kiddie Menu Available 



Fire Chief Thomas 
Gorman made a motion to 
continue the hearing and 
proposed that the owners 
of Stooges meet with the 
QCBPA and formulate 
better plans in regards to 
their kitchen operation. 

One of the owners of 
the building, James 
Markson of Jamark 
Management Inc., said he 
has been unable to rent the 
space for over a year and 
is facing foreclosure by the 
bank unless he rents it 
now. 

"The condition of the 
property is deplorable. This 
can only improve the 
situation," Markson said. 

Building Inspector 
Matthias Mulvey said he 
would favor the move if 
Chief Mullen has no 
objections. Mulvey said he 
is all for filling vacant 
business space in 
downtown Quincy. 

"Something like this 
might have a "richochet" 
effect," Mulvey said. "And 
help fill some of the 
adjacent vacant stores." 

Mulvey also said 
vacant stores attract 
vandalism. 

Jeffrey LaPointe, 
attorney for Stooges, said 
the move would benefit 
Quincy Center by moving 
the tavern away from a 
busy intersection with no 
parking and away from two 
nearby churches. 






ATLANTIC 



N^^'^f^FISH AND LOBSTER 






^v°^ 






Super Bowl Sunday 



Special 



"Bake In A Bucket" (Clambake) 

$13.95 

To Order - Call - 774-1122 



/" 



Is College In Your Future? 

• Are you reevaluating your life or career? 

• Do you want to do something for yourself? 

• Would a Part-Time College program help 
you attain your goals? 

At Quincy College you can begin your Associate's Degree or 
Certificate program this month by going part-time, either days or 
evenings, in one of our many degree programs. With 28 Majors 
and Concentrations to choose from you will be able to find a 
program to help you meet your goals. Financial Aid and 
Childcare are available. Our convenient Quincy Center location 
makes getting to college by bus, car or the red line easy. 

Classes begin January 21 

For more information contact the 
Admissions Office at: 

(617) 984-1700 
1-800-698-1700 

r\^i I cr-c 34 Coddington Street, Quincy, MA 02 169 
L-O L L EG E The South Shore's Community College 





SOUTH SHORE YMCA officials recently presented Mayor James Slieets, fourth from 
left, a banner proclaiming the non-profit organization's 100 anniversary. From left, Jay 
Asher, past president of the YMCA Board of Directors; Patti Ellsworth, administrative 
assistant; June Blair, development director; Ralph Yohe, general executive director; 
Mary Moore, executive director Quincy division; Jackie Whitcomb, administrative 
assistant; Milie Kenealy, member of the Board of Directors; and Paul Hurley Jr., past 
president Board of Directors. Sheets has proclaimed January "YMCA Month" in 



Quincy. 



(Quincy Sun photo by Robert Bosworth) 



Sheets Proclaims January 
•YMCA Month' In Quincy 



January has been 
proclaimed "YMCA 
Month" in Quincy by 
Mayor James Sheets in 
recognition of the non- 
profit organization's 100 
anniversary this year. 

The Articles of 
Incorporation for the 
YMCA were filed Jan. 5, 
1892. The South Shore 
YMCA, located at 73 
Coddington St., Quincy, is 
a non-profit organization 
committed to improving 
the quality of peoples' 
lives, serving people of all 
ages, religions, ethnic 
origins, and income levels 
on the entire South Shore 
and parts of Cape Cod. 

The YMCA operates 
boy and girl resident 
camps in Sandwich and 
many programs including 
Teen Leader's Club, youth 
sports, English tutorial, 
water exercise, strength 
training for handicapped 
adults; full day and after 
school child care and 
more. 

In his proclamation. 
Sheets said the South 
Shore YMCA through the 
years "has demonstrated in 
many ways it acceptance 



of a role of responsibility 
in the growth of our 
community, and this long 
record of accomplishment 
deserves public 

recognition. 

On behalf of Quincy's 
citizens, the mayor 
extended the city's 
"highest commendation to 
the membership, staff and 
volunteers of the YMCA 
for the positive and 
successful programs and 
policies they have 
initiated and supported." 

To celebrate the Y's 
100th anniversary, the 
South Shore YMCA is 
planning a host of events 
throughout 1992. 

On Feb. 14, the YMCA 
will hold a breakfast for 
YMCA members who have 
been affiliated with the Y 
for 10 or more years. 

In April, YMCA 
officials will kick off its 
annual support campaign 
and host a Cabaret Dinner 
with a musical look at the 
past 100 years. In May, 
the YMCA will sponsor a 
Youth Olympics. 

The summer months 
will also be full of 
celebration activities and 



events. A basketball 
extravaganza featuring a 
re-creation of basketball as 
it was first played when 
invented by a YMCA 
director 100 years ago. 

Officials in the 
Camping Services 
Division are planning a 
Camp Reunion Day in July 
and August at Camps 
Burgess and Hay ward in 
Sandwich. 

The "grand finale" of 
Celebration '92 will be 
held Nov. 5 featuring "Up 
With People." 

The South Shore 
YMCA has three divisions: 
Quincy, Community 
Services and Camping 
Services. The service area 
includes Quincy, 

Braintree, Milton, 
Weymouth, Scituate, 
Hingham, Cohasset, 
Norwell, Rockland and 
Hull as well as the 
remaining South Shore 
towns and parts of Cape 
Cod. 

The YMCA first located 
in 1905 at 61 Washington 
St., Quincy. In 1955, the 
new facility was opened at 
79 Coddington St. 



Full Service Oil Change 



$16 



ncg. ni.90. 
Call Dcrtler For OctAili. 
With this coupon onlv 

Expires 1/22/92 



Carbureted Maintenance Tune-Up 



$49 



cat) cars. 6 



i1 

cyl ilighlly higher 

IrKludes: PerfofmarKe 
& Emissions Analysis 
Install new resistor plugs 
Adjust: timing, idle, fuel-air 
mixture, wtiere possitile 
Inspect: sensors, belts, hoses 
& niters. 

Plus Sparks Tnple Guarantee 
see details bekiw. 



*15 




00 f> PIT Winter 
V^" ■ Package 



Includes Any Sparks Tuna-Up 

Plus OH. Lulw 4 Flttar up fo 5 qu. of 1 0W30 oil i 

Plus Cooling Systam Flush up to 2 gal of antifreeze 

cm Dealer For OrtaHi WWi thli coupon only 
Cifwxjt be uied *i conjunction witlh any other on*r Explrei 1/1 S/9i 



«5 



„ .'•''OFF 

On Any Brake Repair 

Call Dealer For Details With thd coupon only Ejipiret 1/1 5/9J 
OURTWUGUAfUNTEE 




, Mm: Out iMlaKi quoM II t« pria you pn 
wtc Of I RIM 01 KOMI) maubcuvi' 



Ifolatin. 
lWfqnMnc» . ( 



I 
1 



-..OtmakhmmaMtHa ■ 
l2manliorl2.000inlM.AiklaOMhi | 



QUINCY ■ 770-4933 

664 Washington St., Rte. 3A '^1 
(across from The Ship Yard) ' 



Houri: M F 8 6 • Sat. 8-4 



Over the last 16 years, 
several facilities were 
added. In 1976, a women's 
area was added. Two 
years later, a new fitness 
wing was added. In 1984, 
a 21-station Nautilus 
center and a day care 
center opened. 

The YMCA operates 
boys and girls resident 
camps on a 400- acre camp 
in Sandwich. Year-round 
programs, including 
conferences, adventure 
training and other non- 
summer camp activities, 
also run at this location. 

Membership has 
increased from 500 
members in 1955 to more 
than 9,000 members today. 
The Y also serves an 
additional 9,000 children 
and adults through 
programs. 

There are also more 
than 200 YMCA 
volunteers. A volunteer 
board of directors oversees 
all pol 'es and activities, 
and V. .er individuals 
volunteer in many other 
ways. 



Public Hearing Jan. 21 At City Hall 

Residents Concerned Over 
South Quincy 'Recyclery* 



Thursday, January 16, 1992 Quincy Sun Page 3 



ri.ivroN 



ROBERT BOSWORTH 

A proposed recycling 
center on Penn St. in 
South Quincy which would 
boost the city's recycling 
effort has some area 
residents concerned about 
increased vehicular traffic, 
potential noise and 
possible odors. 

Supporters and 
opponents of the plan will 
have an opportunity to 
comment on the proposal 
at a public hearing 
Tuesday, Jan. 21 at 7 p.m. 
in the City Hall Council 
Chambers. The Quincy 
Planning Board was 
scheduled to discuss the 
technical aspects of the 
center Wednesday at 7 
p.m. in the second floor 
conference room of City 
Hall. 

Last November, BFI, 
the city's waste hauler and 
recycling firm, unveiled its 
plans to locate the state's 
first "recyclery" or 
recycling center at the 
vacant Antonelli property, 
88 to 106 Penn St., South 
Quincy. 

BFI and some city 
officials say the center 
would boost the recycling 
effort in Quincy by 
allowing business and 
apartment dwellers to 
participate in the city's 
recycling program. 

With the center, 
businesses and landlords 
not part of the curbside 
program could pay BFI to 
collect recyclables, i^uch 
as newspaper and glass, at 
their place of business or 
apartment dwelling, 
thereby reducing their 
waste stream and disposal 
fees. 

As proposed, BFI would 
first collect paper and 



Always Buying 
New & Old 

TAJ 

COIN, 

STAMPS 

and 

SPORTS CARDS 

9 Maple St., 
Quincy, MA 02169 

479-1652 

Conqjlete Line of Supplies 



cardboard. If BFI's plan is 
approved, the firm would 
seek state permits which 
would allow it to collect 
glass, plastics and cans, 
the latter of which are not 
collected in the current 
curbside program. 

Preliminary plans also 
call for a drop-off center 
which would allow Quincy 
residents to "drop-off' 
recyclables at no charge. 

Besides boosting the 
city's recycling effort, 
officials familiar with the 
plan say the center would 
generate 20 to 30 full-time 
jobs. BFI would give 
South Quincy and other 
city residents hiring 
preference. 

Since the proposal was 
unveiled, some residents 
living near the Antonelli 
site have expressed 
opposition and 

apprehension over the 
plan, according to Ward 4 
Councillor Tom Fabrizio. 

Fabrizio, whose ward 
includes the proposed site, 
has met with residents 
regarding the center 
several times, including 
Tuesday night at the Ward 
4 Neighborhood 

Association monthly 
meeting. 

Last month, about 60 
abutters and other 
residents voiced their 



concern at a neighborhood 
meeting, he said. 

Fabrizio said residents 
are most concerned about 
increased vehicular traffic, 
noise on site and any odor 
generated by the facility. 

Fabrizio said "vague 
traffic counts" have 
estimated as many as 50 
to 70 trucks a day entering 
and exiting the facility 
each day. "That count 
doesn't include any cars 
from the public going to 
the drop-off center. It's 
difficult to determine how 
much traffic will be 
generated (by the 
facility)," Fabrizio said. 

Besides traffic, Fabrizio 
said residents are also 
wary about any noise and 
odors created at the 
facility. Under BFI's plan, 
the facility will receive, 
sort and bail recyclables. 

BFI intends to do all 
those operations inside the 
facility by raising the 
present building 12 feet 
from 24 to 36 feet. The 
operation would be housed 
in 28,000-square-foot 
building. 

Although the center 
may be beneficial to the 
city's recycling effort, 
Fabrizio said his first 
concern lies with the 
residents. 

• (f.iini'il till Faiiv iH) 




SEN. PAUL HAROLD (D-Quincy), left, recently met with Mrs. Hillary Clinton, wife of 
Arkansas governor and Democratic presidential candidate Bill Clinton at a State House 
reception. Joining them is Sen. Harold's legislative aide, Jim Boudreau. 



License Board Briefs 



The City of Quincy 
Board of License 
Commissioners took the 
following action at its 
meeting Tuesday: 

•Granted a request from 
Newport Liquors, Inc., 195 
Newport Ave., for 
permission to change 
managers from Richard 
Racette to Stephen 
Racette. 

•Granted a request from 
the George F. Bryan Post 
613, Veterans of Foreign 
Wars (Joseph Sullivan), 
for a permit to conduct its 
aimual Poppy Drive, May 
14-16. 



•Granted a request for a 
One-day liquor license for 
a social fianction at the 
Fore River Clubhouse 
(Thomas Hamill), Jan. 25 
' from 7 p.m. to midnight 

•Granted a request for i 
One-day auctioneering 
license from the Houghs 
Neck Congregational 
Church Mother's and 
Others Club for a fund 
raising auction Monday, 
Feb. 17. 

•Continued, for one 
week, a hearing regarding 
the request from Taso's 
Pizza & Euro-Cafe, 1620 
Hancock St., for a CV- - 
Wine & Malt license. 



•Continued, for two 
weeks, a hearing regarding 
a request from Jonathan's 
Seafood, Inc., 588 
Washington St., 

(Athanasios Kotoulas) for 
permission to extend 
business hours to 24 hours 
a day on Wednesday, 
Thursday, Friday and 
Saturday. 

•Placed on file, a 
hearing regarding 
complaints received 
concerning Triangle 
Transmission Co. parking 
and storing vehicles on 
Liberty, Penn and Quincy 
Streets. 



CHARLIE'S 
MINI-MARKET 

Party Platters 



#1 Charlies Special 

Imported Ham LOL American Cheese 

Roast Beef Potato Salad 

Turkey Breast Cole Slaw 

Genoa Salami Rolls & Pickles 

Serves 25 for only $34.95 




#3 Finger Sandwich Buffet 

A tray of tasty finger rolls filled with: 

Chicken Salad • Tuna Salad 

Crabmeat Salad 

Serves 10-12 for only $24.95 



20% OFF All Greeting Cards 



ORDER EARLY 

Call 770-3245 

247 Atlantic St. North Quincy 



HANCOCK 




Tara Carpet Cleaning 

40% OFF 
All Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning 

^_ $15 per room 

^^P (minimum 2 rooms) Jjb 

^ 1 SOFA or 2 CHAIRS $43 ^^ 

(loose cushions & dry cleaning extra) 

Scotchguard and Deodorizing Also Available 

CALL TODAY 472-9611 



It's the new North 

Quincy branch address 

of the South Boston 

Savings Bank. 

773-8100 

Easy to get to, with all the banking 

services South Boston Savings Bank 

is famous for. It's a SOLID BANK, 

• STRONG • CONSERVATIVE 

• RELIABLE •PROFITABLE 



Visit our other 
Quincy branch 
office located at 
690 Adams St. 
Lakin Square 



South Boston 
Savings Bank 

• ALWAYS THE LEADER" -^ 



Page 4 Quincj Sun Thursday, January 16, 1992 



<%-ia.±zx.o9r 




USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co Inc 

1372 Hancock St . Qumcy. Mass 02169 

Henry W Bosworlh Jr , Publisher 
Robert H Bosworlh Editor 



30* p*r copy. (12.00 p«r ysar by mail In Oulncy 
$14.00 par yaar by mail outaida Oulncy. $17 00 out of state 

Telephone 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 
Second class postage paid at Boston. Mass 

Postmaster Send address change to 
The Quincy Sun, 1372 Hancock St . Qumcy Mass 02169 



The Ouincy Sun assumes nc financial responstt.^ty tor 
lypog.aphica' errors in adverlisemenls txjt will reptmi mat 
part of an adverrserrent m whrch the typographical error 
occurs 



''si>mi.- 



Martin Luther King 
Celebration Sunday 



The city of Quincy will 
celebrate the birthday of 
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. 
Sunday, Jan. 19 at 3:30 
p.m. at United First Parish 
Church, Quincy Center. 

The celebration will 
feature students from the 
Snug Harbor Community 
School and Broad 
Meadows Middle School 
and Quincy Choral 
Society. 

Keynote speaker Rev. 
Pablo Diaz of the Hispanic 
Community Church of 
Boston will speak on the 
Ufe, person and dream of 
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. 
as it relates to the 21st 
century. 

All are welcome. 

Rev. Diaz has been 
involved with the Hispanic 
community and in ministry 
since the age of 15, 
preaching in the streets of 
New York with other 
young people of the 
Primitive Christian 
Church, a Pentecostal 
congregational on New 
York's Lower East Side. 

At 21, he became 
pastor of a storefront 
Pentecostal Assemblies of 
God congregation in the 



Brooklyn. He ministered 
for three years, working 
with Hispanic {>eople of 
diverse economic 
backgrounds. 

Besides being an 
advocate for political and 
social-economical 
development of the 
Hispanic community, he 
has served as an interim 
pastor at Dorchester 
Temple Baptist and is co- 
founder of the Hispanic 
Church of Boston, the first 
Hispanic United Church of 
Christ Congregation in 
Boston. 

He addition. Rev. Diaz 
co-founded Going Places 
Ministries Inc., a non-profit 
organization serving 
families in Jamaica Plain. 
Currently, he facilitates 
meetings between 
Hispanic clergy and the 
superintendent of schools 
regarding public education 
and Hispanic student 
issues. 

A national preacher for 
the 17th Consultation of 
Evangelism in Orlando, 
Fla., he will deliver the 
.keynote sermon at the 
1991 Massachusetts 
Conference Annual 
Meeting. 



^■■■■■i<aiBBBai<aa».aaiiJiiaii» 



R 






m 



aaaaaai ■ aaaaaaaaa 






lirTTIfTfiPIIUfHI 



^ 



Medical Watch 

Thursday, January 16, 7:30 pm 

Friday, January 1 7, 9 am 
Thursday, January 23, 7:30 pm 



lllllllHlll l ll l ll l l l liUU I IIII I I I I I IIIIII 



Medical Management 
of Stones 

"Passinf; a stone i.s worse than giving birtii." Join 
F^ibbie Payne and guests Robert Sipzener. MD. 
gastroenteroiogist and internist at Medical Associ 
ales of Quincy, and Steven Starr, MD. urologist at 
South Shore Urological A.ssociates, to learn how 
stones develop and the options to treat them. 



Miii i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiii i ii i iiiiii i i 



*■/ 






Quincy Hospital 
QCTV© 



'0imW^m 



Community Television Channel 3 
Quincy-Milton-Randolph 



llllllll l llll ll lllll l lll l ll ll l l ll l l lll lll 



Opinion 




Sunbeams 

By Henry Bosworth 



The Grand Hotel 




Fr. Daniel Graham had them all smiling — two 
Bishops, lOpriests, two deacons, family,friends 
and the overflow crowd that had come to St. John's 
Sunday to honor Fr. William McCarthy on the 40th 
aimiversary of his ordination. 

And he also had them nodding in a greement as h e 
likenedSt.John'srectorytoliterature's 
famed Grand Hotel. 

No, he didn't mean St. John's rec- 
tory is a fancy, swanky place. It is as 
plain and simple as most rectories. 

What he meant was life in St. John's 
rectory was like life in the Grand Ho- Fr. McCarthy 
tel, with all kinds of people with various problems 
coming and going. 

(But at St. John's they get help). 

Fr. Graham, now pastor of St. Joseph's Church in 
Quincy Point, spoke from experience and long-time 
close-up observation. 

He spent 12 years with Fr. 
McCarthy at St. John's as an associate 
pastor — years he calls "Camelot 
Years" for a young priest. 

Simday, in a heart-warming hom- p^. GRAHAM 

ily, he traced the changes in the church, the priesthood, 
the coimtry and the world over the past four decades. 

And, he then affectionately zeroed in on his former 
boss: 

"Someone recently asked me what it was like to be 
assigned with Fr. McCarthy," he said. "I have given it 
some serious thought for I was assigned as his associate 
for 1 2 years which is more than one half of my years of 
ordination. 

"I would like to tell you that just before Christmas, 
Fr. Bill Walsh (former Catholic chaplain at Quincy 
Hospital who lived at St. John's and was on hand 
Sunday) and I went to New York City to see a Broad- 
way play, "Grand Hotel" which is a musical play that 
reveals life in a large hotel in Beriin in the 1920's. 

"In it there were several characters: the lonely old 
man who was wealthy but never knew how to be a 
friend, the young pregnant girl, who was abandoned by 
her boyfriend. The old ballerina who was afraid of old 
age and retirement. The young German general who 
had a drinking problem. All lived in the Grand Hotel — 
and the melody of music kept pulsing in the back- 
groimd. 




^^ Medically 
^ Speaking 

hy Michael M. Bakerman, M.I)., F.A.C.C 




DRINK TO YOUR HEALTH 






The evils of alcohol have 
probably been preached since 
the first grapes fermented into 
wine. So it has tjeen with a bit 
of surprise lately that many in 
the medical community 
greeted reports that having 
two to three drinks a day may 
actually be good for you. A 
British study has concluded 
that such drinking may help 
protect against serious heart 
disease. Several other 
studies in recent years have 
failed to turn up evidence that 
moderate alcohol drinking 
increases risks of cancer or 
other diseases. The findings 
have not changed the strong 
advice, however, that ak^ohol 
should not be consumed by 
pregnant women or people 



who cannot control the 
amount they drink. 

PS. Heavy drinking is 
known to cause many serious 
health problems, including 
cirrhosis of the liver and high 
btood pressure. 

You may be surprised at 
some of the new 
recommendations doctors 
have for heart patients today. 
If you wouW like to learn more 
call COMPREHENSIVE 
CARDIAC CARE AT 472-2550. 
We are dedicated to the 
compassionate and caring 
practice of medicine. Office 
hours are by appointment at 
101 Adams St., Suite 24, in 
Quincy. I am affiliated with 
Ouincy Hospital and South 
Shore Hospital. 



"Life in St. John's rectory was a bit like living in 
Grand Hotel. We never new if we were going to have 
street people sleeping in our cellar, pregnant teenage 
giris moving in next door. Food baskets delivered in the 
Common Room and homeless mothers with children 
standing in the front parlor. And all the while, Fr. Bill 
would be singing in the backgroimd: 

"God will provide, God will provide." 

"We come here today to celebrate 40 years of 
priesthood and service to the church. Fr. Bill has grown 
in the past 40 years into a new age with enthusiasm and 
joy. 

"He has responded in new ways to the needs of a 
whole big little world with more colors and smells, 
more problems and pressures, more anxiety and de- 
spair than the Lord Jesus himself experienced. 
"It is good for us to rejoice and be glad for this is life in 
the Grand Hotel. God will provide, Amen, Alleluia, 
Praise to the Lord." 

The day was a beautiful tribute to a deserving 
People's Priest. 

A priest who would literally give you the shirt off his 
back and if it didn't fit, nm out and find one that did. 

There were those who wanted to have a big testimo- 
nial diimer for him at some big fancy place. 

But he said, no. He wanted to keep it simple and easy 
and at no cost for those who might want to attend. 

So the reception was held downstairs in the church 
with coffee, punch and small pastries. 

The important thing to him was the people. They 
were there because they wanted to be. That's what 
really counted. 

□ 
SEAN BARRY is in good condition and in good 
spirits at Massachusetts General Hospital where his 
right leg was amputated last Wednesday. 

"I'm doing fine — considering," he says. "There 
have been some good days and some 
bad days. But I'm upbeat and looking 
to the future." 

As previously reported here, Sean 
had waged a coiu-ageous fight since 
1986 to save the leg after a bout with 
cancer. 

Sean expects to be at the hospital at least another 
couple of weeks. 

If you would like to drop him a card, or visit (Peter 
and Judy Kolson were in the other day), he's in Room 
626 in the Gray Building. The address is 55 Fruit St., 
Boston. 

Or you can call his room, 726-4916. 
It can get to be a long day. 

Norfolk County 
Legion Oratorical 
Contest Sunday 




SEAN 



The Norfolk County 
Council American Legion 
Oratorical contest for local 
high school students will 
be held Sunday, Jan. 19 at 
Morrisette Legion Post, 
Miller St., West Quincy. 

The announcement was 
made by Commander 
Mary Timcoe of District 
Six. 



High school students 
must memorize their 
speech and present it 
orally. The presentation 
topic must be about some 



part of the United States 
Constitution and be 
between eight and ten 
minutes in length. 

Those who are 
successful move on to the 
next competition and 
winners go on to the 
national finals and could 
win scholarship money of 
$12,000 to $18,000. 

Information on the 
contest is available at 
local schools. Norfolk 
County Chairman Henry 
Bradley will conduct the 
program this year. 



Frank Kearns Sun 'Citizen Of Year 



(Cont'd from Page 1) 

homeless, poor and 
elderly. 

He also congratulated 
the other 33 nominees and 
thanked the readers and 
panel for participating in 
this year's award selection. 

"Again this year we 
have many outstanding 
and deserving nominees. 
To be nominated is an 
honor in itself because the 
nominations are made by 
residents in the community 
who recognize hard- 
working, dedicated 
people." 

Besides Quincy, readers 
from several other South 
Shore towns as well as 
from Pennsylvania, North 
Carolina and Virginia 
submitted nomination 
ballots. 

Keams will be honored 
at a reception hosted by 
the Sun at the Quincy 
Sons of Italy Social Center 
in March. 

His community 
activism is quite 
remarkable, considering 
his "second career" in 
local affairs and civic 
causes did not began until 
after he retired as a postal 
clerk at the South Boston 
Annex in 1977. He worked 
for the post office 37 years. 

Retired professionally 
and 65 years old, Keams 
set out to find out "what 
made the city tick" and 
make the most of his post- 
retirement years by 
helping others. 

"When I retired, not 
having anything to do and 
not knowing anyone in 
Quincy, I decided to find 
out what makes this city 
tick. I started attending 
City Council meetings, 
then License Board 



meetings and then public 
hearings," he explained. 

In 1980, Keams got his 
first "break" in his new 
career when he was 
appointed to the Quincy 
Council on Aging by 
former Mayor Arthur 
Tobin. In later years, he 
has been reappointed by 
former Mayor Francis 
McCauley and Mayor 
James Sheets. 

Kearns's first 

appointment "opened the 
door" for other 
opportunities to serve the 
community. In fact, over 
the last 12 years, he has 
been appointed or named 
to 15 community 
assistance groups and 
organizations, all of which 
he continues to serve on. 

In 1981, Kearns was 
appointed to the South 
Shore Elder Services' 
Board of Directors as the 
Council on Aging's 
representative. "South 
Shore Elder Services takes 
care of the elderly and has 
four nutrition sites in 
Quincy," he says, adding 
SSES is also involved in 
home care and 
ombudsman programs in 
Quincy and 10 towns. 

In 1982, Kearns was 
appointed to Quincy 
Community Action as then 
Ward 5 Councillor's 
Stephen McGrath's 
representative. As 

treasurer of QCA's 
Southwest Community 
Center, Keams helps the 
organization feed 600 poor 
families a month as well 
as provide fiiel assistance 
and housing for the elderly 
and poor. 

In 1986, Kearns was 
appointed a commissioner 
of the Quincy Housing 



Authority by McCauley. 
He was reappointed to a 
five-year term last 
February by Sheets. 

Kearns and the four 
other commissioners 
oversee the operation of 
the QHA which has 2,500 
units for families and the 
elderly. 

Other organizations 
Keams is affiliated with 
include Quincy Fair 
Housing Board, Quincy 
City Club, Citizens 
Housing and Planning 
Association, Inter-Agency 
Council of South Shore, 
Quincy Citizens 

Association, Quincy 
Housing and Development 
Association, American 
Association of Retired 
Persons (Quincy and 
national chapters); 
National Association of 
Retired Federal 

Employees and Quincy 
Historical Society. 

In addition, Keams is a 
Norfolk County deputy 
sberiff.and a 

former Silver Hair 
legislator representing the 
Norfolk County senatorial 
district. 

Since his first 
appointment 12 years ago, 
Keams has found out much 
more than what makes the 
city tick. He's become an 
integral part of many 
community organizations 
and worthwhile civic 
causes. 

His approach to 
community service is 
modest and unpretentious. 
Whether he's representing 
the elderly at an important 
meeting or giving food 
commodities from his car 
trunk to a hungry street 
dweller, Keams is always 



there to lend a helping 
hand. 

"You try to help people, 
that's the main thing," he 
says, pausing briefly. 
"You know there's more 
poor out there than there 
were in the 1940s and 50s. 
Even after the depression 
there's more people who 
are poor and hungry, 
especially with people 
losing their jobs. It's tough 
out there." 

Keams, who will tum 
80 years old Sept. 30, 
shows no signs of slowing 
down. "I'm out of the 
house at 6 a.m. I go to 
Mass and then the 
(Sheraton) Tara health 
club for a swim. Then I 
make my rounds." 

Kearns has never 
lefiised to help any group. 
Nor has he ever given it a 
thought. 

"I never say no to 
anyone. There is only yes. 
This is terrific. I love 
helping people. There is 
nothing else for me to do 
in my life except to help 
people. 

"I've lived a ftill life." 
Originally from 
Charlestown, Keams is a 
1932 graduate of Boston 
Latin High School and a 
1936 graduate of Boston 
College where he received 
a BS in science. 

In 1939, he moved to 
Quincy after marrying the 
late Mary C. Hynes. They 
were married 48 years 
until she passed away in 
1988. 

Kearns has one 
daughter, Mary Lou 
Dewar, who lives in 
Thousand Oaks, 

California; and three 
grandchildren. 



Thursday, January 16, 1992 Quincy Sun Page 5 



Readers Forum 



Don't Shut Out 
Expelled Students 



33 Other Nominees For 
1991 Sun 'Citizen Of Year' 



Thirty-three other 
people were nominated for 
the 1991 Quincy Sun 
Citizen of the Year Award. 

The nominees, with a 
brief description of their 
nomination, are in 
alphabetical order: 

Ron Adams, Mass. 
Teacher of the Year; has 
involved his Broad 
Meadows Middle School 
students in positive 
projects, including Bring 
Back the Lexington and 
human rights campaigns. 

Lillian Austin, director 
of the Adams Shore 
Community Center; active 
in community and civic 
affairs. 

Bruce Ayers, 'goes 
above and beyond the call 
of duty with his unselfish 
efforts to help the disabled 
community." 

Frank Barrett, for 
helping hundreds of 
handicapped children, ^ 
disabled veterans, with 
special functions at 
Marina Bay. 

Margaret Bonner, 
well-known and respected 
fashion designer for more 
than 40 years. 

Arthur Ciampa, 
served as executive 
director of Cerebral Palsy 
of the South Shore for 



nearly four decades. 

George Crim, 'angel 
of Greene St.,' a wonderful 
neighbor. 

Ted DeCristofaro: 
"He's always there when 
you call; big or small 
problems, he responds." 

Rev. Cornelius Heery: 
"This man is truly his 
brother's keeper. There 
are only four vowels in his 
language-A, E, 0, U, 
never, never I." 

Molly Hirschberg 
(posthumously); a leader 
in mental health issues; 
former member of local 
Red Cross, Quincy 
Community Action, 
Quincy Mental Health, 
and Quincy Interfaith 
Sheltering Coalition.. 

Robert Jack, for his 
lifelong work with boys 
and girls in community, 
teaching and coaching 
soccer. 

Mark Jaehnig, "bard 
community worker for 
youth;" founded Sacred 
Heart Basketball Program 
(380 youths have 
participated). 

Barbara Johnson, 
volunteer director of the 
Protestant Social Service 
Bureau Pantry Shelf which 
provides food for more 
than 300 families on a 



The Selection Panel 



Panelists who selected 
the 1991 Citizen of the 
Year are: 

JOHN DeCARLI, 
chairman Board of Tmst 
and past president, Quincy 
Sons of Italy. 

Dr. JANET 

DiTULLIO, Director of 
Curriculum, Quincy Public 
School System. 

JOHN GILLIS, 
Quincy City Clerk. 

Rev. KATHLEEN 
GRAVES, Co-pastor 
Covenant Congregational 
Church. 

PAUL HAROLD, State 
Senator. 

GENE HEALEY, Vice 
President of Marketing, 



Wollaston Credit Union. 

EDWARD KEO- 
HANE, owner Keohane 
Funeral Homes and 
Chairman of the Quincy 
Partnership. 

MAUREEN ROGERS, 
Manager of Community 
Development, South Shore 
Chamber of Commerce. 

RALPH YOHE, 
General Executive 
Director, South Shore 
YMCA and President, 
Quincy Kiwanis Club. 

HENRY BOS- 

WORTH, Publisher, The 
Quincy Sun. 

ROBERT BOS- 
WORTH, Editor, The 
Quincy Sun. 



weekly basis in Quincy- 
South Shore area.. 

Kay Jordan, R.N., for 
hundreds of hours of 
volunteer service at Manet 
Health Center (blood 
pressure clinics.) 

Dr. Zarko Jovanovic, 
a Quincy Center dentist for 
more than two decades, 
"welcomes pain sufferers 
without appointments." 

Toni Kabilian: 
unsuccessful school 
committee candidate who 



is still involved in 
education issues. 

Betty Keith, 82 years 
old; volunteer 39 years at 
Quincy Hospital. 

James Kelley, Sr., 
charter member and past 
president of Montclair 
Men's Qub; used some of 
the proceeds from the sale 
of the club to defiay sports 
activity fees at NQHS and 
upkeep of Bishop Field.. 

Roy Lind, as an 

(Cant y on Page 20) 



(The following letter was 
submitted to The Quincy 
Sun for publication) 

Open Letter to the Quincy 
School Committee: 

Being a school 
committeeperson in 1992 
means dealing with 
inadequate funding of 
school programs in an age 
of cutbacks. Public schools 
still serve the same 
mission; the education of 
the city's young people so 
that they can cope with 
the world ahead waiting 
for them. 

However, one issue; the 
issue of violence and 
dangerous weapons within 
the city's public schools 
must be dealt with in a 
viable manner. Should 
students be expelled for 
the possession of 
dangerous weapons? 
Recently that did happen 
and the end result is at- 
home tutoring for these 
law breaking students at 
huge financial expense to 
taxpayers and school 
parents. 

Somehow, providing at- 
home tutoring for those 
expelled doesn't deal with 
consequences faced by 
students who bring guns or 
knives to school. Is at- 
home tutoring a 
punishment or reward and 
why should students 
segregated fi'om the whole 
student body be provided 
such individual tutoring 
services? 

Personally, schools 
should not become penal 
colonies and denying 



students and parents 
access to the city's pubUc 
schools isn't going to solve 
the problem of violence or 
correcting those young 
folks. 

Students considered 
trouble-makers are still 
students, still part of the 
future generation. We need 
to get them back on track 
and part of the learning 
process again. The school 
system should not allow 
anyone to rot. All must 
know that swift and fair 
punishment will be given 
all who break the rules but 
this "throw away the key" 
attitude toward Quincy's 
public school pupils in die 
long run will cost more. 

Students caught with 
weapons on school 
property can not go 
unchallenged but we 
shouldn't close the door on 
their educational future 
because if we do, what has 
anyone gained? Everyone 
concerned is lesser for it. 

Don't call me a 
bleeding heart, I voted for 
Nixon over McGovera, 
Reagan over Mondale, etc. 
But sometimes officials 
have to see beyond the 
immediate and the 
consequences of their own 
actions too. 

Weapons of any sort 
hardly belong in out city 
schools, but whatever 
happened to common 
sense from our school , 
administrators and elected 
officials? 

Sal Giarratani 
184 Atlantic St. 



Father Grateful 

For Concern 
Over FR Bridge 



(The following letter 
was submitted to The 
Quincy Sun for 
publication). 

To the people of the 
Quincy and the South 
Shore: 

I wish to say thank you 
for your help and concern 
to make the Fore River 
Bridge safe for our 
children in the future. 
Although they (the state) 
have done some of the 
things they had promised 
to do they have not yet 
finished the job. And until 
they do I will never be 
satisfied nor will my son 
rest in peace. 

To all the South Shore I 
say thank you from the 
bottom of my heart 
because of you the hate is 
begirming to subside. 

So I make this promise 



to you ana too my son and 
his memory I will do my 
best to make the City of 
Quincy and the Fore River 
Bridge as safe as possible. 
I would like to also say 
thank you to Ted 
DeCristofaro for all his 
help in this fight for safety. 
I am very proud to say I 
have found a politician 
who is concerned and 
fights hard for us in the 
City of Quincy; a man, I 
beUeve, who is honest and 
caring. 

I am so very proud that 
I had the chance to vote 
for a man like him. It's a 
shame that there are not 
more like him that could 
be put in office. Thank 
you Ted and God bless 
you. 

Joseph Smith 

Quincy Point 



Morrissey To Meet 
With Constituents Jan. 29 



Rep. Michael Morrissey 
(D-Quincy) will discuss 
any concerns with 
constituents Wednesday, 
Jan. 29 from 7 to 8 p.m. at 
the Beechwood Life 



Community Center, 225 
Fenno St., Wollaston. 

Morrissey said the time 
would particular good to 
talk over recession-related 
problems. 



Page 6 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 16, 1992 




Marie's 
Kitchen 



Bx MVKII .1. DOI IMI'IO 



Hearty Soups 

Lentil, Green Pea 



This past week our family enjoyed 
two kinds of hearty soups, lentil and 
pea soups. Both have almost the same 
ingredients added except the pea soup 
usually requires a ham bone. Here are 
the recipes for both. 

LENTIL SOUP 

1 Package of lentils 

2 bouillon cubes (or soup stock) 
1 small onion (chopped) 

1 garlic clove (minced) 
1 celery stalk (chopped) 
salt and pepper to taste 
1 cup tomato sauce (optional) 
grated cheese 

Wash lentils and cook according to 
directions. Add all the other ingredients 
aiKl bring to a boil and simmer covered 
for at least an hour and a half. Serve 
with sprinkled grated cheese if desired. 
When my mother used to serve it, she 
jsed pieces of hard bread and then we 
soured the lentil soup over that and 



added the grated cheese. But this soup 
is delicious eaten plain also. 

GREEN PEA SOUP 
about a quart and a half of water 
leftover ham bone 
1 package dried green peas 
stalk of celery (chopped) 

1 onion (chopped) 

salt and pepper to taste 

2 bouillon cubes (optional) 

an extra can of peas (also optional) 

In a large pan, bring all the 
ingredients to a boil, cover and simmer 
for at least two hours or until peas are 
softened. Add the extra can of peas if 
desired. Remove the ham from the bone 
and add it to the soup. If you want a 
thicker soup, add a couple of 
tablespoons of flour or dried instant 
mashed potatoes. Both soups can be 
made ahead of time and stored in the 
refrigerator for several days. 



QCA Meeting, Flea Market 
Silent Auction Jan. 22 



The Quincy Citizens 
Association will meet 
Wednesday, Jan. 22 at 8 
pm. at the Atlantic 
Neighborhood Center, 
Hunt St., at the rear of 
North Quincy High School. 

At the meeting, a mini 
flea market-silent auction 
will be held. Members are 
encouraged to donate any 



items valued at $1 and up. 
Items will be placed on a 
long table with blocks of 
paper and pens 
interspersed among them. 
Members and friends may 
bid on the items by writing 
their price down and 
placing it under the article. 
Proceeds will benefit 
the Joe Brett--QCA 



scholarship fund. 

Association officers 
also remind members that 
during 1992, QCA monthly 
meetings will be held on 
the fourth Wednesday of 
every month, unless 
advised otherwise (spring 
dinner and annual 
meeting-Christmas party.) 



•Quilt In A Day' Class At HN Community Center 



A "Learn to Make a 
Quilt in a Day" class will 
be held Sunday, Feb. 23 at 
Houghs Neck Community 
Center from 8 a.m. to 5 
p.m. 

Beginners through 
experts may choose from 
several different quilt 
patterns. 

A free cutting class will 



be held Sunday, Feb. 16 at 
7 p.m. 

Class size is limited 



and early registration is 
encouraged. For details 
caU 479-7507. 

Workout Class Starts At YMCA 

The South Shore workout including running 

or cycling and cahsthenic 
exercise. 



YMCA will offer a "Y's 
Workout" class beginning 
Monday, Jan. 27 at 6:15 
p.m. or 7 a.m. 

This is a 60-minute 



Registration begins 
tomorrow (Friday). 



Ward 2 Civic Association 
Installs New Officers 




WARD 2 CrVIC Association recently installed new ofFicers at the Fore River Clubhouse. 
Front row, from left, Jim Lyons, Pauline Sweeney, Phyllis Bagen, Zaida Shaw, Isabel 
Brugge and Bob Allison. Back, Bill Chiasson, Dennis Sweeney, Robert LaFleur, past 

president; Michael Marshall, president; Owen Eaton, Ted DeCristofaro and Ron 
Mariano. 




ROBERT MOOD, center, a member of the Ward 2 Civic Association, was presented the 
Unity Award from Association OfHcer Ted DeCristofaro, left for his service to the 
CDmmunity and a commendation upon his retirement from the Naval Reserve from Past 
President Robert LaFleur. 

(Quincy Sun photos by Tom Gorman) 



Quincy Visiting Nurse Assn. 
Hospice Recruiting Volunteers 




The Hospice of the Association, Inc. is 
Quincy Visiting Nurse recruiting applicants for its 
_^_^^____^^____ eight-week volunteer 

training program beginning 
Feb. 10 at the Adams 
Building, 1354 Hancock 
St., Quincy, from 10 a.m. 
to 1 p.m. 




FLORISTS 



|STYUSH120-SEATEf 

06COVEBB)NEAR 

MARMABAY. 

THOUOITTDBE 

AMaiAT 

The $«refj out 

t functkxi room «t Amelia's 
I has become one of Boston's 
I most popular spots lor vued 
dir.gs, shoucrs, corporate 
I meetvtss. and get togethers 
of aU kiTMJs We feature an 
I extensive menu at affordable | 

prices \Wi> oueilook Mvma 

I Bay and the Boston skyline 

Wed like to make your next 

function really fly 

I PkasccaI161747U453. 



A ME 



05 Vetory M. No Quincy, 1^1 



Flowers by Helen 



367 BILLINGS ROAD 

WOLLASTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02170 

Flowers For All Occasions 

Specializing in Weddings 

471-3772 

Certified Weddmq Consultants 






hJONEYMOON 
SPECIALISTS 



Volunteer 
responsibilities include 
befriending and providing 
emotional support for 
terminally ill patients and 
their families. For more 
information, contact 472- 
2828. 



Bonnie Seely Guest Speaker 
At Quincy Nursing Home 



Quint's 
Florists 

761 So. Artery 
Quincy 

773-7620 



MUSIC 







PHOTOGRAPHER 



Photography ^ 

679 Hancock Street. Quincy 

(Wollaston) 

479-688a 



BAKERY 



O'BRIEN'S 
BAKERIES 

9 Beale Street 
Wollaston 
472-4027 



Pharmacist Bonnie 
Seely will discuss 
prescription and over-the- 
counter drugs, Wednesday, 
Jan. 22 at 7:30 p.m., at 

Quincy Nursing Home, 1 1 
McGrath Highway. 

Sav* Gat and Monay 
Shop Locally 



Topics include side 
effects, precautions, action 
in the body, correct way of 

taking medications, colds 
and coughs, and overall 
do's and don'ts. The 
program will be a question 
and answer format. 

For reservations call 
479-2820. The program is 
free to the public and 
coffee and pastry will be 
served. 



JEWELRY 



CetOl50n Rne Jewelry 

Quality and Integrity a Tradition 
The Coletti Family Al - Dave - Mark 
730 HANCOCK ST., WOLLASTON 02170 786-7942 




"Rockin' into the 90's" 

D.J. STEVE KAVANAGH 
Music for all Occasions 



"Music for people who 

take their fun seriously.^' 

773-4936 



Thursday, January 16, 1992 Quincy Sun Page 7 



'Where's The Beef?' Topic 
Of Wollaston Mothers' Club 



Social 



The Wollaston Mothers' 
Club will be Thursday, 
Jan. 23 at the Wollaston 
Congregational Church, 
Lincoln and Winthrop 
Aves. 

Hostesses for the 11:30 
a.m. luncheon will be the 
Reception Committee, 
with Mrs. Pat Spring, 
chairwoman. 

"Where's the Beef' 
will b'' the program 



presented by Roxie's of 
Quincy. Members will be 
shown the various cuts of 
meat, and a meat cutting 
demonstration will take 
place, to be followed by a 
meat raffle. 

Members are reminded 
to bring their DOVE 
donations. 

New members are 
welcome. 

Babysitting is available. 



Robbie Burns Banquet 
At Point Congregational 



The sixth annual 
Robbie Bums Banquet will 
take place Saturday, Jan. 
18 at 6 p.m. in the social 
hall of the Quincy Point 
Congregational Church, 
Washington St. and 
Southern Artery. 

Tickets are $10 and can 
be purchased at the church 
and at the Senior Citizens' 
Center, 1000 Southern 
Artery. No tickets will be 
on sale at the door. 

The evening of 
entertainment will include 
a Processional led by Pipe 
Major Iain Massie of 
Edinburgh, Scotland; the 
"Ode to the Haggis;" and 
a Scottish dinner of 
haggis, roast beef and 
truffle. The "Ode to the 
Haggis" will be recited by 
Jim MacQuarrie. 

Entertainment and 
songs will be led by David 
Mcpherson and Bobbie 
Jack. Scottish dancing will 
be provided by Laura Scott 



and Jay Conet. Master of 
ceremonies will be Glenn 
McGhee, and the pastors 
are the Revs. Fred and 
Carol Atwood-Lyon. Chair 
of ticket sales is Carol 
McGhee. 

The banquet, which 
commemorates Poet 
Laureate Robert Burns' 
birthday, is one of several 
events of "Scottish 
Heritage Week" at the 
Quincy Point Church. The 
congregation will gather 
Sunday, Jan. 19 at 10 a.m. 
for worship and the 
traditional "Kirkin' o' the 
Tartans" ceremony. It will 
be followed by a 
"Ceilidgh" of Scottish 
delicacies in the social 
hall. 

For more information 
about these and other 
church activities, call 773- 
6424, Monday through 
Friday from 8 a.m. to 4 
pjn. 




CHRISTINE MULVEY and WILLIAM O'BRIEN 

(Miller Studio) 

Christine Mulvey Engaged 
To William J. O'Brien Jr. 



Jolanta Zych Selected For 
*Who's Who Among Students' 



Mr. and Mrs. John J. 
Mulvey of Quincy 
announce the engagement 
of their daughter, 
Christine, to William J. 
O'Brien Jr. He is the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. William J. 
O'Brien Sr. of Quincy. 

Miss O'Brien is a 
graduate of North Quincy 
High School and the 
Forsyth School of Dental 



Hygiene, iiihe is employed 
by the South Boston 
Dental Association. 

Mr. O'Brien is a 
graduate of Xaverian 
Brothers High School in 
Westwood and Norwich 
University. He is self- 
employed by Mattie & 
O'Brien Mechanical 
Contracting Corporation. 

A May wedding is 
plaimed. 



Jolanta Zych, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Tadeusz 
Zych of Quincy, has been 
selected for inclusion in 
the 1992 edition of "Who's 
Who Among Students in 
American Universities and 
Colleges," a publication 



listing the country's most 
outstanding campus 
leaders. 



South Shore YMCA 
Slimnastics Class 



IS 



Miss Zych 
completing her senior year 
at Babson College 
Wellesley. 



in 



Richard Brown On Dean's List 



Richard Brown of 
Quincy has been named to 
the Dean's List at Palmer 
College of Chiropractic, 
Davenport, Iowa. 

Brown is in the seventh 

WELCOME WAGON 
WANTS TO f^\ 
VISIT YOU l-'j 
WITH ^ 

GIFTS J>.'- 



trimester of a five year 
program leading to the 

doctor of chiropractic 
degree. 



The South Shore 
YMCA, 79 Coddington St., 
Quincy, will offer a 
Slimnastics class 
beginning Tuesday, Jan. 
28. 

This is an aerobic 
exercise class designed for 
the starter fitness level 
participant. The class has 
four parts: warm-up, 
beginner aerobic dance 



steps, toning exercises and 
stretching. 

Classes will be held 
Tuesday and Thursday 6 to 
7 p.m. Registration begins 
Friday, Jan. 17. 




ALLFREETOYOU 

If you've become engag- 
ed, are a now parent or 
moved. I'd like to call on 
you with gifts in my 
basket intormation and 
cards you can redeem 
for more gifts at local 
busmesses. Free to you 
and a helpful way to 
learn answers to your 
questions 

BARBARA MENDEZ 
479-K87 




Happy Birthday 
Mary 



► 




Bob, Katie, Liz & Ellen 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-3100 




TINA MARIE DiCARLI, this year's Cerebral Palsy poster 
child, is one of many who could benefit from money 
raised at the annual Cerebral Palsy Brunch Sunday from 
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Golden Lion Suite of the Sons of 
Italy Lodge, 120 Quarry St. 

Cerebral Palsy Brunch 
At Sons Of Italy Sunday 



The annual Cerebral 
Palsy Brunch will be held 
Sunday, Jan. 19 from 10 
a.m. to 3 p.m. in the 
Golden Lion Suite of the 
Sons of Italy Lodge, 120 
Quarry St. 



All proceeds from the 
event, which annually 
attracts from 300 to 500 
guests, will be donated to 
Massachusetts Cerebral 
Palsy. 

Donation is $5. 



Mr., Mrs. Kevin Kelly 
Parents Of Son 

Kevin and Gretchen Grandparents are Mrs. 
(Behm) Kelly of Virginia Behm and Mr. 
Wollaston recently and Mrs. Lawrence Kelly 
became 

the parents of a second and great grandparents are 
son, James Patrick. They Mrs. Carmel Kelly and Mr. 
also have a son Matthew, and Mrs. Peter Zoia, all of 
2 1/2. Quincy. 



LOVE IS ... a perfect wedding at the 
Golden Lion Suite 




fc) 



Sp««k to Rlla -- the'* our renUI igenl 
• peclalliing In complttc wedding 
package plana and all olhtr occaaloni 
The Golden Lion Sulle accomodalet up 
10 300. The Venetian Room up to 140 
guests. Give Rita a call lor an 
appointment lor your retervallon. New 
brochures are available 

(Air Conditioned) 

CAM. 

Quincy Sons of Italy Social C enter 

120 Quarry Street, Quincy. MA 02169 

SEWNIMBER is472-S900 



' 



n fui f^;« nn ru< f^n f^i« r^fl RA RA n^ RM ^A KM MM ^M n^ MM nn 



Winfield 
Gift Emporium 

After Christmas 
Clearance 

25%-50% OFF 
All Merchandise 



Hours: Tues-Sat. 10:00 am-5:00 pm 

Open Sunday 12-5 pm 

Closed Mondays 

853 Hancock St, Quincy 479-9784 




wy^^^y^yw^if^^^tr^^^^^^^^^K^*^'*^**^'^ *<>**< 



MONDAY SPECIAL 

WASH • CUT • BLOWDRY 

HERS '20 



00, V^5^ 

^ Long hair 

slightly higher 



TUES. & THURS. 
BLOW CUT SPECIAL 

I 11^7 I O Includes 



WEDNESDAY SPECIAL 
PERM SPECIAL ^ 

UNIPERM ^> 



GOLDWELL 
FOAM PERM 

All gpecials perlormed by one of Rusteli'i staff 



Includes Shampoo 



Long hair 
AQ slightly higher 
*'*' Complete 



Russell Edward's 



Complete 
slightly higher Nail Tipping and Overlay S60 
for longer hair Sculptured Nails S60 

ff Pedicures S25 

"Body and Facial Waxing Available" 



OPEN 9-5 DAILY AND WED & THURS EVENINGS 

Corner Hancock, Chestnut Sts, 1 Maple St., Quincy 472-1060 



Page 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 16, 1992 



Arts/Entertainment 



Broadway Musical 
Review At ENC 



"Grand Central 
Broadway," an original 
musical review, will be 
presented by Eastern 
Nazarene College's 
Communications Arts 
Department Jan. 23-25 in 
the college's Cove Fine 
Arts Center. 

The nostalgic musical 
review will emphasize 
"the importance of finding 
and following the dreams 
and visions of the human 
heart," according to 
director Jennie Gorton, 
who is a senior 
communication arts major 
at ENC. 

This review will pay 
tribute to the 

aforementioned artform by 
presenting the history of 



musical theater through 
scenes from pivotal 
productions of various eras. 
This review will feature 
selections from 

"Oklahoma," "Les 
Miserables," "Phantom of 
the Opera," "Miss 
Saigon," "Show Boat," 
"West Side Story," and 
"Evita." 

"Grand Central 
Broadway," is scheduled 
for Thursday, Friday and 
Saturday, Jan. 24-26, at 7 
p.m. Tickets are $5. 

For tickets or 
information write Grand 
Central Broadway, Eastern 
Nazarene College, 23 East 
Elm Ave., Quincy, MA, 
02170, or call the ENC 
box office at 773-6350 ext. 
262. 




*Learn To Be Lean* 
At South Shore YMCA 




The South Shore 
YMCA, 79 Coddington St., 
Quincy, is offering a 
"Learn to be Lean" 
exercise class for 
individuals who would like 



to lose weight and improve 
their fitness level. 

Class begins Tuesday, 
Jan. 28 at 7 p.m. 
Registration begins Friday, 
Jan. 17. 



GROUP ICE SKATING classes are held at the Shea MDC 
rink in West Quincy for children and adults. Professional 
instructor Gail Wilson, shown here, who teaches 
beginner and intermediate classes for skaters using 
either figure or hockey skates. Weekday, evening and 
weekend classes are available and begin mid-January. 
For registration information call the Bay State Ice 
Skating School, 965-4460. 




RESTAURANT 

Weymouth Landing 



Is pleased to announce we're now open 

THURSDAY • FRIDAY • SATURDAY 

NIGHTS 
6:00aiii-3:30pm»Reopens ll:00pm-morn. 



J 



33 Washington Street - Weymouth Landing 

337-3270 




214 Washington Street • Quincy, MA • 847-3940 



Pitcher of Beer 

(60 oz) 
& 

Cheese Pizza 
Only $5.95 

2 Person Minimum 
Mon-Friday after 4:00 
Saturday & Sunday 
All Day 



Cheese Pizza 
$1.00 

BBQ'd Wings 
$1,00 

Sunda} s Only 
12-9 

(Take Out Excluded) 



Formerly Brittany's 



Cribbage Club 
Elects Officers 

The Senior Citizen 
Cribbage Club recently 
elected officers. 

Irving Isaacson was re- 
elected President; 
Margaret Falco, Vice 
President; Herbert Morgan, 
Treasurer; Mildred Cole, 
ticket person; Margaret 
Cochrane, Sunshine Lady. 

The club welcomes 
people, age 60 and older, 
who enjoy cribbage. The 
club meets each Tuesday 
at noon at the Drop-In 
Center, 24 High School 
Ave. For information call 
Morgan, 773-1426. 



CINEMAS 

Quincy Fair Mall 
1/16-1/23 



HAND THAT ROCKS 
THE CRADLE-R 

11 -.40 - 2:10 - 4:30 - 7:30 • 10M . 



f PRINCE OF TIDES-r1 

12:15 -3.-00- 7:05 -8:50 



FREE JACK-R 

11^40-2:10-4:25-10:10 



FATHER OF 
THE BRIDE-PG 

1 1 :45 - 2«S - 4:30 • 7:20 - 0:50 

HOOK-PG 

12:10-3:15-7:00-9:50 



KUFFS-PG-13 

11^40- 2:10-4:35- 7:15- 9:50 



BUGSY-R 

12:10-3:10-7:00-0^ 



MY GIRL-PG 

U-M-2M-4:30 



CAPE FEAR-R 

7:10 -lOAO 



Bargain Matinees 

First Three Shows 

$3.75 

773-5700 



Soprano To Perform 

At First Parish 

Multi-Cultural Concert 



Soprano Anna Soranno 
will perform vocal music 
from the American Music 
Theater Sunday, Jan. 26 at 
3 p.m. in the United First 
Parish Church, "Church of 
the Presidents," as part of 
its multi-cultural series. 

Soranno is a member of 
the Scarborough Chamber 
Players and a popular 
soloist in New England. 
Her 1991-1992 season 
includes the "St. Nicholas 
Mass" with the Handel & 
Haydn Society, Mozart's 
"Mass in C" with the 
Newton Chorale Society, 
Mozart's "Dominican 
Vespers" with the Dedham 
Chorale Society, "The 
Creation" at Philips 
Academy Exeter, "St. 
John's Passion" at 
Boston's Trinity Church, 
and additional 

performances as resident 
soloist and various recitals. 

The 1991 winner of the 
National Association of 
Teachers of singing, she 
has also made compact 
disc recordings on the 
London Records label with 
the Trinity Church Choir 
and performed for National 
Public Radio and 
Television and Continental 
Cablevision both in the 
American composers and 
the performing artist series. 



Noted for her reputation 
in chamber music, oratorio 
and opera, Soranno will 
present a program on the 
lighter side. Accompanied 
by pianist Jeffrey Bunker, 
she will sing works by 
American composers 
Aaron Copland, Leonard 
Bernstein, Irving Berlin 
and Jerome Kern along 
with roots from Gilbert & 
Sullivan and currently 
popular shows by Kurt 
Weil, Steven Sondheim 
and Andrew Lloyd Weber. 

Soranno, a native of 
Oswego, N.Y. and graduate 
of the Crane School of 
Music in SUNY Potsdam, 
has a MM from the New 
England Conservatory of 
Music, where she has 
since taught voice in the 
Extension Division. She 
studied with Phillis Curtin 
and has performed at 
Tanglewood with the 
Opera Company of Boston 
in Bernstein's nationally 
televised 70th birthday 
celebration. Currently she 
is head of the voice 
department at Phillips 
Academy at Exeter, N.H. 

Tickets are $5, $3 for 
seniors and children under 
12, and can be bought at 
the door or by calling 328- 
0677. 



Germantown Children's 
Chorus AtBeechwood 



The Germantown 
Children's Chorus will join 
the children at Beechwood 
Community Life Center's 
After School Program for a 
"Talent Exchange" 
Thursday afternoon, Jan. 
16. 



WOLLASTON 
THEATRE 



14 Beale St. 773-4600 



Wed&Thurs Jan 15 & 16 

Danny DeVito & Gregory Peck 

•OTHER PEOPLE'S 

MONEY" (R) 

Humerous & Serious 

Eve's 7:00 Only 



Starts Fri Jan 17 

Al Pacino & Michelle Reiffer 
"FRANKIE & JOHNNY" (R) 

Adult Comedy Drama 

Fri & Sat 7;00&9;15 

Sun-Thurs 7:00 Only 

Mon & Tues Dollar Night 

ALL SEATS $3.00 



Kathy Hogan, teacher- 
coordinator of the 
Germantown Children's 
Chorus, will direct the 
children's "Song and 
Dance Revue." 

"We're looking forward 
to this talent-exchange 
between the two children's 
groups as a first in many 
all-city after school 
activities," said Louise 
Humphreys. Beechwood's 
After School Program 
Director. 

This week's exchange 
launches Beechvvood's 
"Project Outreach." 
Children will be 
encouraged to participate 
in after school enrichment 
offerings with students 
from all Quincy 
elementary schools and 
neighborhoods. 



Buccini*s/Mister Sub S 

62-64 Billings Rd., No. Quincy 02171 
328-9764 

COMBO SPECIALS 
Steak/Cheese $3.80 

Chicken Broiler $4.30 

Chicken Parmigiana $4.35 

Meat Ball $3.55 

Turkey Club $3.90 

Italian $3.25 

Tuna $3.50 

Includes: Small Sub or Syrian 

Medium Size Fountain Drink 

Small Size Boyd's Chips 
Store Hours: Mon-Fri 10-10 

•Sat. 10-8 'Sun 11 -8 



/ 






Thursday, January 16, 1992 Quincy Sun Page 9 



ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST CHURCH 

Invites you to cruise aboard the "FUN SHIP" 

CELEBRATION 

7 Nights, 8 Days 
Sailing from Miami Marcfi 28 to 

San Juan - St. Thomas - St. Maarten 

Sponsored by Rev. William McCarthy, Pastor 




Fly/Cruise Cost per person twin basis 
Inside Cabin, 2 Lower Beds, Riviera Deck, Private Facilities 

Regular Rate $1,499 Special Rate $1,099 

You Save $800 per cabin 

Leave Logan Airport Boston, Saturday, March 28, 9:00 am 

Sail from Miami Saturday, March 28, 4:00 pm 
Return Logan Airport Boston, Saturday, April 4, 5:00 pm 

Reservations DeadlineTFebrua^^ 



For More Information Call: 

Prime Travel 

472-3697 



Page 10 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 16, 1992 

'Why Change Is Possible' 
At Covenant Congregational 



Rev. Kirk Johnson, co- 
pastor with Rev. Kathleen 
Graves, will preach "Why 
Change Is Possible" at the 
10:45 a.m. worship service 
Sunday at Covenant 
Congregational Church, 
Whitwell and Granite Sts., 
Quincy. 

The choir, directed and 
accompanied on either 
piano or organ by Richard 
Smith, minister of music, 
will sing an introit and two 
anthems. Smith will also 
play an organ prelude, 
offertory and postlude. 

Sunday School, with 
classes for all ages, 
nursery through adult, will 
begin at 9:30 a.m. During 
the worship service, a 
nursery is available for 
children four and younger. 
For children up to age 12, 
there is junior church, led 
by Arlene Morse. 

Immediately following 
the worship service, coffee 
will be served in 



fellowship hall downstairs. 
Those attending the all 
church winter retreat will 
leave for Pilgrim Pines, 
N.H. Volunteers are 
needed to serve coffee. 

Activities for the week 
are: Ladies Aid annual 
meeting at 1:30 p.m. 
Wednesday; choir 
rehearsal at 7 p.m. 
Thursday; a council 
meeting at the church at 7 
p.m. Friday and the men's 
breakfast at 8:30 a.m. 
Saturday. 

Coming events include 
the annual business 
meeting of the 
congregation Jan. 26, 
where many important 
issues will be discussed. It 
will be preceded by a 
sandwich luncheon that 
will begin as soon as the 
worship service is over. 

For more information 
about any of the church's 
activities, call the church 
office at 479-5728. 



Family Renewal Series 
At St. Mary's 



RICH--Renewal In 
Christian Homes, a three- 
evening program dealing 
with family life, family 
issues, parenting 
challenges, etc., is being 
offered by St. Mary's 
Parish, 115 Crescent St., 
West Quincy. 

The program will be 
presented Thursday 
evenings, Jan. 23 and 30 



and Feb. 6 from 7:30-9:30 
p.m. in the Parish Hall. 

Dr. Leo Fahey, a 
clinical psychologist from 
the Family Guidance 
Center of the Archdiocese 
of Boston will be the 
featured speaker. 

The program is open to 
all parents, grandparents or 
parents to be. 

Healing Service At 
Sacred Heart Jan. 21 

Heart Church, North 
Quincy. 



A Liturgy and Healing 
Service with the Rev. 
Charles Flaherty, S.S.C, 
will be held Tuesday, Jan. 
21 at 7:30 p.m. at Sacred 



The service will be held 
in St. Joseph's Oratory. 



OPEN HOUSE 

St. Ann's School, Wollaston 
January 30, 1992 

Invest in your child's future for: 

• A private atmosphere of care, 
concern, and individual attention. 

• A quality education for every child 

• Moral development through 
Christian teachings 

St. Ann's Offers: 

• Reasonable class size 

• Modern science lab experience 
for grades K-8 

• Extracurricular activities: basket- 
ball, cheerleading, student 
council, choir, drama club, 
science club. 

• A safe and orderly environment 

• Free private tutoring on a regular 
weekly basis 

• A fully supervised and organized 
extended day program at a cost 
of $375 for the entire year 

• Spanish, computer, art, and 
physical education instruction 

• Very affordable rates payable 

monthly 
For more information Call 471-9071 



Religion 



'Kirkin' O' The Tartan' 
At Point Congregational 



In celebration of its 
Scottish heritage, the 
Quincy Point 

Congregational Church 
will gather its members, 
friends and visitors for 
"The Kirkin' o' the 
Tartan" ceremony Sunday 
at 10 a.m. 

All are invited to the 
service, especially those 
of Scottish descent. The 
church is located at 
Washington St. and 
Southern Artery. 

The service will include 
prayers in the Celtic 
tradition, the wearing or 
presentation of family 
tartans and the blessing. 
Pipe Major Iain Massie of 
Edinburgh, Scotland, will 
pipe the processional and 
recessional marches. Dr. 
Herman Weiss, church 
organist and choir director, 
will play and the Chancel 
Choir will sing. 

The Rev. Carol-Atwood 
Lyon will deliver the 
morning sermon titled 
"Transformations." The 
Rev. Fred Atwood-Lyon 
will serve at liturgist. 
Acolyte will be Michelle 
Hunter, a member of the 
1992 Confirmation class. 

All worshippers of 
Scottish descent are 
invited to wear their 
family or other tartan, to 



come forward during the 
procession led by Massie 
and to receive a Scottish 
blessing. 

Following the morning 
service, everyone is 
invited to enjoy the 
"Ceilidgh" of homemade 
Scottish delights, 
including shortbread, in 
the social hall. Tea and 
coffee will also be served. 
Church members and 
friends who are making the 
delicacies are reminded to 
bring them the church 
kitchen before the worship 
service. 

Child care is provided 
each Sunday during 
worship, enabling parents 
to worship with the 
congregation. Church 
School classes begin at 10 
a.m. for children up to 
grade nine. Infants, nursery 
and kindergarten children 
go to their classrooms at 
10 a.m.; all other children 
and young people gather 
first in the sanctuary for 
"Time With the Children" 
before attending class. 

Parents wishing to 
register their children and 
young people in the 
Church School can call 
773-6424, Monday through 
Friday, or ask for the 
superintendent on Sunday 
mornings. 



Family Sunday At 
Bethany Congregational 



The Rev. Roger 
Ketcham will preach at 
the 10 a.m Sunday worship 
service on the topic "Faith 
Is A Laughing Matter" at 
Bethany Congregational 
Church, Spear and 
Coddington Sts., Quincy. 

It will also be Family 
Sunday with children of 
the Church School in 
attendance during the first 
part of the service. 

A Baptism service will 
be conducted for two 
infants, Zachary William 
Cosgrove and Derek Bates 
Reardon. Music will 
feature selections by the 
Chancel Choir directed by 
Gregory Flynn, organist 
and choir director. 

Scripture reader will be 



HOUGHS NECK 

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

310 Manet Ave 

Worship 9am • 10:30 am 

Sunday School 

8:30 am & 10:00 am 

Dr. Peter V. Corea 

Rev. M. Alicia Corea 

"Every Sunday la 

Walcome Sunday" 

479-2855 



Janette Archer. Greeting 
the worshipers will be 
Doris Allen and Dorothy 
Mersereau. Hosting the 
fellowship hour in the 
Allen Parlor at the 
conclusion of the worship 
service will be Russell and 
Olive Hodgkins and Robert 
and Diane Delvecho. 

Rev. Ketcham will 
direct the weekly Bible 
study in Room 3 of the 
parish house at 8:30 a.m. 
Sunday. Child care for 
infants and toddlers is 
provided during both hours. 
Bethany Church is 
accessible to the 
physically handicapped 
via a ramp on the Spear 
St. side of the sanctuary. 

Bethany Church offers a 
Dial-A-Prayer service to 
the community 24 hours a 
day at 773-4500. 



(^United Way 



The Covenant Congregational Church 



315 Whitwell Street. Quincy 



Invites YOU to worship 
with them e.tch Sunday 



Morning Worship 

10:45 a.m. 

Rev. Kathleen J. Graves 

Rev. Kirk E. Johi.son 

Pastors 




'Do What He Tells You' 

Sermon Topic At 
Quincy United Methodist 



Human Relations Day 
will be celebrated Sunday 
at the 10 a.m. worship 
service at Quincy 
Community United 
Methodist Church, 40 
Beale St., Wollaston. 

Rev. Harry Soper Jr.'s 
sermon topic will be "Do 
What He Tells You." A 
special offering will 
support the United 
Methodist Voluntary 
Service Program and 
Youth Offenders Rehab 
Program. 

Greeters will be MiUie 
McHugh and Edna 
Wentworth. Ushers will be 
Bud and Julia Milham. 
Hostesses at the fellowship 
hour will be Liz Bucella, 



Paula Mulrey, Barbara 
Fielding and Irene Loerger. 
Scripture reader will be 
Janet McGonigle. 

Events for the week 
include: a junior high 
youth fellowship at 6 p.m. 
and a South Shore Cluster 
meeting at 7:30 p.m. at the 
Weymouth United 
Methodist Church Sunday. 
Open recreation in the 
church gym continues at 7 
p.m. Monday. The 
Christian Serenity Group 
meets at 7 p.m. and the 
Inter-Church Faith Council 
at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. The 
senior high meets youth 
fellowship meets with 
Derek Schmitt at 7 p.m. 
Wednesday. 



First Presbyterian Church 
Robert Burns Night Jan. 25 



First Presbyterian 
Church, 270 FrankUn St., 
Quincy, will hold a Robert 
Bums Night Saturday, Jan. 
25 at 6 p.m. 

Proceeds from the 
event, which features 
Scottish food and 
entertainment, will help 
meet the needs of the 
hungry and homeless on 
the South Shore. 

A Scottish roast beef 
dinner with haggis. 



shortbread and trifle will 
be followed by a two-hour 
concert of Scottish music, 
poetry and dance. Tickets 
are $12 for aduhs and $6 
for children age 12 and 
under. 

Tickets are available by 
calling Robert and Jean 
Jack at 472-3713 or Scolty 
and Barbara Waters at 
773-4106 or call the 
church at 773-5575 or 
reservations. 



'Where Do We Go From Here?' 
Sermon Topic At 
First Parish Unitarian 



This Sunday Dr. 
Sheldon W. Bennett, 
minister, will give the 
sermon "Where Do We Go 
From Here?" during the 
10:30 a.m. worship service 
' at United First Parish 
Church (Unitarian 
Universalist). 

The choir, directed by 
Norman Corey, will sing, 
and Mr. Corey will 
accompany on organ. 

Visitors are welcome 
and are invited to the 
social hour following the 
service. Mike Araujo and 
Tara Hastings will host the 
social hour. Phil Curtis and 



Matt Malloy will usher. 

The women's group and 
the men's group will meet 
at noon following the 
social hour. 

The city celebration for 
Martin Luther King Jr. will 
be at 3:30 p.m. at the 
church. 

Historic First Parish, 
"Church of the 
Presidents," is located at 
1306 Hancock St. in 
Quincy Center, opposite 
City Hall. Church School 
and child care are 
provided (Brenda Chin, 
director). For more 
information call 773-1290. 



Rummage Sale Saturday 
At Quincy United Methodist 



A rummage sale will be 
held Saturday from 9 a.m. 
to 2 p.m. at the Quincy 
Community United 
Methodist Church, 40 



Beale St. 

A special feature will 
be an "All You Can Get in 
a Bag for $2" sale. 



Blood Drives In February 



The American Red 
Cross will conduct three 
blood drives in Quincy 
during February. 

Dates and locations are: 

•Tuesday, Feb. 4, 9 a.m. 

to 2 p.m., Quincy College 

at Bethany Congregational 

'Church. 18 Spear St. 



•Monday, Feb. 10, 11 
a.m. to 5 p.m., Patriot 
Ledger, 400 Crown Colony 
Dr. 

•Monday, Feb. 24, 1 to 
7 p.m., Quincy Point 
Congregational Church, 
444 Washington St. 



Free Blood Pressure Screening 

Medical personnel will Quincy, Friday. Jan. 24 

conduct a free blood from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 
pressure screening test at 

the Super Stop & Shop, No appointment is 

141 Newport Ave., North necessary. 



Thursday, January 16, 1992 Quincy Sua Page II 



At St. John's Church 



Fr. William McCarthy Celebrates 40th Anniversary 





FATHER BELL -- Rev. WiUiam McCarthy, pastor, thanks 
the overflow crowd that turned out Sunday to honor him 
at 40th orduation anniversan' Mass at St. John's. 



HELPING TO CELEBRATE the 40th anniversary of the 
ordination of Rev. William McCarthy, pastor of St. John's 
Church at a special Mass Sunday were (seated) South 
Reeion Bishop Daniel Hart and North Region Bishop 
John Mulcahy, and (clockwise) Rev. Daniel Graham, 
pastor St. Joseph's Church; who was the homilist; Rev. 
Francis Conroy, St. John's; Rev. Thomas Gates, St. 
Williams, Dorchester; Rev. Robert Beale, Our Lady's 
Hall, Milton; Deacon Charles Sullivan, St. John's; Rev. 
Richard Moran, St. John's; Fr. McCarthy, Very Rev. 



Cornelius Heary, pastor Sacred Heart, Quincy and 
Quincy Area Vicar; Deacon Joseph Papile, St. Thecla's, 
Pembroke; Rev. Peter Quinn, St. John's; Rev. Ted 
Fortler, Quincy Hospital chaplain in residence at St. 
John's; Fr. James Braley, Secretary to Bishop Mulcahy 
and Rev. William Walsh, former Quincy Hospital 
chaplain now pastor of St. Peter's, Cambridge. Also 
attending was Rev. John McMahon, retired Pastor, St. 
Mary's, Quincy. 

(John Noonan Photos) 




FAMILY MEMBERS WITH Fr. William McCarthy at his 40th ordination anniversary 
are (front), nieces Judy Perrone , Lucie Perrone and his sister, Mary Perrone. At rear 
are nephews John and William Perrone. 



GRAND NIECES AND grand nephews attending were (front) Danielle Perrone and John 
Perrone, Jr., and (from left) Kim Tessier, Christopher Perrone, Melissa Perrone and 
Cherie Tessier with the guest of honor. 




FR. DANIEL GRAHAM, pastor, St. Joseph's Church, 
Quincy, pays special tribute to Fr. William McCarthy, 
his long-time friend, as homilist at the latter's 40th 
ordination Mass. 



GRAND NIECE Mellisa Perrone receives communion 
from Fr. William McCarthy. 



CITY COUNCIL PRESIDENT Charles Phelan presents a 
citation to Fr. William McCarthy. 




PARISHIONERS Marguerite and Elmer Behenna 
congratulate Fr. William McCarthy at a reception 
following the anniversary Mass. 



ACTING SCHOOL Supt. Eugene Creedon and his wife, 
Kathy, St. John's parishioners, offer their congratulations 
to Fr. William McCarthy at reception. 



ROSEMARY AND ARCHIE Wahlberg, who are 
celebrating their 40th wedding anniversary, congratulate 
Fr. William McCarthy on the 40th anniversary of his 
ordination. 



Page 12 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 16, 1992 



Anna C. Anderson-Cleary, 92 

Former Dietitian At Quincy Hospital 



A funeral service for 
Anna C. (Peterson) 
Anderson- Cleary, 92, of 
Quincy, was held Jan. 10 
at the Hamel, Wickens 
and Troupe Funeral Home, 
26 Adams St. 

Mrs. Cleary died Jan. 8 
at home. 

She retired in 1965 after 
working for 17 years as a 
dietitian at Quincy 
Hospital. She was 
previously employed at the 
Waltham Watch Co. and 
at the Squantum Airbase 
during World War II. 



A lifelong resident of 
Quincy, she was a member 
of the Viking Qub and the 
Fifth Lutheran Church. 

Wife of the late Axel 
Anderson, she is survived 
by a stepdaughter, Harriet 
Ainderson of Duxbury; and 
a cousin. Baron Hugo Lira 
of Miltoa 

Burial was in Mt. 
WoUaston Cemetery. 

Donations may be made 
to the Memorial Fund, 
1000 Southern Artery, 
Quincy, MA 02169. 



Charles F. MacDonald, 76 

Worked For Bethelem Steel Co. 



A funeral Mass for 
Charles F. MacDonald, 76, 
of Quincy, was celebrated 
Monday in Sacred Heart 
Church. 

Mr. MacDonald died 
Jan. 9 at Carney Hospital 
in Boston after a. long 
illness. 

He was a retired welder 
and shipfitter for 
Bethlehem Steel Co. in 
East Boston. 

He was born and 
educated in Lowell before 
moving to Quincy 15 years 
ago. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Edith L. (Iseman) 
MacDonald; two sons, 
Michael MacDonald and 
James MacDonald, both of 



Quincy; seven daughters, 
Edith O'Neil of Boston, 
Patricia MacDonald of 
New York, Helen Meegan 
of Braintree, Ahce Dugas 
of Attleboro, Theresa 
Mayo of Dorchester, and 
Charlene Provost and 
Sandra Thomas, both of 
South Boston; a sister, 
Gertrude Grieco of 
Methuen; 23 grandchildren 
and nine great- 
grandchildren. He was also 
the father of the late 
Charles F. MacDonald Jr. 

Burial was in 
Knollwood Memorial Park, 
Canton. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Bolea- 
Buonfiglio Funeral Home, 
116 Franklin St. 




A THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK 



There is an old Dutch 
proverb which statea, "an 
ounce of patience is worth 
a pound of brains." 

D Scott Deware 

To do swifliy what seems to need doing is 
good because this is a part of the business of 
survival. But to act too swiftly, without even 
an instant's reflection, is not good. The lower 
animals act swiftly; they do not meditate. 
Sometimes they survive, but often they hurl 
themselves into traps. 

If we claim to be higher animals, we must 
practice a little reasoning, a little reflection, 
for these are said to be virtues which set us 
above other animals. II Is good to remember 
the statement that has come down to us from 
an ancient Chinese sage: "One moment of 
patience may ward off great disaster, one 
moment of impatience may ruin a whole life." 

Deware Funeral Home 

576 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 

472-1137 

Member of the "New England Funeral Trust" 

and your Suburban Boston Pre- Need 

funeral specialist 

Serving All Religious Faiths 

Services Rendered To Any Distance 



Obituaries 



John J. Mantia, 84 

Locksmith; Owned Variety Store 

A funeral Mass for John Margaret A. O'Brien of 

Cohasset; a brother, 



J. Mantia, 84, of Quincy, 
was celebrated today 
(Thursday) at 10 a.m. at 
St. Joseph's Church, 
Quincy Point. 

Mr. Mantia died Jan. 12 
at Carney Hospital in 
Boston after a brief illness. 

He was a locksmith for 
40 years and retired four 
years ago. He was also co- 
owner, with his wife, of 
the former Mantia's 
Variety Store in Quincy 
which they owned for 
many years. 

He was a lifelong 
resident of Quincy. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Mildred F. (Hines) 
Mantia; a daughter. 



a 

Anthony Mantia of 
Quincy; a sister, Catherine 
Saltalamacchia of Quincy; 
and many nieces and 
nephews. 

Burial was in Mt. 
WoUaston Cemetery. 

Visiting hours were 
scheduled for yesterday 
(Wednesday) from 2 to 4 
p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. at the 
Sweeney Brothers Home 
for Funerals, 1 
Independence Ave. 

Donations may be made 
to the building fund of St. 
Joseph's Church, 556 
Washington St., Quincy, 
MA 02169. 



Barbara Frazer, 71 



A memorial service for 
Barbara (Lyman) Frazer, 
71, of Squantum, was held 
Jan. 11 at WoUaston 
Congregational Church. 

Mrs. Frazer died Jan. 6 
at home after a long 
illness. 

She was current 
president of the Seaside 
Gardener of Squantum and 
past president of the 
Squantum Women's Club. 

She lived in Squantum 
for 50 years and was a 
member of WoUaston 
Congregational Church. 

A former member of the 
First Church of Squantum, 
she had been a deaconess 
and moderator for that 
church and served on 
several committees. 

She was the chief den 
mother of the Cub Scout 
pack sponsored by First 
Church of Squantum for 12 
years. 

She was a former 
member of the North 



<f 



American Heart 
Association 



Quincy High School Band 
Parents Association. 

Bom in Boston, she was 
a 1938 graduate of North 
Quincy High School and 
attended the Bryant and 
Stratton School in Boston. 

She worked at the Stale 
Street Trust Co. until 1944. 

She is survived by her 
husband, Donald Wilson 
Frazer; two sons, Paul 
Frazer of Squantum and 
Robert Frazier of 
Weymouth; a daughter, 
Karenann Fantucchio of 
Whitman; a sister, Muriel 
Burnhauser of Rockland; 
three grandchildren and 
several nieces and 
nephews. 

A private burial service 
was held at the 
Massachusetts National 
Cemetery in Bourne. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Deware 
Funeral Home, 576 
Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to the WoUaston 
Congregational Church, 
Winthrop Ave., Quincy, 
MA 02170 or the Hospice 
of Quincy Visiting Nurse 
Association, 1354 
Hancock St., Quincy, MA 
02169. 



MONUMENTS 


QUINCY 
MEMORIALS Inc. 




Cemetery Lettering 






Cleaning 








Vases 








Vigil Lights 




18 WillardSt. 




Sculpturing 
Rose Quartz 




Quincy 02169 




Mausoleums 








Markers 




"On The Expressway" 




Colonial Tablets 
Stant Markers 




Exit 9 Near E. Milton Sq. 


J 


Bronze Markers 


L 




|617-471-0250| 


Free Illustrated Catalog 
Budget Tenns Available 



George P. Mathieson, 72 

Retired Truck Mechanic 



A funeral service for 
George P. Mathieson, 72, 
of Quincy, was conducted 
Jan. 11 at the Deware 
Funeral Home, 576 
Hancock St. Burial was in 
Pine Hill Cemetery. 

Mr. Mathieson died Jan. 
9 at home. 

He was a truck 
mechanic for Woodward 
Springs until retiring in 
1985. He previously 
worked as a mechanic for 
Whitings Milk Co. for 24 
years. 

Mr. Mathieson served 



with the Army during 
World War II. He was a 
member of the Town River 
Yacht Club. 

He was the husband of 
the late Dorothy M. 
(McKinnon) Mathieson. 
He is survived by a 
daughter, Karen Johnson of 
Maine; four sons, Peter 
Mathieson of Maine, 
George Mathieson of 
Carver, Charles Mathieson 
and Paul Mathieson, both 
of Brockton; a brother, 
James Mathieson of 
Quincy; and six 
grandchildren. 



Edward N. Wallace, 73 

Retired Land Court Engineer 



A funeral Mass for 
Edward N. "Bud" 
Wallace, 73, of Quincy, 
was celebrated today 
(Thursday) at St. Ann's 
Church, WoUaston. 

Mr. Wallace died Jan. 
11 at Carney Hospital in 
Boston after a long illness. 
He was a former Navy 
chief gunner and an 
engineer for Massachusetts 
Land Court for 35 years. 
He retired from the land 
court in 1986 and served 
nine years in the Navy and 
34 years in the Navy 
reserves before retiring in 
1978. 

He was a member of 
the NERA Fleet Reserve 
Organization and an at- 
large member of the 
Disabled American 
Veterans. 

He was a former 



director of the Yorktown 
Association. 

He was bom in Boston 
and was a graduate of the 
Franklin Institute of 
Technology in Boston. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Catherine (Slattery) 
Wallace; a sister, 
Dorothea Grant of 
Pocasset; and five 
nephews and nieces. 

Burial was in 
Massachusetts National 
Cemetery, Bourne. 

Visiting hours were 
scheduled for yesterday 
(Wednesday) from 2 to 4 
p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. at the 
Keohane Funeral Home, 
785 Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to the Hospice of the 
South Shore, 100 Bay 
State Drive, P.O. Box 334, 
Braintree, MA 02184. 



Joseph A. Pomarico, 75 

Retired Printer In Boston 



A funeral Mass for 
Joseph A. Pomarico, 75, of 
Quincy, was celebrated 
Monday in St. John's 
Church. 

Mr. Pomarico died Jan. 
9 at Quincy Hospital. 

He was a retired printer 
for T.O. Metcalf Printing 
Co. in Boston. 

Bom in Weymouth, he 
was a graduate of 
Weymouth Trade School. 
He moved to Quincy 45 
years ago. 

He served with the 
Army during World War 11 



and was a member of the 
Veterans of Foreign Wars 
and the Weymouth Sons of 
Italy. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Helen V. (Spadorcia) 
Pomarico; a daughter, 
Betty Ann Pomarico of 
Quincy; and two sisters, 
Lucy Pomarico and 
Filomena Dentino, both of 
Weymouth. 

Burial was in Mt. 
WoUaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Bolea- 
Buonfiglio Funeral Home, 
116 Franklin St. 




'IMtedW^ 

CF MASSACHUSETTS BAy 



CHRISTIAN DIOR • SOPHIA LOREN • JOAN COLLINS 



VUARNET • PIERRE CAHDIN 



Eyeglasses 

$25 Off 

Complete 



Jn OPTICAL & J 
• D« HEARING AIDS Jl 



1361-A Hancock St., Quincy Sq. ^ 
773-3505 • 773-4174 

^Air $499 

Complete 

30 Day Trial 2 Yr. Warranty 

4 

FREE VALIDATED PARKING 

1 YEAR WARRANTY 
ON ALL FRAMES 

MALSTON • AVANT GARDE • OSCAR DELA RENTA • YVES SAINT LAURENT • TURA 



Sweejtey JSroihers 

HOME FOR FUNERALS 

RICHARD T. SWEENEY, JR. 
JEFFREY F. SWEENEY 

1 INDEPENDENCE AVENUE • QUINCY, MASS. 

472-6344 



1 



=M= 



Albert C. McWhinnie, 81 

A funeral Mass for toQuincy. 



Helen V. Mottla, 84 



Albert C. McWhinnie, 81, 
of Quincy, was celebrated 
Jan. 10 at Sacred Heart 
Church. 

Mr. McWhinnie died 
Jan. 7 at home after a long 
illness. 

He was a member of 
the Teamsters Union Local 
829 and a boiler maker at 
the Fore River shipyard. 
He was a truck driver and 
union member for 48 years 
and formerly was a driver 
for the Milton Cab Co. and 
a boilermaker for the 
Boston & Maine Railroad. 

He was a member of 
the Quincy Elks Lodge and 
a former member of the 
Holy Name Society at St. 
Mary's Church. 

He was born in Nova 
Scotia and lived in 
Dorchester before moving 



Husband of the late 
Mary L. (Cain) 
McWiiinnie and LiUian G. 
(Spillane) McWhinnie, he 
is survived by a son, John 
A. McWhinnie of Athol; a 
daughter, Jane Novy of 
Holbrook; two brothers, 
Woodrow McWhinnie; 
four sisters, Marjorie 
McCarthy, Julia Simpson, 
Dorothy McGee, and 
Mildred Lablanc; six 
grandchildren and a great- 
grandchild. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keobane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St., WoUaston. 

Donations may be made 
to Boston Catholic 
Television Center, 55 
Chapel St., Box 56. 
Newton, MA 02160. 



Charles F. MacDonald, 76 

A funeral Mass for wife, Edith L. (Iseman) 

Charles F. MacDonald, 76, MacDonald; two sons, 

of North Quincy, was Michael MacDonald and 

celebrated Monday in James MacDonald, both of 

Sacred Heart Church. Quincy; seven daughters. 

Burial was in Knollwood Edith O'Neil of Boston, 

Memorial Park, Canton. Patricia MacDonald of 

Mr. MacDonald died New York, Helen Meegan 

Jan. 9 at Carney Hospital, of Braintree, Alice Dugas 

Dorchester, after a long of Attleboro, Theresa 

illness. Mayo of Dorchester, and 

He was a welder and Charlene Provost and 

shipfitter for Bethlehem Sandra Thomas, both of 

Steel Co. in East Boston South Boston; a sister, 

until retiring in 1977. Gertrude Grieco of 

Mr. MacDonald was Methuen; 23 grandchildren 
born in Lowell and and nine great- 
graduated from Catholic grandchildren, 
schools there. He lived in He was the father of the 
Dorchester before moving late Charles F. MacDonald 
to Quincy 15 years ago. Jr.. 

He was a Golden Funeral arrangements 

Gloves boxer as a were by the Bolea- 

youngster. Buonfiglio Funeral Home, 

He is survived by his 116 Franklin St. 



Karen West, 50 



A funeral Mass for 
Karen (Gambino) West, 
50, of Quincy, was 
celebrated Tuesday at St. 
Boniface Church. Burial 
was • in Massachusetts 
National Cemetery, 
Bourne. 

Mrs. West died Jan. 10 
at New England Medical 
Center, Boston, after a 
long illness. 

She was bom in San 
Francisco and lived in 
Dorchester before moving 



to Quincy 14 years ago. 

She is survived by her 
husband, Ronald T. West; 
a son, Joseph West of 
Quincy; four daughters, 
Corrine West, Karen 
West, Connie West and 
Shirley West, all of 
Quincy; her parents, 
Josephine (Brignolo) and 
Joseph A. Gambino of East 
Boston. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 



A Few Words on 
FUNERAL SERVICE 



Free literature 
on funerals 



1 



Mam n-Nidentsofourioninuinil) haxc 
round our litiniluri' hilplul in k-arniri^ 
inort' alxiul funerals and pri'-planniiiK. 
\\ h\ pre-plan a tuneral? Kirs), \ou can 
make deiisions and choices, yourwil. 
\\ ilh lull composure instead of during 
yriex iny and eniolional stress. Second. 
\ou need not "overspend." Nou should 
select onl\ that service, casket, and 
those touches which \ou feel are 
ini|>ortant. 

that helmed Scripture passable or 
s|H'cial h>nni. the minister whose 
tiiidersiandiiit: and compassion >ou so 
admire — all can he part of \our 
ser\ ice. 
(all or write lor \our tree cop\. 

Hamel. Wickens & Troupe 
Funeral Home, Inc. 

26 Adams Street • Quincy, MA 

Roger G. Hamel 617-472-5888 
Funeral Director 



FUNERAL PRE-NEED SPECIALISTS 



A funeral Mass for 
Helen V. Mottla, 84, of 
Quincy, was celebrated 
Jan. 11 in St. John's 
Church. 

Miss Mottla died Jan. 7 
at home after a brief 
illness. 

A former telephone 
operator, she was retired 
from New England Bell 
and a member of the 



Telephone Pioneers of 
America. 

She leaves a nephew 
and a niece, Peter D. 
Mottla and Patricia 
Harlan, both of Wayland; 
two grandnieces and two 
grandnephews. 

Burial was in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Funeral Home, 74 Elm St. 



Thursday, January 16, 1992 Quincy Sun Page 13 

Albert V. Papile 

Navy Veteran Of Three Wars 



George P. Mathieson, 72 



A funeral service for 
George P. Matbieson, 72, 
of Quincy, was held Jan. 
11 at the Deware Funeral 
Home, 576 Hancock St. 

Mr. Mathieson died Jan. 
9 at home. 

He served with the 
Army during World War II 
and was a member of the 
Town River Yacht Club. 

Husband of the late 
Dorothy M. (McKinnon) 

Edith M. 

A funeral Mass for 
Edith M. Cellini of Quincy 
was celebrated Monday at 
St. John's Church. 

Mrs. Cellini died Jan. 9 
at Quincy Hospital after a 
long illness. 

She was bom in Rome, 
Italy. 

She is survived by two 
sons, Robert Cellini of 
Hull and Anthony P. 
Cellini of Chelmsford; 
three daughters. 

Marguerite Blue of 



Mathieson; he is survived 
by four sons, Peter 
Mathieson of Maine, 
George Mathieson of 
Carver, and Charles 
Mathieson and Paul 
Mathieson, both of 
Brockton; a daughter, 
Karen Johnson of Maine; a 
brother, James Mathieson 
of Quincy; and six 
grandchildren. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Cellini 

Florida, Carol Townshend 
of Cohasset and Marcella 
M. Cellini of Quincy; a 
sister, Marcella De 
Placido of Boston; 12 
grandchildren; and 14 
great-grandchildren. 
Burial was in 



A funeral Mass for 
Albert V. Papile of Las 
Vegas, Nev., formerly of 
Quincy, will be celebrated 
tomorrow (Friday) at 10 
a.m. in St. John's Church. 

Mr. Papile died Jan. 10 
in Las Vegas after a brief 
illness. 

A Navy veteran of three 
wars, he served in World 
War II, the Korean War 
and the Vietnam War. He 
retired in 1965 after 22 
years of service. 

He was an employee of 
the Hilton Hotel in Las 
Vegas for 20 years. He 
retired in 1987. 

He was born and 
educated in Quincy and 
lived in Nevada for 26 
years. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Marie (Petrunti) 
Papile; four sons, Edward 



Papile and Peter Papile, 
both of Las Vegas, and 
Paul Papile and Thomas 
Papile, both of California; 
a daughter, Louise Papile 
of Washington; seven 
brothers, Alphonzo "Pop" 
Papile, William J. Papile, 
John P. Papile, Leo Q. 
Papile, and James P. 
Papile, all of Quincy, 
Ralph J. Papile of 
Hingham and George W. 
Papile of North 
Weymouth; and four 
sisters, Mary C. Papile, 
Amelia V. Faherty and 
Helen Mariano, all of 
Quincy, and Gloria J. 
Kelly of North Weymouth. 

Burial will be in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Visiting hours are today 
(Thursday) from 2 to 4 
p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. at the 
Bolea-Buonfiglio Funeral 
Home, 116 Franklin St. 



Free Hearing Aid Screenings 
At North Quincy Stop & Shop 



Michael's 
Boston. 



St. 
Cemetery, 



Funeral arrangements 
are by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 



Sable Hearing Aid 
Service will conduct four 
free hearing aid screenings 
this month at the Super 
Stop & Shop, 141 Newport 
Ave., North Quincy. 

Screenings are 

scheduled for 10 a.m. to 
5:40 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 
16, Tuesday, Jan. 21, 
Wednesday, Jan. 22 and 
Thursday, Jan. 23. 



Screenings are 

available free to senior 
citizens and those over 
age 21. Participants 
should schedule an 
appointment for the exam 
at the service desk. 

Fill a prescription at the 
Stop & Shop Pharmacy 
day of the exam and 
receive a $5 store gift 
certificate. 



For those times 

when the 
darkness lingers 



With the loss of a loved one through death, it is helpful to be able to 
share the feelings and emotions which we all experience. 

y^m^^^-^jUS^ ^^'' "^^^^ of us. there are family members. 

' '^ -^ /MiAV clergy, and friends who are ready to listen in a 
caring way. 

Yet. there are those who find it helpful to 
share their grief with someone outside their 
immediate circle of support. 

Because of our continuing commitment to 
the families we serve. Keohane Funeral 
Service is pleased to announce that Dr. 
Sherry Johnson has joined our staff as a Grief 

Counselor. Her educational background, professional experience and 

understanding manner can be particularly helpful. 

We are the first funeral home in New England to offer the service of 
a Grief Counselor. 





^ohano funeral Service 



KEOIIANK FUNKRAI. IIOMK. INr. 

711) lUncnck Slrrd 

Quincy. MA 02170 

M7-77.1-.155I 



PYNE FUNERAL HOME. INC. 

21 EmeraU Street 

Minsham. MA 0204} 

6l7-74«-0)IO 



KEOHANE FUNERAL HOME, INC. 

Mi Hineock Street 

QMincy. MA 02171 

6I7-77J-JS5I 



Page 14 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 16, 1992 



Sun Sports 



Basketball 



Quincy Bounces Back 
With Two Wins 



The Quincy boys 
basketball team snapped a 
three-game losing streak 
with victories last week 
over Taunton and 
Plymouth to even its 
record at 4-4 (4-2 in the 
Old Colony League). 

The Presidents played 
at Silver Lake Tuesday, 
will host Barnstable Friday 
night and will be home to 
Falmouth next Tuesday 
night. 



Quincy unleashed its 
most explosive offense of 
the season to roll over 
Taunton, 93-58, last 
Friday, rolling up a huge 
35-16 halftime lead. 

Dave Jolley had his 
best game with 28 points 
and pulled down 12 
rebounds. 

Joey Crespi had 18 
points and Robbie Kane 
had nine points and seven 
steals. 



Earlier in the week the 
Presidents defeated 
Plymouth, 78-73. 

Crespi had his best 
game of the year scoring 
27 points. Junior guard 
Matt Dwyer scored 14 
points and Jolley had 12 
points and 12 rebounds as 
Quincy built up a 42-29 
halftime lead. 

Chris Luongo had 24 
points to lead the Blue 
Eagles. 



North Runs Into 
Double Trouble 



The North Quincy boys' 
basketball team, after 
winning five in a row 
following an opening day 
loss, had rough going last 
week, losing two out of 
three games to drop its 
record to 5-3 (3-2 in the 
Old Colony League). 

The Red Raiders faced 
Barnstable Tuesday night, 
will play at Falmouth 
Friday at 7 p.m. and will 
be home to Weymouth 
next Tuesday at 5 p.m. 

Last Friday North lost 
to Old Colony League 
favorite Bridgewater- 
Raynham, 75-64. 

Sean Donovan had 15 
points, Desmond Bellot 14 
and Bo Smith 12 for the 
Raiders. 

Earlier in the week the 
Raiders bowed to Silver 



Lake, 67-54, despite an 
outstanding game for 
Donovan, who had 25 
points. Luke Sheets had 
eight points for North. 

In their previous game 
the Raiders edged 
Taunton, 54-52, as Matt 
Flynn hit two free throws 
with 15 seconds left in the 
game. 

Taunton's Billy 
Cunningham scored a 
three-pointer with 30 
seconds left, tying the 
game at 52. Flynn was 



inbounds pass and hit the 
winning free throws. 

Bellot led North with 18 
points and Flynn finished 
up with 12. North led at 
the half, 22-19. 

"The Eastern Mass. 
Tournament is open to 
everyone this year, despite 
a team's record, but I am 
aiming to win at least 12 
games, the minimum 
number to qualify in the 
past," North coach Ted 
Stevenson said. "We just 
missed the past few years." 
.-TOM SULLIVAN 



fouled on the ensuing 

YMCA Volleyball Begins Jan. 27 



The South Shore 
YMCA will offer two coed 
volleyball programs 
beginning in January. 

Volleyball I will be for 
beginners on Wednesday 
nights and Volleyball II 



will be for advanced 
players on Monday nights 
from 8 to 10 p.m. 

The programs will begin 
Monday, Jan. 27. 
Registration will begin 
Jan. 17. 



Quality Printing 

at a 
Reasonable Price. 




VJe have computerized our 
typesetting department 



f^'"' " ' -^ ^ and we're expanding our 



printing division. 



We Specialize in: 
Program Books, Brochures, Newspapers, 
Newsletters, Political Flyers, Tickets, 
Stationery, Envelopes and Typesetting. 



^^-ti±xxc3ar 



1372 Hancock St., Quincy Square 

471-3100 




JOE MATOS. right, an employee with Foye and Letendre Landscaping «' Q-J'^J'' «"'* 
new sod around the pitcher's mound at Adams Field. The heavily udlized field is 
undergoing a $7,100 refurbishing project, its first in six years. ^„^ „ ,., 

•* * (Quincy Sun photo by Robert Bosworth) 



North Girls Lose 
To BR, 38-30 



The North Quincy girls' 
basketball team lost a 38- 
30 decision to 
Bridgewater-Raynham last 
Friday, dropping its record 
to 6-3. The North girls are 
4-1 in the Old Colony 
League. 

North Quincy played at 
Barnstable Tuesday, will 
host Falmouth Friday and 
will play at Weymouth 
next Tuesday at 5 p.m. 



Earlier last week North 
defeated Silver Lake, 43- 
32, after trailing, 17-15, at 
the half. 

Regina Murphy and 
Noreen McDonough each 
had four steals in the first 
four minutes of the second 
half when North took 
command. 

Cindy White had 15 
points and Tricia Hughes 
contributed 13. In their 
previous game the North 



girls topped Taunton, 42- 

37. 

Hughes had nine points 
and had nine assists, while 
Jenny White and 
McDonough combined for 
14 points and Murphy 
played strong defense. 
North trailed, 19-14, at the 
half but took the lead for 
good midway through the 
second half on a Hughes 
layup. 



Bellot On Football All-Scholastic Team 



Desmond Bellot of 
North Quincy High School 
has been named to the 
1991 Boston Globe All- 
Scholastic football team. 

Bellot, a senior, was 
the focal point of North 
Quincy's defense from his 



defensive back position, 
picking off eight 
interceptions and 
averaging 15 tackles per 
game. 

As a wide receiver on 
offense, he had 49 
receptions for 787 yards 



and five touchdowns. He 
has been an Old Colony 
League all-star selection 
at both positions. Bellot 
also plays basketball and 
runs track for the Red 
Raiders. He would like to 
study communications in 
college. 



Bowling 



Hart Rolls 142 In St. John's League 



Mike Hart rolled the 
season's high single of 142 
in St. John's Holy Name 
Bowling League action 
and Bud McAllister rolled 
the .season's second high 
single of 140. 

McAllister had the 
weekly high three of 341 
and Hart rolled 328. 

McAllister's team had 



the high team single of 
477 and John Grande's 
team had 383. McAllister 
also had the high team 
three of 1217 and Grande 
had 1094. 

McAllister's team leads 
the league with a 67-45 
record, followed by Karl 
Vonhartenstein's team at 
60-42. The rest of the 
standings: Joe Matarazzo, 



58-54; Aldo Saluti, 53-59; 
Grande, 53-59; Jim 
Mastrantonio, 45-67. 

The Top Ten: Bob 
Saluti, 103.9; Grande, 
102.67; Mastrantonio, 
100.8; Dave Nolan, 96.13; 
Hart, 96.12; Don Gilliland, 
95.71; Rich Warner, 93.69; 
Dan Dieso, 93.67; 
Matarazzo, 93.59; 
McAllister, 93.24. 



II SUBSCRIPTION FORM 

FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAIL TO 



^^xi.±xxcsr 



1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 



NAME 



STREET 
CITY _ 



STATE 



ZIP- 



CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 



L 



( ) 1 YEAR IN QUINCY 

( ) 1 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY 

( ) 1 YEAR OUT OF STATE 



$12.00 
$14.00 
$17.00 



( ) CHECK ENCLOSED 
( ) PLEASE BILL ME 



I 

J 



Thursday, Januarj 16, 1992 Quincy Sun Page 15 



Hockey 



North Skates By B-R, 5-3 



The North Quincy 
hockey team defeated 
Bridgewater-Raynham, 5- 
3, last Saturday to improve 
its record to 5-3 (3-2 in the 
Old Colony League). 

The Red Raiders faced 
Quincy last night 
(Wednesday), will host 
Plymouth Saturday at 8 
p.m. and will be home to 
Silver Lake next 
Wednesday night at 6:40. 

Dave Pacino scored 
North's first goal against 
Bridgewater-Raynham 
with Andrew Vermette and 



Matt Riley assisting. Sean 
Vermette scored the 
second goal with an assist 
for Jim Carinci and Jim 
Sapienza scored the next 
goal with Pacino getting 
the assist. 

Mike Christopherson 
scored the tie-breaking 
goal with Dave DesRoche 
and Riley assisting and 
Riley scored an insurance 
goal unassisted. 

Dennis Ruggere had an 
excellent game in goal for 
North. 

Earlier in the week 
North lost to Weymouth, 



4-2. 

Sapienza had a goal 
with Sean Vermette 
assisting and Vermette 
scored the second goal to 
tie the score at 2-2 but 
Weymouth then scored 
twice to clinch the win. 

Junior goalie Sean 
Conley had an outstanding 
game for North, making 
several sensational saves. 
Weymouth peppered him 
with shots in the opening 
period. 

"This is going to be a 
real dog fight for the 
league title," said North 
coach Tom Benson. 



"Anyone of several teams 
has a chance and it looks 
like everything will be 
one- and-two- goal games in 
the league. I expect we 
will be in every game but 
no one has really stepped 
forward yet to be the 
league's best. Offense has 
been a bit of a problem for 
us. I'm happy with the 
effort, but we still need to 
buy a few goals. Our 
defense is strong and 
Ruggere and Conley have 
been doing a fine job in 
goal." 

--TOM SULLIVAN 



Quincy Streak Snapped , 4-2 



The Quincy hockey 
team's five-game unbeaten 
streak (three ties, two 
wins) came to an end 
Saturday night when 
Weymouth scored all four 
goaJs in the second period 
to defeat the Presidents, 4- 
2. Quincy is 4-2-3 on the 
season (3-1-2 in the Old 
Colony League). 

Quincy faced North 
Quincy last night 



Swimming 



(Wednesday), will play at 
Barnstable Saturday at 
7:45 and will be at 
Plymouth next 

Wednesday. 

"The other" Scott 
MacPherson, not the 
team's high sc(ker, scored 
his second goal of the 
season to J^ut the 
Presidents ahead in the 
first period. Dave Mullen 
assisted. 



Scott MacPherson, the 
team's top scorer, scored 
his 13tb goal in the second 
period with Steve Miller 
assisting. MacPherson has 
13 goals and six assists for 
19 points. 

Steve MacPherson had 
a fine game in goal and 
had no chance to stop 
some of the Weymouth 
goals as the Wildcats got 
behind the Quincy defense. 



Earlier in the week 
Quincy defeated Silver 
Lake, 3-1, on goals by 
Miller, Jeff Craig and "the 
other" Scott MacPherson. 

High-scoring Scott 
MacPherson, Steve 
Provost, Dave Mullen and 
Jamie Schatzl had assists. 

MacPherson had 18 saves 
in goal. 

-TOM SULLIVAN 




MAYOR JAMES SHEETS and BUI MacMullen look 
over a scale model of the U.S.S. Lexington 
maritime museum and park which MacMullen 
designed for the city at his own expense. 
MacMullen used aerial photographs of the ship 
to construct the model. 
(Quincy Sun photo by Robert Bosworth) 



North Takes Taunton 



Julie Detwiler ENC 
Volleyball Team Member 

Julie Detwiler of National Honor Society, 
Quincy is a hitter on Foreign Language Honor 
Eastern Nazarene Society and Students 



The North Quincy boys' 
swim team opened its 
Pilgrim Conference 
schedule with a 98-79 
victory over Taunton, 
improving its overall 
record to 4-1. 



this has left us 
undermanned," said coach 
Bill Walker. "We seem to 
be healthy again and I 
hope we can stay that 
way, because this is not an 
easy schedule. 



"The boys have been "We got a comfortable 
recovering from illnesses lead early against Taunton 
the past three weeks and and were able to move 



some people around. This 
enabled us to get some 
times on people in events 
we usually are unable to 
get them into. The boys 
are excited about their fast 
start and I hope we can 
continue to surprise 
opponents." 

North winners were 
Mike Ploof, Dan Reilly, 



Barry Canavan, Erik 
Delorey, Tom Meade, Dan 
Bermingham, Jacky Lei, 
Jim Flaherty and Mike 
KeUey. 

Finishing second was 
Alan Morse and third 
place finishers were John 
Aliberti, Greg MacKay, 
Nader Sidahmed and 
William Lee. 



College's women's 
volleyball team. 

Detwiler, a junior, is a 
1989 graduate of North 
Quincy High School where 
she played volleyball, 
tennis, and was a member 
of choir, jazz choir. 
Madrigals, French Club, 
Social Enrichment Club, 



Gym/Swim Exercise Program Begins Jan. 22 



Recreation Director 
Barry Welch announces 
the Quincy Recreation 
Department will conduct 
two separate exercise 
classes on Monday and 

Wednesday evenings at 
the Lincoln Hancock 
Community School 
gymnasium beginning Jan. 
22. 

The 6 p.m. class will be 



an high and low impact 
aerobic class. 

The 7 p.m. class will 
feature strength and 
stretching exercises 
designed to improve tone, 
flexibility and endurance 
of specific body areas. 

Both classes will be 
taught by Debbie Vacca. 

Registration can be 
done at class time and 
participants can use one of 



two payment options. A 
$30 one time fee for all 
classes, from Jan. 22 to 
April 29, or $3 for each 
individual class payable at 
the time of each class. 

Participants in the 7 
p.m. class may also 
participate in the adult 
swim at 8 p.m. in the pool 
located in the same 
building. 

The program is open to 



persons past high school 
age and proper gym attire 
is requested. 

For more information, 
call the Quincy Recreation 
Department at its new 
number, 376-1394. 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

L 



"KICKS FOR KIDS" 

Brand Name Children's Footwear 

10% OFF Already Low Prices 

with this Ad 

Rte 18 South Weymouth 

(Across from Factory Paint) 

Mon-Sat10-5 331-8028 

Expires 1-31/92 



Against Drunk Driving. 

"She has outstanding 
passing skills," said coach 
Nancy Detwiler. "She has 
a soft touch especially on 
overhand passes." 

Detwiler, an 

English/communications 
arts major, is the daughter 
of Dr. Nancy and David 
Detwiler of Quincy. 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
J 



YMC A Basketball League Begins Jan. 16 



and 



The South Shore The season will consist eight players 

YMCA will offer a men's of nine regular season maximum of 12. 

basketball league this games, playoff and For more information, 

winter on Thursday championship rounds. call the South Shore 

evenings from 6 to 10 p.m. Team rosters will YMCA at 479-8500, ext. 

beginning Jan. 16. include a minimum of 135. 



SAME DAY SLIDES 



(E-6 PROCESS) 
only at 



Photo Quick of Quincy 



1363 Hancock St. 
Quincy Center 

472-7131 



V 



Before It Snows! 



BLOW OUT OIL CHANGE 

$Q Q3 (^^^) 

Premium Quality Lube, Oil, Filter 
14 Point Safety Inspection 

with This Ad Expires 1 /31 /92 



rr 



rr 



THE BLUE AND WHITE BUILDINGS 



PETAR'S ERIC'S 

AUTOMOTIVE' AUTO BODY 

(61 7) 786-9080 (61 7) 472-6759 

324-330 Quincy Ave., Quincy 



^ 



Page 16 Qulncy Sun Thursday, January 16, 1992 



Track 



North Wins Second Straight 



The North Quincy boys' 
track team won its second 
straight meet with a 
victory over Silver Lake to 
improve to 2-2. 

Senior John O'Connell 
had a big day with wins in 
the high jump and 300 and 
led off the winning 4x176 
relay team. 

Scott Kohler continues 
to improve in the shot put 



and won with a 41-6 1/2 
toss. A pleasant surprise 
was sophomore Josh 
Walty, who came from 
last place to nearly steal 
the race in the 1,000, 
coming in right beside 
North veteran Josh 
O'Donnell, the winner. 

The meet was decided 
in the mile relay and the 
team of Marc Sinclair, 



O'Donnell, Mike Yee and 
Jeremy Gott was never 
challenged, tying its 
seasonal best of 3:54.7. 

North was scheduled to 
face Bridgewater- 
Raynham Tuesday and a 
win would guarantee its 
first .500 season in nearly 
10 years. 

North's other winners 
were Tony Licciardi in the 



50, Yee in the hurdles, 
Eric Torvi in the mile, and 
the 4x176 relay team of 
O'Donnell, Marc Larson, 
Chris Murray and 
Licciardi. 

Placing third were 
Munay in the 50, Larson 
in the hurdles, Gott in the 
600, Jason Carson in the 
mile, Greg Buck in the 
two-mile and Kevin Price 
in the high jump. 



North Girls' Depth Pays Off 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

The North Quincy girls' 
track team's depth paid off 
with several valuable 
second and third place 
finishes to defeat Silver 
Lake, 48-43, and improve 
its record to 3-1. 

Heather Rendle was 
North's standout and was 
put to the test by Silver 
Lake's Kerri Crosby in the 
high jump. Both girls 
cleared five feet but 
Rendle was declared the 
winner with fewer misses. 
Rendle nearly came back 
to clear 5-2 but just nicked 
the bar with her heels. 

"We needed a good 



performance to stay close 
and Heather delivered," 
coach Geoff Hennessy 
said. "Her clutch jump last 
spring turned the 
momentum around for 
North in a win over the 
Lakers." 

Christine Herman has 
her best time in the 
hurdles, finishing a close 
third. "The three Laker 
hurdlers were much better 
than ours, but our kids dug 
down deep and came up 
with personal bests," said 
Hennessy. Herman's finish 
moved North to a point 
from victory and the relay 
team of Melanie Gaziano, 



Karen Leary, liana Cobban 
and Suzanne Lewis ran 
away to clinch the victory. 

North's other winners 
were Amy Wong in the 50, 
Gaziano in the 1,000, 
Lewis in the mile and Erin 
Duggan in the two mile. 

Finishing second were 
Susanne Hamilton in the 
300, Cobban in the 600, 
Katie McNamara in the 
mile and Trisha 
McNamara in the shot put. 

Third place finishers 
were Katy Deady in the 
50, Jen Nutley in the 300, 
Sonia Olmedo in the 
1,000, Kristy Kabilian in 
the two-mile and Anh Ho 



in the shot put. 

Lewis placed sixth in 
the two-mile in the recent 
Dartmouth Relays. She 
raced to a personal best 
11:47.4 and was the first 
girl from Massachusetts to 
finish. 

Sophomore Duggan 
qualified for the states, 
running a 12:50.3 in the 
unseeded section. Wong 
turned in fast times in the 
55 meter (7.30 and 7.33), 
but was eliminated in the 
semifinal in a photo finish. 
She had the seventh best 
time overall. 

Teams from all over the 
Eastern U.S. and Canada 
competed in the meet. 



Falvey Heads QBRW Association 

This year marks the Race Week will be Week Association second vice president, 

55th annual Race Week held from Wednesday, president, Charles 

sponsored by Quincy Bay July 29, through Sunday, John "Jack" White 

Race Week Association, Aug. 2. Hoffman first vice treasurer and George 

Loc. Daniel Falvey is Race president, Edward Romans Jackson secretary. 

Registration Underway For 
Rec Cross Lifeguard Course 



The Quincy Recreation 
Department is conducting 
registration for an 
American Red Cross 
Lifeguard Training Course, 
announces Recreation 
Director Barry Welch. 

Registration can be 
made in person week 
nights at the Lincoln- 
Hancock School Pool from 
6 to 9 p.m. 



The course is open to 
persons age 15 and older 
who have a current First 
Aid and CPR Certification 
and are capable of passing 
a prerequisite swim test. 

Classes will be held 
Tuesday and Friday 
evenings beginning Friday, 
Jan. 17 at 7 p.m. 
Successful completion of 



the course along with a 
completed First Aid and 
CPR course will qualify 
participants for positions 
as lifeguards at waterfronts 
or pool locations. 

Course fee is $10 for 
Quincy residents who have 
a current pool membership. 
Non-residents fee is $50. 
Both groups are 



responsible for purchasing 
their own text book from 
the Red Cross. 

Lifeguard Training 
replaces the former Red 
Cross Advance Lifesaving 
Course. 

For more information, 
call the Quincy Recreation 
Department at its new 
number, 376-1394. 



ENC Men's Basketball On QCTV-3 



Quincy Community College mens' basketball Gordon College Fighting at 7 p.m. 

Television, QCTV-3 has games this season. Scots. The game was 

announced it will cover Coverage will begin played Jan. 8 and will be 

selected Eastern Nazarene with the Crusaders vs. the televised Monday, Jan. 20 



BORED? 

Start A Quincy Sun 
Delivery Route. 

You'll Be Part 0£ 
The Business World. 

Call 471-3100 
or Apply in Person 



1372 Honcock Street, Quincy Square 471-3100 



r^ -[Mr, 



The Crusaders are 
coached by George Sisson 
and feature two players 
from Quincy, Kip Caldwell 
and David Cawthome. The 
game will also be shown 
again Jan. 21 at 9 a.m. and 
Jan. 22 at 1 p.m. 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO 





SERVICE 



MOBIU 



tUTO-HOME-IUSINESS 

• DUDIOITSINS'.ALIED^ 

• lOCHS REKITED 

• DOOH CLOSERS 

• PANIC HAROWIXE 

• lUTO KETS FITTED 



^:VISIT OUR SHOWROOM: 
I 756 SO. ARTFRV. QUINCY^ 



Youth .Hockey 



Bantam B's Win 
K. Of C. Tourney 



Quincy 's Bantam B 
hockey team, sponsored by 
the Quincy Rotary Club, 
won the recent Knights of 
Columbus Tournament at 
the Quincy Youth Arena 
with an 8-3 victory over 
Weymouth in the 
championship game. 

Robbie Callow had a 
hat trick, Dan Donohue 
and Tommy Moriarty two 
goals apiece and Patrick 
Connolly one. Jason 
Fennelly, Danny Boylan, 
Connolly, Callow, Josh 
Wingate and R.J. DiMattia 
had assists. 

Pee Wee goalie Brian 
Beaton had an outstanding 
game and the Bantam 
coaches thank him for 
helping the team out. 



Quincy opened with a 
5-3 win over Milton. 
Jimmy Kelly scored twice 
in the first period, 
Fennelly and Connelly 

scored in the second and 
Ronnie McGann in the 
third period. Wingate, 
McGann, Connolly, 
Donohue and Travis 
Greenwood had assists. 
Mark Smith played a fine 
game in goal. 

The Bantam B's 
advanced to the finals by 
defeating Braintree, 8-2. 
Wingate had four goals, 
Beaton two and McGann 
and Kelly one each. 
Beaton played an 
excellent game in goal. 

The Bantam B's are 
coached by Steve 
Sullivan. 



Mite A's Tie Canton 



The Quincy Mite A's 
skated to a 4-4 tie with 
Canton in an exciting 
contest last week. 

Canton rallied late in 
the game with a penalty 
shot and a last minute goal 
to forge the tie. 

Quincy took the lead 
early in the first period as 
Didier Alther scored 
unassisted. Jim Cashins, 
Jill Mclnnis and Ryan 
Murray also tested the 
Canton goaUe. 

Canton bounced back 
with two goals to take a 2- 
1 first period lead. 

Alther fed Steve Goff 
for the tying goal early in 
the second period. Quincy 
got excellent defensive 
play from Frank Curreri, 



Kiva Tupe, Scott 
MacDonald, Domenic 
Papile and Chris Griffin. 

The line of Scott 
Mattson, Sean Dooley and 
Dan Kennedy kept the 
pressure on Canton and 
Mattson scored to put 
Quincy ahead 3-2 after two 
periods. 

Shane Kabilian and 
Ryan Murray had good 
scoring opportunities for 
Quincy but it was Alther 
who scored, his second of 
the game, to put Quincy 
up 4-2. 

Canton then scored on a 
penalty shot and got a late 
goal to tie it. 

Ryan Kruegar was 
outstanding in net with 16 
saves. 



Squirt B's Win 
Behind Langille 



Quincy's Squirt B 
hockey team, sponsored by 
Quincy Cable and coached 
by Rick Fitzpatrick, 
defeated Framingham, 5-3, 
with Jeff Langille playing 
an outstanding game in 
goal. 

Chad Fitzpatrick had 
two goals and Ryan 
Barrett, Steven Ford and 
Jimmy Sullivan one each. 



Brian Nolan had three 
assists, John Barron two 
and Mike Welch, Kevin 
Regan and John Bertucck 
one each. 

Joey Ardagna, Shaun 
Haidul and Patrick Kenney 
had fine games and Paul 
Markarian, Billy Griffin 
and Sean Slattery were 
defensive standouts. 



Boston Marathon Training 
At South Shore YMCA 



The South Shore 
YMCA, 79 Coddington St., 
Quincy, is offering a 
Boston Marathon Training 
Program Wednesday 
evenings at 7 p.m. 

The six-month 

instructional training 
program began last 
October. Its goal is to 



educate, motivate and 
train runners of all levels 
properly for completing the 
'92 marathon which will be 
held Monday, April 20. 

Education seminars will 
be given, along with bi- 
weekly group runs. There 
is also a before and after 
health fitness evaluation. 



South Shore YMCA 
Offering Yoga Classes 



A 



472-2177 



w' 



-''^9/M 



The South Shore 
YMCA, 79 Coddington St., 
Quincy, will offer two 
yoga classes beginning 
Wednesday, Jan. 29. The 
eight-week exercise 
classes are designed to 
improve body and mental 
control. 

The program focuses on 



six areas: deep relaxation 
and breathing, physical 
postures, flexibility, 
strength, poise and 
balance, and 

concentration. 

Class times are 
Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. 
and 7 p.m. Regi.stration 
begins Friday, Jan. 17. 



Jamboree Finals 



Johnson Takes 
Squirt House Honors 



Johnson Motor Parts 
defeated the Quincy Sun, 

,4-2, to win the Squirt 
House League jamboree. 

Sean Dooley had a hat 
trick and Spike Bertucci a 
goal for Johnson and Kevin 
Cellucci and Joe Prada 
had assists. Pat Grogan 
and Sean Garvey scored 
for the Sun and Joe 
Ardagna had an assist. 

In the semifinals 
Johnson topped Green 
Environmental, 6-4, and 
the Sun edged Burgin 
Platner, 3-2. 

Kevin Cellucci had two 
goals and Chris Griffin, 
Sean Dooley, Nick 
Pizziferri and Chad 



Fitzpatrick one each for 
Johnson and Pizziferri, Jeff 
Glynn, Spike Bertucci, 
Cellucci, Fitzpatrick and 
Billy Norris had assists. 
Kevin Mason, Pat Kenney, 
John Barron and Brian 
Quinn scored for Green. 
Barron had two assists and 
Frank Curreri, Matt Holt 
and Kenney one each. 

Mike Carloni scored 
two goals and Steve Ford 
one for the Sun. Patrick 
Lyons, Steve McGonagle 
and Tom Gasta had assists. 
Paul Markarian and Scott 
MacDonald scored for 
Burgin Platner and Jacob 
Fleming, Mike Sullivan 
and Didier Alther had 
assists. 



Samoset Mite 
House Winner 



Samoset Pharmacy 
edged Neponset Valley, 2- 
1, to win the Mite House 
League jamboree. 

Mark Gibbons scored 
both goals and Bill 
McKeon and Matt Glynn 
had assists. Stephen Price 
scored for Neponset Valley 
unassisted. 

In the semifinals 
Samoset walloped the 
Paul Harold Club, 8-2, and 
Neponset Valley edged 
Lydon-Russell, 4-3. 

Gibbons had a hat trick 
to spark Samoset. Matt 
Kenney had two goals and 
Ryan Doyle, Matt Miller 
and John Alves a goal 
apiece. McKeon had three 
assists, Doyle two and 



Glynn, Ryan Barry and 
Alves one each. Scott 
Markarian and Adam 
Smith scored for Harold 
and Sean Fennelly and 
Terrence Doherty had 
assists. 

Shaun Lynch scored in 
a shootout to break a tie 
and give Neponset Valley 
the win. John Walsh, Mike 
Sullivan and Shawn 
Richardson had the other 
goals and Joe Callahan, 
John Mooney and 
Richardson had assists. Joe 
Fitzpatrick scored twice 
and Mark Giese once for 
Lydon-Russell. Joe 
Jackson had two assists 
and Bryan Cooper one. 



Colonial Pee Wee Winner 



Colonial Federal won 
the Pee Wee House 
League jamboree title with 
a 3-2 victory over Marina 
Bay Taxi. 

Billy Graney scored the 
winning goal in the final 
minute of play and Jim 



Hasson and Bill DeLaiarro 
scored the other goals. Jon 
Haddad had an assist. Paul 

Princiotto and Matt 
Radzevich scored for 
Marina Bay and 
Radzevich had an assist. 




Crime ^i^ 
Watch f A 



By ROBERT HANNA 
Crime Prevention Officer 
Quincy Police Department 



The Con Artist 

The clever con artist is a good actor who disarms his 
victim with an affable "nice guy" approach. But behind 
this friendly exterior is a shrewd psychologist who can 
isolate potential victims and break down their 
resistance to his proposals. Reach conquest is part of a 
game in which he must "best" his fellow man. 

The typical con artist is amoral - but seldom violent, 
and mobile, with an excellent sense of timing. He 
sincerely believes his victims deserve their fate. And, 
if caught, he'll probably strike again later. Con artists 
are seldom rehabilitated. 

The Victim: 

Anyone can be a victim - even a person who 
considers himself too intelligent or sophisticated to be 
"conned". During the 1920's, "Yellow Kid" Weil 
routinely swindled bankers, saying "that's where the 
money is." Many victims share certain characteristics. 
Often, but not always, they are older, female and live 
along. They are trusting of others - even strangers - and 
may need or desire supplemental income. Loneliness, 
willingness to help and a sense of charity are 
characteristics a con artist will exploit to gain a 
victims cooperation. 

The con artist ultimately will exploit his victim's 
assets - including life insurance benefits, pensions, or 
annuities, "nest eggs," home equity, or other tangible 
property. And he'll usually obtain the willing 
cooperation of his victim to complete the scheme. 

Key Words: 

An can artist is difficult to detect by looks alone. 
But you can often spot him by his words or expressions, 
including: 

Cash only. - Why is cash necessary for a proposed 
transaction? Why not a check? 

Secret Plans - Why are you being asked not to tell 
anyone? 

Get Rick Quick - Any scheme should be carefully 
investigated. 

Something for Nothing - A 'retired' swindler once 
said that any time you are promised something for 
nothing, you usually get nothing. 

Contests - Make sure they aren't a 'come-on' to 
draw you into a money-losing scheme. 

Haste - Be wary of any pressure that you must act 
immediately or lose out. 

Today Only - if something is worthwhile and 
available today, it's likely to be available tomorrow. 

Too Good To Be True - Such a scheme is probably 
not good or true. 

Last Chance - If it's a chance worth taking, why is 
it offered on such short notice? 

Left-Over Material - Left-over material might also 
be stolen or defective. 

Next Week Part H. 



2 Services Sunday At Houghs Neck Congregational 



"We Know That Peace 
Will Come" is the topic of 
the sermon Rev. Alicia 
Corea will deliver at the 9 
a.m. worship service 
Sunday at Houghs Neck 
Congregational Church, 
310 Manet Ave. 

Serving for the 
Diaconate will be Joan 
Kirby and Barbara Curran. 
Greeter will be Jackie 
Price. 

Dr. Peter Corea's 
message will be "In 
Search Of Justification" at 
the 10:30 a.m. service. The 
choir will be directed by 
Arden Schofield, organist. 
Soloist will be Chris 



Prendergast. Harold 
MacLaughlin and Ken 
Stone will serve for the 
Diaconate. Carol Hallett 
will be the greeter. 

Between the services a 
coffee hour will be held in 
the Conference Room, 
hosted by Pamela Praetsch 
representing the 

Hospitality Committee. 

Sunday School at 8:30 
a.m. is for early childhood 
children age two through 
grade one. At 10 a.m. 
intermediate and middle 
school students meet. 
Gloria Brummitt is the 
superintendent. The church 
is equipped for the 



physically challenged. 
Baskets for paper products 
for Father Bill's Place and 
non-perishable foods for 
PSSB Pantry Shelf are in 
the vestibule every 
Sunday, along with 
birthday cards for the 
church family members. 

Immediately following 
the 10:30 a.m. service the 
Christmas Fair Committee 
will meet in the 
Conference Room for the 
final report of last year's 
Seaside Fair and to begin 
planning for this year. 

On Monday at 6 p.m. 
Webelos meet with Paul 
Schofield. Boy Scouts 



meet at 7 p.m.with Marty 
Gordon. On Wednesday at 
10 a.m. Preschool 
Playschool for children 
accompanied by an adult 
meet with Paula Clarke. 
Brownies meet at 2 p.m. 
with Mrs. Leth. Choir 
rehearses at 7:30 p.m. with 
Arden Schofield. Also at 
7:30 p.m. the monthly 
meeting of Mothers and 
Others Club will be held 
followed by a Pound and 
Yard Auction. Susan 
Catrambone is president. 

Coming event : Jan. 26, 
Pilgrim Fellowship will 
have a pizza lunch 
meeting at 1 p.m. to 
welcome new members. 



When The Back Hurts' WoUaston Congregational Topic 



'When The Back Hurts' 
will be the sermon topic of 
the Rev. Elden D.J. Zuem 
Sunday at 10 a.m. at 
Wollaston Congregational 
Church, Winthrop Ave. 

The senior choir will 
sing under the direction of 
Ralph Opie. Scripture 
reader will be Ellis 



Laycock. Ushers will be 
Joseph and Alice Pinel 
with Annie Channon as 
acolyte. 

Church School and 
nursery facilities welcome 
all children including 
those of high school age. 
All are welcome to 
worship at the church and 



to attend the fellowship 
hour following the service. 
Activities for the week 
include the Wednesday 
evening prayer service, 
and meetings of the South 
Shore Camera Club, Scout 
Troop, and Wollaston 

Mothers Club. The 
congregation is also a 



service group for SHARE 
and welcomes calls to thf 
church office regarding 
any events or SHARE 
participation. 

For more information 
call 773-7432, Monday 
through Friday, 10 a.m. to 
1 p.m. 



Thursday, January 16, 1992 Quincy Sun Page 17 



Police Log Hot Spots 



Monday, Jan. 6: 

Break, 9:05 am, 99 Bracket St., River Bay Club. 
Office broken into. 

Break, 12:35 pm, 35 Brooks Ave. Apartment 
broken into. Jewelry stolen. 

Armed Robbery, 4:57 pm, 825 Southern Artery, 
South Shore Bank. Suspect is a white, male, in his 
20's, wearing a knitted hat, white scarf around face, 
blue sweater. 
Tuesday, Jan. 7: 

Attempted Break, 2:08 pm, 144 Palmer St. Cellar 
door, bulkhead door and back door damaged. 
Wednesday, Jan. 8: 

Attempted break, 8:17 am, 16 Pleasant St. United 
Presbyterian Church, also an attempt to enter office at 
22 Pleasant St. 

Break, 4:44 pm, 80 Prospect Ave. Garage broken 
into, snowblower stolen. 
Thursday, Jan. 9: 

Break, Arrest, 8:14 pm, 299 Centre St. Sugermans. 
Security guard held a Boston man who was anested by 
Off. M. Kelly for Breaking and entering in the 
nighttime. 
Friday, Jan. 10: 

Attempted break, 1:18 am, 1 Copeland St. 
Brewers Comer Pharmacy. Caller reports two white 
males just broke fix)nt window and fled down Water St. 
Suspect number one was wearing a leather jacket with 
white hooded sweatshirt hanging out. Suspect number 
two was wearing a jean jacket and white sneakers. 

Break in progress, 8:33 pm, 26 Stewart St. Caller 
reports he caught suspect breaking in. Suspect 
described as a white male, 5 '10", 230 Lbs, black 
mustache, dungaree jacket, red flannel shirt. Suspect 
fled toward Washington St. 

Break, 10:22 pm, 156 Billings St. Apartment 
broken into. 
Saturday, Jan. 11: 

Armed Robbery, 4:16 am, 552 Willard St., Sunoco 
Gas Station. Suspect is described as a white male, in 
his 20's, short dark hair, wearing a black leather 
jacket, showed a silver automatic weapon, fled in a 
small blue car. 

Break, 11:13 am, 338 Washington St. Atlantic 
House. Broken into overnight 

Break, 6:35 pm, 14 Mill St. Under investigation. 

Att. Break, 8:26 pm, 31 Weymouth St. Under 
investigation. 
Sunday, Jan. 12: 

Robbery, 2:35 pm, Field St. Cab driver was robbed 
by three white youths that fled in a white four door 
Peugeot. 

Break, 9:41 am, 3 Snug Harbor Court. Under 
investigation. 

Services for Week: Calls for Service-llll; 
Arrests Made-57; Stolen VehicIes-21. 

If you have any information on any of the above 
crimes, or any crime, please call the Quincy Police 
Detective Bureau at 479-1212 ext. 312. You wdll not be 
required to identify yourself, but it could help. 

New Hours For Tax 
Filing At IRS Office 



To assist taxpayers with 
federal tax inquiries, the 
Internal Revenue Service 
Boston District announces 
new hours at its Quincy 
office, 1458 Hancock St., 
Quincy Center. 

The Quincy office is 
open Monday, Wednesday 
and Friday from 8:30 a.m. 
until noon and 1 to 4:30 
p.m. to distribute forms, 
answer quick questions 
and assist taxpayers with 
federal tax inquiries. 

During the last week of 
the filing season, the 
office will be open all 
business days from April 6- 
15. 



The headquarters office 
located in the John F. 
Kennedy Building in 
Boston will be open 
Monday through Friday 
from 8:30 a.m. until 4:30 
pjn. 

Taxpayers can also call 
toll-free telephone 
numbers for assistance. 
The numbers are 1-800- 
829-1040 for taxpayer 
information; 1-800-829- 
FORM for forms and 
publications; and 1-800- 
829-4477 for refund 
information. 

Massachusetts 
taxpayers have until April 
15 to file their tax returns. 



Boy Scout Troop 26 
Announces Fund Raiser 



A series of fundraiser^ 
is planned for Boy Scout 
Troop 26, St. Boniface 
Parish, Germantown. 

A can & bottle drive 
will be held Saturday, Jan. 
18 from noon to 2 p.m. and 
Wednesday Jan. 15, 22 
and 29 from 4:30-6:30 p.m. 
at the St. Boniface Church 



parking lot, 26 Shed St., 
and the Civil 

Defense/DPW parking lot, 
55 Sea St. 

An arts/crafts/bake sale 
will be held Saturday, Jan. 
,25 at the Civil Defense 
Hall, 55 Sea St. Donations 
are appreciated, call Mr. 
Roosa, 770-0979. 



Pajje 18 Qulncy Sun Thursday, January 16, 1992 



Concerns Raised Over 
South Quincy Recycling 



(Cont'd from Page 3) 

"It has to be looked 
upon as a business going 
in a residential 
neighborhood. The issue 
can get clouded because 
it's recycling . First and 
foremost it's a business 
going into a neighborhood 
and that has to be 
addressed first," Fabrizio 
said, adding "this is not a 
referendum for or against 
recycling." 

Although there are 
some homes in close 
proximity to the proposed 
site, the land is zoned 
industrial. The property 



once was used for minor 
mill work. It became idle 
several years ago. 

After its meeting 
Wednesday night, the 
Planning Board may make 
a recommendation 
supporting or opposing the 
proposal to the City 
Council. 

After next Tuesday's 
public hearing, Fabrizio 
said tie expects to call for 
a vote on the proposal at 
the council's next meeting, 
Monday, Feb. 3. 

Although the site is 
zoned industrial, BFI 
needs special permit fi"om 




United Way 



WANTED 

Retail Advertising 

Salespersons 

Full and Part Time 

The Quincy Sun 

1372 Hancock St., Quincy 

471-3100 



LEGAL NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS THE 

TRIAL COURT THE 
PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT 
NORFOLK DIVISION 
DOCKET NO. 91 P2845E1 
Estate of LOUIS M. 
BERKOWITZ late of 
QUINCY In the County of 
NORFOLK 

NOTICE 
A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that FRANCES 
H. BERKOWITZ of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
executrix named in the will 
without surety on the 
bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on January 29, 
1992/ 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty- 
seventh day of December, 
one thousand nine- 
hurKlred and ninety-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBTE 

1/16/92 



LEGAL NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS THE 
TRIAL COURT THE 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT 
NORFOLK DIVISION 

Docket No. 91 P2895E1 
Estate of SIMON P. 
FAHERTY late of QUINCY 
In the County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 
A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that COLLEEN 
F. GIACOMOZZI of 
BRAINTREE in the County 
of NORFOLK be appointed 
executrix named in the will 
without surety on the 
bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 5, 
1992. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, wrthin thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the thirtieth day 
of December, one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

1/16/92 



the City Council to 
operate the facibty. The 
special permit is needed 
since the use entails waste 
recovery. Therefore, a 
two-thiid votes is required 
(6 votes of the full nine- 
member council) to 
approve the project. 



ELEMENTARY 
LUNCH 



Jan. 20-24 

Men: NO SCHOOL- 
Martin Luther King Day. 

Tues: NO LUNCH 

Wed: Pizza, fruit juice, 
fruit cup, chocolate chip 
cookies, milk. 

Thurs: grilled hot dog 
on a roll, vegetarian 
beans, fruit juice, milk. 

Fri: grilled cheese 
sandwich, tater tots, fruit 
cup, milk. 



SECONDARY 
LUNCH 



Jan. 20-24 

Men: NO SCHOOL- 
Martin Luther Kind Day 

Tues: hamburger on a 
roll, cole slaw, fruit juice, 
jello, milk. 

Wed: hot dog on a roll, 
vegetarian beans, fruit 
juice, milk. 

Thurs: turkey 
fricassee, mashed potato, 
peas, fresh baked wheat 
roll, milk. 

Fri: grilled cheese 
sandwich, tater tots, fruit 
juice, milk. 

LEGAL NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS THE 

TRIAL COURT THE 
PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT 
NORFOLK DIVISION 
DOCKET NO. 91 P2837E1 
Estate of RICHARD J. 
O'BRIEN late of QUINCY 
In the County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 
A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that 
CATHERINE P. O'BRIEN 
of QUINCY in the County 
of NORFOLK be appointed 
administratrix with the will 
annexed without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on January 29, 
1992/ 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty- 
seventh day of December, 
one thousand nine- 
hundred and ninety-one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBTE 
1/16/92 



Kinnecom Resigning Jan. 31 

To Take Position With Utah DOT 

City Advertising For 
Traffic Engineer Vacancy 



By ROBERT 
BOSWORTH 

With 17 days left before 
the application deadline, 
newspaper advertisements 
for a new traffic engineer 
had yielded just two 
applications as of Tuesday 
morning, according to the 
city's personnel director. 

Several weeks ago. 
Traffic Engineer David 
Kinnecom announced his 
resignation effective Jan. 
31. Kinnecom, who was 
appointed the city's traffic 
engineer by former Mayor 
Francis McCauley in 
September, 1987, will 
become an engineering 
supervisor in the state of 
Utah's Department of 
Transportation. traffic and 
safety division 

Sheets said the city will 
have a difficult time 
replacing Kinnecom. "It 
will be tough to replace 
David. David has done a 
superb job. We're losing 
him at a bad time," he 
said. 

The new traffic 
engineer, whomever he or 
she is, will have their 
hands full almost 
immediately. The 

intersection at Quincy 
Shore Dr. and East 
Squantum St. is expected 
to be reconstructed 
sometime this spring or 
summer. Other projects 
needing traffic engineering 
work in the not too distant 

LEGAL NOTlci 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS THE 
TRIAL COURT THE 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT 
NORFOLK DIVISION 

Docket No. 91 P2812E1 

Estate of HOWARD R. 

BROWN late of QUINCY In 

the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that QUINTILIO 
BERSANI of MARSHFIELD 
in the County of PLYMOUTH 
be appointed executor 
named in the will without 
surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before 10:00 
in the forenoon on January 
29, 1992. 

In addition you should file 
a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day (or 
such other time as the 
Court, on motion with notice 
to the petitioner, may allow) 
in accordance with Probate 
Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of 
said Court at Dedham, the 
twenty-seventh day of 
December, one thousand 
nine hundred and ninety- 
one. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

1/16/92 



future may be the Old 
Colony commuter rail 
station in Quincy Center 
and east-west crossway 
connector from Route 3A 
to the Burgin Parkway. 

The city began 
advertising for the position 
in area newspapers over 
the weekend. As of 
Tuesday morning, two 
applicants had replied, 
according to Personnel 
Director Kathy Yaeger. 

Yaeger said one of the 
applicants is from Quincy. 
She said the Quincy 
applicant does not work for 
the city. 

With unemployment 
high and a salary which 
pays in the low to mid 40s, 
the traffic engineer 
vacancy is almost sure to 
attract more applicants. 
Deadline to submit 
resumes is Friday, Jan. 31. 

Responsibilities include 
design, operation and 
maintenance of city traffic 
signals, signs, pavement 
markings, parking meters 
and city parking garage. 
Candidates must have a 
B.S. in civil, electrical or 
traffic engineering along 
with a minimum of four 
years of relevant traffic 
engineering experience, 
including at least two 
years in management or 
supervisory experience. 



Sheets and Yaeger hope 
a new traffic engineer is 
hired as soon as possible, 
perhaps by March 1. 
Yaeger said the hiring 
time depends in part on 
the number of applications 
the city receives. 

After Jan. 31, applicants 
will be interviewed. 
Yaeger will forward the 
names of two or three 
applicants with her 
recommendations to the 
mayor for consideration. 
Sheets will then make the 
decision. 

Sheets, who will fi-eeze 
or eliminate fiinding for 30 
municipal positions in an 
effort to save 
approximately $1 miUion 
during FY 93, said 
eliminating the traffic 
engineer is not feasible. 

"We have to have a 
traffic engineer. 

Eliminating the traffic 
engineer would be like 
taking the navigator out of 
an airplane. David 
Kinnecom saved us a lot 
of money and solved us a 
lot of problems." 

The city does not have 
an assistant traffic 
engineer. Prior to 

Kinnecom's appointment, 
the city's planning 
department or a private 
contractor performed the 
traffic engineer's 
responsibilities. 



Vacation Day Care Registration 



Registration is 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



LEGAL NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 
#91A0211-A1 
Bristol, ss. 

Probate Court 

To the father of parts 
unknown, father of Michael 
Brandon McDonald now 
Michael Charles Cook as 
changed by petition for 
change of name, of Norton 
in said County, a minor. 

A petition has been 
presented to said Court by 
William Charles Cook, II and 
Anne M. Cook his wife, of 
Norton in said County, 
praying for leave to adopt 
said Michael Brandon 
McDonald now Michael 
Charles Cook. 

If you desire to object 
thereto you or your attorney 
should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Taunton before ten o'clock 
in the forenoon on the 
twenty-seventh day of 
February 1992, the return 
day of this citation. 

Witness, Ernest 

Rotenberg, Esquire, First 
Judge of said Court, this 
thirteenth day of December 
1991. 

ROBERT E. PECK, 
Register 
12/31,91 1/9,16/92 



underway for Quincy Atter 
School Day Care for full- 
day care during February 
Vacation week from 8:30 
a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at 
Lincoln-Hancock School. 

Interesting and fun 
activities are planned. For 
information call Mrs. 
Pounder at 773-3299. 

Save Gat and Money 
Shop Locally 

LEGAL NOTIC E 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 
PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT 
Norfolk, ss. 

91P0993-E1 

To all persons 
interested in the estate of 
Karin T. Wadsworth late of 
Quincy in said County, 
deceased, testate. 

A petition has been 
presented to said Court for 
license to sell - at private 
sale - certain real estate 
of said deceased, which is 
situated in Quincy, in said 
County, in accordance 
with the rules set out in 
said petition. 

If you desire to object 
thereto you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham before 
ten o'clock in the forenoon 
on February 5, 1992. the 
return day of this citation. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court, this 
Feb. 5, 1992. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER 
1/16, 23. 30/92 



Thursday, January 16, 1992 Qulncy Sun Pa^e 19 




EVERYBODY'S MARKETPIAGE 



FOR RENT I WANTJD 



HALLS FOR RENT 

Newly Renovated 
Sons of Italy Social Center 
Golden Lion Suite 
Capacity - 300 
Venetian Room 
Capacity - 140 
Call 472-9 



TF 



HALL FOR RENT 

North Quincy K of C 

Building 

5 Mollis Avenue 

For information please call 

328-5967 



HALL FOR HIRE 

Weddings. Showers, 

Meetings, Banquets 

Elks Home, 440 E Squanlum St 

Quinsy 

472-2223 

TF 



HALL FOR RENT 

(completely remodeled) 

Houghs Neck Post No 380, 

American Legion, 1116 Sea St 

479-6149 

TF 



SHOOTERS PUB 
FOR RENT 

Available for any occasion. A 
setting reminiscent of an Old 
English Pub. 4 antique Bil- 
liard tables, dart boards. For 
more information call 

472-0771 1/30 



HALL FOR RENT 

Furnace Brook Golf Club. 
Small groups, 50-90. 
Contact Mai Holm 

472-8466 2/6 



STORE FOR RENT 

Cheap Rent $480 

Retail or Office 

65 Billings Rd. 

North Quincy 

734-8172 1/16 



PERSONALS 



HOLY SPIRIT 
Thank You 



B.R. 

1/16 



Thank You 

St. Jude 

For Favors Granted 



B.M.H. 1/16 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Oulncy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



Sun 



SmSaTiRfn 



Ads 



Get 



Results 



WANTED TO BUY 

Old woodworking tools, planes, 
chisels, surplus hand tools; all 
trades. Precision machinist tools. 
Also wanted: old books, paintings, 
frames, antiquee, estate lots. 



1-617-558-3839 



TF 



WANTED: 

Actors for TV Commer- 
cials; movie extras and 
game show contestants. 
Many needed. Call 1 -805- 
682-7555 ext.T-3806. a/u 



HELPWAffTEi 

AIRUNES NOW HIRING 

Travel Agents, Flight At- 
tendants Mechanics, etc. 
Entry level and up. Sala- 
ries to $105K. CalM -805- 
682-7555 ext.A-3654. 3/19 



TRAVEL FREE or on a 

shoestring. Air couriers 
needed - also overseas 
and cruiseship help 
wanted. Call 1-805-682- 
7555 Ext. F-3844. 



3/18 



POSTAL JOBS 
AVAILABLE! 

Many positions. Great 
benefits. Call 1-805- 
682-7555 ext. P-4029 

3^ 



GOVERNMENT JOBS 

NOW HIRING in your 
area. $16,000-$68,000. 
Call 1-805-682-7555 ext. 
J-3865 for current federal 

list. 3/1S 



NEED EXTRA INCOME 

FOR 1992? 

Earn $500-$1 ,000 weekly 

stuffing envelop Details: 

Rush $1 ,000 wHh BASE to: 

OIH Group, Inc. 

1019 Lk. Sherwood, 

Orlondo, FL 32818 e/n 



LEGAL NOTICE 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS THE 
TRIAL COURT THE 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT 
NORFOLK DIVISION 

Docket No. 90P1298-GI 

To Gertrude L. Grindle 
and the Massachusetts 
Department of Mental Health 
and to all persons interested 
in the estate of Gertrude L. 
Grindle of Braintree in said 
Court, mentally ill person. 

A petition has been 
presented to said Court for 
license to sell at - private 
sale - certain real estate of 
said ward for her 
maintenance - And praying 
that the petitioner may 
become the purchaser of 
said real estate. Which is 
situated in Quincy in said 
County, in accordance with 
the offer set out in said 
petition. 

If you desire to object 
thereto you or your attorney 
should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham before ten o'clock 
in the forenoon on January 
15, 1992, the return day of 
this citation. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, Rrst Judge of said 
Court, this December 9, 
1991. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER 

1/9, 16,23/92 



SERVICES 



Caprpet & Upholstery 

Cleaning by JK&K 

"Winter Special" 

25% Off 

with this Ad 

• Dry Foam Method 

• Better than Steam 

• Leaves No Residue 

• No Shrinking 

• Fully INsured 
Call 471-6319 



SERVICES 



SERVICES 




EXPERT 

lAMP REPAIR 
t RfWHHNG 



1/30 



^aintin£ & 
^attcovtring 

By'Ed'Barr 
Itte fiigfiest quality tvot^ 
performed matCy at rea- 
sonoBU. rates, free esti- 
mates, referrences avail- 
aB(e, over 18 years e^e- 
rienu. 

CalC 479-3284 
today 3/5 

RUBBISH REMOVAL 

Complete cleanouts - attics- 
cellars-garages-yards. Re- 
moval of appliances-boilers- 
oil tanks-water heaters. Fast 
service-reasonable 

472- 0877 2/6 

'Tar and Gravel 

• Shingles 

• Gutters 

• Repairs 

HEALY ROOFERS 

'Flat Roof Specialists' 
Jim Healv 471-2123 4A) 

FOR SALE 

REPOSSESSED & IRS 
FORECLOSED HOMES 

available at below market 
value. Fantastic savings. You 
repair. Also S&L bailout prop- 
eriies. Call 1-805-682-7555 
ext. H-6705 for repo list your 
area. 3/i9 




QRANITE 
LOCK CO. 

472-2177 

755 SOUTHERN ARTERY 
QUINCY TF 

MtSCELLANEQtIS 
BINGO 

North Quincy K of C 

Wsd., 7 pm - Hard Cards 

Prizss-Snacks 

Relaxed Atmosphsrs 

Rsfrsahmsnts. Parking 

Call 328-9822 2/1 3 



INSTRUCHQN 

WORD PROCESSING IS IN 

DElUANb l LEAt^N M6ftg 

QUICKLY AND THOROUGHLY 

Wm< PRIVATE INSTRUCTK>NSI 

CALL WORD CONNECTIONS 

(617)840-8002 

Leave message 

All Call* promptly istumsd. 2/6 



LEGALNOnC^i 



SEIZED CARS 

trucks, boats, 4 wheelers, 
motorhomes, by FBI, IRS, 
DEA. Available your area 
now. Call 1-805-682-7555 
ext. C-6368 



3/19 



@ United Way 

^^^^ U brings out the best in all of us. 



COMMISSIONERS 
NOTICE TO CREDFTGRS 
OF INSOLVENT ESTATE 
TO PRESENT CLAIMS 
Estate of Alfred E. 
O'Connor late of Quincy, 
Norfolk County, 

Massachusetts, 
deceased, represented 
insolvent. 

The subscribers, 
having been appointed by 
the Probate Court for said 
County, commissioners to 
receive and examine all 
claims of creditors against 
the estate of said Alfred E. 
O'Connor that creditors of 
said estate have up to 
April 30, 1992, to present 
and prove their claim 
against said estate, and 
that they will meet to 
examine the claims of 
creditors at the offices of 
Edward H. Masterson, 
Esquire, 21 McGrath 
Highway, Suite 301, 
Quincy, Massachusetts 
02169, at 2:00 pm on the 
24th day of January, 1992. 

EDWARD H. MASTERSON 
LEONARD L LEWM 

12/31/91 1/9,16/92 



LARRY'S 
HOME REPAIR 

• Carpenters 
• Painters 

• Decorators 
General Contractor 
20 Years Experience 
Licensed • Insured 
Interior-Exterior Painting 
Scroll Ceiling 
All Home Repairs 
Small or Large 

659-7471 328-8735 

TF 

ADVANTAGE RESUME 
$25 a resume 

Laser printing 

on quality paper 

39 Parker St., Quincy 

(off Granite St., across from 

Star Martlet and Fruit Basket) 

479-6422 i/ig 

ROOFS AND ADDITIONS 
Dormers, Decks, Bath- 
rooms, CJuincy and So. 
Shore area. Quality work, 
good prices. Jordan Const. 
1-800-649-6720 2/6 

E.J. TANTILLO 

Plumbing & Heating 

Boilers, Water Heaters, 

Gas Piping, 

Master Lie. #9904. Insured 

479-5777 3/5 

SULLIVAN Landscape 
& Tree Service 

Pruning, Removals, brush 
chipping. Bobcat senrrce. Fully 
insured. Reasonable rates. 

472-3595 *^ 



SERVrES 



ROOFING 

Residential & Commer- 
cial Competitive prices,. 

Economy Roofing 
Call 617-837-6720 1/23 



A & T Vacuum 

• 14.95 Overhaul Special 
on any vacuum 

• Sewing machine repairing 

• VCR repairing and cleaning 

• Sharpening 

(scissors, knives, etc ) 

• Oreck XL Vacuums 

• Electrolux w/power nozzle 

$150 
• Used Vacuum's $45 & up 
27 Beale St 
Wollaston 
479-5066 



Your South Short 

Htadquartsr* 

For 



Appliance 
Service 

ON ALL 

MAJOR 

APPLIANCES 



HANCOCK TIRE 
& APPLIANCE 

1 15 Franklin St . So Ouincy 
«/2-1710 

TF 




WALLPAPERING 

Frank Montani 
Highest Quality Workmanship 
and Service. Neat, clean, 
professional; reasonable 
rates; ceilings painted. Please 
eave message 698-9472 2/6 



SNOW SHOVELING 

Driveways & walks etc. 
Sanding also available. 
Reliable service. Ouincy 
770-4593 or 508-584-6227 



1/16 



INSTRUCTION 



WORD PROC ESSING IS IN 

CEMAtlDl LEARN MORE 

QUICKLY AND THOROUGHLY 

WITH PRIVATE INSTRUCTIONS: 

CALL WORD CONNECTIONS 

(617)849-9002 

Leave Message 

All cal'c promptly returned 1/30 



CUSTOM WINDOW 
TREATMENTS 

by experienced profes- 
sional. Very reasonable 
rates. 
Please Call 3932 1/23 



HOUSECLEANING 
and WINDOW CLEANING 

on Wednesdays and 
Saturdays. Call 
773-6816 nights mo 



Cft^x±xi.car 




%^ 



MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN, 1372 Hancock SL, Quincy, MA 02169 
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment must accompany order. 



INDEX 



D Services 

a For Sale 

O Autos 

D Boats 

O For Rent 

Wanted 

D Help Wanted 

O Pets, Livestock 

a Lost and Found 

D Real Estate For Sale 

a Real Estate Wanted 

a Miscellaneous 

O Work Wanted 

a Antiques 

D Coins A Stamps 

D Rest Homes 

a Instruction 

Day Care 

D Personal 

a Electrical A Appliances 



RATES 
IVTEEK 
3-7 WEEKS 

•-12 WEEKS 

19 WEEKS 
OR MORE 



D $5.00 for one Insertion, up to 20 words, 1 0S for each additional word. 
D $4.60 per Insertion up to 20 words for 3-7 Insertions of the same ad, 

IDS each addltk>nal word. 
D $4.30 per Insertion up to 20 words for 8-12 insertions of the same ad, 

IDS more each sdditlonal word. 
D $4.00 per Insertion up to 20 words for 13 or more insertions of the 

same ad. 10S each additional word. 



D Enclosed is $ — 
In The Quincy Sun 



.for the following ad to run 



.weeks 



COPY: 



NO REFUND WILL BE MAOC AT THIS CONTRACT RATI IN THE EVENT OF CANCELLATION. 
DEADUNE: MONOAV. SM P.M. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR PHONE NUMBER IN AO. 



Page 20 Qulncy Sun Thursday, January U, 1992 



4 



Quincy's 
New Numbers. 
Now Appearing 

On Refrigerators 
Everywhere. 



Kmergency Numbers: 

Police 911 

Fire 911 

Non-Emergency Numbers 

Police 479-1212 

Fire 376-1010 

.\nimal Cxintrol 376-1364 

.\sian Information 376-1200 

Assessors Office 376-1170 

Atlantic NeighborhcxxJ Center 376-1381 

AuditorsOffice 376-1260 

Board Of Appeals 376-1451 

Building & Zoning IX^partment 376-1450 

Cemetery Department 376-1290 

City Council Office 376-1340 

Ciry (buncilors 376-1350 

ClerksOffice 376-1130 

(x)mmunit\ Development Block (Jrant 376-1360 

C]onser\ ation Commission OFC 376-1367 

Council On Aging OFC 376-1240 

Council On .Mcoholism 376-1400 

Data Processing 376-1 1 10 

i:iectcd Officials 376-1335 

Kmcrgency Management 376-1234 

Kngineering Depamncnt 376-1950 

Fuel Kmcrgency I lotlinc 376-1070 

Health Department 376-1270 

AIDS Information 376-1287 

Clinic Infonnation 376-1298 

Housing Authority 847-4350 

1 lousing Rehabilitation 376-1050 

LavvOffice 376-1516 

Library 376-1300 

Mayors Office 376-1990 

Park & Forestry .• 376-1252 

Parking Clerk 376-1060 

I'ersonnel lX;partment 376-1066 

Planning & Omimunity IX-'velopment 376-1360 

Planning Board Infomiation 376-1360 

Public Works (All Offices) 376-1900 

Commissioner s Office 376-1959 

Carage 376-1944 

Highway 376-1927 

Recycling Information 770-BINS 

Snow Line 376-1943 

Purchasing Agent 376-1061 

Recreation 376-1386 

Recycling Information 770-BINS 

Rent Grievance Department 376-1070 

Retirement Board 376-1075 

ScwerAVater/I>ain 376-1925 

South CxHstal (Jareer Development Administration 328-7300 

Tax (>)llector 376-1080 

Treasurer's Office 376-1080 

Veterans' Services 376-1 190 

Weights & Measures 376-1250 

Wire Department 376-1480 

Youth (>)mmission 376-1244 

All Other Offices 376-1000 



The telephone numbers for Qulncy Hospital, the Police, Schools and 
Quincy (College have not changed. Please keep this list handy until your new 
Telephone Directory is issued. 

^M New England telephone 

A MYNEX.Ckxnpany 



33 Other Nominees 
For Sun 'Citizen Of Year' 



(Cont'd from Page 5) 

announcer for WJDA, he 
shows a genuine concern 
for men and women "with 
never a hint of self- 
aggrandizement." 

Donald (Skip) and 
Doris Marshall, foster 
parents to 458 children 
over the past 27 years; 
named the 1991 Foster 
Family of the Year by the 
National Foster Parent 
Association. 

Francis McCauley, 
"the only former mayor to 
give a non veteran the job 
of a veteran of three wars." 

Joseph McConville, 
dedicated head coach of 
the Quincy Youth 
Instructional Drills and 
chairman of the Quincy 
Planning Board. 

Peter O'Connell, for 
his sincere concern for 
Quincy senior citizens and 
for giving "his time, effort 
and money to make 
Quincy a better place to 
live." 



John Osgood, he does 
exceptional work with 
special children of Quincy 
as an employee of the 
Quincy Recreation 
Department. 

Peer Group of North 
Quincy High School, 
"kids helping other kids 
fight drug and alcohol 
abuse-the give kids the 
understanding that they 
may not be able to get 
from an adult." 

Mary Raux, children's 
librarian at North Quincy 
library, "a special friend to 
every child that comes in." 

Jane Reikard, "a part- 
time employee receiving 
part-time pay. She puts in 
more than full-time hours" 
as executive secretary of 
the city's Rent Grievance 
Board. 

Esther Sanger, founder 
and executive director of 
Quincy Crisis Center and 
Mary Martha Learning 
Center (Hingham) which 
provide food, shelter and 



counseling for area 
residents. 

Ed Spargo, who has 
devoted much of his 
retirement time for two 
decades trying to better 
the health and well-being 
of his fellow man. 

Don Strong for his 
involvement in elder 
action, hospice. Senior 
Olympics and other 
community services. 

Olin Taylor, member 
of Quincy Conservation 
Commission and other 
civic groups; has repaired 
more than 800 veterans 
markers at Quincy 
cemeteries. 

Barry Welch, "a 

master at coordinating any 
event" as Quincy's 
Recreation Director. 

George White, 
volunteering his time as 
general chairman of the 
Quincy Christmas Festival 
Committee to make the 
Quincy Christmas parade a 
success. 



Sheets To Lobby 
In D.C. For Quincy Plan 



(Cont'd from Page J) 

said the Lexington 
continues to be a "wait 
and see situation." 

"I don't expect to check 
on the Lexington unless 
we hear something 



specific before I leave. 
We're pretty much in 
contact with Washington 
on the Lexington." 

Sheets said the decision 
on the carrier could come 




TEU 32ai700 



[■ AS[ [[ON OUAIJI'V C[J: A\[- KS 

LAUr>:DRY DRY CLEANING ■ ALTERATIONS ■ STORAGE 



WEDDING GOWNS A SPECIALTY 



PETER LIO 

O/^NER 



6/ BiL.i.irJG'^, HD 
NO QUINCY MASS 



at the end of the month. 
But he said he's believed 
that before. "Right now, 
where hearing the end of 
the month. But that's what 
we heard in December and 
in November and in 
October." 

One factor which may 
push the Lexington 
decision ahead is the 
U.S.S. Forrestal. The 
aircraft carrier will replace 
the Lexington as the 
Navy's training carrier in 
Pensacola, Fla., on Feb. 4. 

After Feb. 4, the 
Lexington will need to find 
another home. 



You can do better 

at Colonial Federal with 

a new car loan! 



20"y« 



OOVNN 



siKW^'l 



WOS)] 



»/o 



^PR 



montniy , 



on a 



\oan 



ot 



$l0,000tor3vearsy^^^^^ 



'm^ots.pr^ 



ipal 



andii 



nterestv 



\1.' 



L^ 



ft' 



INSURED FDIC 



COLONIAL FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK 

OUINCV 15 Beach Slreel 617 471-0750 

EAST WEYMOUTH Corner o( Middle & Washington Streets 617-331-1776 
HOLBROOK 802 South FranHin Street 61? 767 1776 vs^ 

WAREHAM Cranberry Pla/a 508 ?95 1776 f = f 

ItlOf" 





TGacttl ''^Vl<^l"<i our JO unmoni 



VOL.24 No. 18 



Thursday, January 23, 1992 




Two Memorial Masses, 
Prayer Service Planned 

A Year Later Pain 

Remains For Families 

Of 3 Fire Victims 



By MICHAEL WHALEN 

They say that time 
heals all wounds, but in 
some cases, wounds can 
take a long, long time to 
heal. 

Such is the case of the 
Cortez family of 85 
Mears Ave. in Houghs 
Neck and the Wall 
family of 18 Empire St. 
in Germantown, who lost 
three members on Jan. 
24, 1991 in a fire at the 
Cortez home caused by a 
space heater that was 
pushed up against a bed. 

Victims of the blaze 
were 25-year-old 
Margarita Cortez, her 
four-year-old nephew, 
Lawrence "Buddy" Wall, 
and his two-year-old 
sister, Reginann. The 
children died the evening 
of the fire— Buddy from 
smoke inhalation and 
Reginann from bums-and 
their aunt died two days 
later of both smoke 
inhalation and bums she 
suffered in the blaze. 

It is for these reasons 
that two memorial 
Masses will be 
celebrated in memory of 
the victims. The first will 
be Friday at 9 a.m. and 
the second will be 
Sunday at 10:30 a.m., 
both at Most Blessed 
Sacrament Church in 
Houghs Neck. 

In addition, a prayer 
service will be held 
Saturday at 2 p.m. at the 
Cortez home. 

The house, which has 
been completely rebuilt— 
an estimated $120,000 
damage was caused by 
the fire— stands tall and 
proud and strong, peiiiaps 
in tribute to the numerous 
friends, relatives and 
neighbors who donated 
their time, money and 
building materials to see 
that the repairs were 
made as quickly as 
possible. Yet inside the 
house live the family 
members whose 

memories still linger and 
whose hearts still ache a 
year after the loss of their 
loved ones. 

Twenty-one-year-old 
Herminigilda Cortez 
(known to friends as 
"Hilda") is the youngest 
of the Cortez children 
and the only one who 
still lives with her 
parents, Herminio and 
Lovinda, in their Mears 
Avenue home. She said 
she feels that under the 
circumstances, her 




LAWRENCE AND REGINANN WALL 

rescue the others. He 
spent several days in 
intensive care at Quincy 
Hospital because of this 
courageous act. Both he 
and his wife refused to be 
interviewed for this 
story). 

As for herself, Hilda 
Cortez said there were a 
number of people who 
helped her cope with her 
own sorrow. 

"I consulted a priest 
because I was having 
trouble believing in 
God," she said. "He told 
me I would have to try to 
find it in my heart why 
He did what He did, and 
that this would make me 
closer to God. I also saw 
a psychiatrist for two 
months. I felt really 
guilty and was blaming 
myself, saying *If only I 
had been home.' He (the 
psychiatrist) basically 
made me understand it 
wasn't my fault. 

"But it was mainly my 
friends, like Laurie 
Vanelli, who gave me 
the most support. I can 
talk to Laurie. She told 
me, 'I'm going to be your 
big sister now. I'm going 
to be Magga for you.'" 

Vanelli, a close fiiend 
of the entire family, said 
she tried to help them as 
much as possible after 
Hilda's sister "Magga" 
and the two children 
were killed. 

"I feel like I'm taking 
over Magga's place, 
because Magga was 
always telling Hilda how 
to do the right things, and 

(C(mt'dOnPagel7) 



MARGARITA CORTEZ 

family has been quite 
strong in dealing with the 
tragedy. 

"I think we've coped 
very well," she said. 
"We lived through 
Thanksgiving, we lived 
through Christmas, and 
we lived through New 
Year's. But the hardest 
one of all will be the 
anniversary date (of the 
fire)." 

Cortez said everyone 
in her house has dealt 
with their loss in an 
individual way. 

"My mother almost 
never goes out," she said. 
"Day in, day out she's 
here, except when she 
occasionally goes 
shopping. And my father 
doesn't talk about it (the 
deaths) at all. He works 
many hours, from early in 
the day to late at night. 
He still feels guilty about 
what happened." 

(Herminio Cortez, 
who was the only other 
family member at home 
on the night of the fire, 
tried in vain to help 



"^ 5 ,000 More Residents 
Than U.S. Counted? 




Door-To-Door 

City Census 

Starts Monday 

By STEVE KAVANAGH 

The city will be conducting a door-to-door census starting Monday in 
North Quincy and Squantum. 



City Clerk John Gillis 
said he thinks there are 
about 5,000 more people 
living in Quincy than was 
reported by the 1990 
federal census. 

The U.S. Bureau of 
Census reported last 
March that Quincy had 
84,985 residents-up 242 
from the 1984 census. The 
1985 Massachusetts State 
Census counted 88,122 
Quincy residents. 

Gillis said he believes 
the federal census was 
incorrect and may have 
missed members of 
Quincy's Asian population. 
The city will hire 
census workers, including 
residents of Asian descent, 
to go door-to-door. Gillis 
said the cost of the census 
would be about $25,000. 

The census will take six 
weeks (one week per 
ward). After completing 
Ward 6 workers will 
canvass Ward 5 beginning 
Feb. 3; Ward 4, Feb. 10; 



Ward 3, Feb. 17; Ward 2, 
Feb. 24; and Ward 1, 
March 2. Census workers 
will wear identification 
badges with the city seal, 
Gillis said. 

"We hope the people 
will open their doors to the 
census takers so we can 
get an accurate count," 
Gillis said. 

The census workers will 
wo.k Monday through 
Saturday, 9 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m. and Sundays from 11 
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 

Robert Brennan, head 
of Quincy's Data 
Processing Department, 
said forms wiU be printed 
this week for census takers 
to use. Census woikers will 
verify current residents and 
add new residents and 
delete any who have 
moved. 

Gillis said the city does 
its own census on a regular 
basis but normally by mail. 

"We usually do a 
mailing but recently it has 



not been that successful," 
he said. 

The 1990 U.S. Bureau 
of Census counted 77,915 
white residents, 928 black, 
5,577 Asian or Pacific 
Islander. The census listed 
358 people of "other race." 

Quincy ranked ninth in 
Massachusetts in 
population just behind Fall 
River and ahead of 
Newton. 

Census figures are used 
by some federal agencies 
in determining grants and 
aid. The numbers are also 
used to determine state 
and federal legislative 
districts and the number of 
electoral votes a state has. 

Gillis said if the Quincy 
census shows a higher 
population it will not 
change the official federal 
figure but it could help the 
city at the time of the next 
federal census. 

"We'll be able to show 
them that they were wrong 
next time," Gillis said. 



Firefighters Help Mother 
Save Infant Son 



Two Quincy 

firefighters helped a 
young mother save the 
life of her infant son 
after the baby stopped 
breathing Tuesday 
evening. 

Donna Correia of 
Federal Ave., South 
Quincy, was feeding her 
one-month-old son 
Justin Garofalo Tuesday 
evening when the baby 
stopped breathing after 
choking on some 
formula, said Deputy 
Fire Chief Joseph 
Walsh. 

After a brief yet 
futile attempt to clear 
the infant's windpipe 
and restore the baby's 
breathing, Correia 
called the fire 
department at 10:11 
p.m. "She was very 
panicky," Walsh said. 

Firefighter Robert 
Shea received the 911 
emergency call and 
fellow Firefighter Peter 
Lindblom alertly picked 



up the same line. Shea 
and Lindblom are both 
emergency medical 
technicians and are 
trained to respond to 
medical emergencies. 

"When I got the call, 
the baby was choking 
and not breathing at all. 
I told her to do four 
back blows because you 
can't do the Heimlich 
Maneuver on a baby. 
She did the back blows 
and the baby threw up. 
The baby then began 
crying and started 
breathing again," Shea 
explained. 

"She calmed down 
after that." 

While Shea coached 
Correia, Lindblom 
dispatched Rescue One 
to the scene. He also 
asked the mother if 
there was someone in 
the house who could 
stand outside the house 
and "flag down" the 
emergency vehicle. 



Within two minutes. 
Rescue One arrived. 
An ambulance also 
arrived. The baby, who 
was now breathing 
again, was taken to 
Quincy Hospital for 
observation. 

The baby was 
brought to a physician 
for ftirther observation 
Tuesday. 

Lindblom, 35, of 
Weymouth, has been a 
Quincy firefighter for 
more than four years. 
Shea, 36 and a resident 
of Hull, has been on the 
department for three 
years. 

Tuesday was the first 
time Shea had worked 
the night shift. It was 
also the first time he 
had received an 
emergency call. 

"The guys did a 
great job coaching her 
and saving the baby's 
life. They did a great 
job," Walsh said. 



Page 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 23, 1992 



MWRA Provides More 
Space At Staging Area 
For Quincy Fire Dept. 



The Massachusetts Water Resources Authority 



Full Service Oil Change 



$16 



ncg $21 90 
ChII Oi-rilrr Foe Dctdlll. 
With thu coupon only 

Expires 1/29/92 



Carbureted Maintenance Tune-Up 



$49 



90 



carb an. * i'e 
cyt digMy higher 

Includes: Performance 
& Emissions Analysis 
Install new resistor plugs 
Adjust: timing, idle, fuH-air 
mixture, where possitjie 
Inspecc sensors, tielts, hoses 
inters. 

PkJS Sparks Triple Guarantee 
see details t>elow. 



$1 50° OFF 




Winter 
Package 



r 

■ IrKludes Any Sparks Tuiw-Up 

■ PkJS Oil, Lute ft Filtw up to 5 qts. of 1 0W30 oil 

1-' 



PkJS Cooling System Flush up to 2 gal. of antifreeze] 

CjM De«cr For DrMt WUt this coupon only 
C«nrm be uKdIn conjunction wtahwy other oflkr E)q>lrM 1/2S/B2 



I 



«5 



00 OFF 

On Any Brake Rerair 

en OeHer For DetMiVMhINt coupon amy Ei^ras 1/20/92 




OWnWlEaUMUMTEE 

Mmc Ow Mian qMM I* la prio* yai pnr. 
MicOuramM Of MOMd mnikcif OT 

rinonMncK Af woritawflmiMdlor 
12 monti a ItOOO miM. JM tor OMHii 



I 

1 
I 



■ H QUINCY ■ 770-4933 .■ 

■ 664 Washington St., Rte. 3A '® I ■ 
■^ (acrou from Tht Ship Yardl i^— ■ 



Houri: M F 8 6 • SaI. 8 4 



has provided the Quincy 
Fire Department additional 
space at the Fore River 
Staging Area to store and 
maintain their vehicles. 

In April, 1989, the 
MWRA granted Quincy a 
five-year license allowing 
the city's fire department 
to use a single bay at the 
FRSA to service and 
repair fire trucks. The fire 
department, which lacks 
indoor maintenance 
facilities, will now be able 
to use more space within 
the same building at the 
FRSA at no cost to 
Quincy. 

"The MWRA is more 
than happy to 

accommodate the needs of 
the Quincy Fire 
Department," said MWRA 
Director Paul Levy. "We 

strive to maintain an 
amiable and cooperative 
relationship with Quincy 
and hope it will continue 
that way." 




QUINCY SONS OF ITALY Lodge 1295 held its annual Cerebral Palsy Brunch Sunday 
in conjunction with the national telethon shown locally on WCVB-Channel 5. The 
brunch, which was attended by approximately 350 people, raised $4,000 for Cerebral 
Palsy research and services. People who have CP are physically disabled due to faulty 
links between the brain and motor nerves. Lodge President Michael Capone, second 
left, and State Trustee John Falvey, second from right, are Joined by Brunch Co- 
chairmen John Norton, left, and Kevin Realini. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 

Black's Creek Clean-Up 
Planned By Youth Council 

By STEVE KAVANAGH 

The Quincy Youth 
Council is planning a 
clean up of the Black's 



Announcing 

theb^inningof 
averyhealmy 
relationship 

lijQuincy Health 
Hospital Stop" O 



Experience, Convenience. Better service. A medical team prepared to 
address your family's health needs no matter how large or small. These are the 
benefits of the new affiliation between HealthStop and Quincy Hospital. 

If you're looking for quality medical care, go to the nearest HealthStop. 
Our family physicians and internists are available weekdays, evenings and 
weekends. You and your family will get immediate medical attention at our 
easy-to-find locations in Quincy, Braintree, Hanover and Weymouth. 

Should you need specialized care, HealthStop can refer you to a physician 
on the Quincy Hospital medical staff The staff at HealthStop will call ahead and 
make all the arrangements for you. 

The whole idea is to make not only the treatment, but the process of 
getting excellent medical care as painless as p6ssible. If you'd like some more 
information on how the HealthStop/Quincy Hospital affiliation can benefit you, 
your family, or even your company please call. We're at (617) 964-1870 ext, 266, 

Excellent health care close to home — HealthStop & Quincy Hospital 

HealthStop Locatkms: Braintree, 759 Granite St, 617-848-1950; Hanover, 20 East St, 617-826-3146 
Quincy, 25 Scammeil St, 617-773-2144; Weymouth. 795 Bridge St, Rte. 3A, 617-3374105. 

Quincy Hospital, 114 Whitwell St , Quincy, MA 617-773-6100 



Creek area. 

The council recently 
formed committees to 
work on projects such as 
the environment and 
planning teen social 
activities. 

"We have called the 
MDC to see about 
cleaning up the Black's 
Creek area," said Michael 
D'Amico, Youth Council 
co-director. 

"David Raherty (Ward 
3 Youth Councillor) has 
been recruiting Quincy 
High School students to 
help clean up debris," 
D'Amico said. 

Members of the 
council's Environmental 
Awareness Committee 
include Flaherty, Angela 
Chabot and KelU Langille. 
The committee is chaired 
by Francis Derwin, a 
resident of Tobin Towers, 
80 Clay St., who is 
President of the Civilian 
Conservation Corps., 
Chapter 60. 



Derwin has stated that 
he wants the schools to 
provide environmental 
awareness programs as an 
extra-curricular activity 
and as part of the school 
curriculum. Derwin and the 
Youth Council will work 
together to gather support 
for the idea. 

The Function Planning 
and Social Committee will 
organize youth forums and 
activities such as dances. 
The council wants to 
provide Quincy youngsters 
with positive leisure 
alternatives. 

Committee members 
are Jacob Drohan, Jill 
Fishman, Andrew Kramer 
and Erin Haherty. 

The Youth Council also 
has established a Fund 
Raising Committee whose 
purpose is to raise money 
for council projects. 

Committee members 
are Jeffrey Earnest, Steve 
Parsley and Marcia 
Malone. 



Taso's Gets License 
For Wine & Beer 



Taso's Pizza, 1622 
Hancock St., has won 
approval for a CV-Wine & 
Malt license from the City 
License Board as part of 
its expansion. 

Taso's is expanding into 
the space next door at 
1620 Hancock St. and will 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



cater more toward an aduK 
clientle. 

"The way I understand 
it, they ate basically going 
from a take-out restaurant 
to a sit-down restaurant," 
said Fire Chief Thomas 
Gormaa 

The owner, Anastasios 
Kapsaskis, told the board 
he will remove the pinball 
and video machines in his 
pizza parlor "to better 
control the younger 
CTOwd." 
"STEVE KAVANAGH 



P^ 




IN.SIIRANCE A<;FNI V.INI 

"B« Sure Now • Not Sorry Later" 

OUR NEW LOCATION IS: 
62 DERBY STREET. HINQHAM. MA 

PO BOX 522 ACCORD STATION 02018-0522 

Rear BIdg., behind SHEARSON & LEHMAN 

(OFF RTE 3, EXIT 15 NEXT TO Hh. JHAM PLAZA) 

TEL: (617)740-4070 
COME BY AMD VISIT OUR NEW OFFICE 



Thanday, January 23, 1992 Qntaicy Son Pfts* 3 



For NQHS Athletics, 
Bishop Field Improvements 

Montclair Men's Club 
Donates Over $54,000 



By ROBERT 
BOSWORTH 

When the Montclair 
Men's Club officially 
closed its doors in 
December, 1989, the 
civic-social institution left 
behind a legacy of 
community involvement, 
fellowship and service. 

Now, more than two 
years later, members of 
that defunct group have 
added to that legacy by 
making a donation of more 
than $54,000 to the city of 
Quincy. In addition, the 
contribution was allocated 
into two tnist funds so that 
North Quincy boys and 
girls will benefit from the 
fund for years to come. 

The money, which 
members recently 
presented to Mayor James 
Sheets, will be divided for 
two purposes. One fund in 
the amount of $27,000 will 
be used to offset athletic 
fees at North Quincy High 
School. The second fund 
will be used for 
improvements and 
maintenance to Bishop 
Field, located at Holbrook 
Rd. and Small St. adjacent 
to the Montclair School. 

According to James 
Kelley, an original 
member and past president 
of the club, $2,000 of the 
trust funds' principal plus 
interest accrued will be 
distributed from the two 
funds each year. The 
city's park department will 
determine how the Bishop 
Field fund is spent and the 
school committee will 
earmark the athletic fee 
revenue, he said. 

Kelley noted the 
athletic fee trust ftind will 
be beneficial in these 
trying economic times. 
Cutbacks in athletic 
budgets have forced fees 
for some sports to more 
than $60. 

Kelley and Joseph 



Gildea, another original 
member and past 
president, said the 
members met and voted to 
set up the two trust funds. 
The athletic fees and 
Bishop Field 

improvements were 
targeted because members 
wanted to money to 
benefit Montclair 
youngsters and the 
community. 

"We wanted to do 
something for Montclair. 
We wanted to help the 
kids and the community 
and combine those causes 
if we could," Kelley said. 

"It will help the boys 
and girls of Montclair who 
play sports at North 
Quincy High School and 
keep up Bishop Field," 
Gildea added. Each trust 
fiind has been set up to 
last as many as IS to 17 
years, Kelley said. 

Tte funds are the result 
of the sale of the 
clubhouse and property in 
Montclair. Remaining 
revenue generated by the 
sale went to attorney's 
fees, sales taxes and other 
taxes and miscellaneous 
debts, Gildea said. 

"We were left with a 
clean bill of health. We 
paid up everything," he 
said. 

In addition to the two 
trust funds, the men's club 
has also donated $2,500 
for a historical lamppost in 
Quincy Center. 

The trust funds and 
lamppost expenditure are 
only the latest in the club's 
long list of community 
services, fellowship and 
achievements during its 
40-plus years of existence. 

When the WoUaston 
Golf Club moved, 
members led the fight to 
locate another golf course 
there (Presidents Golf 
Course) and keep the area 
sunounding the course 



open space. 

Members were also 
responsible for brighter 
sodium vapor lights along 
West Squantum St. 

Of course, the club was 
synonymous with sports. 
Gildea's "Sports Nights" 
and "Award Dinners" 
attracted some of the 
greatest names in sports, 
including Bobby Orr, John 
Havlicek, Gino Cappelletti 
and Bobby Doerr. 

In fact, sports is the 
main root in the club's 
history. 

The Montclair Men's 
Club began with men 
playing baseball at Bishop 
Field and as a baseball 
team in the Park League. 
Those associated with the 
team rented the Montclair 
Improvement Association 
building for meetings and 
decided to call their 
organization the Montclair 
Men's Club. 

The organization started 
Sept. 12, 1946 and 
received its club charter 
almost a year later on 
Sept. 24, 1947. 

In the early years, the 
club was very active. 
Weekly dances were held, 
and bcvl'ng leagues 
flourished; sell-out crowds 
attended the mammoth 
sports nights held at North 
Quincy High School and 
the clubhouse. In its bey 
days, the club boasted 
more than 300 members, 
all of whom lived or had a 
relative who lived in 
Montclair. 

But in December, 1989, 
the club was forced to 
close its door because of 
low membership and rising 
taxes and costs to operate 
and maintain the building. 

And although the 
members were taken out of 
the club, the club couldn't 
be taken out of the 
members. To this day, 
members still remain 




MONTCLAIR MEN'S CLUB officers present a check for more thaa $54,000 to Mayor 
James Sheets. The money will be used to offset athletic fees at North Quincy High 
School and improvements to Bishop Field hi Montclair. Makhig the presentation are, 
from left, Edward Adams, past president; George Olson, past president; Richard Post, 
flnancial secretary; William Connelly, treasurer; Mayor Sheets; James Kelley, 
recording secretary; and Joseph Gildea, past president. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Robert Bosworth) 



close, getting together for 
social functions and card 
games. 

"There is still a 
tremendous friendship 



among the members 
today," Gildea said. 

And with the club's two 
trust funds, that friendship 
will continue and a new 



generation of Montclair 
residents and youngsters 

will benefit from the club's 
legacy. 



Two Traffic Changes In 
North Quincy Implemented 



Two traffic changes, 
one involving a signal 
operation and the other a 
conversion from a one-way 
to a two-way street, have 
been implemented in 
North Quincy, aimounces 
the Quincy Traffic and 
Parking Department. 

At the intersection of 
Hancock St., East 
Squantum and West 
Squantum Sts., the traffic 



signal operation has been 
changed to facilitate left 
turns by northbound drivers 
on Hancock St. 
Northbound traffic on 
Hancock St. now has an 
advanced green signal 
indicated by a green left 
arrow. 

The change was made 
to reduce traffic accidents 
at the intersection. 

Motorists in North 
Quincy are also advised 



that Fayette St. has been 
changed to a two-way 
street between West 
Squantum St. and 
Holbrook Rd. only. 
Fayette St. remains a one- 
way street south of 
Holbrook Rd. 

No parking at any time 
is in effect on the east side 
of Fayette St. between 
Holbrook Rd. and West 
Squantum St. 



Before It Snows! 



Atlantic Fish & Lobster 

Fresh Fish & Shellfish 

Fried Foods - Daily Specials 

Live Lobsters 



A 



Retail & Wholesale 



Vv 



Homemade Fish & Clam Chowder 
Open 7 Days a Week 

10% Discount With This Coupon 

148 Granite St. 
774- 1 1 22 In The Fruit Basket Store 



; BLOW OUT OIL CHANGE ; 

I ^9-95 ^""^"^^ 

j Premium Quality Lube, Oil, Filter [ 
I 14 Point Safety Inspection i 

I with This Ad^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^JE)yjre^ 1/31^92 J 



PETAR'S ERK 

AUTOMOTIVE AUTO I 

(617)786-9080 (617)47 

324-330 Quincy Ave., Quincy 



ERIC'S 
AUTO BODY 

(617)472-6759 





Blackwood Pharmacy 
471 -3300 

Very Personalized Service by Bonnie Seely, 
and her Staff 

FREE DELIVERY Quincy and Milton 



BONNIE SEELY BS-RPh 



30% OFF ALL 

Russell Stover Candies 

Now Through Valentine's Day 



Hours: Open Dally 9-8 

Saturday 9-6 

Sunday 8:30-2 



Blackwood Pharmacy 



663 Hancock St. 

Quincy 

471-3300 



Page 4 Qoincy Snn Thursday, January 23, 1992 



Opinion 




USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co , Inc 

1372 Hancock St . Ouincy. Mass 02169 

Henry W Bosworlh Jr . Publisher 
Robert H Bosworth, Editor 



3W per copy. $12.00 par year by mall in Quincy 
114.00 par yaar by mall outtlda Ouincy. $17.00 out of itata 

Telephone 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 
Second class postage paid at Boston. Mass 

Postmaster Send address change to 
The Quincy Sun, 1372 Hancock St , Qumcy. Mass 02169 



The Ouincy Sun assumes no fmanciat responsi&.lity for 
typographical errors m advertisements tKil will reprint thai 
part of an advertisement in which the typographical error 
occurs 



Rabies May Enter 
State Early This Year 



A mid-Atlantic strain of 
rabies carried by raccoons 
is expected to enter 
Massachusetts early this 
year, according to the 
state Department of Food 
and Agriculture's Division 
of Animal Health. 

There were some 200 
cases of raccoon rabies in 
western Connecticut last 
year. 

In an advisory issued 
recently, Mabel Owen, 
state director of Animal 
Health, notified cities and 
towns that all dogs must 
be licensed and strongly 
recommended that house 
cats also be vaccinated. 

According to state law, 
all dogs, six months or 
older, must be Ucensed in 
Massachusetts. Proof of 
rabies vaccination must be 
provided before a license 
will be issued. 

"Every traditional 



method of rabies 
protection must be 
complied with fully. A 
thoroughly vaccinated dog 
population will provide a 
butter between infected 
wildlife and people. 
Rabies in human is a fatal 
disease," Owen said. 

Officials also advise 
against attempting to feed 
or handle any wild animal, 
such as raccoons, 
especially those behaving 
abnormally. Anyone 
observing abnormal 
behavior in a wild animal 
should contact their city or 
town animal officer. 

Some cities and towns 
will be conducting 
vaccination clinics 
offering low-cost 
inoculations. For more 
information, contact the 
Division of Animal Health 
at 617-727-3018, ext. 165 
or 162. 




BUY U.S. 
SAVINGS BONDS 



Medically 
Speaking 

by Michael M. Bakerman, M.D., FA.CC 
VISUAL DEFECT MAY CAUSE DYSLEXIA 



A team of Harvard 
scientists lias found new 
evidence to support the 
theory that dyslexia is not 
just a behavioral or 
emotional problem, but 
may be caused by brain 
defects. As many as four 
or five percent of 
Americans struggle with 
dyslexia, a common 
learning disability that 
affects language usage 
and reading. The disability 
often results in severe 
learning difficulties. The 
Harvard researchers 
concluded that several 
different brain defects 
impair vision and hearing in 
dyslexics. This would 
mean that dyslexic 
children start having 
problems processing what 
.they, see and hear in a 
normal, organized way 
even before they start to 



speak. The new findings 
could lead to earlier 
diagnosis of dyslexia. 

P.S. President 

Woodrow Wilson, Vice 
President Nelson 
Rockefeller and General 
George Patton were all 
dyslexic. 

This column is 
presented as a public 
service for the benefit of 
all by the offices of 
COMPREHENSIVE CAR- 
DIAC CARE. If you have 
further questions about 
this or any topic covered in 
this column, call us at 472- 
2550. If necessary, we will 
refer you to another 
medical professional. 
Office hours are by 
appointment at 101 Adams 
St., Suite 24, in Quincy. I 
am affiliated with Quincy 
Hospital and South Shore 
Hospitals. 




Sunbeams 

By Henry Bosworth 



Guns And Tutors 



Should two Quincy High School students expelled 
for carrying guns be provided tutoring as their 
right to an education? 

The state Department of Education says "Yes." 

The Quincy School Committee — a majority four 
members — says "No." 

The question appears to be headed to court for a final 
answer. 

Meanwhile, I don't know about you but I find 
myself leaning toward the four School Committee 
members who voted against providing tutoring for the 
two 15-year-olds. 

The estimated cost of tutoring them for the remainder 
of this school year is $6,000. 

Now, $6,000 really isn't a lot of money. 

But why should taxpayers have to come up with 
even $6 for private tutors for any students who indicate 
they apparently aren't interested in education or living 
by the rules. 

It's not just the money. It's also the principle of the 
thing. 

But Sandra Moody, acting general coimsel for the 
state Department of Education says Massachusetts 
commimities are obhged to provide an education for 
every child under 16. 

And, says she, kids who cause trouble and don't 
belong in school buildings, must be provided tutoring. 

But this apparently is a board policy — not a law and 
has not been tested in court. 

Moody wants to take Quincy to cottft over this. And 
Quincy apparently is ready to go. It would be a pre- 
cedent-setting case that other conununities would be 
closely watching. 

There's got to be an argument with the thinking that 
every troublemaker expelled from school is then auto- 
matically entitled to private tutoring. 

Why should taxpayers have to pick up that tab? And 
what makes anyone think that u-oublemakers who 
don't pay attention to their teachers will pay any 
attention to tutors? Providing Uitors won ' t automatically 
give them an education because they won't automati- 
cally be tuned in. 

School officials don't cherish coming down hard on 
young people who make mistakes. But young people 
have got to learn that there are do' s and don' ts out there 
and if they choose to go with don'ts, there's a penalty 
that goes with it. 

People are getting a little tired of the misfits in life 
— yoimg and adult — who thumb their nose at society, 
get caught and then expect society to bail them out. 

As far as schools are concerned, aren't the other 
students entitled to rights and consideration? Shouldn ' t 
they have the right to feel safe in a classroom without 
fear someone in the next seat or behind them has a 
loaded gim in his pocket? 




AGNITTI 

INSURANCE 

AGENCY, INC. 

Let us give you a 
competitive quote on your 
AUTO, homeowner, business. 
Anthony L. Agnitti life and health 

• Registry Service 

• Free Notary Service • Time Payments 

• Fully Computerized 
• Quotes By Phone 

21 Franklin St. 

Quincy, 021 69 770-01 23 




Mayor james Sheets, who is chairma n of the Schoo l 
Committee and one of the four who 
voted against providing tutoring in 
the gun case, said it for a lot of parents 
when he observed: 

"I would have difficulty if I send 
my son to high school and I don't SHEETS 
know if the kid next to him has a gun or not. I think it's 
deplorable." 

Most kids today want an education and are working 
at it. But it isn't easy. 

Sometimes they have to put up with classroom 
clowns, jokers and malcontents who are just occupying 
space and grudgingly putting in their time waiting to 
get to 16 so they can quit school. 

But the kids who want to learn shouldn't have to put 
up with guns, knives or any kind of weapon. Or with 
kids who carry these weapons. 






RAYMONDI 



SANTORO 



MARIANO 



School Committee members Frank Santoro, Daniel 
Raymondi — an attorney — and Ronald Mariano 
joined Sheets in voting against the mtoring. 






COLLINS DURHN STICE 

Vice Chairwoman Mary Collins, Steve Durkin — 
an attorney — and Linda Stice voted to abide by the 
state Department of Education's policy that expelled 
shidents under 16 should be provided with mtors. 

"These are Quincy children," said Stice, a 
newcomer to the committee, "and Uke it or not ... they 
are our responsibility and that's not a responsibility 
we should wash our hands of" 

True. But we also have a responsibility to me kids 
who don't get in trouble. 

Collins notes a court case could be costly to the city. 

Maybe. Maybe not. 

But it might be worth it. 

Right now, according to the state Department of 
Education, every expelled student under 16 is entitled 
to private tutoring. If they are too troublesome to be in 
school, give them a tutor. 

That's ahnost like giving them a reward for fouling 
up. 

Out of the litigation might come a community's 
declared right to handle each case individually instead 
of the state imposing a blanket "must" ruling on them. 

Kids who get in trouble could still get a break by just 
indicating they deserve one. 

If they are expelled for the school year, let them sit 
it out without tutors. Let them return to school the 
following year as a second chance. 

That year sitting it out would give them time to think 
about wrongs, rights, do's and don'ts. 




The U.S. receives more legal immigrants than any 
other country. Between 1820 and 1984, about 52 million 
people officially arrived on our shores. 



License Board Briefs 



The Quincy Board of 
License Commissioners 
took the following action 
at its meeting Tuesday: 

•Granted a request from 
the Disabled American 
Veterans, Quincy 
Cavanaugh Chapter #79, 
(Carl Anderson), for a 
permit to conduct its 
annual "Forget Me Not 
Drive" fiind raiser April 30, 
May 1 and 2 with rain 
dates of May 7, 8 and 9. 

•Granted a request from 
the Wollasion Legion 



Parents Club, (Marie 
Gallagher), for a One-day 
liquor license for a fund 
raising dance for the 
Legion baseball team at 
the Fore River Qubhouse, 
Feb. I. 

•Granted a request from 
the Montclair Deli, 218 
West Squantum St., 
(William Oliver), for a 
one-day Ucense extension 
for Sunday, Jan. 26 from 
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

•Granted a request from 
the Squantum Youth 



Committee for permission 
to conduct a canning drive 
at Tedeschi's, Squantum, 
Jan. 26, 28, 30 and Feb. 2, 
4, 5, 6; Dunkin' Donuts, 
Jan. 25, 26 and Feb. 1. 2; 
Dollar Saver Liquors, Jan. 
24, 25, 31 and Feb. 1. 

•Granted a request from 
Basky Liquors, Inc., (John 
Baszkiewicz), for the 
transfer of the All Alcohol 
Package Store license 
from Newbury Liquor 
Mart, Inc., 66 Newbury 
Ave. 



•Continued, for one 
week, a hearing regarding 
a request from Balducci's, 
35 Billings Road, 
(Kenneth Balducci), to 
transfer the Common 
Victualer Ucense to Arthur 
Kyranis. 

•Granted a request from 
Footprints, 1515 Hancock 
St., (John Blythe), for 
permission to hold a 
matinee show, Sunday, 

Feb. 22, for ages 13-17 and 
their parents. 



Readers Forum 



Dedication Of Those In Public Safety Profession 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 

In recent years, the 
public safety profession 
has suffered severe cuts in 
personnel, funds, and in 
many other ways due to 
the financial plight of this 
state and our cities and 
towns around the 
Commonwealth. With 
police departments 
merging, votes of no 
confidence to chiefs of 
different departments from 
their members, layoffs, 
loss of fire apparatus, 
closing of fire stations, 
acceptance of no-raise 
contracts, I am sure the 
morale in these fire and 
police departments is at an 
all-time low. 

In view of this, I would 
like to tell the public of 
the dedication of the 
people who work in the 
public safety profession in 



spite of these obstacles. 

On Thursday evening, 
Jan. 9, 1992 at 
approximately 11:15 p.m., 
an accident occurred on 
Quincy Shore Drive 
involving a pickup truck 
which struck a large tree. 

As a member of the 
Quincy Fire Department, 
the ladder company to 
which I am assigned got a 
special call for the second 
set of "Jaws of Life" to 
respond to this accident. 

Upon arrival, I saw a 
victim trapped in the 
vehicle. This entrapment 
was one of the worst with 
which I have ever been 
involved. Due to using 
only first names for over 
an hour, I was not aware 
that the victim was a 
fellow firefighter. Thanks 
and praise to the following 
public safety professionals 



who demonstrated a two- 
plus hours team effort to 
free this man from the 
wreckage and save his 
life: 

To Norfolk Bristol 
Ambulance personnel, one 
of whom held the victim's 
head in traction for a long 
period of time and to his 
partner who made sure the 
IV fluid was flowing 
properly and checked vital 
signs in spite of the 
precarious conditions of 
gasoline leakage all 
around him. 

To the MDC police 
officer (or whatever they 
are called now) who stood 
on the hood of the truck 
holding a heavy portable 
quartz light and afrer a 
very long time asked for 
one glove because his 
hand was burning, but 
never gave up his position. 



Sheets To Speak At Squantum Assn. Meeting 

The 



Mayor James Sheets 
will be the speaker at the 
Squantum Community 
Association general 
meeting Tuesday, Jan. 28 
at 7:30 p.m. at the 



Squantum Community 
Center. 

Sheets will talk about 
his plans for the coming 
year for the city, 
especially as those plans 



8 Elected To Sacred Heart 
Student Council 



Eight junior high school 
students were recently 
elected to the newly 
formed student council at 
Sacred Heart School, 
North Quincy. 

Elected as grade 
representatives for grade 
eight were Kristen Kelly, 
Michael Bums, Christine 
Kennedy and Thomas 
Sullivan. 

Grade seven student 
representatives are Janean 
Pulera, Mark Bracken, 
Kerri McLaren and Edward 
McGillicuddy. 

The students comprise a 
pilot group that will decide 

guidelines to be followed 



WANTED 

Gold, Diamonds 

and 

Jewelry 

Any Condition 



Quincy 

Jewelry 

Exchange 

543 Washington St. 
(Rte. 3A) Quincy 

773-1501 



by the new student 
council. The council's 
goals are to help students 
become more actively 
involved in democratic 
government and to lead 
the nearly 500-member 
student body in plaiming 
group activities and 
service projects. 

The council is under the 
direction of principal 
Sister Ann Marie Ghiloni 
and eighth-grade teachers 
Maryanne Galante and Jo- 
Ann Yuska. 

Sacred Heari School, at 
340 Hancock St., offers 
instruction in grades K to 
8. 



affect Squantum 
pubUc is welcome. 

The Squantum Youth 
Committee will also 
present its plans for 
refurbishment of the 
playground with a new 
basketball court, new 
tennis court and a new 
street hockey court. 



ELEMENTARY 
LUNCH 



Jan. 27-Feb. 28 
Men: pizza, fruit juice, 

chocolate chip cookies, 

milk. 

Tues: NO LUNCH 
Wed: Curly rotini with 

meat sauce, fruit cup, 

fresh baked Italian roll, 

milk. 

Thurs: grilled hot dog 

on a roll, vegetarian 

beans, £mit juice, milk. 
Fri: Grilled cheese 

sandwich, tater tots, fhiit 

cup, milk. 



To the police officers of 
both Quincy and MDC 
who kept spectators at a 
safe distance so we could 
do our job and also for the 
concern they showed when 
they found out it was one 
of our men involved. 

To Fire Chief Thomas 
Gorman who had the 
foresight to have a second 
set of "Jaws of Life" 
rebuilt for just this kind of 
emergency. 

Last but not least to all 
my fellow firefighters who 
I know and work with and 
all others at the accident, 
you gave me a renewed 
outlook as to why I chose 
this profession and I am 
truly proud to be 
associated with you. 

The citizens of the 
Commonwealth should be 
aware that their members 
of the public safety field 
are true professionals at 
their jobs and have 
deepest concern for the 
general public. 

Robert V. Perry 
President, Quincy 
Fire Fighters 
Association 
Local 792 



SECONDARY 
LUNCH 



Jan. 27-Feb. 28 

Men: pizza, green 
beans, apple crisp, milk. 

Tues: early release 
day-Middle School-Hot 
dog on a roll, vegetarian 
beans, firuit juice, milk. 

Wed: Stuffed shells 
with sauce, vegetable, 
fruit juice, fresh baked 
Itahan roll, milk. 

Thurs: Barbeque 
chicken, mashed potato, 
vegetable, fresh baked 
wheat roll, milk. 

Fri: Grilled cheese 
sandwich, tater tots, fruit 
juice, milk. 



DID YOU KNOW? 

if you own a home in Massacliusetts, you may be able to protect some 
of your property from future claims of creditors by filing a Declaration of 
Homestead. Homestead protection can be useful if you are sued as a 
result of an auto accident, business debts, a loan guarantee gone bad or 
other misfortune. A properly filed and recorded Homestead will protect up 
to $1 00,000* of equity In your homestead property against attachent, 
seizure, or execution of judgement by your creditors. (*up to $200,000 if 
you are over age 62 or disabled) 

For more infomnation regarding the preparation of this document or 
other legal documents, call our office today. 

DOC-U-PREP OF NEW ENGLAND 

15 Chauncy Street • South Weymouth, MA 02190 • (617) 337-6194 

SELF FILING 
LEGAL DOCUMENTS SERVICE 
We are not Lawyers, and do not give Legal Advice. 



Thnnday, Juiiiary 23, 1992 Quincy San Pkgc 5 



Quincy's 
Yesterdays 

Quincy Says 'No' 
To Rapid Transit 

A proposed South Shore rapid transit system that would 
tie in with Boston 's Metropolitan Transit Authority at Savin 
Hill drew the opposition of pub-^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
lie officials in Quincy. 



Jan. 22>28 

1959 

33 Years Ago 



Mayor Amelio Delia Chiesa 
noted that the South Shore Tran- 
sit District would be capitalized 
for $20 million, an expense that 
could fall on Quincy, Braintree,«""""""""^^^^^<*" 
Weymouth and Hingham if the plan failed. 

"It doesn't have a chance of passing in the Legislature," 
said Delia Chiesa, "unless those communities assume part 
of the current MTA deficit which is nmning in the vicinity 
of $17 million a year." 

Mccormick appointed 

James F. McCormick Jr. was appointed to the School 
Committee, succeeding Paul K. Duffey, who resigned to 
become general manager of the East Coast offices of the 
Federal Sign and Signal Coip. in Philadelphia. 

City Solicitor Douglas Randall handed down the opinion 
that Duffey 's successor had to be selected by the remaining 
members of the School Committee, choosing the highest of 
the defeated candidates in 1956. 

Former School Committeeman Carter Lee said he thought 
that under the new Plan A charter the choice of "any suitable 
person" had to be made by a joint session of the Qty Council 
and the School Committee. 
Randall's opinion prevailed 

QUINCY-ISMS 
Charies W. Gaughan of 60 Montclair Ave., Montclair, 
was named to the $11,960 post of superintendent of the 
Bridgewater State Farm .. Plans for the modem marina on 
a portion of the Old Squantum Naval Air Station were 
announced by Boston Edison, owners of the land, and 
Gordon Bowen, a Boston businessman ... City Auditor 
Alexander Smith closed the municipal books for 1 958 with 
$721 ,000 in the excess and deficiency fund ... Rib roast beef 
was 26 cents a pound at Foy 's Supermarket, 11 77 Hancock 
St ... Presidents Lodge, Knights of Pythias, was formally 
instituted at the Quincy Jewish Community Center with 
Frank Duby as chancellor commander ... Executive Vice 
President William A. O'Connell announced that the Quincy- 
South Shore Chamber of Commerce will move fixjm 18 
Washington St. into new quarters at 113 Parkingway ... 
George Burke scored 31 points as the North Quincy Koch 
Qub defeated the Nor-Bri Qub of Dorchester, 97-90, in the 
finals of the South Boston Boys Club Tournament ... Mrs. 
Mary McDonald, 75 , widow of former City Councillor Neil 
McDonald, died at City Hospital ... "The Seventh Voyage 
of Sinbad," starring Kerwin Matthews and Kathryn Grant, 
was playing at the Strand ... James F. McGonnigal, execu- 
tive secretary of Local 5, said that a poll of Fore River 
workers came out 3,205 to 3 1 1 against a proposed state sales 
tax ... Mayor Delia Chiesa said preUminary figures indicate 
an $18.2 milliwi budget for 1959, up some $1 .2 million over 
the previous year ... Elizabeth Rosatone of 99 Bigelow St, 
Quincy Center, was selected Betty Crocker Homemaker of 
Tomon-ow for 1959 at Quincy High School ... Union and 
management met at the State House and failed even to agree 
on another meeting date in the 68-day-old strike at the 
Eastern Massachusetts Street Railway Co ... Newly elected 
Cong. James A. Buike opened a Quincy office in the Post 
Office building on Washington St ...Russ Landberg tallied 
34 points in vain as the North Quincy High School basketball 
team bowed to Maiden, 77-62 ... Clifford H. Marshall, son 
of Mrs. KathrynM. Rago of 77 Longwood Rd., Merrymount, 
was selected outstanding member of his platowi at the 
Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, S.C ... A 1955 
Ford Fairlane was $2395 at Fore River Motors, 418 Quincy 
Ave., Quincy Point ... Gerald Goodwin of Haverhill was 
named assistant to pro Dan McNiece at Wollaston Golf Club 
... Henry Willman, membership secretary of the Quincy 
YMCA, said membership was now 4,013 compared to 513 
when the Y moved out of its old building on Washington St. 
in September, 1955 ... Films of the coronation of Pope John 
XXm, taken by the Rt. Rev. Walter J. Leach, were shown to 
the St. Ann's School Guild .. Mayor Delia Chiesa named 
Richard E. Post of 130 South St., Quincy Point, as fence 
viewer ... Sen. Charies W. Hedges headed the Committee 
planning the 40th anniversary reunion of the Quincy High 
School Qass of 1919 



Page 6 Qulncy Sun Thursday, January 23, 1992 




Marie's 
Kitchen 



B\ MAKII .1. I) Ol IMPIO 



Luscious And Delicious 




It was the first time we had ever 
attended someone's 90th birthday 
celebration especially for someone who 
looked and acted 20 years younger. My 
sister-in-law Teresa's beautiful mother 
Gina Vella was an inspiration to us all. 
And the food was something else. I 
naturally managed to snag a couple of 
great recipes; one by her granddaughter 
Jean, a luscious dessert and the other 
by another granddaughter, Ann, a 
delicious baked vegetable-meat bake. 

JEAN'S 7 LAYERED BARS 
1 packet of graham crackers 
1 stick of melted margerine 
1 bag chocolate chips 
1 bag butterscotch chips 
1/2 bag shredded coconut 
1 cup any kind of nuts 
1 can condensed sweetened milk 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a 
slightly greased [an, layer the crushed 
grahams over the margerine. Then 
place the chocolate chips, the 
butterscotch chips, the coconut and the 
nuts layer by layer. Add the condensed 
mUk. Bake for about 30 minutes or until 



top is slightly golden. Cool and cut into 
small squares. The squares are thick 
and scrumptious. 

ANN'S VEGETABLE-MEAT 
SUPREME 
1 10 oz package cauliflower (or fresh 
equivalent) 

1 10 oz package frozen broccoli 
1 cup Bisquick 

1 cup milk 

4 slices cheese (any kind) 

2 eggs 

salt and pepper to taste 

1 Lb ground meat (any kind) 

Steam together the broccoli and 
cauliflower and set aside. Saute the 
meat and set aside. Combine the 
Bisquick, milk, grated cheese and eggs 
and mix thoroughly. Add the vegetables 
and the meat and mix again. Top with 
cheese slices and bake in a greased 9 x 
9 square or round pan in a 400 degree 
oven for about 30 to 35 minutes. Cut in 
squares when cooled. Ann says you can 
substitute any favorite vegetable such 
as asparagus, zucchini, etc. 



CELEBRATING La Leche League's 25tb year are former Qulncy Group members; 
norence Steeves, Marie Wilkinson, Donna O'DonneU and Judy Chase. 



Three Squantum School Teachers 
Nominated For Education Awards 



Chinese-Asian New 
Year Celebration Feb. 2 



The Committee for 
Immigrants and Refugees, 
Inc., will hold its fourth 
annual Chinese/Asian New 
Year celebration Sunday, 
Feb. 2 from 5 to 9 p.m. at 
North Quincy High School. 

The celebration will 
feature songs and dances 
from many Asian cultures 



as well as a banquet 
dinner. 

Featured guest for the 
evening will be Mrs. Susan 
Weld, wife of Gov. Bill 
Weld. She is an expert on 
ancient Chinese law. 

Tickets are available 
from the Wollaston 



Lutheran Church (773- 
5482) or any committee 
member for $10 per adult 
and $7 per child. 

All members of the 
community are invited and 
welcome to attend and 
help usher in the Year of 
the Monkey. 



Richard Meade To Speak At Historical Society 



Richard Meade, 
director of the Quincy 
Planning Department, will 
speak on "Preserving And 
Making Quincy History 
Through Planning" tonight 
(Thursday) at 7:30 p.m. at 
the Quincy Historical 



Society meeting. 

The meeting at 8 
Adams St is free and open 



Three Squantum School 
teachers have been 
nominated for the Reader's 
Digest 1992 American 
Heroes in Education 
Awards, a national 
program honoring 
educators who are making 
a difference in U.S. 
schools. 

Diane Willard, 
Kimberly Gardner and Lois 
Brandes were selected for 
nomination by fellow 
teachers, principals and 
administrators at 
Squantum School. 

Individual teachers and 
principals, or teams of up 
to six educators will 
receive $5,000, with an 
additional $10,000 going 
to their schools to support 
the activities that eamed 
them national honors. In 
addition, up to five runner- 
up schools will be awarded 
$2,000, with $500 going to 
the individual or team. 

Because of budget 
restraints, a city-wide 
three-year enrichment 
program for academically 
talented third and four 
graders was eliminated. 
The principal and third 



grade staff worked on 
developing a building 
approach to meet the need 
of challenging or providing 
for enrichment activities, 
but only for the 
academically talented 
third and fourth graders, 
but all students in grades 
three and four. 

Dr. Willard, a member 
of the team, developed a 
series of contracts in 
language arts and social 
studies to be used in the 
regular classrooms by all 
students. Each contract 
included content area, 
topic, focus questions and 
activities: easy, more 
difficult and difficult. 

All third graders 
participate in the 
academic enrichment 
program within the regular 
education classroom. 
Students identified by 
classroom teachers as 
above average in ability, 
highly task-committed and 
creative, participate 
weekly in specific, in- 
depth problem-solving and 
research experience under 
the direction of a 
classroom teacher and a 



to the 

Refreshments 

served. 

Parents Of Son 



public, 
will be 



resource teacher. Field 
trips and speakers are 
provided for dl students as 
these become appropriate 
to particular aspects of the 
enrichment program. 

The awards program is 
jointly sponsored by The 
Reader's Digest 

Association Inc., the 
National Association of 
Secondary School 
Principals, National 
Education Association, 
National Association of 
Elementary School 
Principals and American 
Federation of Teachers. 

George Grune, Reader's 
Digest chairman and chief 
executive officer, said, 
"Extraordinary 
contributions are made 
each day by ordinary 
teachers and principals. 
We want to find these 
unsung heroes, honor them 
and showcase their 
achievements to 

encourage educators 
everywhere to strive for 
their best." 

Nominations will be 
reviewed by a panel of 
distinguished educators. 
Winners will be 
announced in April. 



Wollaston School PTO 
Sponsoring Two Scholarships 



Paul and Roxane 
Renken of Stoughton are 
parents of a son, bom Dec. 
19 at Brockton Hoi^ital. 



Grandparents are 
Raymond and Cathy Rowe 
of Quincy and Clifford and 
Barbara Renken of Quincy. 



The Wollaston School 
PTO is sponsoring two 
lottery scholarships of 
$200 each to two students 




^ 




from the 1992 high school 
graduating class who 
attended the Wollaston 
School. 

Applications are 
available at the Wollaston 
School office and must be 
completed and returned by 
April 1. 

To qualify for the 
scholarships, students 
graduating in the current 
school year must have 



been accepted to an 
accredited institution of 
higher education. They 
must have either attended 
the Wollaston School or 
live within the current 
boundaries of the 
Wollaston School to be 
eligible. 

The winner will be 
chosen by lottery at the 
PTO's April meeting. 



RECEPTION HALLS 



1120-SEAT 
.JODNEi 
MARMABAY. 
THOINHTTQBE 

The MDct's out 

! function reotn «t Amdia'si 

I has tMOome one of Boston's 

I most popular tpots for u«d' 

dtngt, thow«s, corporate 

mflctinQS, and Qvl-togBthcn 

of aD kinds We feature an 

I extensive menu at affordable | 

prices We owalook Manrta 

' Bay and the Boston skyline 

We'd bke to make your next 

functxm reaUy fly. 

II Pteaw caD 617471 14S3. C 



MELIA 



> Victory Rd. No Qumcy. MaI 



FLORISTS 



Flowers by Helen 

367 BILLINGS ROAD 

WOLLASTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02170 

Flowers For All Occasions 

Specializing in Weddings 

471-3772 

Certified Wedding Consultants 



HONEYMOON 
SPECIALISTS 



Maureen Kane Receives 
UMass Nursing Degree 



space 



THis^ 



Quint's 
Florists 

761 So. Artery 
Quincy 

773-7620 



MUSIC 



PHOTOGRAPHER 



Photography 



's 

Studio 



679 Hancock Stra«t. Quincy 

(Wollaston) 

479-6888 



BAKERY 



O'BRIEN'S 
BAKERIES 

9 Beale Street 
Wollaston 
472-4027 



Maureen Kane of 
Quincy recently received a 
bachelor of science degree 
in nursing from the 
University of 

Massachusetts at Boston. 

Kane, who also named 
to the Dean's List, is a 
1964 graduate of the 
Boston City Hospital 
School of Nursing. A 
former recipient of the 
City of Quincy Employee 



of the Year Award, she is 
currently employed by the 
Hospice of the Quincy 
Visiting Nurses' 

Association. 

A resident of 9 Edwins 
St., she is the wife of 
Robert Kane and the 
mother of five children, 
Robert Jr., Erin, Christine, 
Maiylynne, Matthew, and 
Sarah. 



JEWELRY 



NARFE Meeting Feb. 10 




Poison Rne Jewelry 

Quality and Integrity a Tradition 

The Coletti Family Al - Dave - Mark 

730 HANCOCK ST., WOLLASTON 02170 786-7942 



The National 

Association of Federal 
Retired Employees 

(NARFE) will meet 



p.m. at the Social Club, 
252 Washington St. 

Speaker will be from H 
& R Block. All Federal 
retirees are welcome to 



Monday, Feb. 10 at 1:30 join and anend meetings. 




Mr. and Mrs. DANTE MASTRO 

Mr., Mrs. Dante Mastro 

Celebrate 50th 

Wedding Anniversary 



Mr. and Mrs. Dante 
Mastro of 11 Rosemary 
Lane, Quincy, recently 
celebrated their golden 
wedding anmversary. 

The couple's two 
children Dante Mastro II of 
Pembroke and Rosemary 
Melesky of Dauphin, Pa., 
hosted a reception at the 
Weymouthport Condo 
Function Hall. 

The Mastros were 
married Sept. 7, 1941 at 
St. John the Baptist 



Church, Quincy. They 
have lived at their present 
address for 40 years. Mrs. 
Mastro is the former 
Gioconda Sferruzza. 

Mr. Mastro is a semi- 
retired owner of an 
appliance parts store. He is 
a member of the Sons of 
Italy and the Morrisette 
American Legion Post. 
Mrs. Mastro is a retired 
nurse and bookkeeper. 
They have five 
grandchildren. 



Quincy Hospital Auxiliary 
Heart Tag Day Feb. 7 



Quincy Hospital 
Auxiliary will sponsor its 
annual Heart Tag Day 
Friday, Feb. 7 from 9 a.m. 
to 2 p.m. in the main lobby 
of the McCauley Building. 

Donations for tags will 
be solicited by auxiliary 
volunteers throughout the 



hospital and free blood 
pressure readings and 
coffee will be available. 
The event will also 
include a drawing. 

Proceeds will be used 
to purchase cardiac 
equipment for the hospital. 

Event chairman is 
Marie McKeever. 



Patricia Morrell In 
Students' 'Who's Who' 



Patricia Morrell of 
Quincy, daughter of 
Thomas and Patricia 
Morrell, is one of the 56 
Plymouth State College 
students named to the 
1992 edition of "Who's 
Who Among Students in 
American Universities and 
Colleges." 

Miss Morrell was 
selected by a panel of 
Plymouth State students, 
faculty members and 
administrators, and the 
editors of the annual 
directory, based on her 
academic achievement, 
service to the community, 
leadership in 

extracurricular activities 

Parents 

Kenneth and Elaine 
Russell, 153 Grove St., are 
parents of a son, bom Dec. 



and potential for continued 
success. 

A senior elementary 
education major, she is a 
member of the Plymouth 
State College varsity 
women's basketball team. 
Miss Morrell is a member 
of the Mainstreaming of 
America Club and has 
helped with the Special 

Olympics. She has earned 
athletic and academic 
honors such as being a 
Scholar Athlete and being 
named to the President's 
List for outstanding 
academic achievement 
along with many 
basketball honors. 

Of Son 

30 at South Shore 
Hospital, Weymouth. 




TEL 320-1700 



FASHION OUALIfV CLtANhRS 



LAUNDRY - DRY CLEANI 



NG • ALTERATIONS - STORAGE 



WEDDING GOWNS A SPECIALTY 



PETER LIO 

OVVNCR 



87 BILLINGS HD 
NO QUINCY. MASS 



Social 




Mr. and Mrs. MICHAEL MURPHY 

(Sharon's Studio) 

Jean Sandonato Wed 
To Michael Murphy 



Jean Marie Sandonato, 
daughter of Americo and 
Dora Sandonato of Quincy, 
was recently wed to 
Michael Murphy, son of 
Joseph and Mary Murphy 
of South Weymouth. 

The ceremony was 
celebrated at St. John the 
Baptist Church and was 
officiated by the Rev. 
Thomas Nicastro of 
Wappinger Falls, N.Y., 
who married the bride's 
parents in 1958. A 
reception followed at the 
Son's of Italy, Braintree. 

The bride was given in 
marriage by her parents. 

Aileen Croasdale of 
Manchester, N.H., served 
as Maid of Honor. 

Bridesmaids were Lina 
McLean of Sandwich and 
Anna Scurti of Easton, 
both sisters of the bride; 
Maryellen Zedlar of 
Glendale, Calif., sister of 
the groom; Rita 
Pasqualone and Rita 
Sandonato, both of 
Quincy, and Jamie Lil 
Ascenzo of North Reading, 
all cousins of the bride. 

Chelsea McLean of 
Sandwich, niece of the 
bride, served as Flower 



WELCOME WAGON 
WANTS TO /^A 



VISIT YOU I 

WITH y i 

GIFTS -^ ^^ - 




ALL FREE TO YOU 

If you've become engag- 
ed, are a new parent or 
moved, I'd like to call on 
you vi^ilh gifts in my 
basket, information and 
cards you can redeem 
for more gifts at local 
businesses. Free to you 
and a fielpful way to 
learn answers to your 
questions. 

BARBARA MENDEZ 
479-2M7 




oiri. 

Joseph Murphy of 
Lebanon, N.H., served as 
Best Man for his brother. 

Ushers were Tom 
Cawley and Michael 
Doolin, both of Quincy; 
Jeffiney Zedlar of Glendale, 
Calif., brother-in-law of the 
groom; David Ahlstedt of 
Woburn and Michael 
Murphy of Weymouth; and 
P.J. Ascenzo of North 
Reading, cousin of the 
bride. 

Zachary McLean of 
Sandwich, nephew of the 
bride, served as Ring 
Bearer. 

The bride is a graduate 
of Quincy High School and 
attended Northeastern 
University. She is 
employed by Serono 
Laboratories, Inc., in 
Norwell. 

The groom is a graduate 
of Weymouth Vocational 
Technical High School 
and served in the United 
States Marine Corps. He is 
employed by Barr & Barr 
Construction Co. 

Following a wedding 
trip to Disney World the 
couple is residing in South 
Boston. 

Saw* Gas and Monay 
Shop Locally 




Thnnday, Jannary 23, 1992 Quincy Son Pag* 7 

Jeanne Corcoran 

Quincy Hospital 

Employee Of Month 

Jeaime Corcoran has 
been named the December 
Employee of the Month at 
Quincy Hospital. She has 
worked in the 
rehabilitation department 
as an occupational 
therapist at the hospital 
since January, 1988. 

Corcoran is a graduate 
of the University of New 
Hampshire with a bachelor 
of science degree. Before 
coming to Quincy 
Hospital, she worked at 
New England Sinai 
Hospital in Stoughton aixi 
Portsmouth Hospital in 
New Hampshire. She also 
provided consulting 
services for nursing homes, 
acute care centers and 
home care organizations. 

"Jeanne is an 
outstanding clinician, 
highly regarded by her 
colleagues in her field and 
well respected by her 
peers in the department 
and co-workers in the 
hospital," said Chariene 
Garabadian, director of the 
Quincy Hospital 

Rehabilitation Department. 
"With Jeanne's interest 
and enthusiasm for her 
profession and her caring 



JEANNE CORCORAN 

and supportive approach 
with her patients, she 
makes a significant 
improvement in the lives 
of the patients she treats 
as well as a significant 
contribution to the 
hospital." 

Corcoran will soon be 
taking courses toward her 
master's degree. She said 
she finds "a real positive 
changes in the working 
environment at Quincy 
Hospital over the past few 
years," and enjoys working 
with the state-of-the-art 
equipment in the 
occupational therapy 
department. 

Corcoran lives in 
Quincy with her husband, 
Bob, and two-year-old son, 
Matthew. 



Dogs For The Disabled Topic 
For Quincy A.A.R.P. Feb. 5 



The Quincy Chapter of 
A.A.R.P. #4097 will meet 
Wednesday, Feb. 5 at 1 
p.m. at Pagnano Towers, 
Quincy Point. 

Guest speaker will be 
Ann Sava and her 



assistance dog, Chelsea. 
Sava will discuss dogs as 
partners for the disabled. 

Parking is available at 
the rear of Jonathan's 
Restaurant, Washington 
St., Quincy Point. 



Parents Of Daughter 

Brian and Alison Djerf, at South Shore Hospital, 
1 Grogan Ave., are parents 
of a daughter, bom Nov. 25 



Weymouth. 






Winfield 
'' Gift Emporium 

After Christmas 
Clearance 

25%'50% OFF 
All Merchandise 

Hours: Tues-Sat. 10:00 aiii-5:00 pm 

0|>en Sunday 12-5 pm 

Closed Mondays 

853 Hanco<± St., Quincy 479-9784 







MONDAY SPECIAL 

WASH • CUT • BLOWDRY 

HERSJ20 



TUES. & THURS. 
BLOW CUT SPECIAL 

HIS ^13 „ 



Long hair 
slightly higher 



WEDNESDAY SPECIAL 
PERM SPECIAL ^ 

UNIPERM*' 



Includes Shampoo 



Long hair 
~j slightly higher 
Complete 



iitak: 



FOAM PERM 

All specials performed by one of Russeli's staff 
Russell Edward s 



Complete 

slightly higher Nail Tipping and Overlay S60 
lor longer hair ^ Sculptured Nail. S60 

ff Pedicures 525 

"Body and Facial Waxing Available' 



^^Jf/z/^/z/re (^^/f£ a/i// >/if/Y^ 

OPEN 9-5 DAILY AND WED & THURS EVENINGS 

Cornor Hancock. Chestnut Sts , 1 Maplo St , Ouincy 472-1 060 



Page 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 23, 1992 

Teace-ing It Together' 
For HN Sunday School 



The Houghs Neck 
Congregational Church 
Sunday School classes are 
continuing their lessons 
following the theme 
"Peace-ing It Together." 

The children in the 
early childhood group, age 
two through grade one, 
will meet Sunday at 8:30 
a.m. The intermediate and 
middle school students 
will meet at 10 a.m. in 
fellowship hall. 

Rev. M. Alicia Corea 
will deliver the sermon "If 
One Suffers, All Suffer 
Together," at the 9 a.m. 
worship service. Greeter 
will be Jackie Price. 
Diaconate members 
serving will be Diane 
Robbins and Alpha Story. 
Scripture reader will be 
Jacqueline Freel. 

Dr. Peter V. Corea will 
speak on "Prayers That 
Make Good Things 
Happen," at the 10:30 a.m. 
worship service. Scripture 
reader will be Martin 
Gordon. Greeter will be 
Carol Hallett. Members of 



the Diaconate serving will 
be Peg McDonald and 
Barbara Christie. Arden 
Schofield will direct the 
choir and Dorothy Sparks 
and Harold Little will sing 
an offertory duet 

A coffee hour between 
the worship services will 
be hosted by Pamela 
Praetsch in the conference 
room. 

The Pilgrim Fellowship 
will hold a pizza lunch at 
1 p.m. to welcome new 
members. Pilgrim 
Fellowship encourages 
middle high and high 
school students to join 
them for pizza and ice 
cream. They will be 
planning events for the 
coming months. 

The church is equipped 
for the physically 
challenged. Bring 
donations for the baskets 
in the vestibule for Fr. 
BiU's Place; and the PSSB 
Pantry Shelf. Every 
Sunday is "Welcome 
Sunday" at the church. 



St. Ann's School 
Registration Feb. 5, 6 



St. Ann School, 
WoUaston will conduct 
registration for the 1992-92 
school year for grades K-8 
Wednesday, Feb. 5 and 
Thursday, Feb. 6 from 9 to 
11 a.m. at the school, 1 St. 
AnnRd. 



Registration fee is $50 
(non-refundable). Parents 
should bring a copy of 
child's birth certificate, 
baptismal certificate and 
medical records. 

School records are 
required from grades 2-8. 



Mite Box Thrift Shop Open 



St. Chrysostom's Mite 
Box Thrift Shop, Hancock 
and Linden Sts., is open 
Wednesdays, Thursdays 
and Fridays from 10 a.m. 
to 4 p.m. 



Household items, winter 
coats, skirts, slacks, 

blouses, shoes and dresses 
are available at reasonable 
prices. 



OPEN HOUSE 

St. Ann's School, Wollaston 
January 30, 1992 

Invest in your child's future for: 

• A private atmosphere of care, 
concern, and individual attention. 

• A quality education for every child 

• Moral development through 
Christian teachings 

St. Ann's Offers: 

• Reasonable class size 

• Modern science lab experience 
for grades K-8 

• Extracurricular activities: basket- 
ball, cheerleading, student 
council, choir, drama club, 
science club. 

• A safe and orderly environment 

• Free private tutoring on a regular 
weekly basis 

• A fully supervised and organized 
extended day program at a cost 
of $375 for the entire year 

• Spanish, computer, art, and 
physical education instruction 

• Very affordable rates payable 

monthly 
For more Information Gall 471 -9071 



Religion 



Foundation Director 
United Methodist Speaker 



'Stop Cheating Yourself 
Bethany Sermon Topic 



"Mysterious, 
Miraculous Minas" will be 
the sermon topic of 
visiting pastor. Dr. Robert 
Cruickshank, Sunday at 
the 10 a.m. worship service 
at Quincy Community 
United Methodist Church, 
40 Beale St. 

Greeters will be Joan 
Honig and Maude 
Kyoperie. Richard and 
John Potter will be ushers. 
Margaret Minyard will be 
the lay reader. Gayle and 
Michael Johnson and 
Debbie and Stephen Little 
will manage the 
Fellowship Hour. 

Sunday School will 
follow the Pastor's Young 
Disciples message. Child 
care is provided and 
church facilities are 
handicapped accessible. 

Dr. Cruickshank, 
Executive Director of the 
United Methodist 
Foundation, will conduct a 
"Wills and Trusts" seminar 



at a noon luncheon. He 
will discuss the 
importance of making a 
will and reviewing existing 
wills. 

The Junior High Youth 
Fellowship meets Sunday 
at 6 p.m. 

Open Recreation is at 7 
p.m. Monday and the 
Trustees Meeting is at 
7:30 p.m. 

On Wednesday the 
Senior High Fellowship 
meets at 7 p.m. 

On Thursday, Bible 
Class meets at 10 a.m.. 
Bell Ringers meet at 6:30 
p.m. and Senior Choir 
Rehearsal meets at 8 p.m. 

Coming events include 
an AIDS Healing Service 
with other churches 
participating on Tuesday, 
Jan. 28 at 7:30 p.m. Fr. 
James Hawker, director of 
reUgious education for the 
Archdiocese of Boston, 
will preach a homily. 



The Rev. Robert 
Ketcham will speak on 
"Stop Cheating Yourself 
as his sermon topic 
Sunday at the 10 a.m. 
worship service at Bethany 
Congregational Church, 
Spear and Coddington Sts. 

Scripture reader will be 
Lena Foster. The Chancel 
Choir will sing under the 
direction of Gregory Flynn, 
organist. Greeters will be 
Nancy Cosgrove and Anne 
Keeler. Hostesses for the 
fellowship hour in the 
Allen Parlor following the 
worship service will be 
Mildred Rickson and Betty 
Stevens. 

Church School classes 
are held in the parish 
house at 10 a.m. Rev. 



Ketcham will lead the 
weekly Bible study in 
Room 3 of the parish 
house at 8:30 a.m. Child 
care is provided for infants 
and toddlers to enable 
parents to attend both the 
Bible study and the 
worship service. 

The youth group will 
meet next Sunday from 7 
to 9 pm. Youths of junior 
high and senior high age 
are welcome to attend. 

The Chancel Choir 
rehearses Thursday 
evenings at 7:30 p.m. New 
voices are always 
welcome. 

Bethany Church offers 
Dial-A-Prayer 24 hours a 
day at 773-4500. 



'Distinguishing Marks' Sermon 
Topic At Point Congregational 



Parish Bean Supper Feb. 1 
At Our Lady Of Good Counsel 



Our Lady of Good 
Counsel Parish, 227 Sea 
St., will hold a Parish 
Bean Supper Saturday, 
Feb. 1 at 5:30 p.m. in the 
parish hall. 

The menu will include 
baked beans, ham, hot 
dogs, potato salad, cole 
slaw, rolls and butter. 
Desserts will be served 
with coffee, tea, or cold 
drinks. 

Tickets are $5 for 



adults, $2 for children 
under 12, and may be 
purchased at the weekend 
Masses Saturday and 
Sunday or by calling the 
following committee 
members: Lorraine Grier, 
773-5421; Nancy Pitts, 
472-0861; Dolly Shea, 

328-4995; Margaret Reilly, 
472-3974. 

Seating is limited and 
no tickets will be sold at 
the door. 



The Rev. Fred Atwood- 
Lyon will preach on "The 
Distinguishing Marks Of 
The Church," this Sunday, 
during the 10 a.m. service 
of worship. 

The Rev. Carol Atwood- 
Lyon will serve as liturgist. 
David Lindblom, a 
member of the 1992 
Confirmation class, will 
serve as acolyte. 

During the morning 
service, the pastors will 
baptize Carly Maxwell 
Hampton, the daughter of 
Andrea Neil and Sanford 
Hampton of Quincy. The 
godparents will be Pamela 
Lynch of Bridgewater aiKi 
Neill Hampton of 
Mattapan. 

Church organist and 



choir director. Dr. Herman 
Weiss will play and the 
Chancel Choir will sing. 
Jeffrey Sposato will be the 
soloist 

Church School classes 
are provided each Sunday 
at 10 a.m. Infants and very 
young children in nursery 
and kindergarten are taken 
directly to their classrooms 
at that hour. All other 
children and young people 
attend the first portion of 
the worship service in the 
sanctuary and then are 
dismissed to their classes 
which end at 11:15 a.m. 

For more information 
about the church, call 773- 
6424, Mondays through 
Fridays, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. 



International Folk Dance 
Class At First Parish Friday 



St. Joseph School 
Registration Jan. 29 



Quincy's first 

International Folk Dance 
class will be held Friday, 
Jan. 24 from 8 to 10 p.m. at 
United First Parish Church 
(opposite City Hall). 

The class will be basic 
instruction and all, 
including beginners, are 



welcome. Regina 
Laskowski of Boston's 
Folk Arts Center will be 
the instructor. 

Donation is $3 and 
those who wish to attend 
are asked to wear 
comfortable dancing shoes. 



St. Joseph School in 
Quincy will hold 
registration for next year 

Wednesday, Jan. 29 from 9 
a.m. to 2 p.m. in the school 



library. 

Parents should bring 
child's baptismal/birth 
certificate, record of all 
immunizations and a $25 
registration fee. 



Donations Sought For 
Houghs Neck Auction 



St. Mary School 
Open House Jan. 28 



St. Mary School, 121 
Crescent St., West 

Quincy, grades pre- 
kindergarten through eight 



will hold an open house 
Tuesday, Jan. 28 at 9:30 
a.m. 

Refreshments will be 
served. 



The Mothers and Others 
Club and Boy Scout Troop 
6 of Houghs Neck 
Congregational Church are 
seeking donations for their 
annual auction to be held 
President's Day, Feb. 17, 
at 6 p.m. 

Requested are 

household items that are 
either new or used but in 
good condition. 



SAME DAY SI 



(E-6 PROCESS) 
only at 

Photo Quick of Quincy 

1363 Hancock St. 
Quincy Center 

472-7131 



memorabilia, furniture, or 
small appliances. Used 
clothing will not be 
collected. Items may be 
dropped off at the church, 
310 Manet Ave., the day 
of the auction between 9 
a.m. and 1 p.m. Those 
wishing to have items 
picked up can call 479- 
9086. For more 
information, call 479-5776. 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO 



SERVICE 



MOIIIC 



AUTO-NOME-IUSINESS 
.. DUDIOlTSINt-.ALlED^ 
)• LOCKS RERETED 
• OOOR CLOSERS 
I* PANIC HAROW«NE 
I. AUTO KHS FITTED 



IVISIT OUR SHOWROOM! 
^756 SO. ARTERY. QUINCY I 

472-2177' 



Thundaj, January 23, 1992 Qoincy Sun Page 9 



310 On Central Honor Roll 

Central Middle School Amy Lee Drysdale, Jay J. Andrew Joseph Bisconte, Stromberg, Kathleen A. 

lists 310 students on its Emerson, Jill Alexandra Christopher Jay Bregoli. Swanton, Melody M. 

firstquaiier honor roU. Fishman, Erin M. Flaherty. Kathleen Marie Burke, Wass, James Wong, Eric 

^^y.^: Stephan Gerard Gildea, Kathleen F. Calisto, Thomas Wood, Timothy 

High Honors Rebecca Susan Gordan, Thomas Karwai Chan, Gerard Wood, Annie Yu, 

Grade 6: Kevin Ann, Teuta Hajrizaj, Susan Sean Michael Ciavarro, Steven William Zero. 

WiUiam J. Armstrong III, Hassan Haydar, Carolyn Nichole Jean Demaggio, Grade 8: Christine 

John Patrick Barron, Erin Provost Jarvie, Dianne Irvin L. Diaz, Christopher Aiello, Christina Maria 

Siobhan Barry, Alma Kane-McGunigle, Tina j Dimattia Jaclyn M Amate, Jacqueline Lea 

Panangan Batac, Michelle Katsarikas, Dennis Karol Dubois, Chri^opher Joseph Armstrong, Ruben B. 

Ann Boncek, Jonathan Kohut, Tommy Leung, ^^f^^ j^^on Christopher Austria, Kimberly Claire 

Robert Calm, Paul L. Mehssa Ann Lord, Daniel Dunbar Matthew Arthur Barry, Cassandra M. Beck, 

Carney, Mary Lynn James Macheras, Lynne poley. JiU Marie Garland, Joseph Robert Biagini, 

Chenette, Dennis Victor Maconochie, Kelly Ann Kerri-Lee M ^ Gates Joseph Benjamin Carr, 

Chornenky Jane Lynn Magnuson, Jon Daniel Dominque m'. Good! King Wai Cheng, Jeffrey 

Collins. William E Mahoney, Lauren Amelia Carmela Janet Guarino, Coleman. Brad Peter 

Connolly, Michael Raul McLellan, Janine Jennifer Mary Hartford, Currie, Julian Davis, 






Costales, Patrick J. Elizabeth Miller, Charles 

Coughlin, Joanna Cullen, Francis O'Brien, Jin Kee 

Jon Delucia, William Pacifico, Ann Elizabeth 

Patrick Deshler, Erin Ann Petniccelli, Jill Kathleen 

Djerf, JuUe Danielle Dunn, Picardi, Kosanna W.Y. 

Karl L. Ehrens. Joseph Poon, Laura Beth Powers, 

Michael Flores, Brian Kathryn Dorothy Quinn, 

David Frazee, Justin M. Amanda M. Rork, Laura 

Graeber, Pamela Elizabeth Marie Shea. Erica Lynne 

Gray, Christa Marie Smith, Katherine E. 

Haverly, Emily Sarah Sullivan, Maureen Marie 

Inferrera, Michelle G. Sullivan, Felicia Tam, 

Jodrey, Katherine Anne Jennifer Tantillo, Sean 

Johnson, Tracey L. Patrick Tirrell, Wendy 



Brian Hughes, Daniel Michael A. Deossie, Julie 

Joseph Hynds, Melissa Diplacido. Michael Eddy, 

Keefe, Mark Thomas Susan E. Fenton, Nicole 

Kelly, Patrice F. Kelly, Foti, Vikrant Gadre, Lynne 

Matthew F. Kisiel, Adam Ann Garland, Margaret 

Jeffrey Knowles, Sharon Ellen Goodwin, Kristen 

Kitman Lee, Bryan P. Green, Kelly Cierra 

Linskey, Andrew J. Howard, John Francis 

Mauriello, Isabel Maziarz, Hynds, Matthew R. Jamis, 

Matthew Steven Peter Mark Johnson, Eric 

McLoughlin, Meghan Haytung Lam, Hubert 

O'Brien- Ali, Marie Phan, Lam, Johnny Lee, Chandra 

John F. Quinn, Erin Ann K. Leister, Jimmy Zhan 

Rooney, Sarah Shi Liang, Brendan B. 




Jurewich Michael Kane, Eiien Trafton, Jimmy Rydwansky, Nawal M. Maness, Elice McC^lum, 

Micnael Keenan, Rebecca ^^^ Melissa M. Welch. 

A. Kelsch, Daniel Alan ^^^^-^ Elizabeth Wise, 

Kinnecom, Matthew ^indy Wong, Wingsze 

Stewart Lebo Jennifer yuen, Mei Ying Jemiy 

Look, Leah Lorenzetti, 2iien 

William Ma, James q^^^^ g. Maryann 

Leyland MacDonald, j^^^all Ashworth, Annie 

Amity Lynn Manning, Liza Bergen, Michelle T 



Hisham Saffarini, Nicole Richard Mooney, Daniel 

Mae St. Pierre, Jennifer Patrick O'Donnell, 

Marie Starsiak, Michael E. Gregory Oriando, Matthew 

Stockdale, John Frederick Orlando, Mary Anne 

Sullivan, William Y. Patch, Jennifer Pineo, 

Walker m, Bai Lan Zhu. Ja°et Lynn Psota, Lisa 

Grade 7: Kevin J. Marie Renzi, David 



CARL FRADET, owner of Comer Food Mart on Hancock 
St., Qulncy Center, presents a $400 check to the 
American Cancer Society South Shore Chapter. Beth 
Ann Strenge, second from right, co-chairman of the 
fundraising committee, presents a certificate of 
appreciation to Fradet. Looking on are Eileen Rooney, 
National Cancer Society Board of Directors, and Mary 
Ellen Stowell, area director. Central Middle School 
students contributed to the donation by holding a can 
drive in December. Volunteers to assist in fundraising 
are needed and may contact the local ACS chapter. 
(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman} 

YMCA Aerobics 
Class Begins Jan. 27 

Shore the advanced student. 



The South 



_^„ j,.„, Ahern, William Joseph Francis Risitano, David 

Christopher Ma°nix, goiiino^ jeff^y Boyle, Barron, Marianne Blaikie, RoweU, David Sansevero, ^^^ ^„„^^ ^„„,^ 

Jeffrey Michael Marks, Yinsim Marie Champoux, Ryan Edward Catarius, Joel E. Scott, Leslie A. yMCA will offer a coed Classes will be offered 

xU^ k" d 1, x/?"*^' Valerie Jennette Chin, Angela Chabot, Lily Chan. Smyth. Allison Steele, aerobics class beginning Mondays, Wednesdays 

Michael Patrick McEvoy, j^^^ina Marion Cramer, Laurie Ann Costello, Daniel Patrick Stone, Monday, Jan. 27. This wUl and Fridays from 6:30 to 

Kara Anne McSweeney, ^^^^^^ Crosby, Jennifer Jessica Anne Esdale, Kimberly Bess Sudenfield, be a Hi-Lo combo aerobics 7:30 p.m. Registration wUl 

Jason Yee Moreno, Cullen, Lisa CurUs, Pamela M. Farrell, John Tuan Tan, Judy Wong. class for the beginner to begin Jan. 17. 

Jennifer Anne Morton, pgnj^g (Dung) Dieu, Anthony Ferraro Jr., 

Nyryan V. Nolido, Maura j^^g Donnelly, Kelly Jonathan O. Haddad, 

E. O'Brien, Jill Susanna ^„jj ouggan, Andrew Ashkan Hedvat, Ryan 

O'Connell, Andrea George Evans, Kristin Thomas Herlihy, Peter 

Osborne, Vincent Conrad prancis Fluhr, Thomas Hogan, Nakema Howard, 

Pivmcny, Andrew Tunothy Qg^ard Gildea, MeUssa A. Michael Scott Johnston, 

Risitano, Marisa Lauretta Greene, Michael Joseph James Michael Keyes, 

Ross, Meredith Ann Rugg, Griffin, Maria Anna lorio, Julie A. Kingsbury, 

Sarah A. Satkevich, Lisa Dawn Louise Jacobs, William Kwong, Melissa 

See, Leela Jayne Shankar, Linda Gail Jellison, Lingoes, Peter J. 

Kelly-Anne Shaw, Colin William T. Lebo, Jimmy Loughman III, Courtney 

M. Shea, Kenneth Siu, Lee, Amy Leung, Vincent Mitchell, Timothy 

Edward Angus Smith, Leung, Jason Hai King O'Brien, Kenneth M. 

Stephanie A. Sprague, Liu, Claire Marie Lutts, O'Connell, Christina M. 

Mark J. Stanton, Andrea Benny Ma, Robert Mantia, Partridge, Anna Quach, 

Marie Stevens, Katelyn John Marco Marinilli, Joel Tanya Ritchie, Hillary 

Keppler Sweetser, Erin Yukio Marquis, Andrew Lynn Rogers, Timothy 

Tormey, Thanh T. Tu, Daniel Myers, Christine T. John Semchenko, Bridget 




HANCOCK 



Shannan Elizabeth Neamlu, Suk Ting Ng, 
Whalen, Christopher Amy Nicklas, Michael P. 



Taylor Wilkie. 

Grade 7: Jennifer Lynn 
Austin, Mark Robert 
Belanger, Timothy 
Michael Brown, Jennifer 
Calkins, Vivian Chan, 
Angela Y. Chin, Jamie A. 
Christo, James Michael 
Conley, Erica Davis 
Crawford, Paul Michael 
Daley, Mary Teresa 
Damata, Mark Demeo, 
Kara A. Dempsey, Cuong 
Diep, David M. Doherty, 
Sarah Elizabeth Downing, 



O'Brien, Meaghan 
O'Connor, Debika Paul, 
Kristin Priscella, Jessica 
Lynn Quilty, John 
Frederick Riley, Terrence 
Daniel Roche, Carolyn 
Marie Rolfe, Amalia 
Solano, Kevin Michael 
Sullivan, Yao Giang Wu, 
Lily Yeung. 

Honors 

Grade 6: Justin Patrick 

Adams, Matthew M. 

Allen, Danielle Archer, 

Sarah Katherine Beston, 



A. Shaughnessy, Susan 
Lynne Solimini, Michael 
A. Starr, Alexander Nils 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-3100 





{%J Is pleased to c 



RESTAURANT 

Weymouth Landing 



Is pleased to announce we're now open 

THURSDAY • FRIDAY • SATURDAY 

NIGHTS 
6:00ain-3:30pm*Reopen$ ll:OOpni-inorn. 



% 



# 



33 Washington Street - Weymouth Landing 

337-3270 



It's the new North 

Quincy branch address 

of the South Boston 

Savings Bank. 

• STRONG • CONSERVATIVE 
•RELIABLE •PROFITABLE 

HOURS 

MON - TUES - WED ■ FRI - 9 AM to 5 PM 

THURSDAY 9AM to 7PM 

SATURDAY 8:30AM to 12 NOON 

Telephone 773-8100 



Visit our other 
Quincy branch 
office located at 
690 Adams St, 
Lakin Square 



South Boston 
Savings Bank 

•^^ ALWAYS THE LEADER' 



Page 10 Qulncy Sun Thursday, January 23, 1992 



Arts/Entertainment 




CAST MEMBERS of Quincy Center Dinner Theatre's production of "Rumors" - the 
Neil Simon Comedy •- include, front, I to r, Sharon Evans, Betty Taylor, Molly 
Hochkeppel, Tommie Stevens and Paul Farwell. Rear, I to r, Barry Zaslowe, John 
Hurley and Michael Kelly. 

Quincy Dinner Theatre 
Presents Neil Simon's 'Rumors* 



Quincy Center Dinner 
Theatre will present the 
Neil Simon comedy 
"Rumors" at the Masonic 
Temple, 1170 Hancock 
St., Jan. 25 and 31 and 
Fteb. 1, 2, 8 and 9. 

Cast members include 
Stephen Gainer of Quincy, 

Tommie Stevens of 
Braintree, Sharon Evans of 
Hingham, Barry Zaslowe 
of Jamaica Plain, John 
Hurley of Stoughton, Paul 
Farwell of Boston, Betty 
Taylor of Brighton, Molly 
Hochkeppel of Cohasset 
and Michael Kelly of 
Waltham. 

Ticket prices are $13.50 
- $27.50 and include tax 
and gratuity. For 
information call Darling 
Productions, 843-5862. 




QUINCY RESroENTS Miki Saltzman, right, left, and 
Angela Bohl, both members of Diane Purdy's Children's 
Theatre Workshop rehearse for their upcoming 
production, "KUlings at the Carney," to be performed 
Saturday, Jan. 25 at 3 p.m. at the Woodward School, 1102 
Hancock St., Quincy Center. 





214 Washington Street • Quincy, MA • 847-3940 

Super Bowl Sunday 
Spectacular! 

Free Buffet 

Win Celtics/Bruins Tickets 

Sports Trivia, Prizes & Giveaways 

3 Large TV's Visible from any 
Seat in the House 

OPEN AT 12:00 PM 

Formerly Brittany^s 



Quincy Symphony 
Midwinter Concert Feb. 7 



The Quincy Symphony 
Orchestra will present the 
second concert of its 38th 
season on Friday, Feb. 7 at 
8 p.m. in the Performing 
Arts Center of the North 
Quincy High School, under 
the direction of Michael 
Webster, guest conductor. 

The program will 
include Mozart's Overture 
to "The Magic Flute," 
Copland's "Billy the Kid" 
Ballet Suite, and Dvorak's 
Symphony no. 9, "From 
the New World." 

Webster, guest 
conductor for the concert, 
is a multi-faceted 
musician, well known as a 
clarinetist, conductor, 
composer, and arranger. 
He is currently music 
director of the Jordan 
Winds at the New England 
Conservatory and assistant 
conductor of the Asian 
Youth Orchestra, Yehudi 
Menuhin, artistic director. 
He has also conducted the 
Society for Chamber 
Music in Rochester, N.Y., 
Domaine Forget in 
Quebec, the Brockton 
Symphony and the annual 
St. Maarten Pops Event 
with members of the 
Boston Symphony. In 
addition to the Quincy 
Symphony concert, he will 
also appear this season as 
guest conductor with the 




MICHAEL WEBSTER 



Wellesley Symphony in 
May. 

As a clarinetist, 
Webster has performed as 
soloist with the 
Philadelphia Orchestra and 
the Boston Pops among 
others. He has been 
principal clarinetist of the 
Rochester Philharmonic 
and the San Francisco 
Symphony. As a composer, 
he has had compositions 



and transcriptions 
published by G. Schirmer. 

Tickets are $8 at the 
door, $6 for seniors and 
students. Tickets may also 
be purchased in advance 
at Sullivan's Comer, 716 
Hancock St., Wollaston. 
For information, call 328- 
5347 or 925-4319. The 
Performance Center is 
handicapped accessible. 



'Lend Me A Tenor' 
Auditions Jan. 25 & 29 



Auditions will be held 
next week for Quincy 
Center Dinner Theatre's 
March production of the 
comedy "Lend Me A 
Tenor." 

Auditions will be held 



CINEMAS 

tuiNCY Fair Mall 



Monday, Jan. 27 and 
Wednesday, Jan. 29 at 7 
p.m. at Masonic Temple, 
1170 Hancock St. 

The cast will include 
four female roles age SO- 



SO and four male roles age 
20-50. Two of the male 
roles call for tenor singers. 
For information call 
Darling Productions, 843- 
5862. 



St. Mary's School 
To Present 'Oliver' 



1/23-1-29 



HAND THAT ROCKS 
THE CRADLE-R 

11 ^40 - 2:10 - 4:30 - 7:30 - 10M> . 



f PRINCE OF TIDES-RI 

12.15-3.-00-7:0S-»:90 



FREE JACK-R 

11iM-2:10-4:25-10:10 



St. Mary's School, 95 
Crescent St., West 
Quincy, will present an 
adapted version of Lionel 
Bart's musical "Oliver" 
Friday, Jan. 31 at 7:30 p.m. 



and Saturday, Feb. 1 at 1 
and 7:30 p.m. 

Tickets are $3 
purchased through the 
school at 773-5237 or at 
the door. 



Francesca Stroscio Graduates 
From NE Broadcasting School 



FATHER OF 
THE BRIDE-PG 

1 1j45-2X>6 -4:30- 7:20 -9g 

HOOK-PG 

12:10- 3:15 -7.-00-»:SO 



KUFFS-PG-13 

1 1 :40 ■ 2M0 - 4:3s ■ 7:1S - 10M 



BUGSY-R 

12:10-3.10-7.-00-SM 

FRIED GREEN 
TOMATOES-PG-13 

12:18 -3:15 -700-8 50 

CAPE FEAR-R 

(CdlFeractMdul*) 



Bargain Matinees 

First Three Shows 

$3.75 

773-5700 



Francesca Stroscio of radio. 
Squantum recently The 
graduated from the 
Northeast Broadcasting 
School in Boston. 

He completed ^ 



school offers 
students practical hands-on 



training from a faculty of 
on-air and behind the 



program with a major in scenes professionals 




HOMEMADE 
ICE CREAM CAKES & PIES 

"There's No Taste 
Like Homemade" 

68A BMIngt Rd. 
N. Quincy. MA 

472-8558 



rfta 



Chamber Music Concert In 
First Presbyterian Church Feb. 2 



Thnnday, Jtaauaj 23, 1992 Qnincy Sua Pag* U 



The Amici Quartet, 
composed of Boston 
Symphony members 
Tatiana Dimitriades, 
Bonnie Bewick, Edward 
Gazouleas, and Joey 
Moerschel will present a 



concert Sunday, Feb. 2 at 
2 p.m. at First Presbyterian 
Church, 270 Franklin St. 

They will present 
Mozart's Quartet K. 387, 
Beethoven's Op. 59, no. 1, 



Penny Drive For 
Collins-Rest-A-While 



The Quincy Park 
Improvement Committee 
(Q-PIC), is conducting a 
"Penny Drive" to raise 
money for the renovation 
of Collins-Rest-A-While 
Playground. 

Q-PIC will be at the 
Recreation Department 
Office at 100 Southern 



Artery, Saturday, Jan. 25 
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 
Residents are encouraged 
to donate pennies to help 
rebuild the playground 
located on Southern Artery 
across from Veterans 
Memorial Stadium. 

For information call 
MicheUe Lydon, 471-5780. 



8 NQ Students In 
Honors Festival Concert 



Eight students from 
North Quincy High School 
participated in the 
Southeast Massachusetts 
Music Educators 

Association District 
Honors Festival recently at 
Bridgewater State College. 

Singing in the festival 
concert were Tracy 
O'Sullivan, Jeannette 
Currie, Mark Jolly, 
Thomas Rines, Wayne 
Weikel, David Scott and 
Philip Pacino who 
auditioned and were 
selected for the chorus of 
200. 

Band member 

Christopher Hill played 
first chair in ihe Southeast 
District Festival Concert 
Band. Hill, Pacino, Scott, 
O'Sullivan and Jolly were 
each recommended for the 
All-State Music Festival. 

The choral students are 
members of the North 



Quincy Concert Choir 
under the direction of 
Catherine Camabuci. The 
choir is preparing for a 
combined concert with 
Madison Park and 
Brockton High Schools 
and members of the 
Handel and Haydn Chorus 
and Orchestra on March 1 1 
at Madison Park. 

North's Show and Jazz 
Choirs are also rehearsing 
for a spring musical revue 
on April 7 and 8. 

Hill is a member of the 
North Quincy Band under 
the direction of Richard 
Kenneally. He is also a 
member of the Concert 
Choir. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



SHIPYARD DINER 

South Street (next to Shipyard) 

770-3545 

Under New Management 

Breakfast & Lunch 

Served Daily 

Breakfast: Mon-Fri 6 am-11 am 
Sat-Sun 7 am-1 pm 
Specials $1.99 & up 
Lunch: Mon-Fri, 11 am-3 pm 
Specials $2.75 & up 
Fish & Chips $3.95 ^ 

Take Out & Kiddie Menu Available 



Looking for something to do 
on a Friday Nigtit? 

LAS VEGAS NITE 

Friday, January 24 

7-1 2 pm 

Knights of Columbus Hall 

Hancock St., North Quincy 

Cash Prizes 
Refreshments Available 
Door Prizes 
Free Admission with this Ad 




and will be joined by BSO 
bassoonist Richard Ranti 
and bassist Nicolas 
Tsolainosto perform Jean 
Francais' Divertissement. 
This is the first concert in 
the church's "Artists 
Series 1992." 

Admission is free, child 
care is available and a 
reception with the 
musicians follows in the 
church's fellowship hall. A 
free-will offering will be 
taken to further the concert 
series. 

For more information BRIAN McNAMEE, right, of Billings Rd., Nortli Quincy, accepts tlie UMass/Boston 
call 773-5575 for more College of Management's Distinguished Service Award from Dean Daniel Shimshak at a 
information recent annual business breakfast. McNamee, proprietor of his own accounting service 

and consulting business, received an MBA from UMass/Boston in 1986. 



ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST CHURCH 

Invites you to cruise aboard the "FUN Si-IIP" 

CELEBRATION 

7 Nights, 8 Days 
Sailing from Miami March 28 to 

San Juan - St. Thomas - St. Maarten 

Sponsored by Rev. William McCarthy, Pastor 







Fly/Cruise Cost per person twin basis 
Inside Cabin, 2 Lower Beds, Riviera Deck, Private Facilities 

Regular Rate $1,499 Special Rate $1,099 

You Save $800 per cabin 

Leave Logan Airport Boston, Saturday, March 28, 9:00 am 

Sail from Miami Saturday, March 28, 4:00 pm 
Return Logan Airport Boston, Saturday, April 4, 5:00 pm 






Reservations Deadline, February 28 



For More Inforivation Call: 

Prime Travel 
472-3697 



Page 12 Qulncy Sun Thursday, January 23, 1992 



Nils Olenius, 89 

Retired Locksmith 



A funeral service for 
Nils Olenius, 89, of 
Quincy, was held Tuesday 
at the Hamel, Wickens 
and Troupe Funeral Home, 
26 Adams St. 

Mr. Olenius died 
Wednesday at the 
Middlesex State Hospital 
in Waltham after a long 
illness. 

He was a retired 
locksmith for Quincy City 
Hospital. He retired 20 



years ago. 

He was a veteran of the 
U.S. Anny. 

Born in Sanduiken, 
Sweden, he moved to the 
United States at age 19 
and lived in Quincy for 60 
years. 

He is survived by a 
friend, Paul Wirta of 
Canton. 

Donations may be made 
to the American Cancer 
Society, 294 Pleasant St., 
Stoughton, MA 02072. 



Thomas A. McAuley, 63 

Retired From New England Telephone 



A funeral Mass for 
Thomas A. McAuley, 63, 
of Quincy, was celebrated 
Tuesday at St. Ann's 
Church. 

Mr. McAuley died 
Friday at Massachusetts 
General Hospital in Boston 
after a long illness. 

He was a retired 
assistant manager of 
security for New England 
Telephone, where he 
worked for 40 years before 
retiring in 1988. 

He was a Navy veteran 
and a member of the 
Telephoner Pioneers and 
the Knights of Columbus. 

He was a lifelong 
resident of Quincy. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Ann (Phelan) 



McAuley; his mother, 
Anastasia "Honor" 
McAuley; a son, Michael 
P. McAuley of Hingham; a 
daughter, Maureen 
McAuley of Quincy; two 
brothers, Patrick McAuley 
of Quincy and James 
McAuley of Weymouth; a 
sister, Anna McAuley of 
Grafton; three 

grandchildren and many 
nieces and nephews. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to the Quincy Youth 
Hockey Association, P.O. 
Box 751, Quincy, MA 
02269. 



Frederick 'Bob' Austin, 75 

Retired Diesel Mechanic For Construction Co. 



A funeral Mass for 
Frederick "Bob" Austin, 
75, of Quincy, was 

celebrated Monday at St. 
Mary's Church. 

Mr. Austin died Jan. 17 
at Quincy Hospital after a 
long illness. 

He was a retired diesel 
mechanic for the J.F. 
White Construction Co. 

He was a native of 
Dorchester. 



He is survived by his 
wife, Annette (Noris) 
Behan-Austin. 

Burial was in Milton 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Funeral Home, 326 
Copeland St. 

Donations may be made 
to the Heart Fund, Fourth 
Avenue, Needham, MA 
02194. 




A THOUGHT FOR THE WE£K 

Have you ever noticed 
thoae peraons who think 
twice before malclng a 
promise can usuaiiy be 
counted on to iceep the 
D Scott Deware promlae? 

Careless promises should never be given • 
or counted on. A promise Is a pledge; an 
obligation to be kept. A promise that can 
cauae discomfort, harm or Injustice to 
yourself - or to others - should never be 
made, no matter how much prodding or 
pereuaslon is involved. 

It Is usually very easy to make a promise 
... Expediency or change of mind Is seldom a 
Justified excuse for breaking a promise. A 
promise Involves honor, duty and ethics ... 
The t>est promise you can make - Is a promise 
to yourself ... Promise yourself you will never 
make a promise to anyone, unless you are 
fully prepared and able to keep your promise 
... In addition to aplrllual benefits. It Is a 
good way to gain honor, stature, praise and 
prestige among men ... 

Deware Funeral Home 

576 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 

472-1137 

Memoer of the "New England Funeral Trust 

and your Suburban Boston Pre-Need 

funeral specialist 

Serving Ali Religious FaHhs 

Services Rendered To Any Distance 



Obituaries 



Jerome J. Coughlin, 85 

Retired Norfolk Prison Community Director 



A funeral Mass for 
Jerome J. Coughlin, 85, of 
Quincy, was celebrated 
Tuesday at Most Blessed 
Sacrament Church. 

Mr. Coughlin died Jan. 
16 at Braintree Manor 
Nursing Home after a long 
illness. 

He was the retired 
community director for the 
state prison in Norfolk. He 
coordinated social and 
recreational activities for 
the prisoners, such as the 
debating team and the 
football team. He worked 
for the prison for 35 years, 
retiring nearly 25 years 
ago. 

He was involved with 
the Quincy Community 
Players in the 1960s and 
was hired as an extra in 
the 1963 movie "The 
Cardinal," which did some 
filming in the West 
Quincy Quarries. 

He was formerly 
involved with the Eye 
Openers, a group of singers 
based at the South Shore 
Association for the Blind 
in Quincy. The singers, all 
legally bUnd, entertain at 
area hospitals and nursing 
homes. He sang and 
performed for the group as 



master of ceremonies for 
10 years, until health 
problems forced him to 
step down last year. 

After retiring from the 
prison, he worked part- 
time as a guard for the 
First National Bank in 
Boston. 

Born and educated in 
Boston, he lived briefly in 
Millis before moving to 
Quincy in 1946. 

Husband of the late 
Mary (Howlett) Coughlin, 
he is survived by two sons, 
Denis Coughlin of 
Princeton and Brian 
Coughlin of Fitzwilliam, 
N.H.; a daughter. Sheila 
Hennessey of Quincy; two 
sisters, Arme McCarty of 
Rockland and Ruth Green 
of Dorchester; 10 
grandchildren and two 
great-grandchildren. 

Burial was in St. 
Joseph's Cemetery in 
West Roxbuiy. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for 
Funerals, 1 Independence 
Ave. 

Donations may be made 
to the American Diabetes 
Association, 40 Speen St., 
Framingham, MA 01701. 



Mildred C. Fay, 77 

Worked For Rustcraft Inc. 



A funeral Mass for 
Mildred C. Fay, 77, of 
Quincy, was celebrated 
Jan. 18 at St. Boniface 
Church. 

Miss Fay died Jan. 15 
at Quincy Hospital. 

She worked for 
Rustcraft Inc. in Dedbam 
and Boston for 25 years 
before retiring in 1977. 

Bom and educated in 
Boston, she lived in South 
Boston for many years 
before moving to Quincy 
eight years ago. 

She is survived by two 
brothers, Thomas W. Fay 
of Randolph and Charles J. 



Fay of South Boston; a 
sister, Eleanor A. Daley of 
Quincy; and many nieces 
and nephews, including 
Fay D. Sullivan of 
Foxboro. 

Burial was in Holy 
Cross Cemetery, Maiden. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for 
Funerals, 1 Independence 
Ave. 

Donations may be made 
to the Quincy Visiting 
Nurses Association 
Hospice Program, 1354 
Hancock St., Quincy, MA 
02169. 



John J. Keough, 76 



A funeral Mass for John 
J. Keough, 76, of Quincy, 
was celebrated Jan. 13 in 
Sacred Heart Church, 
Cambridge. 

Mr. Keough died Jan. 10 
at Quincy Hospital after a 
long illness. 

He was a retired 
employee of Columbia 
Packaging Co. 

Bom in Cambridge, he 
Uved there most of his life 



before moving to Quincy 
15 years ago. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Mary T. (Sarchioni) 
Keough; two sons, John J. 
Keough ni and Stephen J. 
Keough; two daughters, 
Margaret A. Lynch and 
Karen A. Govoni; 12 
grandchildren and three 
great-grandchildren. 

Burial was in 
Cambridge Cemetery. 



Dorothy M. Trotman, 65 

World War 11 Army Veteran 



A funeral service for 
Dorothy M. (Hunter) 
Trotman, 65, of Quincy, 
was held yesterday 
(Wednesday) at the 
Hamel, Wickens and 
Troupe Funeral Home, 26 
Adams St. 

Mrs. Trotman died Jan. 
18 at home after a long 
illness. 

She was a World War n 
Army veteran. 

She was born in 
Somerville and was a 
resident of Farmington, 
N.H. before moving to 
Quincy 45 years ago. 

She is survived by her 



husband, George T. 
Trotman; a son, Arthur F. 
Leavitt of Machias, 
Maine; a daughter, Alice 
L. Taylor of Weymouth; a 
stepson, George T. 
Trotman of Seattle; a 
stepdaughter. Donna 
Spruill of Hingham; three 
brothers, James Hunter, 
Frank Himter and Charles 
Hunter, all of Farmington, 
N.H.; a sister, Eleanor 
Hunter; six grandchildren, 
and six great- 
grandchildren. She was the 
mother of the late George 
S. Leavitt. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 



Agnes L. Campbell, 78 

Retired Sales Employee For Jordan Marsh 



A funeral Mass for 
Agnes L. (Meade) 
Campbell, 78, of Quincy, 
was celebrated yesterday 
(Wednesday) at St. John's 
Church. 

Mrs. Campbell died Jan. 
19 at the Elihu White 
Nursing Home in Braintree 
after a long illness. 

She was a sales 
employee at Jordan Marsh 
in Boston for 15 years 
before retiring in 1976. 

She was bora in Boston 
and lived in Quincy for 25 
years. 

Wife of the late 
Thomas E. Campbell, she 
is survived by four sons, 
Thomas E. Campbell Jr. of 
Pembroke, Donald V. 
Campbell of Quincy, 
William E. Campbell of 
Braintree and Paul R. 



Campbell of Quincy; two 
daughters, Carole E. 
Qeary of Nq)les, Fla., and 
Cherie Ann Baldner of 
Hull; three sisters, Loretta 
Coleman of Quincy, Joan 
Pickett of Marshfield and 
Barbara Pozier of Melrose; 
24 grandchildren and nine 
great-grandchildren. 

She was the sister of 
the late Thomas Meade, 
William Meade and 
Marion Neeley. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to St. Anthony Shrine, 100 
Arch St., Boston, MA 
02107-2278. 



Arthur J. Hendrickson, 72 

Retired Purchasing Agent For Shipyard 



A funeral service for 
Arthur J. Hendrickson, 72, 
of Quincy, was held 
Tuesday at the Hamel. 
Wickens and Troupe 
Funeral Home, 26 Adams 
St. 

Mr. Hendrickson died 
Jan. 17 at home after a 
short Ulness. 

He was a retired 
purchasing agent for the 
Fore River Shipyard. He 
retired in 1984 after 45 
years of service. 

He was a member of 
the Veteran of Foreign 
Wars Post 697, Whitman, 
and the Long Service Club 
at the shipyard. 

An Army veteran of 
World War II, he received 
the Victory Medal, the 



CHRISTIAN C:CR • SOPHIA LOREN • JOAN COLLINS • VUAHNET • PIERRE CARDIN 



Eyeglasses 

$25 Off 
Complete 



Jn OPTICAL & Jl 

• MMm HEARING / 

1361-A Hancock St., Quincy Sq. ^ 
773-3505 • 773-4174 ^ 

^Aids^ $499 ' 

Complete 



$499 



30 Day Trial 



2 Yr. Warranty 



American Campaign 
Medal, the Asiatic and 
Pacific Campaign Medal, 
and the Good Conduct 
Medal. 

Bom in Quincy, he was 
raised and educated in 
New York and lived in 
Randolph, Abington and 
Weymouth before moving 
to Quincy 20 years ago. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Evelyn M. (Carter) 
Mattson Hendrickson; a 
son, Arthur J. Hendrickson 
II of Hull; a daughter, 
Grace L. Warner of 
Duxbury; a step-son, 
Donald W. Mattson of 
Quincy; a sister, Agnes 
"Willy" Bennett of 
Weymouth; and six 
grandchildren. 

Burial was in 
Knollwood Memorial 
Cemetery, Canton. 

Donations may be made 
to the Hospice of QVNA, 
P.O. Box 2370, Quincy, 
MA 02169. 



© United W^ 

^^^ It hrinf(\ out the best in all f>f us 



FREE VALIDATED PARKING 



1 YEAR WARRANTY 
ON ALL FRAMES 



H 3 



HAIt-TDN • aVANTGAROF • OSTARnEIAPEN^A t YVESSAINT lAURfNT 



<f 



American Heart 
Association 



Helene Sargent, 101 

Founded Camp Fire Girls Council 



Thanday, Jannary 29, 1992 Qolncy Sun Page 13 



A private funeral 
service and burial at Blue 
Hill Cemetery, Braintree, 
were held for Helene Ward 
(Stockford) Sargent, 101, 
of Quincy, the first 
member of the Quincy 
Council of Camp Fire 
Gills. 

Mrs. Sargent died Jan. 
18 at William B. Rice 
Eventide Retirement 
Home. 

A native of Somerville, 
she founded the Quincy 
Camp Fire Girls when she 
came to Wollaston in the 
1930s. She and her late 
husband, Malcolm 
Cleaves Sargent, were the 
first leaders. 

Mr. Sargent was a 
founded of the Sea Scouts 
in Quincy. 

Mrs. Sargent was past 
president of both 
Wollaston Mothers Club 



and Wollaston Women's 
Club, chairperson of the 
Red Feather Fund and 
USO, and a member of the 
Quincy Neighborhood 
Club, Quincy Community 
Chest and Community 
Council. 

She was a member of 
Wollaston Congregational 
Church for 80 years. 

She is survived by two 
daughters, Shirley 
Forsman of Carver; 
Beverly Morgan of 
Weymouth; five 

grandchildren and seven 
great-grandchildren, all of 
women attended her 100th 
birthday party in the 
Eventide Home where she 
lived for many years. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Deware 
Funeral Home, 576 
Hancock St., Wollaston. 



St. Joseph's Parish Planning 
75th Anniversary Celebration 



Arthur J. McNaught, 68 

Retired MBTA Bus Driver 



A funeral Mass for 
Arthur James McNaught, 
68, of Quincy, was 
celebrated yesterday 
(Wednesday) at St. John's 
Church. 

Mr. McNaught died Jan. 
18 in Quincy Hospital after 
a long illness. 

He was a retired MBTA 
bus driver. 

Bom in St. John's, New 
Brunswick, Canada, he 
attended St. Pa»:ick's 
School in Roxbury and 
was a graduate of Boston 
English High School. 

He was a member of 
the Carmen's Union and a 
Navy veteran of World 
Warn. 

He is survived by two 



sons, Lt. Cmdr. Robert 
McNaught, U.S.N., of Oak 
Harbor, Washington, and 
Thomas McNaught of 
Quincy; two daughters, 
Barbara Gesner of 
Westport and Kathleen 
Brown of Wareham; two 
brothers, Daniel McNaught 
of Watertown and Harold 
McNaught of Walpole; 
two sisters, Rita Jardine of 
Norwood and Mildred 
Foley of Weymouth; and 
13 grandchildren. 

Burial was in 
Massachusetts National 
Cemetery, Bourne. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Funeral Home, 74 Elm St. 



Florence M. Lowe, 72 

Owned Beauty Salon 



A funeral Mass for 
Florence M. (Tinson) 
Lowe, 72, of Quincy, was 
celebrated Tuesday at St. 
Mary's Church. 

Mrs. Lowe died Jan. 17 
at Carney Hospital in 
Boston after a brief illness. 

She was the former 
owner and operator of 
Florence's Beauty Salon 
and the former manager of 
Beauty Garden and Beauty 
Time. She was also an 
instructor at Hanover 
Beauty Academy. She 
retired in 1970. 

She was co-founder of 
St. Mary's School Guild 
and was a member of St. 
Mary's Ladies Sodality 
and the Keepsake Quilter's 
Guild. She also enjoyed 



working with ceramics. 

She was born in 
Somerville and lived in 
Quincy most of her life. 

She is survived by her 
husband, George R. Lowe 
Sr.; a son, George R. Lowe 
Jr. of Kingston; a daughter, 
Maijorie A. Perfetuo of 
Quincy; three 

grandchildren, Stephen P. 
Perfetuo and Lisa A. 
Perfetuo, both of Quincy, 
and Jennifer M. Lowe of 
Kingston; and a sister, 
Helen Barclay of Weston. 

Burial was in St Mary's 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for 
Funerals, 1 Independence 
Ave. 



St. Joseph's Church, 
550 Washington St., 
Quincy Point, is making 
plans to celebrate its 75th 
anniversary as a parish. 

The 75th anniversary 
committee, chaired by 
John (Jake) Comer, has 
been meeting periodically 
since last fall to plan a 
year-long series of events 
to commemorate this 
"jubilee" year. 

Fr. Daniel Graham, 
pastor of St. Joseph's 
Church, says the parish 
has been seeing many 
physical signs of renewal 
taking place at the St. 
Joseph's, namely in the 
church's restoration. The 
exterior has been painted, 
a new illuminated signed 
ere':ted in front of the 
church and new plexiglass 
windows installed for the 
church interior. 

"These are important, 
major reconstructive 
efforts to prepare our 
physical plant for our 75th 
anniversary," Fr. Graham 
said. 

"An anniversary jubilee 
year is a time of joy to 
celebrate what God has 
done in our midst for the 
past 75 years. Begun in' 
1917, St. JosejA's Parish 
has been a dynamic herald 
of faith in the Quincy 
Point area for three 
quarters of a century. 

"Many of you (Quincy 
residents) and your 
famiUes entered this faith 
community through 
baptism, journeyed in your 
faith formation with us in 
our 65-year-old parochial 
school and have achieved 
academic excellence in 
your adult life. Others 
have joined us at varying 
stages of life," Fr. Graham 
s^aid. 



"The jubilee year is a 
special time for each and 
every one of youth 
because you are a part of 
the great history that 
makes up St. Joseph's 
parish family. 

"We will be 
remembering the past and 
the faith-filled people who 
sacrificed to build St. 
Joseph's. Some of our 
relatives and ancestors 
were among those 
parishioners. We are 
planning some all 
inclusive events to 
celebrate the 75th 
anniversary so you might 
want to set your calenders 
ahead now," he added. 

The first major 
anniversary event will be 
an alumni Communion 
Mass and breakfast 
Sunday, April 26 at 8:30 
a.m. The celebrant of the 
Mass will be former 
curate, Fr. Bob Tyrrell, 
now at Archbishop 
Williams High School. 
Homolist will be Fr. Jim 
McCarthy, another former 
curate for many years who 
is presently director for the 
priests personnel office. 

All former sisters and 
teachers as well as former 
St. Joseph's students and 
their families will be 
invited to attend. 
Following the Mass, a 
catered breakfast will be 
held in the new parish hall. 
Tickets are $3.50. For 
tickets, contact the 
Alumni Communion 
Breakfast Chairperson, 
Mary- Jo Glavin Brogna at 
472-0394. Anyone 

knowing addresses of 
former alumni who have 
moved out of the area is 
asked to inform Mary-Jo. 



The next event marking 

Church School Open 
House Sunday At 
United First Parish 



the 75th anniversary will 
be a Communal Mass of 
Anointing of the Sick and 
Elderly of the Parish 
Saturday, June 20 at noon, 
in the new parish hall. 
The event will be chaired 
by Eleanor McBride and 
assisted by Judy Kahler. 
All parishioners who are 
need of the sacrament of 
the sick will be invited 
and transportation will be 
provided. There is a 
handicap access ramp. 

The celebrant of the 
Mass will be the beloved 
former pastor, Fr. Joseph 
Downey, who served the 
church for 20 years. He 
will be assisted by Fr. Joe 
Raeke, former curate, who 
will give the homily. Fr. 
Raeke is presently 
assigned to Holy Family, 
Duxbury. 

The major 75th 
anniversary event will be 
held Sunday, Sept. 27 at 
the 11:30 a.m. Mass. 
Bishop Alfred Hughes, 
vicar for administration for 
the Archdiocese, will be 
the principal celebrant and 
homolist. 

Bishop Hughes was a 
visiting clergyman at St. 
JosejA's Church for many 
years while on the faculty 
of St. John's Seminary. He 
will be joined by all past 
and present priests and 
deacons who have served 
at St. Joseph's. 

Following the Mass, the 
parish will host a special 
75th anniversary banquet 
at Lantana in Randolph. 
Tickets are $30 per person 
for this five-course diimer. 
Banquet chairperson is Joe 
Kahler, 773-6089. Tables 
of 10 can be reserved. 

Other jubilee activities 
planned this year include a 
collection of old 



memorabilia of St. 
Joseph's which will be on 
display at each major 
event. Memorabilia 

chairperson is Eleanor 
McBride, 472-6628. 
Anyone with items for the 
display should contact 
Eleanor. 

St. Joseph's Aimiversary 
is plaiming an ad book 
chaired by Eunice Ford, 
773-9263 and Mai 
Creaven, 773-7557. They 
will be seeking patrons 
and sponsors for their 
commemorative ad book. 

A parish anniversary 
cook book is being 
coordinated by Donna 
Bertrand, 479-5346. 
Parishioners and fiiends of 
St. Joseph's can submit 
their favorite recipes. 

The final event marking 
the 75th anniversary of St. 
Joseph's will be a parish 
float in the annual Quincy 
Christmas Parade Sunday, 
Nov. 29. The float project 
is being chaired by Bob 
Allison and assisted by Fr. 
Dan RUey and the C.Y.O. 
of Sl Joseph's. 

The next 75th 
anniversary planning 
committee meeting will be 
held Sunday, Feb. 16 at 6 
p.m. in the school 
cafeteria. Anyone wishing 
to serve on the committee 
can contact Chairperson 
John (Jake) Comer at 471- 
3534. 

Members of the 
Steering Committee 
include Bob Allison, Bob 
and Eleanor McBride, 
Eunice Ford, Ron 
Denning, Sr. Anne Judge, 
Sr. Bemadette Noonan, 
Mary-Jo Brogna, Joe and 
Judy Kahler, Joe Hajjar, 
Rita Bouchie, Agnes Pitts, 
Mai Creaven, Eileen and 
Jake Comer and Elaine 
Mills. 



St. Agatha School Observing 
'Catholic Schools Week* 



Agustin L. Alfonso, 71 

Stockroom Supervisor 



A private funeral 
service for Agustin L. 
Alfonso, 71, of Quincy, 
was held Jan. 13 at the 
Sweeney Brothers Home 
for Funerals, 1 
Independence Ave. 

Mr. Alfonso died Jan. 10 
at home after a brief 
illness. 

He was a stockroom 
supervisor. 

Born and educated in 



Havana, Cuba, he came to 
the United States in 1960 
and Uved in Jamaica Plain 
before moving to Quincy 
10 years ago. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Graciella (Ruiz) 
Alfonso; two daughters, 
Aimee Alfonso of 
Wollaston and Beatriz 
Alfonso of Weymouth; and 
two sisters. 

Burial was private. 



The Church School will 
hold an open house 
Sunday during the social 
hour following the 10:30 
a.m. worship service at 
United First Parish Church 
(Unitarian Universalist), 
1306 Hancock St., Quincy 
Center. 

Dr. Sheldon Bennett, 
minister, will give the 
sermon "Promise the 
Children" during the 
service. 

Matthew Cross, guest 
musician, will play flute 
selections. Norman Carey, 
music director, will 
accompany and will also 
play organ pieces. 

Kay Johnson and Matt 
Malloy will usher. 

Visitors are welcome 
and invited to the social 
hour following the service. 
Brenda Powers and 
members of the Religious 
Education Committee will 



host the social hour. 

Everyone will be 
invited to visit the Church 
School classrooms during 
the social hour where 
children and teachers will 
show their projects and 
talk about what they have 
been learning. Visitors are 
welcome. 

The Multi-Cultural 
Concert Series will present 
a concert of 20th century 
American songs by 
Soprano Anna Soranno at 
3 p.m. Admission is $5, $3 
for seniors. 

Sunday evening at 7 
p.m.. Dr. Bennett will lead 
a discussion in the on- 
going series 

"Understanding the Bible 
from a Liberal 
Perspective." Future dates 
are Feb. 9 and 23. 

For more information, 
caU 773-1290. 



Saint Agatha School, 
440 Adams St., Milton, 
will observe "Catholic 
Schools Week" Jan. 27-31 
with a series of programs 
on the theme "Discover 
Catholic Schools." 

Monday will be Student 
Day followed by Mission 
Awareness Day on 
Tuesday. 

The highlight of the 
week's celebration will be 
Wednesday at a 9 a.m. 
Mass offered by the Most 
Rev. Roberto O. Gonzalez, 
O.F.M. Following the 



Mass, coffee and donuts 
will be served in the 
school cafeteria. There 
will then be an Open 
House for parents and 
fiiends. 

Thursday will be 
"Appreciation Day" for 

teachers and staff. Lunch 

will be served. 

The week's celebration 

will culminate on Friday. 
Parents and family 

members are urged to 

participate in the activities 

and attend the Open House 

Wednesday. 



Councils For Children 
Meeting Jan. 28 



Free Screenings At Lambert Eye Center 



The South Shore and 
Coastline Councils for 
Children will meet 
Tuesday, Jan. 28 from 7:30 
to 9:30 p.m. at the East 
Milton Congregational 
Church, 610 Adams St., 
Milton. 

Jack Hauck, South 



Shore and Coastline area 
director of the Department 
of Social Services, will 
give a 1992 update of the 
agency and its services. 

For more information 
call Karen lacobucci of 
Quincy at 773-1994. 



Lambert Eye Center, 
100 Congress St., is 
offering free eye 
screenings every Friday 
from 1 to 4 p.m. 

The screenings are 



given to check to for 
glaucoma, cataracts and 
other eye disorders. 

For more information or 
to make an appointment 
call 471-5665. 



United Way 




Page 14 Quincy Son Thursday, January 23, 1992 



Sun Sports 



Basketball 



North Takes 
Falmouth 



The North Quincy boys' 
basketball team, enjoying 
one of its best seasons in 
some time, defeated 
Falmouth, 69-63, last 
Friday to improve its 
record to 7-3 (5-2 in the 
Old Colony League). 

The Raiders hosted 
Weymouth Tuesday, will 
host high-flying Boston 
College High, coached by 
Quincy's Brian Buckley, 
Friday night at 7 p.m. and 
will be at Plymouth next 
Tuesday at 7 p.m. 

Luke Sheets had his 
best game of the year 
against Falmouth with 14 
points and six rebounds to 



spark the Red Raiders. 

Sean Donovan had 13 
points, Desmond Bellot 12 
and Chris Olsen had nine 
points and nine rebounds. 

Earlier in the week 
North Quincy defeated 
Barnstable, 72-62, led by 
Bellot who had 13 points 
and six assists. 

Matt Flynn scored 13 
points and was four for four 
from the free throw line 
with a minute to play, 
extending North's lead 
from two points to six. 

Donovan had 11 points 
and seven rebounds and 
Tim Johnson scored 10 
points. 



Fouls Do 
Quincy In 



The Quincy boys' 
basketball team was 
plagued with foul problems 
last week which played a 
major role in the 
Presidents' losses to Silver 
Lake and Barnstable. 
Quincy's record dropped to 

4-6 (4-4 in the Old Colony 
League). 

Quincy hosted 

Falmouth Tuesday, will be 
home to Bridgewater- 
Raynham Friday and will 
host Weymouth next 
Tuesday, completing a 
four-game home stand. 

The Presidents led 
Barnstable, 37-31, at 
halftime but ran into foul 
trouble in the last two 
quarters as the Cape team 
went home with a 63-49 
victory. 

Robbie Kane had 
another big night for 
Quincy with 20 points. 
Dave Jolley scored 17 and 
Steve Loud had 10. 

Steve Camara had 19 
points and Matt Wilcox 13 
for Barnstable's Red 
Raiders. 

Earlier in the week 
Quincy had all kinds of 
foul problems as Silver 
Lake hit on 20 of 24 free 



throws in the second half 
and had 28 for 34 for the 
game to top the 
Presidents, 86-59. 

Jolley went into the 
game as the league's 
second-leading scorer with 
a 17.2 points a game 
average but was held to 
nine points as he ran into 
early foul trouble and sat 
out much of the second 
half. 

Several other Quincy 
players also ran into foul 
trouble as the Lakers 
paraded to the free throw 
line. 

Mike Bartlett had his 
best game with 14 points 
and two steals, Kane had 
1 1 points and Matt Dwyer 
had a fine game and 
scored 11 points. 

"Fouls really hurt us 
and, although the score is 
not indicative, we can 
play with this team," said 
Quincy coach John 
Franceschini. 

The Presidents will get 
their chance to get even 
when they host the Lakers 
on Feb. 11. 

Silver Lake improved to 
7-3 with the win. 
-TOM SULLIVAN 




CHAMPIONS IN THE Quincy Lodge of Elks Hoop Shoot 
Contest are, front row from left, Christine Fitzpatrick, 
Brian Miller and Colleen NIchoI. Second row, Carolyn 
Williams, Geoffrey Meade, and Brian Doyle. Thiid row, 
Recreation Director Barry Welch and Ed Miller, Quincy 
Elks Hoop Shoot chairman. 



SECOND AND THIRD place winners in the Quincy 
Lodge of Elks Hoops Shoot Contest are, front row from 
left, Chris Bregoli, Lowander Lee, Lauren Doyle, 
Elizabeth Calari, Chris Liccardi and Patrick Jaehnig. 
Second row, Shawn Walsh, Chuck Feelcy, Nicole 
Cincotta, Hillary Miller and Mike Travers. Third row. 
Recreation Director Barry Welch and Quincy Elks Hoop 
Shoot Chairman Ed Miller 



6 Local Champions 
In Hoop Shoot Contest 




Quincy 

Pound 

Adoptables 







American Eskimo, male, 8 months, all white 
thick coat and curly, bushy tail, needs training. 

Yellow Labrador Retriever, male, 8 months, good 
personality. 

Black Labrador Retriever, female, 1 year, 
friendly. 

Officers Hiylils Berlucchi and Bruce DiBella, 773-6297, 

daily hours 8:30 ain-4:30 pm Except Sunday 

Adoption hours 8:30-9:30 am and 3:30-4:30 pm 



Local winners in the 
Elks' National Hoop Shoot 
Free Throw Contest have 
been announced. 

The event is co- 
sponsored in Quincy by the 
Quincy Recreation 
Department and the 
Quincy Lodge of Elks. 

Winners in six 
categories, three boys and 
three girls ages 8-13, will 
now advance to the Circle 
District Championship to 
compete against winners 
from nine other districts in 
southeastern 
Massachusetts. 

First place trophies 
were awarded to Colleen 
Nichol and Brian Miller in 
the 8-9 year old category; 
Christine Fitzpatrick and 



Brian Doyle in the 10-11 
year old category; and 
Carolyn Williams and 
Geoffrey Meade in the 12- 
13 category. 

More than 250 
youngsters took part in the 
Quincy competition which 
was conducted at nine 
recreation programs 
supervised by leaders from 
the Recreation Dept. 

The Elks Hoop Shoot is 
in it's 20th year and more 
than 3 million boys and 
girls are expected to 
participate this year. 

The second and third 
place finishers also 
received trophies from Ed 
Miller, Hoop Shoot 
chairman for the Quincy 
Elks. Director of 



Recreation Barry Welch 
presented certificates to 
all center champions. 

Those receiving 
trophies were, second 
place, Patrick Jaehnig and 
Nicole Cinotta, age 8-9; 
Shawn Walsh and Hillary 

Miller, age 10-11; Mike 
Travers, age 12-13. 

Third place winners 
were Chris Licciardi and 
Elizabeth Caliri and 
Lauren Doyle (tie), age 8- 
9; Chris Bregoli and Lee 
Lowander, age 10-11; and 
Chuck Feely, age 12-13. 

Center champions are 
Matt Mooney, Mark 
Robertson, Patrick 
Bregoli, Dean Zoia, Jr., 
Eric Stanton, Ryan 



Hutchings, Ben Powell, 
Jim Parastatides, Paul 
PoUini, Tanya Young, Rita 
Griffin, Tonia Eraser, 
Danielle Gaglione, Neila 
Foster, Debra Brancaccio, 
Andrew Currie, Jim 
Munchbach, John Hurley, 
Randy Feetham, Shawn 
Cheney, Brian Deshler, 
Brian Deptula, Jarrod 
DeCelle, Mike Greene, 
Mike Fournier, Joe 
Mariano, Eric Wirtz, 
Kevin Sullivan, Mark 
Stanton, Ryan Nickerson, 
Mark Froelich and Matt 
Noonaa 

The Quincy Lodge of 
Elks will be the host of the 
Circle District 

Championship Saturday, 
Feb. 1. 



Girls Basketball 



North Girls Win 8th 



The North Quincy girls' 
basketball team defeated 
Falmouth, 36-29, last 
Friday to improve its 
record to 8-3 (6-1 in the 
Old Colony League). 

The North girls played 
at Weymouth Tuesday and 
will host Plymouth next 
Tuesday night. 



Jen White scored 12 
points and had 16 rebounds 
to spark North against 
Falmouth as the North 

defense was outstanding, 
holding Falmouth's leading 
scorer, Aimee Eggleston 
(25 points a game) to just 
two second-half points. 
Regina Murphy and 



Noreen McDonough led 
the North defense and 
Tricia Hughes contributed 
nine points. Maureen 
McCarthy played an 
outstanding game on the 
boards. 

The North giris, who 
trailed at the half of 
several games, had a 25- 



16 lead at the intermission 
this time. 

Earlier in the week 
North defeated Barnstable, 
55-50, as Cindy White 
scored a career-high 24 
points and Hughes scored 
a career-high 22 points. 

McDonough played an 
outstanding game from her 
point guard position. 



Quincy Girls Put It Together 



The Quincy girls' 
basketball team has had a 
frustrating season but it put 
together one of its bettor 
efforts last Friday to defeat 
Barnstable, 62-49. It's 
record is now 2-7. 

Quincy played at 
Falmouth Tuesday, will be 



at Bridgewater-Raynham 
Friday night and will visit 
Weymouth next Tuesday, 
completing a four-game 
road trip. 

Kristi Richmond scored 
18 points to lead Quincy 
over Barnstable. 

Debbie Gray and Kim 



Marsden had 13 points 
each as Quincy trailed by 
six points with five 
minutes left in the game. 

Gray scored on three 
successive layups and 
Richmond hit six straight 
free throws to put the 
game out of reach for the 



Cape team. 

Eariier in the week 
Quincy lost to Silver Lake, 
54-32, as Laker sophomore 

Amy King killed the 
Quincy girls with 23 
points, 16 rebounds and 
five blocked shots. 



Rendle Receives Third Varsity Volleyball Letter 



Junior co-captain Holly 
Rendle, a graduate of 
North Quincy high school, 
recently received her third 
varsity letter as a member 
of the Colgate University 
women's volleyball team. 

Rendle, an outside 
hitter, appeared in 91 
games for the Red Raiders 



this fall after having her 
1990 cut short by a 
shou'der injury which 
required surgery. 

She had 174 kills, 271 
digs, and 25 servic? aces 
this fall, and ranked 
among the Patriot League 
conference leaders in dig 
average with 2.98. 



Colgate, which had a 
22-6 overall record, posted 
a perfect 7-0 Patriot 
League ledger. The Red 
Raiders were team 
champions at the Yale and 
Colgate Invitationals but 
fell to Army in the 
league's postseason 
tournament fmals. 

Rendle, who is 



m aj orin g in 

sociology/anthropology, 
was a three-rime all- 
Suburban League and 
Patriot Ledger all- 
scholastic choice at 

NQHS. In 1987. her team 
was undefeated as 
Division 1 state 
champions. 



Hockey 



Quincy, North Stay 
In Title Contention 



Thursday, January 23, 1992 Quincy Sun Page 15 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

Last week's Quincy- 
North Quincy hockey 
game lived up to 
expectations as the rivals 
battled each other to a 1-1 
tie and stayed in 
contention for the Old 
Colony League crown. 

Later in the week North 
tied Plymouth, 1-1, while 
Quincy was shut out for 
the first time, bowing to 
defending state Div. 1 
champion Barnstable, 4-0. 

North went into last 
night's game with Silver 
Lake with a 5-3-2 overall 
record (3-2-2 in the 
league), while Quincy 
went into the Plymouth 
game with a 4-3-4 overall 
maik (3-2-3 in the league). 

Quincy will host 
Falmouth Saturday at 6:40 
at the Quincy Youth Arena 
and will be at Silver Lake 
Saturday, Feb. 1 at 6:45. 

North will be at 
Barnstable Saturday at 
7:45 and will be home to 
Falmouth Wednesday 
night at 8 at the Youth 
Arena. 

Quincy and North 
engaged in an outstanding 
game with few penalties, 
fine skating, some 
outstanding defensive play 
and brilliant performances 
by the rival goalies, Steve 
MacPherson of Quincy and 
Dennis Ruggere of North. 

"This was just an 
outstanding hockey 



Track 



game," said Quincy coach 
Bob Sylvia. "It really was 
a big game for both teams, 
certainly one of the most 
meaningful in some time. 
Both teams have a 
legitimate chance to win 
the league title and that 
hasn't happened for many 
years. 

"It's amazing how the 
pendulum has swung in 
this rivalry. I've been here 
since the 1965-66 season 
and for the fu-st 12 years 
we never lost to North. But 
right now we haven't 
beaten them in seven 
years." 

"It was a great game to 
be involved with," said 
North's second-year coach 
Tom Benson. "It was nice 
in that it was such a 
meaningful game in the 
standings." 

Any one of six teams 
could win the league title 
with only Bridgewater- 
Raynham and Silver Lake 
apparently out of the 
ninning. 

The Presidents 

dominated the first period 
but scored only once on 
Scott MacPherson 's 14th 
goal of the year. Dan 
Morrell assisted. 
MacPherson is the number 
three scorer in the league. 

North rebounded in the 
second period and tied the 
score on Aiden 
O'Donoghue's goal. Mike 
Christopherson and Matt 



Riley assisted. 

"We had our chances, 
but give credit to their 
goalie," said Sylvia. "Our 
big gun, Scott 
MacPherson, had five or 
six shots from point-blank 
range, but the kid came up 
with the big saves." 

Saturday uight North's 
junior goalie, Sean 
Connelly, had an 
outstanding game with 30 
saves in North's 1-1 tie 
with Plymouth, the league 
leader. 

North's defense was 
excellent and Riley gave 
North the tie with his goal 
with newcomer Bob 
Fitzgerald assisting. 

Fitzgerald, a transfer 
from Catholic Memorial, 
was just declared eUgible 
by the MIAA and his assist 
was his first point for the 
Raiders. 

"Bob comes with the 
reputation of being a big 
scorer and he should help 
make up for the loss of our 
top scorer, Mike 
DesRoche," said Benson. 

"He is a fine skater and 
shooter and I expect him 
to pick up our offense. It's 
great to have him with us." 

The Quincy-Bamstable 
game was one of the 
roughest of the year with 
numerous penalties. The 
Presidents had their 
chances but were 
frustrated by the many 
penalties against them. 



North Clinches 
.500 Season 



The North Quincy boys' 
track team clinched its 
first .500 season in 10 
years with a 59-32 victory 
over Bridgewater- 
Raynham last week to 
improve its record to 3-2. 

The Raiders finished 
their dual meet season 
yesterday (Wednesday) 
against Falmouth and now 
get ready for the sectional. 



state and New England 
championships. 

North's wirmers against 
B-R were Mike Yee, 50- 
yard hurdles; Tony 
Licciardi, 50-dash; Jeremy 
Gott, 600; Josh Walty, 
1000; Eric Torvi, mile; 
John O'Donnell, high 
jump; Scott Kohler, shot 
put; the 4x176 relay team 
of John O'Donnell, Marc 



Quincy Youth Hockey 
Fundraiser Sunday 



The Quincy Youth 
Hockey Association will 
hold a fundraiser on 
"Super Bowl Sunday," 
Jan. 26 from noon to 5 p.m. 
in conjunction with Papa 
Gino's, 1 Beale St., 
WoUaston. 

A portion of all sales, 
including in-house, take- 



out, and delivery (in the 
North Quincy and 
Wollaston areas only) will 
be donated to help defray 
rising costs to the over 600 
children who participate in 
the hockey program. 

To participate in the 
program through take-out, 
or for more information, 
caU 770-3444. 



Larson, Chris Murray and 
Licciardi, and the 4x440 
team of Mark Sinclair, 
Yee, Gott and Josh 
O'DonneU. 

Taking second places 
were Larson, 50 hurdles; 
Sinclair, 600; and Jason 
Carson, two-mile. 

Placing third were Mark 
Cocuzzo, 50; Josh 
O'Donnell, 600; Keith 
Lentini, 1000; freshman 
Matt Fatseas, mile; and 
Justin Dilks, shot put. 

Licciardi, Walty, 
Carson and Dilks are only 
sophomores. 



"KICKS FOR KIDS" 

Brand Name Children's Footwear 

10% OFF Already Low Prices 

with this Ad 

Rte 18 South Weymouth 

(Across from Factory Paint) 

Mon-Sat10-5 331-8028 

Expires 1-31/92 



Always Buying 
New&Old 

TAJ 

COIN, 

STAMPS 

and 

SPORTS CARDS 

9 Maple St., 
Quincy, MA 02169 

479-1652 

Comidelc line (rfSupfdies 



Baseball 



Morrisette To Host 
Regional Tourney In August 



By STEVE KAVANAGH 

The baseball season 
may seem far away right 
DOW but don't tell that to 
Heniy "Hank" Bradley. 

Bradley has been busy 
planning the 1992 
American Legion 
Northeast Regional 
Baseball Tournament 
which will be held at 
Adams Field in August. 

Morrisette Legion Post 
is the host for the tourney 
and Bradley, a Post 
member and Quincy's 
Veterans Services 
Director, is the tournament 
committee chairman. 

The double-elimination 
tournament wiU feature the 



American Legion State 
Champions from 

Massachusetts, Maine, 
Connecticut, New 
Hampshire, Vermont, 
Rhode Island and New 
Jersey. In the event 
Morrisette wins the state 
championship the state 
runner up will qualify. 

The winner of the 
Northeast Regional will 
advance to the American 
Legion World Series in 
Fargo, North Dakota, with 
the wimiers of the seven 
other regional tournaments. 

American Legion 
National Commander 
Dominic DeFrancesco is 
expected to be in Quincy, 
Monday, Jan. 27. Bradley 



PAL Plans 
3.5 Road Race 



The Quincy Police 
Athletic League, Inc. will 
hold a 3.5 mile road race 
Sunday, May 17, at 10 
a.m. 

The race will start and 
finish at Veterans 
Memorial Stadium. 

Officer Bob Hanna is 
race director and Chief 
Francis Mullen is honorary 
race director. 

Entry fee is $8 before 
May 1 and $10 after. T- 
shirts will go to the first 
300 entrants and prizes 
will go to the top three 
finishers in each male and 
female category; youth 
under 15, juniors 16-19, 
open 20-29, sub-masters 
30-39, masters 40-49, 
seniors 50-59, veterans 60 
and over, and wheelchair 
entrants. 

The Officer Richard 
Hynn Memorial Trophy 
will be awarded to the first 
Quincy police officer to 
finish. 

Checks or money orders 
made payable to Quincy 
Police Athletic League, 



Inc., should be mailed to 
Quincy Police Athletic 
League, Inc., P.O. Box 
215, Quincy, 02269. 



said he hopes 
DeFrancesco can attend a 
contract signing at Mayor 
James Sheets office. 

Morrisette bid $8,000 to 
host the tournament and 
the Morrisette Alumni 
Association has raised 
about half of that. Bradley 
said another fund raising 

golf tournament will likely 
be held. 

The money goes to the 
national organization to 
help deft-ay expenses for 
transporting and housing 
teams and umpires. 

Concession and 
souvenir stands will be 
available and Bradley said 
he hopes to have 
commemorative t-shirts 
and souvenirs designed for 
the tournament 

"Hopefully \ve'll be 
erecting some smaller flag 
poles in the vicinity of the 
scoreboard to raise the 
state flags of the teams 
that are playing," Bradley 
said. 



Quincy, North Winter 
Home Sports Schedule 



Jan. 22 Through Jan. 28 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-3100 



Wednesday, Jan. 22 

•NQHS Hockey vs. Silver Lake, JV 5:30 p.m., 

Varsity 6:40 p.m. 

•NQHS Wrestling vs. Plymouth, 5 p.m. 

Thursday, Jan. 23 
•NQHS Swimming vs. Cohasset, 4 p.m. 

Friday, Jan. 24 

•NQHS Boys Basketball vs. B.C. High, Freshman 

3:30 p.m., JV 5:30 p.m., Varsity 7 p.m. 

QMS Boys Basketball vs. Bridgewater-Raynham, 

Freshman 3:30 p.m., JV 5:30 p.m., Varsity 7 p.m. 

Saturday, Jan. 25 
•QHS Hockey vs. Falmouth, Varsity 6:40p.m., JV 
8 p.m. 

•NQHS Wrestling, Quad Meet vs. B.C. High, 
Brookline and Framingham, noon. 

Tuesday, Jan. 28 
•QHS Boys Basketball vs. Weymouth, Freshman 
3:30 p.m., JV 5:30 p.m. and Varsity 7 p.m. 
•NQHS Girls Basketball vs. Plymouth, Freshman 
3:15 p.m., JV 5:30 p.m., Varsity 7 p.m. 
•NQHS Swimming vs. Waltham, 4 p.m. 
•QHS Boys and Girls Track vs. Silver Lake at 
Taunton, 3:30 p.m. 



II SUBSCRIPTION FORM 

FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAIL TO 



•■car Spa^a. 



1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 



NAME. 



STREET 
CITY 



STATE- 



2IP- 



CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 



L 



( ) 1 YEAR IN QUINCY 

( ) 1 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY 

( ) 1 YEAR OUT OF STATE 



$12.00 
$14.00 
$17.00 



( ) CHECK ENCLOSED 
( ) PLEASE BILL ME 



J 



Page U Qulncy Son Thursday, January 23, 1992 



«g ■»«,>«&--» i^ss^^p 



Wrestling 




%-j^ ^ 



-^ w 



•mWW 



Ife'l'lfl^ 



« » -» 



MEMBERS OF THE Quincy Youth Hockey Mite A's team. Bottom row, left to right: Jill 
Mclnnis, Dan Kennedy, Scott MacDonald, Ryan Kruegar, Chris Griffin, Domenic 
Papile, Shane Kabilian, Ryan Murray. Middle row: Frankie Curreri, Tom SuUivan, 
Dldier Alther, Klva Tupe, Jim Cashins, Steve Goff, Sean Dooiey, Scott Mattson. Top 
row: Coaches Steve Papile and Mike DcsRoche, Santa Claus, Coach Tom Sullivan. 



Youth Hockey 



Colonial Holds Lead 



Colonial Federal holds 
an eight-point lead in the 
Pee Wee House League 
after getting by Keohane's, 
6-5. 

Chris Knox scored two 
goals and Scott Shepherd, 
Mike Martin, Jon Haddad 
and Jim Hasson one each. 
Ken O'Connell had two 
assists and Hasson and Joe 
Bracken one each. 

Steve Kiley, Mike 
Balducci, Andre Nagy, 
Brian Beaton and John 
Masone scored for 
Keohane's and Justin 
Whitman and Mike 
Gallagher had assists. 

New England Deli 
edged Marina Bay Taxi, S- 
4, on goals by Rich 



Perona, Tim Hunter, Brian 
Gates, Gene Silverman 
and Dave Rowell. Chris 
Katides had two assists 
and Hunter, Perona, Brad 
Macauley and Gates one 
apiece. 

Paul Princiotto, Matt 
Langille, A.J. Quinn and 
Carlos Ashmanskas scored 
for Marina Bay and Dennis 
Allen, Chris DiMattia, 
Mark Glyim, Quinn and 
Chris WiUde had assists. 

Marina Bay edged 
Colonial Federal, 4-3, with 
Glynn, Tim Lewis, Quinn 
and Matt Radzevich 
scoring the goals and 
LangiUe, Princiotto, Justin 
Doty, Quinn, Lewis, Jason 
Snaitb and Glynn having 



assists. 

Billy Graney, Ken 
O'Connell and Hasson 
scored for Colonial 
Federal and Haddad, 
Shepherd and Bracken had 
assists. 

Keohane's topped N.E. 
Deli, 4-1, on goals by 
Masone, Whitman, Beaton 
and Kiley. Balducci, 
Beaton, Kiley and Masone 
had assists. 

Macauley scored for 
Deli with Glenn Chase 
assisting. 

The standings: 

Colonial Federal, 9-1-3; 
Keohane's, 6-6-1; Marina 
Bay Taxi, 6-7; N.E. Deh, 
2-9-2. 



Ryan's 4 Goals Spark Purdy's 



Samoset Pharmacy 
edged Lydon-Russell, 3-2, 
in Mite House League 
action. 

Mark Gibbons had two 
goals and Pat O'Donnell 
one. Billy McKeon had 
two assists and O'Donnell, 
Gibbons and Paul Flyim 
one each. Mark Giese and 
Jeremiah Hasson scored 
for Lydon and Matt 
Minicucci had an assist. 

The Paul Harold Club 
defeated Balducci 's, 3-1, 
as Matthew Glynn scored 
twice and Jordan Virtue 
once. Ryan Graeber, Andy 
Ross and Steve Kelly had 
assists. Brian Stock scored 



for Baldrcci's. 

Billy Ryan's four goals 
sparked I*urdy's Ice Cream 
to a 10-0 win over 
Neponset Valley Survey. 
John Segalla had two 
goals and John Chevalier, 
Brian Lewis, Steve Wilkie 
and Kenny Reichel one 
each. Joe Cox had two 
assists and Lewis, Wilkie, 
Frank Guest, Ryan, John 
Segalla, Steve Segalla 
and Jamie Chiocchio one 
each. 

Purdy's and Balducci's 
tied, 1-1, with Wilkie 
scoring for Purdy's and 
Josh Giordani for 
Balducci's. 



Neponset Valley and 
Samoset tied, 2-2, as 
Shawn Richardson and 
Shaun Lynch scored for 
Neponset Valley with an 
assist for Richardson, and 
Matt Kenney and Pat 
O'Donnell scored for 
Samoset and Ryan Doyle 
and Billy McKeon had 
assists. 

Harold and Lydon- 
Russell also tied, 3-3, with 
Adam Smith scoring twice 
and Virtue once for Harold 
and Graever and Glynn 
having assists. 

Graham McShane, 
Giese and Hasson scored 
for Lydon and Giese had 
an assist. 



Gamers Hat Trick Powers Burgin 



Johnson Motor Parts 
edged the Quincy Sun, 4- 
3, and holds a two-point 
lead in the Squirt House 
League. 

Jeff Glynn, Jon 
Paquette, Sean Dooiey 
and Spike Bertucci scored 
the goals and Glyim had 
two assists and Chris 
Griffm and John Sullivan 
one each. 

Joe Ardagna had two 
goals and Pat Grogan one 
for The Sun and Sean 
Haidul had an assist. 

Doran & Horrigan 
blasted Green 

Environmental, 9-2, with 
Chris Cullen having a hat 



trick, Ryan Barrett two 
goals and Matt Gibbons, 
Kiva Tupe, Josh Silverman 
and Billy Griffin one each. 
Giiffln had three assists 
and Tupe, Ryan Krueger, 
Bobby Harvey and Barrett 
one each. 

Brian Quinn and Tom 
Gouthro scored for Green. 

Ron Camel's hat trick 
led Burgin Platner over 
Granite Auto Electric, 8-6. 
Scott MacDonald had two 
goals and Mike SuUivan, 
Paul Markarian and Didier 
Alther one each. Alther, 
Gamel and Dom Papile 
had three assists each, 
MacDonald two and 



Sullivan, John Katsarikas 
and Sean Slattery one 
apiece. 

Shane Kabilian, had 
four goals and Jim 
Sullivan and Mike Welch 
one each for Granite Auto. 
Tom Hughes had three 
assists, Sean McCusker 
two and Bill Morrell, Chris 
Carthas, Sullivan, Welch 
and Kevin Regan one 
each. 

The standings: Johnson 
Motor Parts, 8-3-1; Doran 
& Horrigan, 7-4-1; Quincy 
Sun, 6-4-2; Burgin Platoer, 
5-6-1; Green 

Environmental, 5-6-1; 
Granite Auto Electric, 2- 
10. 



Souza, Sleiman 
Quincy Standouts 



The Quincy wrestling 
team is off to a slow start 
with only a 39-29 victory 
over Widtham in its first 
month of competition. 

However, two wrestlers 
have been outstanding. 
Senior captain Greg Souza 
(140, 145) is 7-0 in dual 
meets and won the 
Westside Invitational for 
the third year in a row and 
placed second in the 
Lowell Holiday 

Tournament. 

Senior Ally Sleiman 
(152) is 8-0 in dual meets 
and won both the Westside 
Invitational for the second 
year in a row and the 
Sanford (Me.) Tournament 
and took second in the 
Lowell Tournament. 

Fifth-year head coach 
Lou Venturelli is joined by 
two first-year assistants, 
former Quincy wrestlers 
Chris Mackey and John 
Heath. 

"We are not 
discouraged by the 1-8 
dual meet record," said 
Venturelli. "When you 
look at the quaUty of our 
schedule and what we've 
had to work with in terms 
of numbers, we are 
actually quite pleased with 
the progress of the team. 



Once again, our biggest 
problem is having the kids 
to work with. We are down 
to 16 boys after only a 
month into the season." 

Sophomore Shane 
O'Connor (103) has shown 
promise, pinning two of his 
last four opponents after a 
slow start. 

Freshman Matt Miller 
(112) has done the same 
with his first two wins 
coming by pins in the last 
three starts. 

"These two are a 

dynamic opening act," 

said Venturelli. "If I can 

just get them both to win 

in the same meet, we'll be 

fine." 

Wrestling junior varsity 
behind Miller is first-year 
senior Lisa Ross, the first 
girl to wrestle for Quincy. 

"Lisa has had to 
overcome obvious barriers 
and I give her a lot of 
credit," said the Quincy 
coach. "She has more 
courage than 95 percent of 
the boys in the school who 
could be helping this 
team." 

Forfeits at 119 and 130 
pounds are a source of 
frustration for the 
Presidents. Promising 
sophomore Peter 



Penwarden (125) is 3-4 
and showing a lot of 
promise. 

Sophomore Ashley 
Davis (140, 145) is 4-5, 
senior Clint Currie (160, 
171) is 5-3, junior Mark 
Nutley (160, 171) is 2-4 
and junior Guy Schipellite 
(heavyweight) is still 
looking for his first win. 

New to the team and in 
the starting lineup are 
freshman Bryan Gallahue 
(135), senior Mike 
Anderson (171, 189), 
sophomore Mike Elder 
(189) and freshman Mike 
Feeley (heavyweight). 

Wrestling well for the 
jayvees are freshman 
Jason Bennett (145) and 
junior Damian Carini 
(145). 

"Our goals now are to 
strengthen the chances of 
having a few sectional or 
state champions and, of 
course, to beat North 
Quincy," said VentureUi. 

The Presidents will face 
Xaverian, Lowell and 
Norwood in a quad meet 
Saturday at 1 p.m. at 
Xaverian and will host 
Bridgewater-Raynham 
next Wednesday at 7 p.m. 
The meet at North Quincy 
will be Feb. 5 at 7 p.m. 

"TOM SULLIVAN 



Girls Track 



North Defeats B-R 



The North Quincy girls's 
track team defeated 
Bridgewater-Raynham, 60- 
31, last week to up its 
record to 4-1. 

North met Falmouth 
yesterday (Wednesday) in 
its final dual meet and 
now gets ready for the "big 
meets," the sectional, 
state and New England 
championships. 

North's winners against 
B-R were Amy Wong, 50- 
yaid dash; Jeimifer Nutley, 
300; Melanie Gaziano, 
1000; Suzanne Lewis, 
mile; freshman Laura 
Blaikie, two-mile; Heather 
Rendle, high jump; Trish 



McNamara, shot put; and 
the 4x176 relay team of 
Wong, liana Cobban, 
Susanne Hamilton and 
Nutley. 

Finishing second were 
Hamilton, 300; Erin 
Duggan, mile; Kristy 
Kabilian, two-mile; Katy 
Deady, high jump; and 
freshman Tracy Gross, shot 
put. 

Taking third places 
were Deady, 50; Cobban, 
600; freshman Katie 
Gustafson, two-mile; and 
Anh Ho, shot put. 

In the State Coaches 
Meet at Harvard 
University last weekend, 
Lewis won the two-mile in 



11:37 and Wong placed 
sixth in the 55-meter dash 
in 7.65 after setting a 
school record of 7.2 in the 
semifinals. 

Other North Quincy 
state qualifiers are 
Hamilton and Nutley in 
the 300 and Duggan in the 
two-mile (12.415). She 
won the unseeded section. 

"The girls have done 
really well in dual meets 
and our second season now 
begins," said coach Geoff 
Hennessy. "Our younger 
girls have improved in 
every meet and I feel we 
can make a good showing 
in the big meets." 

•-TOM SULLIVAN 



BORED? 

Start A Quincy Sun 
Delivery Route. 

You^ll Be Part 0{ 
The Business World. 

Call 471-3100 
or Apply in Person 



1372 Hancock Street, Quincy Square 471-3100 



- r^ 



Thorsday, January 23, 1992 Qnlncy Sun Page 17 



McCauley Candidate For 
GOP State Committeeman 






Former Mayor Francis 
McCauley announces be is 
,a candidate for Republican 
, State Committeeman for 
ithe Norfolk senatorial 
iJistrict. 

Tbe Norfolk district 
encompasses tbe city of 
(Juincy and the towns of 
Avon, Braintree and 
Holbrook. Tbe present 
incumbent, Andrew Card 
of Holbrook, special 
assistant to President 
Busb, is not seeking re- 
election. 

Tbe Republican State 
Committee is comprised of 
40 men and women 
elected from each of tbe 
state's senatorial districts. 
The role of the state 
committee is to choose a 
party chairman, and to 
promote the aims and 




FRANCIS McCAULEY 



goals of the Republican 
Party. 

McCauley has been 
active in Republican Party 
politics for more than 30 
years. He has been a 
member of the Republican 
City Committee for 32 



years, serving as 
committee treasurer five 
years. He has also been a 
delegate to six Republican 
state conventions. 

A graduate of Boston 
<:ollege High School, 
McCauley attended 
Boston College and 
graduated with honors from 
Bentley College. He 
retired from a Quincy bank 
upon his election as mayor 
of Quincy in 1981. 

Besides serving eight 
years as mayor, McCauley 
served on the City Council 
eight years and six years 
of the School Committee. 
In March, 1968 he was 
appointed to the Selective 
Service Board no. 27 by 
President Lyndon Johnson 
on recommendation of 
Gov. John Volpe. In 



March, 1969, Gov. Francis 
Sargent appointed him to 
the Quincy Housing 
Authority, where he served 
five years including a year 
as chairman. 

During the 1990 state 
election, McCauley was 
active in the campaigns of 
Gov. William Weld, Lt. 
Gov. Paul Cellucci and 
State Treasurer Joseph 
Malone. Last March, 
Malone appointed 
McCauley executive 
director of the state Board 
of Retirement. 

McCauley is married to 
tbe former Sandra 
MacKinnon of Quincy. 
They are the parents of 
five children and 
grandparents of four. 



A Year Later Pain Remains 
For Families Of 3 Fire Victims 



(Cont'd from Page 1) 

that's what 1 try to do," 
Vanelli said. 

She was also one of the 
many people who helped 
the family rebuild the 
house. 

"I wanted to be a part 
of it. I wanted to do 
something for them, to let 
them know 1 cared even 
though Magga wasn't 
around," she said, adding 
that she initially met the 
Cortez family through her 
friendship with Magga. 

Like Herminio and 
Hilda Cortez, Vanelli also 
had her own reasons for 
feeling guilty about the 
death of Magga and the 
two children. 

"I felt bad because I'd 
broken plans with Magga 
for that night," she said. "I 
felt bad because if we had 
actually gone out, it may 
not have happened. But 
eventually 1 just figured 
there was nothing 1 could 
have done. It might have 
happened another day, or 
it might have happened 
when we came back. 

"1 think about Magga a 
lot. 1 miss her kindness and 
her willingness to be a 
friend and always be 
around. She always 
thought about other people 
before herself. Magga 
always thought about other 
people's feelings." 

Perh^s no one was hurt 
more deeply by the three 
deaths than Gloria Wall of 
Germantown. In addition to 
the loss of her beloved 
sister, she also had to cope 
with the fact that her only 
two children were dead. 

"I'm really still in 
shock," she said. "It's not 
one of those things you 



Bowling 



recover from; 1 don't think 
it'll ever be like it used to 
be. 1 think we're basically 
getting by. 

"But my house is not 
really a home anymore. 
It's just a place to sleep, 
now that the kids aren't 
here. Sometimes 1 don't 
even want to come home. I 
also miss Magga very 
much. She was like a little 
second Mom to my kids." 

Unlike her sister Hilda, 
however, Wall said she 
never experienced a loss 
of faith in God. Rather, it 
was this faith that gave her 
the strength to go on. 

"I'm very religious," 
she said. "If it wasn't for 
my faith in God, it would 
be a lot harder. But I 
beUeve in Him, and know 
that He's taking care of 
my kids. I think He's the 
One that's helping me out 
right now. If you believe 
that, you can deal with 
something like this." 

Wall is also continuing 
to see a psychiatrist to 
help her with her pain. 

"When it (the deaths) 
first happened, I was 
basically in a daze, in 
total shock. I didn't cry at 
all. The doctor helped me 
cry it out and showed me 
the anger I was feeling. All 
the emotion came out, and 
that's why I'm in a steady 
mind, because of him." 

She also gave her 
husband, Lawrence, credit 
for giving her support 
throughout the ordeal. 
Wall noted that the couple 
flew to Nevada in both 
July and December to visit 
his parents and to find a 
temporary change of scene 
for therapeutic reasons. 
Wall also took heart 



when she saw all the 
people helping to rebuild 
her parents' home. 

"That was wonderful," 
she said. "All of a sudden, 
we gained friends we 
never knew. And we're 
still very good friends with 
every one of them. We 
appreciate everything 
they've done. 

"All of Quincy is 
responsible for helping us. 
(Councillor-at-Large) 
Michael Cheney, (Ward 1 
Councillor) Peter Kolson 
and all the city officials 
helped us. It's a very good 
town, Quincy. If it 
happened in another city, 
the response probably 
wouldn't have been as 
good." 

Hilda Cortez agreed, 
singling out her next-door 
neighbor, Renee Stone, as 
the "key factor" who 
spearheaded the 

movement to rebuild the 
Cortez home. 

"She organized 
everyone to get together 
and got everything going," 
said Cortez. "Renee has 
been a really good friend 
to us. She's a real 
humanitarian." 

Asked to respond to 
such praise. Stone refused 
to be labeled as such. 

"I think of lot of people 
would have done it," said 
Stone. "And I didn't do it 
alone; it was everybody 
that did it. It was a group 
eflfort 

"To think that 
something like that even 
happened in our own 
backyard is still such a 
shock. I never want to see 
something like that ever 
happen again. I am glad, 
though, for the friendships 



that came out of it. We'll 
always be friends, 
forever." 

Despite the fact that 
Stone and so many others 
have become such good 
friends, however, the 
family members must still 
deal, in their own separate 
ways, with the loss of their 
loved ones. No one is quite 
certain what to expect in 
the days to come. 

"The future's too 
twisted, it's so uncertain 
right now," said Cortez. 
"You can only hope for the 
best." 

"I don't know what's 
going to happen down the 
road," said Wall. "We 
have no plans for the 
future. You live for today, 
and you let tomorrow be 
there. 

"But I'm really hoping 
for another baby 
someday," she added with 
a smile. 

For now, the bright 
hopes for the future must 
contrast with the dark 
memories of the past. 
Memories such as that of 
the two children being 
taken to see a production 
of Peter Pan in Boston, 
where the family bought 
Buddy a T-shirt that said, 
ironically, "Never Gonna 
Grow Up." Another painful 
memory, said Hilda 
Cortez, is one from New 
Year's Day, 1991, when 
she and other family 
members kidded her sister 
about her 26th birthday, 
which would have been 
this past September. 

"No, that's never going 
to happen," Magga Cortez 
told her family. "I'm going 
to be 25 forever." 



Crime 
Watch 



By ROBERT HANNA 
Crime Prevention Officer 
Quincy Police Department 




The Con Artist 

Partn 

Tbe following is a Ust of schemes or 'con games' 
that the con man is likely to try on you. 

Home Improvement: 

Home repair/improvement; City Inspector; Termite 
or pest control inspector. 

Bank Related: 

Bank examiner; Pigeon drop 

Investment: * 

Franchise/vending; land frauds; inventions; Security 
investments; Work-at-home. 

Postal Frauds: 

Chain letters; magazine subscriptions; unordered 
merchandise; correspondence courses. 

Others: 

Bait and Svritch Charity Rackets 



Computer Dating 
Contracts 
Freezer Plans 
Health clubs 
Lonely hearts 
Missing heirs 
Talent Scouts 



Debt ConsoUdation 
Dance Lessons 
Psychic/fortune tellers 
Job placement 
Medical quackery 
Referral sales 
Pyramid schemes 



Fake officials 
Some rules: 

• Always investigate before investing money or 
signing a contract 

• Be suspicious about extraordinary promises of high 
or unusual monetary returns, or a 'bargain' no one else 
can match. 

• Don't discuss your personal finances or give cash 
to strangers. 

• Don't be too embarrassed to report that you've 
been victimized or swindled 

• Testify in court, if asked, to help stop this kind of 
crime. 

The Con Game: 

Most successful con games are old schemes for 
today's circumstances. The old "salting the gold mine' 
scheme is still being practiced, for example, but 
today's 'salting' occurs in living rooms, not abandoned 
mines. In the old ruse, you may remember, 
unscrupulous mine owners would place a few gold 
nuggets in exhausted miens so they could sell them for 
inflated profits. In one recent scheme a con artist 
bought six color television sets, at the regular price 
fixjm a retail store, then sold them, still in their cartons, 
to six prominent persons for one fifth of their original 
price. Later, he hired several high school students as 
telephone solicitors to sell 'carloads' of TV sets 
purchased new from a bankrupt retail chain. When 
potential customers balked, the con artist used as 
references the original six customers who had been 
'salted.' Before the police were alerted, he collected 
ahnost $60,000. 

Robert Kane Jr. Receives 

Political Science Degree 

From UMass Boston 

in the fall. He attended 
Quincy PubUc Schools in 
his elementary and middle 
school years and is a 1985 
graduate of Boston 
College High School. 

The son of Robert and 
Maureen Kane of 9 Edwin 
St., he has recently 
relocated to Florida. 



Robert P. Kane Jr., 
formerly of Quincy, 
recently received a 
politicial science degree 
from the University of 
Massachusetts at Boston. 



Kane, who was also 
named to the Dean's List, 
plans to enter law school 



r 



McAllister Team St. John's First Half Winners 



Bud McAllister's team 
won the first half of St. 
John's Holy Name Bowling 
League with a 75-45 
record. Karl 

Vonhartenstein's team was 
second at 62-58. 

The rest of the 
standings: Aldo Saluti, 59- 



61; Joe Matarazzo, 58-62; 
John Grande, 53-67; Jim 
Mastrantonio, 53-67. 

Dave Nolan rolled the 
weekly high single of 125, 
Grande had 120 and Duey 
DiCesare 115. Grande had 
the high three of 343 and 
Mastrantonio rolled 316. 



Mastrantonio's team 
had the high single of 397 
and Matarazzo's team had 
390. Mastrantonio also had 
the high team three of 
1157 and McAllister had 
1124. 

The Top Ten: Grande, 
103.5; Bob SaluU, 103; 



Mastrantonio. 101.21; 
Mike Hart, 96.22; Nolan, 
96.11; Don Gilliland, 
95.49; Dan Dieso, 93.98; 

McAllister, 93.6; 
Matarazzo, 93.55; Rich 
Warner, 93.41. 



^ 



WANTED 

Retail Advertising 
Salespersons 

Full and Part Time 

The Quincy Sxm 

1372 Hancock St., Quincy 

471-3100 



Vs. 



Page 18 Quincy Son Thnnday, January 23, 1!>92 



Business & Real estate 



Joseph Doran Honored 
By CIC For Commitment 



Edward Flavin Elected Mass. 
Real Estate Appraisers Trustee 



J. Joseph Doran, QC, oi 
Quincy, was honored 
recently by the Society of 
Certified Insurance 
Counselors for his more 
than five years of 
"steadfast commitment to 
leadership and excellence 
through continuing 
insurance education." 

The CIC noted that 
Doran's commitment to 
excellence "has been 
demonstrated through 
outstanding individual 
achievement and through 




JOSEPH DORAN 



the highest level of 



professional competence 
in all areas of the 
insurance business." 

Doran, president of of 
Doran & Horrigan 
Insurance Agency Inc., 
earned the CIC 
designation in 1983 and 
ranks ammig the top 1% of 
agents and producers in 
America. 

More insurance 
professionals participate in 
the CIC Educational 
System than in any other 
type of insurance 
education program. 



Norfolk County Bar Assn. 
Establishes Speakers Bureau 



The Norfolk County Bar 
Association announces the 
establishment of a 



Speakers Bureau that will 
provide speakers on law- 
related matters to groups 



HELP WANTED 



School Safety Officer 

School Safety Officer for Quincy Pub- 
lic Schools. Must qualify as a Security 
Guard under Civil Service classification 
plan. Must submit to criminal back- 
ground check. High School diploma 
required. Bachelor's degree preferred. 
Salary range $17,000-$21,000. 

Applications are available in the Per- 
sonnel Office, 70 Coddington Street 
(Woodward Avenue), Quincy and must 
be returned no later than Friday, Janu- 
ary 31, 1992. 



I LEGAL NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
NORFOLK DIVISION 
Docket No. 91 P2919E1 
Estate of MARTIN J. KING 
late of QUINCY In the 
County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that THOMAS 
E. KING of QUINCY in the 
County of NORFOLK be 
appointed executor named 
in the will without surety on 
the tx>nd. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 19, 
1992. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objection to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the fourteenth 
day of January one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-two. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF Pfl09ATE 
1/23/92 



LEGAL NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS THE 
TRIAL COURT THE 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 91 P2925E1 
Estate of ELLA MAY 
HARDING late of QUINCY 
In the County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 
A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that PATRICK 
R. HARDING of TROY in 
the State of MICHIGAN be 
appointed executor named 
in the will without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 19, 
1992. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the fourteenth 
day of January one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-two. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
RBQBTER OF PROBATE 

1/23/92 



of 30 people or more 
without charge to the 
group. 

Attorneys 
knowledgeable in topic: 
which include bankruptcy, 
collections, consumer law, 
conveyancing, 
incorporations, criminal 
law, divorces, landlord- 
tenant, malpractice 
claims, patents, personal 
injury cases, social 
security law, wills, estate 
planning, workman's 
compensation and zoning 
are available to meet with 
groups. 

For more information 
contact one of the 
following Bar Association 
officers: President Helen 
Abdallab-Donohue, 
Norwood; President-Elect 
Matthew J. McDonnell, 
Quincy; Vice President 
Louis A. Cassis, Quincy; 
Secretary William J. 
McNulty Jr., Dedham; 
Treasurer Loretta S. 
O'Brien, Norwood; Past 
President John Dugan, 
Medfield; or Bar 
Association Executive 
Director Adrienne Clarke 
at 471-9693. 



LEGAL NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

NORFOLK DIVISION 

Docket No. 91 P2939A1 

Estate of GERALD R. 

CARUSO late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that RUTH CARUSO of 
ENGLEWOOD in the State 
of FLORIDA be appointed 
administratrix of said 
estate without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court 
at Dedham on or before ten 
q'clock in the forenoon on 
February 19, 1992. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the fourteenth 
day of January one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-two. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER OF PROBATE 

1/23/92 



Edward Flavin, ^iRA, 
of Quincy, has been 
elected to the Board of 
Trustees of the 
Massachusetts Board of 
Real Estate Appraisers, a 
600-member organization 
organized in 1934 to train, 
educate and designate 
qualified men and women 
as real estate appraisers. 

A designated MRA 
member of the board since 




EDWARD FLAVIN 



1984, Flavin is qualified to 
appraise all types of real 
property. He is president 
of Flavin & Flavin Realty, 
Inc., in Quincy, and the 
past president of Quincy 
and South Shore Board of 
Realtors. 

He is active in many 
neighborhood and civic 
associations and Uves with 
his wife and three sons in 
Quincy. 



Donna Ruseckas Suffolk Assistant AD 



Dotma M. Ruseckas of 
Quincy has been appointed 
assistant director of 
athletics at Suffolk 
University, announces 
athletic director James E. 
Nelson. 

A 1982 graduate of 
Bridgewater State 
College, Ruseckas has 
been serving as a physical 
education elementary 
teacher in the Weymouth 
Public Schools. She has 
also served as curriculum 
director at the West 
Roxbury Community 
School. 

Her coaching 

experience includes head 
volleyball and softball 
coach at Weymouth North 




DONNA RUSECKAS 



High School and assistant 
basketball coach at that 
school and Weymouth 
South High School. She 
also served as associate 



Douglas Connor Top Seller 
At Conway WoUaston Office 



Douglas Connors has 
been named tops in sales 
for the month of December 
at the Wollaston office of 
Jack Conway & Company, 
Inc., announces Conway 
President Dick Cahill. 

Connors has 



consistently been among 
the leaders in sales and 
listings for the company. 

Jack Conway & 
Company, Inc. is the 
largest independent real 
estate company in 
Massachusetts. 



Jean LaCivita Joins 
Quincy Ad Agency 



Jean LaCivita has been 
named senior account 
executive at Devine & 
Pearson, Inc. Advertising 
of Quincy. 

LaCivita joined Devine 
& Pearson in 1983 in 
account management and 
was later promoted to 

LEGAL NOTlci 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 
PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT 
Norfolk, ss. 

91 P0993-E1 

To all persons 
interested in the estate of 
Karin T. Wadsworth late of 
Quincy in said County, 
deceased, testate. 

A petition has been 
presented to said Court for 
license to sell -- at private 
sale - certain real estate 
of said deceased, which is 
situated in Quincy, in said 
County, in accordance 
with the rules set out in 
said petition. 

If you desire to object 
thereto you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham before 
ten o'clock in the forenoon 
on February 5, 1992, the 
return day of this citation. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court, this 
Feb. 5, 1992. 
THOMAS PATRICK HUQHES 
REGISTER 
1/16, 23, 30/92 



Production Manager. She 
is currently responsible for 
handling accounts 
including General Foods 
Jello Brand Deserts, Open 
Pit Barbecue Sauce and 
Good Seasons Salad 
Dressings. 

Prior to joining Devine 
& Pearson, LaCivita 
worked at US News and 
World Report Magazine. 

Devine & Pearson Inc., 
is a full service advertising 
agency which markets 
products and services to 
consumer, trade and 
business to business 
sectors. The firm has won 
creative awards including 
Hatch, Clio, Andy and 
One Show. 

MSSONALS 



PRAYER TO TME HOLY SPIRIT 

Holy Spirit, you who gives meaning 
to and shines light on my path so \k& 
Imay reach my goals.you who gives 
me the divine grace to forgive and 
forget the evil done unto me and 
which is with me at every moment of 
my life. I want in this short dialogueto 
reassu re you one more time that I do 
not ever want to be separated from 
you. no matter howqrand the worldly 
poesessions may be, my desire to 
be wrth you and my brothers in per- 
petual glory will not be lessened 
(One should say thisprayer 3 days in 
a row without mentionmg the re- 
quest, within 3 days the divine favor 
shall be grantea, no matter how 
unobtainable it seemed) Publish this 
prayer as soon as your request is 
granted. aA.a i/as 



Thank You 
St. Jude 

For Favors Granted 

M.N. 1/23 



Softball coach at the 
University of 

Massachusetts in Boston. 

Ruseckas is a member 
of the South Boston Sports 
Hall of Fame Committee 
and a past member of the 
Massachusetts Association 
for health, physical 
education, recreation and 
dance. 

"We are delighted to 
have Donna Ruseckas join 
our athletic staff," Nelson 
said in making the 
announcement. "She 
brings outstanding 
credentials to the position, 
has good athletic 
experience and should be 
an asset to our 
department." 




KIM VO 

Atty. Kim Vo 

Joins Boston 

Law Firm 

Atty. Kim D. Vo, 
formerly of Quincy, has 
joined the Boston law firm 
of White, Inker, Aronson, 
P.C. as an associate. 

Miss Vo, now a resident 
of Taunton, graduated from 
Quincy high School in 
1978 and was class 
valedictorian. 

She is a graduate of 
Eastern Nazarene College, 
Boston University School 
of Nursing and Suffolk 
Law School. 



Sun 



Classified 



Ads 



Get 



Results 



Thursday, January 23, 1992 Qulncy Sun Page 19 




EvmBoors marketpuce 



FORRENt 



HALLS FOR RENT 

N«wly Ranovated 
Sons of Italy Social Canter 
Goldan Lion Suite 
Capacity - 300 
Vanatian Room 
Capacity - 140 
Call 472-SWO 



TF 



HALL FOR RENT 

North Qulncy K of C 

Building 

5 Mollis Avenue 

For information please call 

328-S«67 



HALL FOR HIRE 

Weddings, Showers. 

Meetings. Banquets 

Elks Home, 440 E Squantum St 

Ouifify 

472-2223 

Tf 



HALL FOR RENT 

(completely remodeled) 

Houghs Nock Post No 380. 

American Legion, 1116 Sea St 

479-6149 

TF 



SHOOTERS PUB 
FOR RENT 

Available for £iny occasion. A 
setting reminiscent of an Old 
English Pub. 4 antique Bil- 
liard tables, dart boards. For 
more information call 

472-0771 1/30 



HALL FOR RENT 

Furnace Brook Golf Club. 
Small groups, 50-90. 
Contact Mai Hdm 

472-8466 2^ 



FOR SALE 



MOVING SOUTH 

Must sell Men's 3 pc. 
wool suits, Size 38R-$40 
ea. Women's winter 
clothing, sizes 8-12. 
Call 479-3883 1/23 



FOR SALE 

r Delta tilting Arbor 
Unisaw, with miter gage, 
blade guard, uniguard,24 
volt magnetic motor con- 
trol system, unifence and 
table and shelf for 
unifence, $1 295. Contact 
Mr. Swenson, or Mr. 
Rand at 617-773-0210. 
Excellent condition. 



1/23 



^if^sniL^?^ 



THANKSGIVING NOVENA 
TO ST. JUDE: 

O Holy St. Jude, Apostle and 
Martyr, great in virtue and rich 
in miraaes, near kinsman of 
Jesus Christ, faithful interces- 
sor of all who invoke your spe- 
cial patronage in time of need, 
to you I have recourse from the 
depths of my heart and humbly 
beg to whom God has given 
such great power, to come to 
my assistance, hielp me in my 
present and urgent petition. In 
return, I promise to make your 
name known arxi cause you to 
be Invoked. Say 3 Our Fathers, 
3 Hail Marys and Glories. Pub- 
lication must k>e promised. St. 
Jude pray for us and all who 
invoke your aid. Amen. This 
Novena has never been known 
to fail. I have had my request 
granted. (This Novena to be 
said on 9 consecutive days). 
CM. 1/23 



•^A^^VMV^^^fW^^^^^ 



Save Qm and Mon«y 
Shop Locally 



WANTED 



WANTED TO BUY 

Old woodworking tools, planes, 
chi8«ls, surplus hand tools; all 
trades. Precision machinist tools. 
Also wanted: old books, paintings, 
frames, antiques, estate lots. 

1-617-558-3839 -^ 



WANTED: 

Actors for TV Commei- 
dals; movie extras and 
game show contestants. 
Many needed. Call 1 -805- 
682-7555 ext.T-3806. s/is 

HELPWA^ltEcT' 



AIRUNES NOW HIRING 

Travel Agents, Flight At- 
tendants Mechanics, etc. 
Entry level and up. Sala- 
ries to $105K. Call 1 -805- 
682-7555 ext.A-3654.3rt» 



TRAVEL FREE or on a 

shoestring. Air couriers 
needed - also overseas 
and cruiseship help 
wanted. Call 1-805-682- 
7555 Ext. F-3844. 



SERVICES 



an» 



POSTAL JOBS 
AVAILABLE! 

Many positions. Great 
benefits. Call 1-805- 
682-7555 ext. P-4029 

3/1» 



GOVERNMENT JOBS 

NOW HIRING in your 
area. $16,000-$68,000. 
Call 1-805-682-7555 ext. 
J-3865 for cun-ent federal 

list. 3^9 



NEED EXTRA INCOME 

FOR 1992? 

Earn $500-$1 ,000 wMkly 

stuffing •nvelcp Details: 

Rush $1 ,000 wHh SASE to: 

OIH Group, Inc. 

1019Lk.Sharwood, 

Orlando, FL 32818 6/ii 

TELEPHONE 
COMPANY JOBS 

Starts $7.80-$15.75/hr, your 
area. Men and women needed. 
No experience necessary. For 
information call 1-900-740- 
4761. ext. 4143 6 am-8 am -7 
days -$12.95 fee 2/6 



CANNERY WORKERS/ 
ALASKA 

Hiring $600+wkly. Over 8000 
openings. Male/female. Free 
Transportation. Room and 
board. Call E.I.C. Now! 1 -206- 
736-7000 Ext. 5593B4 1/23 



OPt»ORTUNiTY 

A/FTP MEDICAL BILUNG 

Opportunity to qualify as 
a licensee in your area for 
a national healthcare 
company. Do electronic 
medical insurance claims 
processing for medical 
practitioners. $30,000 
PART TIME to over 
$80,000 FULL TIME. 
Company training! Initial 
capital required, $5,998 
plus PC. For information 
by mail call (702) 352- 
4420 (24 hours) 1/23 



MtSCELLANEQUS 
BINGO 

North Qulncy K of C 

Wed., 7 pm - Hard Carda 

Prlze»-Sn«cks 

Reiwced Atmoeplwre 

Rcftwhmwite. Pwlclng 

Call 328-9822 2/i3 



Caprpet & Upholstery 
Cleaning by JK&K 

'Winter Special' 
25% OFF 
with this Ad 

• Dry Foam Method 

• Better than Steam 

• Leaves No Residue 

• No Shrinldng 

• Fully INsured 

Call 471-6319 1/30 

(Painting & 
WcU[covenn£ 

By'Ed'Barr 
Ifie (iigfust quality zvorl^ 
performed tuatCy at rea- 
sonaBU rates. Jree esti- 
mates, referrences avaiC- 
a6U, over 18 years eajpe- 
rience. 

Cail479-3284 
today 35 

RUBBISH REMOVAL 

Complete cleanouts - attics- 
cellars-garages-yards. Re- 
moval of appliances-boilers- 
oil tanks-water heaters. Fast, 
service-reasonable 

472 -0877 2/6 

•Tar and Gravel 
•Shingles 
•Gutters 
•Repairs 

HEALY ROOFERS 

'Flat Roof SpeclalisU' 
Jim Healv 471-2123 4^ 

FOR SALE 

REPOSSESSED & IRS 
FORECLOSED HOMES 

available at below market 
value. Fantastic savings. You 
repair. Also S&L bailout prop- 
erties. Call 1-805-682-7555 
ext. H-6705 for repo list your 
area. 3n» 




SERVICES 



SERVICES 




EXPERT 

lAMP REPAIR 
t RfWHNNG 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO. 

472-2177 

755 SOUTHERN ARTERY 
OUINCY 



TF 



TAX RETURNS 
Very Very Low Rates 

Richard C. McDonough, EA 
Professional Service In 

Your Home 
20 Years Experience 
472-2694 416 



LEGAL NOTICE 



SEIZED CARS 

trucks, boats, 4 wheelers, 
motorhomes, by FBI, IRS, 
DEA. Available your area 
now. CalM -805-682-7555 
ext. C-6368 vm 



(Q 



United Way 

llbringioutthtbestinatofiB. 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS THE 
TRIAL COURT THE 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT 
NORFOLK DIVISION 

Docket No. 90P1298-GI 

To Gertrude L.- Grindle 
and the Massachusetts 
Department of Mental Health 
and to all persons interested 
in the estate of Gertrude L. 
Grindle of Braintree in said 
Court, mentally ill person. 

A petition has been 
presented to said Court for 
license to sell at - private 
sale - certain real estate of 
said ward for her 
maintenance - And praying 
that the petitioner may 
become the purchaser of 
said real estate. Which is 
situated in Quincy in said 
County, in accordance with 
the offer set out in said 
petition. 

If you desire to object 
thereto you or your attorney 
should file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Deidham before ten o'clock 
in the forenoon on January 
1 5, 1 992, the return day of 
this citation. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Judge of said 
Court, this December 9, 
1991. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER 

1/9,16,23/92 



LARRY'S 
HOME REPAIR 

• Carpenters 
• Painters 

• Decorators 
General Contractor 
20 Years Experience 
Licensed • Insured 
Interior-Exterior Painting 
Scroll Ceiling 
All Home Repairs 
Small or Large 

659-7471 328-8735 

TF 

ADVANTAGE RESUME 
$25 a resume 

Laser printing 

on quality paper 

39 Parker St., Quincy 

(off Granite St., aaoss from 

Star Market and Fruit Basket) 

479-6422 i/i» 

ROOFS AND ADOmONS 

Dormers, Decks, Bath- 
rooms, Quincy and So. 
Shore area. Quality work,' 
good prices. Jordan Const. 
1-800-649-6720 2« 

E.J. TANTILLO 

Plumbing & Heating 

Boilers, Water Heaters, 

Gas Piping, 

Master Lie. #9904. Insured 

479-5667 3/12 



SERVICES 



SULLIVAN Landscape 
& Tree Service 

Pruning, Removals, brush 
chipping, Botx^at service. Fully 
insured. Reasonable rates. 

472-3595 4^ 



ROOFING 

Residential & Commer- 
cial Competitive prices,. 

Economy Roofing 
Call 617-837-6720 1/23 



A & T Vacuum 

• 14.95 Overhaul Special 

on any vacuum 
e Sewing machine repairing 
e VCR repairing and cleaning 
e Sharpening 

(scitsors. knivn, etc ) 

e Oreck XL Vacuums 
e Electrolux w/power noz2le 
$150 
e Used Vacuum's $45 & up 
27 Beale St. 
Wollaston 
479-5066 



Your South Short 

HMdquarltrs 

For 



Appliance 
Service 

ON ALL 

MAJOR 

APPLIANCES 



HANCOCK TIRE 
& APPLIANCE 

1 15 Franklin Si . So Quincy 
4/2-1710 

TF 




WALLPAPERING 

Frank Montani 
Highest Quality Workmanship 
and Service. Neat, clean, 
professiional; reasonable 
rates; ceilings painted. Please 
leave message 698-9472 2n 



mmm^mm 



WORD PROC ESSING IS IN 

DEMANDl LEARN MORE 

QUICKLY AND THOROUGHLY 

Wrm PRIVATE INSTRUCTIONS: 

CALL WORD CONNECTIONS 

(617)849-8002 

Leave Message 

All calls promptly returned 1/30 



BABY-SfTTER 

"Experienced and caring 
baby sitter available for chil- 
dren of all ages. Own 
transportation, references 
and wages negotiable. 
Please call Trisha - 786- 
9351. 1/23 

CUSTOM WINDOW 
TREATMENTS 

by experienced profes- 
sional. Very reasonable 
rates. 
Please Call 471-3932 

1/30 



HOUSECLEANING 
and WINDOW CLEANING 

on Wednesdays and 
Saturdays. Call 
773-6816 nights 1/30 



aiV 

^%,^ 



MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN, 1372 Hancock SL, Quincy, MA 02169 
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment mutt accompany order. 



INDEX 



D Services 

D For Sale 

a Autoi 

D Boats 

a For Rent 

a Wanted 

D Help Wanted 

a Pell, Livestock 

a Lost and Found 

a Real Estate For Sale 

D Real Estate Wanted 

D Miscellaneous 

a Work Wanted 

a Antiques 

a Coins A Slamot 

a Rest Homes 

a Instruction 

P Day Care 

a Personal 

a Electrical A Appliances 



RATES 
IWEEK 
S-7WEIKt 

•■12 WEEKS 

IS WEEKS 
OR MORE 



D $5.00foroneineertlon.upto20worda, 10< for each additional word. 
D $4.60 per Insertion up to 20 words for 3-7 Insertions of the same ad, 

10* each addtttonal word. 
D $4.30 per Insertion up to 20 words for 8-12 insertions of thesamead. 

10« more each additional word. 
D $4.00 per Insertion up to 20 words for 1 3 or more insertions of the 

same ad, 10* each additional word. 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



D Enclosed is $ — 
In The Quincy Sun 



.for the following ad to run 



.weeks 



COPY: 



NO RERJNO WMLL K MAOe AT THIS COI^TRACT RATE IN THE EVENT OF CANCCLLATION. 
DtAOUNC: MONDAY, SM WM. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR PHONE NUMBER IN AD. 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



Page 20 Quincy Swi Thursday, Juiiiary 23, 1992 



Mariano Blasts Hazardous 
Waste Exemption Bill 



Remembering MLK 



Testifying recently 
before the Joint 
Committee on Natural 
Resources, State Rep. 
Ronald Mariano (D- 
Quincy) blasted House 
Bill 390 which proposes 
that certain hazardous 
waste facilities be exempt 
from Chapter 21D which 
requires these facilities to 
go through the regulatory 
siting process in a 
community. 

If enacted, the 
exemption bill would 



apply to Clean Harbors in 
Braintree. 

"Attempts by facilities 
such as Clean Harbors to 
avoid the regulatory 
process is wrong and if 
successful it could 
compromise the health and 
safety of my constituents," 
Mariano said. 

"Grandfathering these 
facilities just because they 
were in operation prior to 
March of 1980 is a sham 
and a blatant attempt to 
subvert the intent of the 



legislature." 

While the bill addresses 
other facilities. Clean 
Harbors would have the 
most to gain since it is one 
of the largest facilities of 
its kind in the state. It is 
also located in densely 
populated area near the 
Quincy-East Braintree Une. 

Mariano urged the 
committee to defeat the 
bill and vowed to fight the 
biU on the House floor if it 
leaves the committee with 
a favorable report. 




You can do better 

at Colonial Federal with 

a new car loan! 



20% OQ>NN. 



SNUG HARBOR COMMUNITY School students Jacky Chang, Justin Curran and Viet 
Ngo sing choral selections on the life of slain civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King 
Jr. during the city's MLK birthday celebration Sunday at United First Parish Church. 






O"«'°!r°ormc>paiand> 



fcpaV 



roents^priS 



ftlirrwirolt) 



QfBWWfTTfT^) 





COLONIAL FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK 

QUINCY 15 Beach Street 617-47)-O750 

EAST WEYMOUTH Corner of Middle & Washington Streets 61 7-331 1776 
HOLBROOK 802 South Franklin Street 61 7-767. 1 776 ^^ 

WAREHAM Cranberry Plaza 508 295- 1 7 76 T=l 

INSURED FOIC 'vLM» 



QUINCY CHORAL SOCIETY, under tlie direction of Conductor John Nichols, 
performs "We WiU Overcome" during Quincy's celebration of Dr. Martin Luther 
King's birthday at United First Parish Church Sunday. 



Quality Printing 

at a 
Reasonable Price. 





M/e have computerized our 

fypescffing departmerit 

and we're expanding our 

printing division. 



We Specialize in: 
Program Books, Brochures, Newspapers, 
Newsletters, Political Flyers, Tickets, 
Stationery, Envelopes and Typesetting. 




ELISHA QUIGG, a student at the Broad Meadows Middle School, reads an original 
work on racial harmony at the city's celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King's birthday 

Sunday at United First Parish Church. ^ c 

(QMncy Sun photos by Tom Gorman) 

Asthma Conditioning Program 
For Children At South Shore YMCA 

The Norfolk County- eight-week conditioning 

Newton Lung Association, program for asthmatic 

in conjunction with the children ages 6 to 13 

South Shore YMCA in Friday, Jan. 31. 
Quincy, will begin an The program will 



1372 Hancock St., Quincy Square 

471-3100 



Cyril P. Morrisette 

American Legion Post No. 294 

54 Miller St., Quincy 
MEAT RAFFLE 

Monday, January 27th, 7 pm 
Free Admission 



include exercise, games, 
swimming and an 
educational unit. 

Interested parents 
should contact Rhonda 
Lord with the Lung 

Association office at 508- 
668-6729. 




United Way 







VOL. 24 No. 19 




Thursday, January 30, 1992 




BRING ON THE BOYS OF SUMMER-Mayor James Sheets, seated left, and American 
Legion National Commander Dominic DiFrancesco, seated right, sign a contract paving 
the way for an American Legion Regional Baseball Tournament to be played in August 
at Quincy's Adams Field. Looking on are, standing from left, Mike Preble, department 
commander of Sons of American Legion; American Legion Fast National Commander 
John (Jake) Comer; Dept. Judge Advocate Paul A. M. Hunt; Renardo Matteucci, aide to 
national commander; Norfolk County Commander Mary Timcoe; Dept. Vice 
Commander Hank Bradley, chairman of the regional tournament; Ray Cattaneo, 
manager of the Morrisette Legion baseball team, host for the tournament; Beverly 
DiFrancesco, wife of national commander; and Roy Holt, department baseball 
dMir man. (Quincy Sun photo by Robert Bosworth) 



Disappointed Sheets: 



Lexington Loss 
Setback For Hotel 



By ROBERT 
BOSWORTH 

The Navy's decision to 
award the U.S.S. Lexington 
to Corpus Christi, Texas, 
last week not only sunk 
the city's primary plan for 
a maritime museum, but 
also delivered a setback 
for a possible major hotel 
in Quincy, Mayor James 
Sheets said Tuesday. 

"If we had received the 
Lexington, I would have 
moved immediately to 
start talking to major hotel 
chains. Absolutely," the 
mayor said. 

The mayor and other 
officials in his 
administration had hoped 
to berth the Lexington in 
the Town River and 
convert the storied aircraft 
carrier into a maritime 
museum The Lexington 
was considered a catalyst 
to the downtown 
revitalization effort with 
up to 200,000 or more 
tourists visiting the ship 
every year. 

Sheets and other 
administration officials 
believed those tourists 
would have frequented 
restaurants and shops in 
the downtown area and 
other business districts, 
giving the local economy 
a much needed boost. 
That kind of climate. 
Sheets said, would have 
attracted a major hotel 
chain to construct a hotel 
in the city. 

However, those dreams 
were dashed after Navy 
Secretary H. Garrett 
Lawrence m awarded the 
ship to Corpus Christi. 
Without the Lex, Sheets 
said his administration will 
refocus on the Quincy Plan 
to revitalize the city's 
business districts and 



accentuate the city's 
history to boost tourism. 



Set" S-unbeains 
Paye 4 



"Not getting the 
Lexington may have been 
a setback to a hotel 
project but it was not a 
setback to revitalization," 
he said, adding a hotel 
could still be in the city's 
foreseeable future. 

"I think we'll look 
seriously at a hotel in a 
year and a half. A natural 
e}q>ansion of tourism has 
to happen and how long 
that will take nobody 
knows." 

In awarding the ship to 
Corpus Christi, Garrett 
followed a profile by the 
Naval Sea Systems 
Command, which ranked 
Quincy as the least 
qualified among the three 
cities competing to win 
custody of the ship. 

Corpus Christi was 
ranked first, scoring 5. 65 
on a scale of 8. Mobile, 
Ala., was second with 4.55 
and Quincy third with 3.8. 

Observers, including the 
mayor, offered a number of 
theories as to why Corpus 
Christi was awarded the 
ship. 

Sheets said politics, 
namely Sen. Phil Gramm, 
a powerful Texas senator, 
helped sink Quincy's bid 
for the ship which was 
built at the Fore River 
shipyard in 1943. "The 
involvement of Sen. Phil 
Graham (was a key 
factor). We knew at the 
outset if Graham put his 
credibility on the line for 
the Lex, it would be 
extremely difficult for us 
and from what I'm told, 
that's what happened in 



the last five weeks." 

A second factor which 
may have come into play 
is a promise the Navy 
made and then broke to 
Corpus Christi. As home 
of the Navy's air training 
command center, the Navy 
promised the Texas city 24 
years ago a portion of the 
Navy's fleet. The city 
didn't get a ship. 

The Lexington may 
have been pay back time. 

The mayor, also said the 
Navy high-balled the cost 
of the city's proposed dam 
and cradle for the ship at 
the Town River. "They 
said it would cost $5.27 
million. In our 

application, we said $2.5 
million and we could have 
built one for less than 
that," according to the 
advice of Bruce 
Tobiasson, a well-known 
Naval architect and 
engineer. 

The Navy, although 
invited, never visually 
inspected the Town River 
site, leaving the mayor 
and others connected with 
the effort to believe 
politics was the biggest 
factor. 

Looking back at the 
city's campaign for the 
carrier, the mayor said he 
appreciates all who rallied 
around the Lexington 
effort. "It was a 

tremendous effort because 
we were all believers. 
They are all good, strong 
people so we just go on." 

Although the Lexington 
dream is over, thoughts for 
a maritime museum will 
continue. Sheets said. 
"We have to look at where 
to locate a maritime 
museum. We have over 
200 years of shipbuilding 
heritage that must be 
preserved." 



Assaults, Rapes, Auto Thefts Drop, 
Larceny Under $50, Robberies Rise 

Serious Crimes Drop 
One Percent In 1991 

By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

The number of serious crimes reported in Quincy during 1991 decreased 
by one percent compared to 1990, the fifth lowest incidence of such crimes 
in the last 10 years, according to statistics compiled by the Quincy Police 
Department. 



According to the 
statistics requested by The 
Quincy Sun, there were 
3699 serious crimes 
reported in 1991 compared 
to 3735 in 1990. Serious 
crimes include eight crime 
categories: murder, rape, 
robbery, aggravated 
assault, burglary, larceny 
over $50, larceny under 
$50 and auto theft. 

The crime category 
experiencing the biggest 
decrease was aggravated 
assaults which declined by 
30 percent, from 388 in 
1990 to 271 in 1991. 

Larceny under $50 and 
robbery increased the 
most. The former rose 28 
percent, from 235 in 1990 
to 326 in 1991, while the 
latter increased 23 percent 
fitmi 93 to 128. 

The number of 
burglaries increased 10 
percent, from 892 to 988. 



The remaining four 
categories showed little 
change compared to 1990. 
There were two murders in 
1991 compared to one in 
1990 and 24 rapes in 1991 
compared to 25 in 1990. 



Related Storv 
Page 2 



Larceny over $50 
decreased 7.6 percent from 
1359 to 1257 while auto 
thefts dropped 4 percent 
from 742 to 710. 

Overall, four crime 
categories experienced 
increases (murder, 
robberies, burglary and 
larceny under $50) and 
four categories decreased 
(rapes, aggravated 
assaults, larceny over $50 
and auto thefts). 

Chief Francis E. 
Mullen, a 35-year veteran 



of the department who 
became the city's top law 
enforcement officer in 
September, 1990, said he 
is not surprised by the 
statistics. 

"I'm a realist. Our 
figures are comparable to 
other places. It (crime) 
has its ups and downs but I 
don't think it's out of 
control or anything." 

Compared to other 
years over the last decade, 
1991 was the fifth lowest 
in terms of serious crimes 
reported. 

Beginning with 1982, 
the figures are: 

•1982, 4,743 reports of 
serious crimes, up 22.1 
percent cmnpared to 1991. 

•1983: 4,013 reports, 
up 7.9 percent. 

•1984: 3,610 reports, 
down 2.5 percent 

•1985: 3,998 reports. 

Cont'd on Page 5 



Quincy Police D^(Hirtoieiit Serious Crimes Statistics 




1982 - 1991 




1 


cmms 


1982 


1983 


1984 


1985 


1986 


1987 


1988 


1989 


1990 


1991 


GRAND 
TOTAL 


mmm 








1 


3 


4 


2 


1 


1 


1 


2 


15 


mmm:::: 


21 


12 


29 


17 


28 


32 


21 


20 


25 


24 


229 


miBSBESX 


114 


93 


81 


63 


80 


58 


73 


82 


93 


121 


858 


AWRAVAIED 




184 


165 


158 


185 


283 


297 


287 


388 


271 


2380 


iWipR^ 


1182 


955 


758 


748 


626 


737 


791 


716 


892 


988 


8393 


iiiiilNY 


1818 


1564 


1680 


2072 


1802 


1431 


1499 


1360 


1359 


1257 


15842 


mmmY 


680 


433 


312 


345 


267 


185 


125 


201 


235 


326 


3109 


AUTO 


766 


772 


584 


592 


594 


557 


561 


618 


742 


710 


6496 


'mtAm'-'-'"'^ 


4743 


4013 


3610 


3998 


3586 


3285 


3368 


3285 


3735 


3699 


37322 



North Quincy Bar 
License Suspended 30 Days 



By STEVE KAVANAGH 

A 30-day liquor license 
suspension has been levied 
on the Quincy Bay Inn by 
the License Board for 
serving intoxicated persons 
on Sept. 24, 1989 at the 
Aquarius Lounge. 

The suspension of the 
motel's All-Alcoholic 
license for 30 days was 
described by License 
Board chairman John 
Gillis as "very harsh." 

"It is harsh. But under 
the circumstances it's not 
harsh," said Police Chief 
Frands Mullen. 



The motel bar, now 
named The Outer Limits, 
will remain open pending 
an appeal to the state 
Alcoholic Beverage 
Control Commission. The 
motel's attorney said an 
i^jpeal will be made. 

The board voted 
unanimously to penalize 
the North Quincy motel for 
serving alcohol to two 19- 
year-old Quincy men who 
later died in an automobile 
accident that evening. The 
vote ^as taken diuing the 
conclusion of the the 
hearing which had been 



continued from Jaa 7. 

The License Board 
unanimously cleared 
Quincy Bay Inn of a 
charge of serving utxlerage 
persons. 

Lawyers for the motel 
and for the families of 
Daniel Ward and Shawn 
Clancy, the two men who 
died, were not satisfied 
with the decision by the 
board. 

Attorney Michael Traft, 
representing the families 
of Ward and Clancy, said 
the families wanted a 

(Cont'd on P^ 20) 



Page 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 30, 1992 



Stooges Tavern Withdraws 
Relocation Application 



A request by Stooge's 
tavern to move to a new 
location at the rear of 1S46 
Hancock St. was 
withdrawn without 
prejudice at Tuesday's 
License Board meeting. 

Stooge's is presently 
located in small quarters 
with no parking at 3 
School St. Co-owner 
Cynthia Conley told the 
board the poor economy is 
forcing Stooges to move. 

During the first part of 
the hearing, on Jan. 14, 
License Board members 
told Conlev they might be 



in favor of the move if 
Stooge's would do more to 
feature food at the 
proposed location. 

However, since the 
initial hearing, the board 
has received letters of 
opposition to the move 
from Mayor James Sheets, 
the Quincy Center 
Business and Professional 
Association and the 
Quincy Citizens 

Association. 

Police Chief Francis 
Mullen also said he had 
done some investigating 
concerning the new 



location which fronts the 
Hancock Parking Lot. 

"We (Police 

Department) received over 
100 calls last year-mostly 
on weekends--to the 
Hancock Parking area," 
said Mullen. "I can't see 
putting another liquor 
establishment in there. For 
public safety reasons I'm 
against it." 

"I think the area is 
saturated with liquor 
establishments already," 
said Fire Chief Thomas 
Gormaa 

■■STEVE KAVANAGH 



Mullen Taking Steps 

To Make Quincy Police 

Department More Efficient 



Evaluation Seminar 
Held At North Quincy H.S. 



North Quincy High 
School officials recently 
attended an Evaluation 
Seminar at the school to 
prepare for an evaluation 
this spring. 

Principal Peter 
Chrisom, assistant 
principal Eileen Feeney, 



science teacher Thomas 
Donnelly, and Special 
Education Department 
head William Mulcahy 
attended the seminar 
sponsored by the 
Commission on Public 
Secondary Schools of the 
New England Association 



THE LEGAL ADVICE 

AND 

REFERRAL CLINIC 

DO YOU HAVE 

A LEGAL QUESTION 

OR - ARE YOU CONFUSED 

ABOUT A LEGAL ISSUE? 

The Bar Association of Norfolk 
County is sponsoring legal clin- 
ics to assist you with questions. 
There will be a panel of attor- 
neys volunteering their time to 
assist you. 

WHERE? 

QUINCY DISTRICT COURT 

One Dennis Ryan Parkway 

Quincy, MA 

WHEN? 

Februarys, 1992 

(Wednesday Evening) 

TIME? 

6:00 PM to 8:00 PM 

The above is a public service to 
the community and all are in- 
vited to attend. This will be held 
on a first come, first served ba- 
sis, and is free of charge to the 
public. You will have a one on 
one consultation with an attor- 
ney who specializes in the area 
of the law you may have a 
question in. 



ADRIENNE CLARKE, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 
BAR ASSOCIATION OF NORFOLK COUNTY 



of Schools and Colleges. 

The seminar provided 
an opportunity for 
principals and steering 
committee members of 
schools scheduled for 
evaluation to finalize 
plans for the evaluation 
visit. Participants shared 
their reactions to the self- 
study process with 
Commission members. 

The New England 
Association of Schools and 
Colleges, founded in 1885, 
is the oldest accrediting 
agency in the country and 
is recognized by the U.S. 
Department of Education. 



Since becoming 
Quincy 's police chief 16 
months ago, Chief Francis 
Mullen has implemented a 
number of policies which 
have saved the department 
time and money. 

In terms of 

reorganization and 
consolidation, Mullen has 
introduced a number of 
changes since he was 
appointed chief by Mayor 
James Sheets in 
September, 1990. 

In November, 1990, the 
computer aid dispatch 
went on line, allowing 
police to render the best 
emergency response and 
service possible. To 
implement the new 
system, police and civilian 
personnel were trained. 
The computer system will 
expand with the 
department and modified 
to meet the needs of the 
city. 

A lieutenant was 
assigned in charge of 
communications under the 
Operations Division for 
more efficiency and 
prepare Quincy for 
Emergency 9 1 1 

dispatching with the 
Quincy Fire Department. 

Mullen relocated the 
drug unit to police 
headquarters, creating a 



SHIPYARD DINER 

South Street (next to Shipyard) 

770-3545 

Under New Management 

Breakfast & Lunch 

Served Daily 

Breakfast: Mon-Fri 6 am-11 am 
Sat-Sun 7 am-1 pm 
Specials $1.99 & up 
Lunch: Mon-Fri, 11 am-3 pm 
Specials $2.75 & up 
Fish & Chips $3.95 

Take Out & Kiddie Menu Available 



Full Service Oil Change 



M6 



Reg. $21.90. 
C*ill Dealer For Det>iils. 
With thtj coupon only. 

Expires 2/5/92 



Carbureted Maintenance Tune-Up 

■ Jr cyt digmiy higher 

Includes: Performance 
& Emissions Analysis 
Instal new resistor plugs 
Adjust: timing, idle, fuo-air 
mixture, where possible 
Inspect sensors, tielts. hoses 
SiNters. 

Plus Sparks Triple Guarantee 
see details below. 



$1500 OFF 




I IrKludes Any Sparlcs Tuna-Up 

ilo 



Winter 
Package 



■ Plus Oil, Lub* « Flltar up lo 5 qts. of 1 0W30 oil 

■ Plus Cooling System Flush up to 2 gal. of antifreeze | 

■ CjH Dealer For Detail Wkh mit coupon or*/ 

■ CanrvM be uMd tn conJuncUon wtim any ocher o»»er Ej^lras 2/5/tt2 



I 



«5 



00 OFF 

On Any Brake Repair 

CjM Dealer For DetaHl WW) ttHi coupon only E;q)<rn 2/5/B2 




OUR TUPLE OUARANTEE 

McK OfiriMn quoit it tw priot you pm 
MkOuiitimI or aoMd mn/MuH 

) W »ai<i w » . (Xfwqtliw«twdloi ■ 
l2inontt at 12.000 mhiAdilorDMML | 



I 
1 



■ H quincy - 770-4933 _ 

■ 664 Washington St., Rte. 3A '©!■ 
S^B (across from The Ship Yard) |S S 




FRANCES MULLEN 

centralized operation in 
the Bureau of Criminal 
Investigations. 

The chief also relocate 
the traffic bureau from the 
third floor to the first floor 
to better accommodate the 
public and to consolidate 
the work functions of the 
department. 

He successfully applied 
for several grants resulting 
in the receipt of thousands 
of dollars to aid police in 
their efforts to control 
illegal drug use. 

To date, Mullen's 
tenure as chief can also be 
marked by a number of 
fiscal highlights. 

He reformed the 
accounting procedures in 
the record room, thereby 
keeping strict account of 
all receipts, and installed 
cash registers to provide 
receipts to customers for 
more accountabiUty. 

The chief eliminated 
the call-box system and 
replaced it with an 800- 
number for police 
personnel to call the 
station, saving $18,000 a 
year. 

With the advice of City 
Solicitor Stephen 
McGrath, the department 
became a self insurer of an 
accidental death policy 



(which has not had a 
covered occurrence since 
the 1920s). That move 
saves $9,500. 

MuMen deployed 
additional personnel to 
night patrol so that a 
lieutenant would be in 
command of each night 
shift 

He reallocated funds to 
provide 'gang patrol 
details' on weekends 
during summer months and 
reallocated funds for 
increased coverage in the 
Quincy Square area nights. 

Additional educational 
materials for the training 
of officers has been 
provided and an inventory 
system has been 
established to account for 
all equipment, furniture 
and fixtures owned by the 
department. 

Funding for improved 
police equipment, 
including automatic 
weapons, cruisers, radar 
and various other 
equipment, as well as 
mobile data terminals for 
use in uniform patrol has 
been obtained. 

The chief instituted 
stricter control over 
funding received by the 
department from outside 
sources, such as grants 
and/or gifts. 

Beepers have been 
assigned to key personnel 
to improve intra- 
departmental 

communications system, a 
move which as been most 
effective, Mullen said. 

New policies and 
procedures designed to 
streamline the restitution 
process have been issued. 

The accreditation of the 
Quincy Police Department 
is moving forward and 
Mullen anticipates a 
review during FY 92. 




U.S. SAVINOS BONDS 



CHARLIE'S 
MINI-MARKET 

Holiday Party Platters 



A 



#1 Charlie's Special 

Imported Ham LOL American Cheese 

Roast Beef Potato Salad 

Turkey Breast Cole Slaw 

Genoa Salami Rolls & Pickles 

Serves 25 for only $34.95 



Hours M F 8 6 • $.«t 8 4 



Land O' Lakes 

American Cheese $1 .99 Lb. 

With This Ad 



FREE 10-Ounce Coffee 

w/Purchase of any Sub or Sandwich 

With This Ad 

Offer Good through February 6 



20% OFF All Greeting Cards 



ORDER EARLY 
Call 770-3245 

247 Atlantic St. North Quincy^ 



r 



Thundaj, Janiuu7 30, 1992 Qnincy Son Page 3 



Phelan Forms Council 
Consolidation Committee 



By ROBERT 
BOSWORTH 

Council President 
Charles Phelan Jr. has 
formed a sub-committee 
which will examine budget 
areas for possible 
consolidation and make 
recommendations for 
combining city 

departmental functions. 

Councillors appointed 
by Phelan to serve on the 
sub-committee are Ward 3 
Councillor Larry Chretien, 
Ward 4 Councillor Thomas 
Fabrizio, Ward 1 
Councillor Peter Kolson 
and Councillor Patricia 
Toland. 

Chretien will serve as 
sub-committee chairman. 
He is chairman of the 
council's Ordinance 
Committee. Toland chairs 
the Finance Committee, 
Fabrizio chairs the 
Education Committee and 
Kolson chairs the Public 
Works Committee. 

Chretien said the sub- 
committee will essentially 
brainstorm for suggestions 



and make 

recommendations to 
Mayor James Sheets and 
Phelan. He said 

committee members will 
be constructive and 
consider all parts of city 
government. 

"I want to work with 
people. I'll explore things 
that other people suggest. 
We want to reorganize 
every part of city 
government." 

Chretien said the 
committee's goal is to 
forge a new city 
government structure by 
streamlining city services, 
not creating layoffs. "I 
want to bring everyone 
who has a similar job 
function under one 
umbrella. It's not my 
intention to eliminate jobs. 

"Our goal is to try to 
come to a conclusion on a 
new structure of city 
government before coming 
up with a budget. If we 
can all agree on a 
structure, then the mayor 
and city council will be 
able to determine who 



much money we have." 

In announcing the new 
subcommittee last week, 
Phelan said, "Inasmuch as 
many city councillors have 
already made suggestions 
for consolidation in some 
areas, I will ask the 
committee to combine all 
recommendations and 
report back to the City 
Council before the end of 
February. 

"At that point, the 
recommendations will be 
forwarded to the mayor for 
his review." 

Phelan said the 
subcommittee is a 
proactive approach toward 
the FY 93 budget. Instead 
of waiting for the mayor's 
spending plan and 
recommendations, Phelan 
said the sub-committee 
will begin its own analysis 
and thus be better 
informed on city finances 
and department functions 
during budget deliberations 
this spring. 

The mayor is expected 
to submit his FT 93 budget 
in March or early April. 



The council, which has the 
power to cut but not add 
revenue to the spending 
package, would have 45 
days to adopt it. 

Essentially, Phelan said 
the sub-committee has 
been set up to complement 
the mayor's own 
consolidation task force. 

"I'll be requesting that 
the committee work with 
the mayor and his task 
force. As chairman of the 
subcommittee, Larry 
(Chretien) will be sitting 
on the mayor's 
consolidation committee. 

"I want (the committee 
members) to come up with 
a report on areas that 
could be consolidated. 
We're going to be looking 
at everything. 

"I want us to work with 
the mayor and find things 
that we can accomplish." 

Since it is a sub- 
committee, the new group 
does not have to meet 
publicly. Chretien said the 
sub-committee may decide 
to hold a public meeting or 
bearing in the near future. 




2 Apartment Buildings 
To Be Built For Retarded 



CENSUS WORKER Fran Fareri of Quincy veriHes 
residency information witli Laura Flannery of Winslow 
Rd., Squantum. Census workers began counting the 
number of Qnincy residents Monday by going door-to- 
door in Ward 6. The census will continue over the next 
Ave weeks as census workers canvass the city's other five 
wards. The schedule is: Ward 5, beginning Feb. 3; 
Ward 4 Feb. 10; Ward 3 Feb. 17; Ward 2, Feb. 24; and 
Ward 1 March 2. Census workers, who wear 
identification badges with the city seal, ask residents to 
verify residency information such as household number, 
date of birth and occupation. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Robert Bosworth) 



By MICHAEL WHALEN 

Quincy Housing 
Authority Executive 
Director John "Jake" 
Comer announces plans for 
a new facility to be run by 
the Department of Mental 
Retardation on the grounds 
of Pagnano Towers at 109 
Curtis Ave. 

The building, which is 
to be owned and 
maintained by the QHA, 
will consist of two four- 



person staffed apartments 
for mentally retarded 
adults. It will be funded by 
the Executive Office of 
Communities and 
Development, with an 
estimated construction 
cost of $450,000. 

Comer said he is "very 
excited" about the new 
building, noting that this 
would be the fourth such 
facility to exist in the Qty 
of Quincy. 



"Some communities, 
some major cities, have 
one or two (of these 
facilities), but four is out 
of sight," said Comer. The 
other three buildings are 
located on Safford Street, 
Water Street, and South 
Street. 

The local architectural 
firm John M. Shesky aixl 
Associates, Inc., which 
was chosen from a field of 
over 60 companies that bid 



on the project, will haixUe 
construction of the facility. 
Comer said he is "hoping" 
for the building to be 
completed later in the 
year, although he added 
that early 1993 is probably 
a more realistic 
expectation. 




TEU 32e.17CX) 



FASHION QUALITV CLEANERS 



LAUNDRY - DRY CLEANING • ALTERATIONS - STORAGE 



WECJDING GOWNS A SPECIALTY 



PETER LIO 

Owner 



67 BILLINGS HO. 
NO. QUINCY. MASS. 



Unclaimed 1990 Tax Refunds 
For 15 Quincy Residents 



The Boston Internal 
Revenue Service office 
has unclaimed refund for 
15 Quincy residents. 

Quincy residents listed 
include Ruth Bailey, 
Meredith Baker, Assumpta 
Maguire, Dick Ng, Robert 
Thomas, Donald and Mary 
Codner, Arthur and Froso 
Xefteraki, Phoung Doan 



Huynh, Robert McGourty, 
James DeSilva, Edward 
Gore, Vera Browne, Grace 
Domke, Phoc Chieng and 
Brian Lomasney. 

According to the IRS, 
these refund checks were 
returned by the Postal 
Service because they 
could not be delivered. 
Each year thousands of 



checks are returned 
because the address on the 
tax return was not legible 
or the taxpayer moved and 
did not leave a forwarding 
address. 

If you were due a refund 
and have not received it 
call the IRS at 1-800-829- 
1040. 




RESTAURANT 

Weymouth Landing 



Is pleased to announce we 're now open 

THURSDAY • FRIDAY • SATURDAY 

NIGHTS 
6:00ain-3:30piii*Reopeiis ll:00pm-morn. 

33 Washington Street - Weymouth Landing 

337-3270 



% 



CORBIN'S FASHIONS 



Women's Apparel 



Hours: 

Tuesday - Saturday 

9:30-5:30 



68 Billings Rd. 

North Quincy 

328-1926 



Blackwood Pharmacy 
471-3300 

Very Personalized Service by Bonnie Seely, 
and her Staff 

FREE DELIVERY Quincy and Milton 



PENNY SALE 

Buy One Dress At Regular Price 
Buy Second Dress For A Penny 

30% OFF ALL 

Blouses - Jackets - Robes ■ Skirts - Slacks - Sweaters 



Appel Robes 
Barclay Square 
Boston Travler 
Designers Original 



Graff of California 
Judy Bond 
Leslie Fay Petites 
Northern Isle 



BONNIE SEELY BS-RPh 



30% OFF ALL 

Russell Stover Candies 

Now Through Valentine's Day 



Blackwood Pharmacy 



Hours: Open Dally 9-8 

Saturday 9-6 

Sunday 8:30-2 



M 



663 Hancock St. 

Quincy 

471-3300 



Pa^ 4 Quincy Sun Tharsdiiy, January 30, 1992 



Opinion 



^%xi.±3a.o3r 




USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co Inc 

1372 Hancock St . Quincy. Mass 02169 

Henry W Bosworth Jr Publisher 
Robert H Bosworth. Editor 



3M p«r copy. $12.00 par year by mail in Quincy 
$14.00 par yaar by mall outaida Ouincy. $17 00 out of state 

Telephone 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 
Second class postage paid at Boston Mass 

Postmaster Send address change to 
The Quincy Sun. 1372 Hancock St Quincy Mass 02169 



The Ouincy Sun assumes nc financial responsibility lor 
typographical errors in adverlisemenls txjl will reprint trial 
part of an adverl:serrent in which the typographical error 
occurs 



Readers Forum 



Agrees With Editorial 
On 'Guns And Tutors' 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 

I am writing to say 
"Good for you" for the 
editorial "Guns and 
Tutors." I am in complete 
agreement with you! 

As a parent of a Quincy 
High School Student who 
is there to learn and be in 
a safe enviroimient, I am 
in agreement with the 
administration and School 
Committee. 

It galls me to think that 
Quincy Public Schools 
provide a home tutor at the 
cost of $3,000 per student 
involved. One of these 
families apparently tried to 
claim they lived in a 
neighboring community, 
come now, cheating 
parents as well as gun- 
toting offspring! This is 
like rewarding the 
troublemakers. 

We have a criminal 
justice system in this state. 



School rules are plainly 
spelled out in print and 
signed by every student 
and his or her parent or 
guardian. If they break the 
law it is now up to the 
State to provide a 
correctional facility that 
will attempt to educate 
these people, not the city. 

This is a matter of 
principle and I deeply feel 
we're in trouble when one 
of our elected School 
Committee members is too 
worried about legal 
expenses. 

As a taxpayer, I'd rather 
pay the legal costs than 
the $3,000 of school funds 
to tutor these able-bodied 
troublemakers at home. 
Maybe they should worry 
about the tutors' safety. 

Arline Goodman 
Quincy 



©Unitecl Way 

"^ of Massachusetts Bay 



Medically 
Speaking 



byMichaelM. Bakerman, M.I)., F.A.C.C 




GET HELP FOR DEPRESSION 



We all feel depressed 
from time to time. How can 
you tell when what you've 
got is a case of the mental 
illness known as 
depression rather than a 
simple bout of the blues? 
In true depression, 
physical changes usually 
occur along with the 
feelings of overpowering 
sadness. These 

symptoms can include 
headaches, indigestion, 
and constipation. A 
depressed person may 
also have trouble sleeping 
and lose interest in eating 
and sex. Psychological 
symptoms can include 
losing touch with reality, 
feelings of guilt or 
worthlessness, extreme 
anxiety, and even 
halluctnatiorra. Depression 
occurs in every age group. 
The good news is that 
almost all people who have 
depressive illness can be 
helped through treatment 



P.S. Some 15 percent 
of the population will have 
at least one bout of 
depression serious 
enough to call for medical 
help. 

If you are experiencing 
the symptoms of 
depression, it is important 
that you seek help as soon 
as possible. If you woukj 
care to discuss anything in 
this column, call COM- 
PREHENSIVE CARDIAC 
CARE at 472-2550. We 
focus on treating the 
patient, rather than the 
disease. When treating 
patients, I always try to 
consider how I woukJ like 
myself, my wife and 
children or my parents to 
be treated by a doctor. 
Office hours are by 
appointment at 101 Adams 
St., Suite 24 in Quincy. I 
am affiliated with Quincy 
Hospital and South Shore 
Hospitals. 




Sunbeams 

By Henry Bosworth 



We Deserved To Get Her Back 



We deserved to get one of them back. 
All those great ships that steamed through the 
Fore River bridge and out to the Atlantic and 
the Pacific: the carriers, battleships, cruisers, destroy- 
ers, etc. 

Those mighty vessels that were built here with pride 
and talent and made Quincy known as "the muscle" in 
Uncle Sam's Navy arm. 

We wanted to bring one of them home to stay as a 
shipbuilding museum and a fitting memorial to the 
thousands of Fore River shipyard workers who made 
"built in Quincy" a worid-wide guarantee that it was 
built right. 

The USS Lexington, the famed "Gray Ghost" of the 
South Pacific fighting was the one we wanted. 

And the one we should have gotten. 

The ship was commissioned here in 1943. Shipyard 
workers had petitioned the Navy to name the carrier 
they were woricing on after the first Lexington which 
was sunk in the war. 

The name honors the Battle of Lexington as well as 
the town of Lexington just up the road from Quincy. 

Good sentimental reasons for the Lexington to come 
home to Massachusetts and Quincy. 

But the hard-nosed Navy — or Texan politicians 
who know how to roll a pork barrel when they see one 
— had it wrapped up in yellow roses and delivered to 
Corpus Christi. 

Quincy finished third — behind Mobile, Ala. — in 
the three-way race for the Lexington prize. 

The way Navy Secretary H. Lawrence Garrett, who 
tapped Corpus Christi as the winner, tells it, he was just 
following a profile by the Naval Sea Systems Com- 
mand which ranked Quincy fmancially and otherwise, 
the least qualified of the three contenders. 

No sentiment there. But maybe a lot of behind the 
scene maneuvering. 

The Ingleside Naval Base about 20 miles from 
COTpus Christi was built with the intent that it would be 
home-port to part of the fleet but that plan got torpedoed 
by miUtary budget cuts. 

So, can you imagine the likes of Senators Lloyd 
Bentsen and Phil Granmi just sitting there twiddling 
their thumbs and doing nothing while the battle for the 
Lexington was being waged. 

And, what aboutformer Navy Secretary John Lehman 
who was a staunch supporter of Corpus Christi? He 
certainly still has seme influence. 



ELEMENTARY | SECONDARY 
LUNCH I LUNCH 



Feb. 3-7 
Mon: pizza, fiuit juice, 
fruit cup, chocolate chip 
cookies, milk. 

Tues: NO LUNCH 
Wed: cheese ravioli 
with sauce, vegetable, 
fresh baked Italian roll, 
milk. 

T h u r s : turkey 
fricassee, mashed potato, 
peas, fresh baked wheat 
roll, milk. 

Fri: grilled cheese 
sandwich, tater tots, fruit 
cup, milk. 



NEW8CARRIERS 
WANTED 
H«r«'a a chance to earn 
•xtra monay by building a 
Ouincy Sun horn* (Mlvary 
routa. 

Talaphona: 471 3100 



Feb. 3-7 

Men: pizza, green 
beans, apple crisp, milk. 

Tues: Early Release 
Day-Middle & High 
School-hot dog on a roll, 
vegetarian beans, fruit 
juice, milk. 

Wed: American chop 
suey, vegetable, fruit 
juice, fresh baked wheat 
roll, milk. 

Thurs: Barbeque 
chicken, mashed potato 
vegetable, fresh baked 
wheat roll, milk. 

Fri: baked lasagna with 
sauce, vegetable, fruit 
juice, fresh baked Italian 
roll, milk. 

Saw Qm and Mon«y 
Shop Locally 



And, perish the thought, what about our Com- 
mander in Chief George Bush? He's really more a 
Texan than a Bay Stater even if he was bom in Milton, 
next door to Quincy. 

What might hav^ really tipped the ranking and 
decision in favor of Corpus Chrisu is the fact that Texas 
has a lot more political clout these days than Massachu- 
setts has. 

The Lexington will be moored close to the Texas 
Aquarium which opened in 1990 and drew a reported 
730,000 tourists in its first year. 

Officials there see at least 300,000 visitors touring 
the Lexington aimually at about $5 a head. That adds up 
to $1 ,500,000 — not to mention what all those people 
will spend while visiting. 

The rush is already on to get the Lexington ready for 
business by July 4th. 

Jubilation in Corpus Christi. Gloom in Mobile — 
more so in Quincy. 

Mayor James Sheets and all the others who worked 
so hard together in hopes of landing the Lexington are 
imderstandably disappointed. But there should be no 
shame to losing a good fight. 

Sheets had seen the Lexington a catalyst for down- 
town development and a booming tourism business. 

The Lexington would have drawn an estimated 
200,000 to 300,000 visitors a year who would have left 
millions of dollars in the business community and 
historic sites. 

There are some, though, who think that the loss of 
the Lexington might in the long run, be a blessing in 
disguise. 

They feared the cost of getting it into the Town River 
and then maintaining it could have been too much to 
make it a profitable venture. 

Once the novelty of an 896-foot aircraft carrier 
sitting along Southern Artery wore ofi, the number of 
visitors would decline, they felt. 

Now, we'll never know for sure what it would have 
meant in Quincy. 

But it was worth going after, most people believe. 
Trying to do things to make things better is better than 
not trying to do anything. 

Sheets and all who worked with him in trying to 
make the Lexington a reality deserve a "well done" for 
effort. 

We'll get over losing Lady Lex. And we should — 
and will — keep on trying to make things better for 
Quincy. 

MLK Celebration On QCTV 



Quincy Community 
Television will show "The 
City of Quincy celebrates 
the birthday of Martin 
Luther King, Jr." today 
(Thursday) at 7 p.m. on 
Ch.3 

The celebration was 
taped at the First Parish 
Church Sunday, Jan. 19. 

Rev. Pablo R. Diaz, 
minister of the Hispanic 
Community Church of 
Boston, was the keynote 



speaker. Students of the 
Snug Harbor School and 
Broad Meadows Middle 
School read both original 
works and published 
poems about racial 
harmony. The Quincy 
Choral Society provided 
choral selections. 

Quincy Community 
Television will replay the 
program tomorrow (Friday) 
at 9 a.m. and Monday, 
Feb. 3 at 1 p.m. 



World's Gym To Hold 
'Dance For Heart' Fundraiser 

World's Gym, 95 fund raising event which 
Holmes St., North Quincy, promotes the benefits of 
will sponsor a Dance for cardiovascular fitness 



Heart Aerobathon to 
benefit the American 
Heart Association during 
the week of Ffeb. 2-9. 
The event is a national 



through aerobic exercise, 
while raising funds 

For more information 
call Kathy Hassan at 472- 
9525. 



Thursday, January 30, 1992 Qulncy Sun Page 5 



Serious Crimes Drop One Percent Qnincv's 

>nt from agel) dccadc Contributes to the less revenue. Mullen saiH ho..« Tt'c n«» «... «„ .!,» J 



(Cont'd from Page 1) 

up 7.5 percent. 

•1986: 3,586 reports, 
down 3.1 percent. 

•1987: 3.285 reports, 
down 11.2 percent. 

reports, 
reports, 



reports. 



•1988: 3.368 
down 9 percent. 

•1989: 3.285 
down 11.2 percent. 

•1990: 3.735 
up one percent. 

Over the last decade, 
the years 1987 and 1989 
each reported the lowest 
number of serious crimes, 
a total of 3285 whUe 1982 
had the highest number of 
reported crimes. 4743. 

Among the factors 
contributing to the city's 
serious crimes are early 
release prison orders, 
public transportation, the 
economy and Quincy's 
close proximity to Boston, 
Mullen said. 

Regarding the early 
release of prisoners, the 
chief said, "A lot of these 
guys are repeat offenders." 
With four MBTA Red Line 
stations in Quincy, MuUen 
noted said public 
transportation can make 
some criminals more 
"transient" and bring in 
more undesirables. 

"Public transportation 
can have a positive and a 
negative effect. There are 
some people who use the 
transit system for work but 
on the other hand, some 
people use it to enter the 
city (to commit crimes)," 
he said. 

Moreover, Mullen said 
preventing and solving 
robberies is made more 
difficult by "transient 
people" who use public 
transportation and the 
Southeast expressway to 
enter and exit the city. He 
said stores which are open 
all night also give 
criminals more opportunity 
to rob. 

"Criminals, like police, 
are in the business 24 
hours a day. We alert our 
people. We make frequent 
safety checks to all-night 
stores and we try to 
prevent it. 

"Quincy is also close to 
Boston. We think some 
suspects enter by the 
expressway and exit 
quickly. It's not only 
Quincy. Many of these 
crimes are relative from 
one community to the 
other." 

As for burglaries, 
Mullen said he believes 
the influx of two-income 
families over the last 




AUTO-HOME-BUSINESS 
,• DUDiOlTSINS'.AUED^ 
> LOCKS REKEYED 
, DOOR CLOSERS 
. PANIC HARDWANE 
, AUTO KHS riHEO 



IVISIT OUR SHOWROOMiS 
1756 SO. ARTERY. QUINCYI 

472-2177 



decade contributes to the 
number of burglaries in 
Quincy. As the number of 
husbands and wives both 
earning a Uving increases, 
so do the number of homes 
left empty during the day. 
More empty homes give 
would-be burglaries more 
targets. 

To combat burglaries, 
the department runs crime 
prevention information in 
the local media, including 
a Crime Prevention 
column by Officer Bob 
Hanna. 

Mullen said the arrest 
of one burglar can also 
lead to other burglaries 
being solved. 

"Physical evidence is 
not always left behiiKl but 
when you do have that 
evidence, that could lead 
to an arrest. When you 
have an arrest, you usually 
solve others." 

One recent case in 
point involved a burglar 
who robbed a Quincy 
Center store. Fingerprints 
were found which later led 
to an arrest. After the 
arrest, the suspect was 
linked to about 10 other 
burglaries. 

While the incidence of 
serious crime has 
fluctuated over the last 10 
years, the number of 
police personnel has 
dropped by approximately 
50 officers due to budget 
cutbacks. 

In 1981, Quincy had 
236 patrolmen and superior 
officers. Eleven years ago, 
the department had one 
chief, five captains. 16 
lieutenants, 27 sergeants 
and 188 patrolmen. 

Today. Quincy has a 
force of 182 comprised of 
one chief, three captains, 
12 lieutenants, 26 
sergeants and 152 
patrolmen. 

With fewer officers and 



less revenue, Mullen said 
the department is trying to 
it's best with less. 

"With the reduced 
amount of personnel, we 
have to spread our patrols 
out as best we can with 
the limited resources we 
have," he said, noting the 
department handled 70,000 
service calls and made 
4,000 arrests last year. 

Mullen classifies some 
crimes, such as murder 
and rape, as spontaneous 
and thus are very difficult 
to prevent. However, 
when these types of crimes 
surface, the department 
responds in an attempt to 
solve the problem, the 
chief pointed out. 

After a number of 
sexual assaults were 
reported in the North 
Quincy area last year, 
Mullen arranged several 
personal safety programs 
for women. Besides 
teaching women some 
basic safety techniques, 
the programs increased 
public awareness to 
assaults. 

"In the case of a rape, 
we try to monitor whatever 
we can. We investigate 
and we run personal safety 
programs for women to let 
people be aware of things 
that would affect them in 
the street. 

"It's helpfiil and people 
have taken advantage of 
(the programs)." 

Mullen said he is 
pleased by police 
personnel working together 
as a team. A "collective 
effort," the chief added, is 
essential for a productive 
poUce force. 

Every morning, the 
chief meets with his staff, 
investigators and 
administrators to keep up 
to date on the city's crime 
scene. "We exchange 
information regarding 
crime over the previous 24 



hours. It's not put on the 
shelf." 

Detectives also meet 
frequently with law 
enforcement officials from 
other cities and towns 
regarding breaks and 
similar incidents. In 
addition, Quincy drug 
detectives meet with the 
South Shore Drug Task 
Force once a month to 
discuss certain strategies 
and suspects. 

"We try to keep abreast 
of what's going on and 
determine our strategy on 
what the problem is. We 
cross information from one 
another." 

One crime solved by 
several community police 
departments joining forces 
involved a stalker several 
years ago. Quincy police 
worked with Milton poUce 
and arrested a suspect in 
connection with the 
stalkings. 

The suspect, who was 
from New Bedford, had 
been living in Quincy at 
the time. The stalker 
turned out to be the same 
man who committed a 
murder in Roslindale. The 
man was charged and 
convicted of murder. 

It's that kind of 
cooperative effort, among 
Quincy police personnel 
and area departments, 
which fosters positive law 
enforcement efforts at a 
time when resources are 
Umited. 

"I'm happy with these 
guys. The department 
collectively is doing a 
good job," Mullen said. "I 
know things are difficult 
but we try to do the best 
while we're here. They 
are people working under 
tough conditions. 

"I like to think of the 
department as a family. 

We're all together. If you 
work together you can 
accomplish a lot." 



Yesterdays 




City of Quincy 
Presidential Primary Election 

TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 1992 
VOTER REGISTRATION DATES 

Evening Hours: 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM 
Wednesday, February 5, 1992 

Fore River Club House - Nevada Road 

Lincoln-Hancock Community School - Water Street 

Montclair School - 6 Belmont Street 

Quincy Community United Methodist Church - Beale Street 

Atlantic Neighborhood Center - Hunt Street 

Saturday, February 8, 1 992 

9:00 AM to 5:00 PM 

Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street 

Tuesday, February 11,1 992 

8:30 AM to 10:00 PM 

Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street 

February 1 1 , 1992 is the last day for registrations before the 

Presidential Primary - March 10, 1992. You may also register 

weekdays at City Hall from 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM. 

John M. Gillis 
City Clerk 



Trade School 
Equipment Called 
'Outmoded Junk* 

The Trade School Advisory Committee warned that 
almost all the equipment at the Quincy Trade School is 
"outmoded junk," inadequate, anri 
in some cases downright danger- * ^^ i? ». yi 
ous to students. J 011. 2!r-rCD. 4 

It urged that hazardous ma- i5M7 

chinery be replaced "before there dc Wiirs A ait 
is a serious accident." * 

Committee Secretary Frank C. m 



Webster said the old school building was so crowded that 14- 
year-old boys were sharing the same classrooms with 29- 
year-old veterans of World War H. 

"We must have adequate classrooms immediately to 
divide up the classes as they are required to be," he said. 
CITY PARKING SCORED 

City Councillor Russell T. Bates criticized the dty for 
going iitto the parking business for the benefit, he said, of a 
few property owners, a few merchants and a few out of town 
people. 

"Why should Quincy provide parking for a few mer- 
chants when Foy's and Quincy Market provide parking 
spaces for their customers on their own property that they are 
paying taxes on?" he asked. 

AGAINST HOUSING 

The Mayor's Emergency Committee on Housing voted 
8-5 to table a resolution by Russell W. Frey, secretary of the 
Quincy Chamber of Commerce, against government subsi- 
dized housing. 

It was interpreted as an indication of the group's q>posi- 
tion to a state law that would enable cities to borrow money 
for permanent housing in multiple family units. 
$36 TAX RATE FORECAST 

City officials estimated that the Quincy tax rate for 1947 

will be $36 after they got a look at die budget drawn up by 

Mayor Cbaries A. Ross before he left for three weeks in 

Florida. 

QUINCY-ISMS 

The School Committee revived hockey at Quincy and 
North Quincy High Schools, specifying that Coaches War- 
ren Findlay at Quincy and John Walsh at North get $5 per 
coaching day ... Pvt. Edward M. Glynn of 81 Union St, 
Quincy Point, was discharged from the Army at Fort 
Monmouth, J J. ... Wednesdays were Old Timers Nights at 
the Wollaston Legion Hall with Joe Pioppi and his orchestra 
... A biU filed by Rep. William W. Jenness (R-Quincy) to 
raise the salary of the mayorof Quincy from $S,000to $6,000 
was before the Legislative Committee on Qties ... Elmer R 
Post of Sunmier St, Quincy, was installed as master of the 
Matt^an Grange ... The Ave Maria Coimcil, Knigjits of 
Columbus, met with Grand Knight Henry D. Pease for the 
first time in its new home at 59 Miller St, West Quincy ... 
Tony Aimola, South Quincy middle-weight who was a last 
minute substitution, won a six-rouixi decision over Maurice 
Qoutier in Manchester, N.H ... "My Darling Clementine," 
starring Henry Fonda, Linda Darnell, Victor Mature and 
Walter Brennan, was playing at the Strand ... Mrs. Dorothy 
Willis entertained die Four and Four Club at her home, 
Pontiac Rd., Menymount .. Prime rib roast was 55 cents a 
pound at the Shawmut Market 24 Chestnut St ... A. Wendell 
Qark, vice chairman of the School Committee, said the only 
thing that could be trimmed fix>m the school budget was 
$25,000 earmarked for the conversion of the sdiools horn 
coal to dl ... The Legislative Committee on Cities made an 
adverse report on a bill by Rep. Charies W. Hedges (R- 
Quincy) that would establish a municipal commission to 
supervise Quincy elections ... A recording of "Choo Choo 
Ch'boogie," by Louis Jordan, was 79 cents at Jason's ... 
William H. Doble of West Harwich was elected chairman of 
the board of Pneumatic Scale Corp. and succeeded as presi- 
dent by his son KendaU D. Doble of Cohasset ... John R. 
Smith was elected president of the Men's Brotherhood at the 
First Presbyterian Church ... State Building Inspector Joseph 
M. Norton ordered the auditorium at Central Junior High 
School closed because of the danger of falling plaster ... 
Probate Judge James F. Reynolds allowed the will of Ervant 
Serposs who left the bulk of his $175,000 estate, 50 Bay 
View Ave., Houghs Neck, for a health clinic ... The staff of 
the Thomas Crane Public Library organized to work for a pay 
raise and elected Maijorie Hollman, music librarian, presi- 
dent. 



iaaa 



Page 6 Qoincy Sun 



, ». .JT 

Thursday, January 30, 1992 




Marie's 
Kitchen 



B> MAKIK .1. DOr IMIMO 



Breaded Chicken And Broccoli 

In Cream Sauce 



Did you ever defrost something 
unmarked from the refrigerator only to 
find out it was something different? 
Well that happened to me this past 
week. 

I was defrosting what I thought was a 
package of chicken cutlets through 
plastic WT^. 

They, however, turned out to be 
chicken stir-fry small pieces. Since I 
was planning to have a few people over 
for dinner I decided to bread the pieces 
as a cutlet and prepare them differently 
with broccoli and a cream sauce. They 
were a first for me and will definitely 
be part of future entrees, for our family 
at least. 

BREADED CHICKEN AND 
BROCCOU IN CREAM SAUCE 
1 Lb or so of chicken pieces 
com flake crumbs for coating 
1 egg mixed with a little milk for 
coating 



salt and pepper to taste 

vegetable or olive oil for frying 

2 Tbsps butter or margerine 

2 Tbsps flour 

1 1/2 cups milk 

4 or 5 slices of cheese (any favorite) 

about 2 or 3 cups broccoli (I used 

florets) 

Bread and chicken pieces by placing 
them first in the egg and milk mixture 
and then in the com flake crumbs. Set 
aside. Cook the broccoli and set aside. 
(I steamed it in the microwave). Make 
the cream sauce starting with the butter 
or margerine, add the flour and then the 
milk and stir until blended and 
thickened. Add the broccoli and heat. 
Just before serving, place the chicken 
pieces in the pan and heat until bubbly, 
turning carefully. It's best to use a large 
skillet. Add the slices of cheese on top 
just before serving. The recipe fed six 
with a little left over. 




QUBVCY HIGH SCHOOL Health Educator Georgina Valante recently brought a panel 
of peer educators and professionals to the Woodward School. The panel consisted of 
Scott MacPherson, a plumbing student; Alana Gushing, a nursing student; Renee 
LeTourneau, a childcare student, all seniors fk-om The Center for Technical Education; 
Chris Walker, a Quincy High School senior; Pam Campanale, R.N., and Emily Lebo, 
R.N., both health occupations instructors at the Tech Center. The latest information on 
HIV and AIDS was presented to the students who then had an opportunity to question 
the panel. Discussion was lively and much information was shared. 

4 Students To Be Honored 
At Jewish War Vets Breakfast 



Gayle Morrell In Students' 'Who's Wlio' 



Gayle Morrell of 
Quincy, daughter of 
Thomas and Patricia 
Morrell, is one of the 56 
Plymouth State College 
students named to the 
1992 edition of "Who's 
Who Among Students in 
American Universities and 
Colleges." 

Miss Morrell was 
selected by a panel of 
Plymouth State students, 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Teieplione: 
471-3100 



faculty members and 
administrators, and the 
editors of the annual 
directory, based on her 
academic achievement, 
service to the community, 
leadership in 

extracurricular activities 
and potential for continued 
success. 

A senior elementary 
education major, she is 
captain of the Plymouth 
State College varsity 



women's basketball team. 
Miss Morrell is a member 
of the Mainstreaming of 
America Club and has 
helped with the Special 
Olympics. She has earned 
athletic and academic 
honors such as being a 
Scholar Athlete and being 
named to the President's 
List for outstanding 
academic achievement 
along with many 
basketball honors. 



The Jewish War 
Veterans Quincy Post No. 
193 will hold it's 38th 
annual "Classmates Today 
- Neighbors Tomorrow" 
breakfast meeting, 
Sunday, Feb. 9 at 9:30 
a.m. at the Beth Israel 
Synagogue, 33 Grafton St. 

The following students 
were chosen by their 
classmates as best 



exemplifying brotherhood 
in their daily activities: 

Jennifer White, North 
Quincy High; Marianne 
McSweeney, Quincy High; 
Suzanne Daly, Hull High; 
and Kimberly Robinson, 
Weymouth High. 

Local officials, local 
veteran's organizations 
leaders and officers of the 
JWV will present the 



students with citations. 

Members serving on the 
breakfast committee 
include Harvey Solomon, 
Past Commander and 
Chairman of the 
Brotherhood Program; 
Commander Bertrand 
Shaffer; Past Commanders 
Irving Isaacson and Dave 
Minkofsky; and Comrades 
Paul Bailey and Herb 
Fontaine. 



Beechwood Pre-School 
Begins City-Wide Assessment 



Watercolor Demonstration 
For Quincy Art Assn. 



The Quincy Art 
Association monthly 
meeting and demonstration 

will be held at the River 
Bay Club, 99 Brackett St., 
Tuesday, Feb. 11 at 7:30 
pjn. 



The featured watercolor 
demonstrator will be Peter 
Spataro of Hanover. He 
teaches classes at his 
studio in Hanover and his 
paintings are well-known 
locally and nationally. 

The public is welcome. 



In response to 
escalating community 
queries,Beechwood 
Community Life Center, 
225 Fenno St., Wollaston, 
is considering expanding 
its day care services for 
Quincy families, according 
to Executive Director 
Sharron Beals. 

Barbara Bowery, 
Beechwood's director of 
Pre-School Programming, 
is an experienced 



administrator, qualified to 
direct infant care through 
kindergarten. Current 
assessment at Beechwood 
focuses upon extending 
day care hours (fi-om as 
early as 6 a.m. to as late 
as 9 p.m. for pre- 
schoolers). 

Day care for school- 
aged children has already 
been expanded to cover 
school vacations. 



Families in Quincy and 
adjacent communities are 
invited to assist with this 
day care assessment. 
Families needing early 
morning day care (6 a.m.) 
and/or early evening (to 9 
p.m.) should call 

Beechwood at 471-5712 to 
express interest in 
expansion of its day care 
services. 




RECEPTION HALLS 



1 120-SEAT 

DBOOVODNEAR 

MARMABAY. 

TH0U6HTTOBE 

AMOIAI 

The saoct's out 

t function room at Amelias | 
h« become one of Bniton's 

I most popular spots for wed 
diTigs, showes, corporate 
meetings, and get togethers 
of all kirvds We feature an 

I extensive nnenu at affordable j 
prices. We overlook Marvu 

' Bay and the Boston skyline. 

We'd tike to make your next 

functxxi really fly. 

PIcMecaD 6174711453. 



AM E_LIAS^ 



> Vctay Rd. No Quincy, MAI 



FLORISTS 



Flowers by Helen 

367 BILLINGS ROAD 

WOLLASTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02170 

Flowers For All Occasions 

Specializing in Weddings 

471-3772 

Certified Wedding Consultants 



Quint's 
Florists 

761 So. Artery 
Quincy 

773-7620 



IVIUSIC 



^ 



PHOTOGRAPHER 



Photography ^ 

MC" Studio 

679 Hancock Street. Quincy 

(Wollaston) 

479-6688 



HONEYMOON 
SPECIALISTS 



This SV^* 



BAKERY 



O'BRIEN'S 
BAKERIES 

9 Beale Street 
Wollaston 
472-4027 



11 Residents Named To 
Massasoit Dean's List 



Eleven Quincy residents 
have been named to the 
Dean's List for the day and 
evening divisions are 
Massasoit Community 
College. 

They are: 

Roger C. Atkinson, 



Christopher M. Boudreau, 
Donna M. Deane, Gina M. 
Dibona, John A. Gifford, 
Kellie M. Murphy, Gary F. 
Smith, Donna 

Solchenberger, Carole L. 
Swan, Kathleen B. Tocci, 
Hanh T. Tran. 



Trip To Von Trapp Lodge For 
Sacred Heart Silver Citizen Club 



The Silver Citizens 
Club of Sacred Heart 
Parish is planning a three- 
day trip to the Von Trapp 
Family Lodge for Friday, 
May 15. 

Cost of the trip is $299. 
For more information call 



JEWELRY 



f^OLSOn Fine Jewelry 

Quality and Integrity a Tradition 
The Coletti Family Al - Dave - Mark 
730 HANCOCK ST., WOLLASTON 02170 786-7942 



328-1899. 

Also planned for 
Sunday, March 8 is a 
catered boiled com beef 
diiuer with key lime pie. 
Entertainment will be 
provided by Judy Long. 
Cost is $13.50. 




**Rockm into the 90'$" 

D.J. STEVE KAVANAGH 
Music for all Occasions 



'Music for people who 

take their fun »eriou$lyr 

773-4936 




A GOOD CAUSE-Channel 5 reporter Jim Boyd 
interviews Cindy DiCarli, Quincy Sons of Italy poster 
child Tina Marie DiCarli, and Steve DiCarli during a live 
broadcast at the SOI's annual beneHt brunch for 
Cerebral Palsy. 

Quincy Sons Of Italy 
Brunch Raises 
$4,200 for CP 



More than 300 guests 
attended the Quincy Sons 
of Italy recent annual 
brunch to benefit Cerebral 
Palsy which raised $4,200. 
The brunch featured 
Lodge poster child Tina 
Marie DiCarli, daughter of 
Lodge members Steve and 
Cindy DiCarli and 
granddaughter of member 
Frank DiCarli. 

A contribution of $5 
was requested at the door 
but many in attendance 
contributed additional 
amounts to aid youngsters 
with this crippling disease. 
WCVB-TV Channel 5 
broadcast the event and 
featured two live spots on 
its news program. News 
anchor Jim Boyd 
interviewed Tina and her 
parents and accepted 
donations for Cerebral 
Palsy from SOI President 
Michael Capone. Boyd 
also joined in Lodge 
activities and mingled 
with members. 

Much of the food, 
prepared by member Tony 
Vardaro and his "Kitchen 
Crew," was donated by 
area businesses. The door 
prizes were also donated. 
Supporting businesses 



included Arby's, Capital 
Food Corp., Coletta Bros., 
Jim and Donna Coletta, 
Curry Hardware, Dominic 
Catering, The Egg and I, 
Fasano Catering Finlay's 
Catering, The Fruit 
Basket, Li'l Peach, Lopez 
the Florist, Lynch's 
Variety of Dorchester, 
Mason's Texaco, Neponset 
Variety, The Patriot 
Ledger, The Quincy Sun, 
The Dorchester Reporter, 
South Shore Children's 
Fund, Stella Del Nord, 
Sunbeam Bread, Ron 
Baker, Victoria Diner and 
South Shore "Joey's." 

Local officials 
attending were Sen. Paul 
Harold, Reps. Steve Tobin 
of Quincy and James Brett 
of Dorchester, City 
Council President Charles 
Phelan and councillors 
Bruce Ayers, Larry 
Chretien and Tom 
Fabrizio. 

Capone and Chairmen 
Kevin Realini and John 
Norton all expressed 
thanks to all those who 
helped make the event a 
success, particularly the 
members of the Mens' and 
Ladies' lodges. 



Rummage Sale At 
Christ Church Feb. 7-8 



A rummage sale will be 
held Friday, Feb. 7 from 7 
to 9 p.m. and Saturday, 
Feb. 8 from 9 a.m. to 1 
p.m. at Christ Church 
Episcopal, 12 Quincy Ave. 



The event is being 
sponsored by the women's 
guild. 

For more information 
call 773-0310 or 773-8432. 



CRAFT FAIR 

United First Parish Church 

1306 Hancock Street 

Quincy Center 



Saturday, March 7th 
10:30 am - 3:30 pm 



TABLE RENTAL $15 
Call 773-1290 for application 




a perfect wedding at the 
Golden Lion Suite 



Speak to Rlla -- *h»'t our rtnlal ageni 
• peclalliing In complttt wadding 
package plant and all olhar occaaloni. 
The Goldan Lion Sulla accomodalaa up 
lo 300 The Vanallan Rooni up lo 140 
guatta. GIva Rlla a call lor an 
appolnlmani lor your raaarvatlon. Naw 
brochurat ara available. 

(Air Conditioned) 

(A 1.1. 

Quincy Sons of Hal) Social (enter 

120 Quarry Street. Quincv. MA 02169 

NEW NLMBER ia 472-5900 







Thursday, January 30, 1992 Quincy Sun Page 7 

Reception For New 
ACS Volunteers Feb. 6 



MR. and MRS. JOHN DUCHARME 

Nancy D'Olimpio Wed 
To John Ducharme 



The American Cancer 
Society South Shore Unit 
will sponsor a wine and 
cheese reception for new 
volunteers Thursday, Feb. 
6 from 6 to 8 p.m. at the 
River Bay Club, 99 
Brackett St., Quincy. 

Volunteers from 
Quincy, Braintree, 
Cohasset, Hingham, Hull, 
Milton, Norwell, Scituate 
and Weymouth raised 
$228,500 toward research, 
education and patient and 
family services. 

Upcoming events include 
a fashion show, Daffodil 
Days, golf tournament and 



auction. 

In addition. South Shore 
volunteers provided more 
than 790 rides for patients 
to area hospitals for 
treatment and reached 
over 77,000 adults and 
children through public 
and professional education 
programs. A helpline 
staffed by volunteers also 
operates to inform the 
public about services 
available to them. 

Anyone interested in 
getting involved and 
learning more about the 
cancer society should 
RSVP to 341-4210 by Feb. 
4. 



Nancy D'Olimpio, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
James D'Olimpio of 
Quincy, was recently 
married to John Duchanne, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur 
Ducharme of Hanover. 

A double ring ceremony 
was celebrated in St. 
Mary's Church, Quincy, 
and was officiated by the 
Rev. Dominic Menna of 
St. Anthony's Church in 
Revere. A reception 
followed at the Golden 
Lion Suite at the Quincy 
Sons of Italy HaU. 

Suzanne T. Craig of 
Coventry, R.I., served as 
Matron of Honor for her 
sister. 

Bridesmaids were 
Natalie Ducharme of 
Marshfield, cousin of the 
bride; Stacey and Jennifer 
Horrigan of Quincy, nieces 
of the bride; and Kim 
Gardner and Mary 
Verocchi, both of Quincy. 
Lauren Nicole Craig of 
Conventry was Flower 
Girl. 



William Ducharme of 
Marshfield served as Best 
Man for his brother. 

Ushers were Dr. James 
T. D'OHmpio of New York 
and Domenic D'Olimpio of 
Quincy, brothers of the 
bride; Randy D'Angelo of 
Abington, Christopher 
Glynn of Hanover, and 
Robert Craig of Coventry, 
brother-in-law of the 
bridge. Jonathan 

D'Olimpio was Ring 
Bearer. 

The bride, a graduate of 
Quincy High School, 
Quincy College and the 
Massachusetts Barber 
School, is employed at the 
Plaza Barber Shop in 
Braintree. 

The groom, a graduate 
of Hanover High School 
and Massasoit Community 
College, is employed by 
Chris Glynn Tree Experts 
of Hanover. 

Following a wedding 
trip to the Hawaiian 
Islands, the couple are 
living in Weymouth. 



Marie McAdams Inducted 
Into College Honor Society 



Quincy resident Marie 
E. McAdams, a senior at 
Saint Anselm College, 
was recently inducted into 
the Tau chapter of Delta 
Epsilon Sigma, a national 
Catholic scholastic honor 
society. 

Founded in 1940, the 
honor society recognizes 
academic excellence, 
fosters scholarly activities 
and encourages a sense of 
intellectual community 
among its members. 



Membership is awarded 
to junior students with a 
GPA of 3.2 or higher, 
senior students with a GPA 
of 3.1, and must be 
recommended by the 
chairperson of the 
student's academic 
department. 

A Spanish major at the 
college, McAdams is the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Jerome F. McAdams of 
Atlantic St., Quincy. 



AARP Weekend Chapter 
To Meet Sunday 



The newly formed 
Quincy/Braintree weekend 
chapter of the AARP will 
meet Sunday at 1 a.m. at 
the Quincy Emergency 
Management Agency, 
Dept. of Public Works 
Building, 55 Sea St. All 
are invited. 



Georgette Simon, 
AARP chapter 

organization specialist will 
be guest speaker. Officers 
will be chosen and future 
plans made. 

For more information 
call Ernie Aristide at 472- 
6312. 






Dr., Mrs. Stephen Bresnahan 
Parents Of Daughter 



Dr. and Mrs. Stephen 
Bresnahan of Quincy are 
parents of their second 
daughter, Sophie Marie, 
bom Nov. 30 at Brigham 
and Women's Hospital. 



WELCOME WAGON 
WANTS TO ' ^ 
VISIT YOU 
WITH . ,^ 

GIFTS --x/rw/ f^ 




Grandparents are Marie 
Bresnahan of North 
Quincy, Leo Bresnahan of 
Boston and Mrs. and Mrs. 
Barnard Cosgrove of 
Medfield. 

Sav* Gat and Monay 
Shop Locally 




Winfield 
Gift Emporium 

Yankee Candles 
Lilliput Lane 

Maud Humphrey 
Pauline Dolls 



Hours: Tues-Sat. 10:00 am-5:00 pm 

Optn Sunday 12-5 pm 

Closed Mondays 

853 Hancodk St., Quincy 479-9784 






ALLFREETOYOU 

If you've become engag- 
ed, are a new parent or 
moved. I'd like to call on 
you with gifts in my 
basket, information and 
cards you can redeem 
for more gifts at local 
businesses. Free to you 
and a helpful way to 
learn answers to your 
questions. 

BARBARA MENDEZ 
479-2M7 



MONDAY SPECIAL 

WASH • CUT • BLOWDRY 

HERSi20 



TUES. & THURS. 
BLOW CUT SPECIAL 

HISM3 ,. 



WEDNESDAY SPECIAL 

PERM SPECIAL ^ - ^^^ 



Long hair 
slightly higher 



Includes Shampoo 



UNIPERM »4Z"" 



GOLDWELL 
FOAM PERM 



Long hair 

slightly higher 

Complete 



Complete 

slightly higher Nail Tipping and Overlay S60 
for longer hair sculptured Nail. S60 



All specials performed by one ol Russell's staff 
Russell Edward's 



Pedicures §25 
Body and Facial Waxing Available " 



^imz/^//7€e (^/f^ a/i// i/uY^ 

OPEN 9-5 DAILY AND WED & THURS EVENINGS 

Cornpr Hancock, Chestnut St,^, 1 M.iple St , Quincy 472-1 060 



p 



Page 8 Qulncy Son Thursday, January 30, 1992 



Arts/Entertainment 




VIOLINIST RONG WANG, a winner of the Chinese National Violin Competition, 
performs a selection trom Bach during a recent concert at Quincy High School. The 
performance was sponsored by the Chinese Culture Institute. 

Chinese Cultural Institute 
Sponsors Quincy High Concert 



The Chinese Culture 
Institute recently 
sponsored a concert at 
Quincy High School. The 
Youth Music Program of 
the C.CI. was instituted by 
renown cellist Yo Yo Ma 
who is also a trustee of the 
Institute. 

Doris Chu, president of 
the C.C.I., introduced the 
artists, Rong Wang, 
violinist, and Tian Ying, 
pianist. Each performer 
gave the audience of 
students a brief 
autobiography. The 

audience was then treated 
to a variety of classical 
selections performed by 
Wang and Ying. 
Following the musical 



performance there was a 
question and answer period 
that enabled the Quincy 
High students to discuss 
the program with the 
musicians. 

Wang studied at the 
Beijing Central 

Conservatory of Music in 
China. She won the 
Chinese National Violin 
Competition and graduated 
summa cum laude from 
Boston University's School 
of Music. Her 

engagements this season 

will include recitals for 
WGBH and the Gardner 
Museum as well as 
concerts with the Boston 




'IMlEDWft^ 

CFMASSACHUarrrSBAy 



Philharmonic Orchestra. 

Ying is a graduate 
student at the New 
England Conservatory of 
Music. He was a 
prizewinner at the eighth 
Van Clibum International 
Piano Competition and has 
won the grand prize at the 
1986 and 1987 Young 
Keyboard Artists 
Association Piano 
Competition. 

His past engagements 
have included the Chicago 
Sinfoniette, Hong Kong 
Philharmonic, Shanghai 
Symphony and the Fort 
Worth Symphony. Bom in 
Shanghai, he made his 
first appearance at age 10 
with the Shanghai 
Symphony. 

Both artists stressed 
pride in one's cultural and 
ethnic background when 
discussing their work and 
achievements with the 
Quincy High students. 




2 fori 
Lunch 
Special 

Buy 1 Lunch 
get second Free! 

M-F 11-4 
With This Coupon 



214 Washington Street • Quincy, MA • 847-3940 

Formerly Brittany's 



10^ 



Cheese Pizza $1.00 

BBQ'd Wings $1.00 

12-9 

Specials Served 

Every Sunday 

Take Out Excluded 



OUR HOURS ARE: 
8:00 AM- 1:00 am 
NOON -1:00 am 



MONDAYS-SATURDAYS 
SUNDAYS 



Full Menu Always Available 



TIAN YING, a prizewinning concert pianist from Shanghai, performs for Quincy High 
School students during a recent concert sponsored by the Chinese Culture Institute. 

(Quincy Sun photos by Tom Gorman) 

* Voice Of Tlie Turtle' To Open 
Multicultural Festival At 
Beechwood Center Feb. 23 



Beechwood Community 
Life Center, 225 Fenno 
St., WoUaston, has been 
identified as recipient for a 
Foundation for the Arts 
grant award. 



The award was given 
for the upcoming Quincy 
Multicultural Festival and 
will partially fund the 
festival's opening night 
Sunday, Feb. 23. 

The opening program. 



"Voice of the Turtle," to 
be held at North Quincy 
High School Sunday, Feb. 
23 at 3 p.m., will feature 
Jewish musical traditions. 

"Voice of the Turtle" is 
a Cambridge based, four 
person ensemble that 
specializes in Sephardic 
music. The Sephardim, 
Jews who had lived in 
Spain for 1,500 years, 
were expelled from that 
country in 1492. Travelling 

Chamber Music Concert At 
First Presbyterian Church 



to safer harbors in the 
Ottoman Empire, North 
Africa and Eastern Europe, 
the Sephardim 

incorporated the sounds of 
their adopted homes into 
their music. The ensemble 
performs on ancient and 
modem instruments. 

The 1992 Multicultural 
Festival extends through 
March 14. 

For more infomiation 
call 471-5712 or 328-9200. 



The Amici Quartet 
composed of Boston 
Symphony members 
Tatiana Dimitriades, 
Bonnie Bewick, Edward 
Gazouleas, and Joel 
Moerschel will perform a 
concert at Quincy 's First 



^CINEIVIAS 

Quincy Fair Mail 
1/30-2/5 



HAND THAT RCX^KS 
THE CRADLE-R 

11 i«0 - 2:10 - 4:30 - 7:30 - 10«0 



Presbyterian Church, 270 
Franklin St., SuiKlay, Feb. 
2 at 6:30 p.m. 

They will present 
Mozart's Quartet K. 387, 
Beethoven's Op. 59, no. 1, 
and will be joined by BSO 
bassoonist Richard Ranti 
and bassist Nicolas 
Tslolainos to perform Jean 
Francais' Divertissement. 
This is the first concert in 



the church's "Artist Series 
1992." 

Admission is free, child 
care is available and a 
reception with the 
musicians follows in the 
church's fellowship hall. A 
free-will offering will be 
taken to fuitber the concert 
series. 

Call 773-5575 for more 
information. 



[PRINCE OF TIDES-R 

12:15 •3.-00- 7:08 -030 



FREE JACK 

11:48- 2ns-4:3S-7:ao-10«0 

FATHER OF 
THE BRIOE-PG 

1 1 :48 - 2«6 - 4:30 - 7:20 - »M 



HOOK-PG 

12:10- 3:18 -7M> 



KUFFS-PG.13 

1 ^«0- 2:10 -4:35- 7:18 -10«0 



INMGTHROUGH-R 

12:10-3:10-7«0-««0 



FRIED GREEN 
TOMATOES-PG-13 

12:15 -3:15 -7:00 -950 



CAPEFEAR^ 

OM 



Bargain Matinees 

First Three Shows 

$3.75 

773-5700 



Janelle Nielson Tours British Isles 
With Madrigal Singers 



Janelle Nielson of 
Quincy spent the month of 
January touring the British 
Isles with the Eastern 
Nazarene College (ENC) 
Madrigal Singers. The 
group of 19 select singers 
performed 14 concerts, 
mostly in churches, in 
England, Scotland, Wales 
and Ireland. 

The daughter of Janice 
and John Nielson of the 



Philippines, formerly of 
Quincy, she is a 1989 
graduate of North Quincy 
High School where she 
played three years of 
varsity volleyball. 

Nielson is a junior 
English and psychology 
major and the president of 
the junior class. She also 
sings with the A Cappella 
Choir and is on the 
volleyball team. 



Buccini's/Mister Sub S 

62-64 Billings Rd., No. Quincy 02171 
328-9764 

COMBO SPECIAL? 

Steak/Cheese $3.80 

Chicken Broiler $4.30 

Chicken Parmigiana $4,35 

Meat Bali $3.55 

Turkey Club $3^90 

Italian ^_25 

Tuna $3.50 

Includes: Small Sub or Syrian 

Medium Size Fountain Drink 

Small Size Boyd's Chips 
Store Hours: Mon-Frl 10-10 ■ 

'Sat. 10-8 'Sun 11-8 j^ 



Thursday, January 30, 1992 Quincy Sun Page 9 



Crime ^^^ 



Police Log Hot Spots 



Watch 



By ROBKRT HANNA 
Crime Prevention Officer 
Quincy Police Department 




Parent Alert! 

Sometimes a child who hasn't arrived at school isn't 
homesick or playing hooky. If something happens to a 
child on the way to school, parents often don't know 
until later in the day, and precious hours are lost to law 
enforcement investigators when crimes are reported to 
them several hours after they occur. 

All parents want to know that their children are 
where they're supposed to be, but it may be especially 
important for parents working outside the home, who 
may leave the house before the children do. 

Many schools and parent groups have organized 
Parent Alerts -- volunteer parents and senior citizens 
call the parents of absent students to check that the 
children are someplace safe. It is also a good idea to 
try to estabhsh a school poUcy that will not allow 
telephone calls to substitute for notes stating a reason 
that a child - elementary school to senior high -- will 
not be or was not in school. 

Concerned parents and groups can also establish 
block homes or "Safe Houses" along routes children 
usually take to and from school, in order to give them 
assistance if they should get sick or have an 
emergency along the way. 



Sunday, Jan. 20: 

Att. Break, 3:41 am, 100 Nightingale Ave. Male 
party attempted entrance through rear door. 

Break, 5:34 pm, 81 A Soumi Rd. A VCR, TV, 
Jewelry and Celtic Tickets were stolen. 

Break, 7:07 pm, 80 Qay St. Under investigation. 

Break, 10:08 pm, 21 Scammell St., Presidential 
Liquors. Suspects attempted to break in while 
employees were closing store. Two white males fled 
the area. 
Monday, Jan. 21: 

Break, 1:21 pm, 38 S. Walnut St. Under 
investigation. 

Att. Break, 4:18 pm, 64 Dysart St. Under 

investigation. 

Break, in Prog. 7:21 am, 23 Copeland St. Pauline's 
Tailoring. Caller reports while driving by he observed a 
white male climbing out of broken front window. 
Suspect was young white male wearing blue jacket and 
hooded sweatshirt. 
Tuesday, Jan. 22: 

Break, 9:45 am, 25 Copeland St. Furnace Brook 
Florist. Under investigation. 

Armed Robbery, 3:17 pm, 764 Hancock St. This 
Takes The Cake. A white male, 20 years, 5'8", thin 
build, short dark hair just robbed the store. 

Break, 4:00 pm, 175 Centre St. Apartment broken 
into. 

Wednesday, Jan. 23: 

Break, 9:24 am, 776 Hancock St., Protestant Social 
Services. Under investigation. 

Break, 2:20 pm, 174 Harvard St. Front door kicked 



in, home ransacked. 

Att. Break, 6:26 pm, 90 HaU Place. Attempt made 
at cellar door. 
Thursday, Jan. 24: 

Break, 12:28 pm, 170 South St. Home ransacked. 

Att. Break, 3:21 pm, 229 E. Elm Ave. Window 
beside door broken. No entrance gained. 

Break, 3:24 pm, 123 Independence Ave. Home 
ransacked, stereo stolen. 
Friday, Jan. 25: 

Armed Robbery, 12:29 am, 75 Copeland St. Seven 
Eleven Store. Suspect is a white male, under 6 feet 
tall, acne face, short brovm hair with a rat tail, wearingi^ , 
a gray sweatshirt with the words BUM EQUIPMENT on 
it. 

Break, 3:15 am, 41 Franklin St. Vogue, Suspect is 
a white male, wearing a blue jacket, white pants and a 
red scally cap. 

Break, 12:48 pm, 34 Madison Ave. Under 
investigation at this time. 
Saturday, Jan. 26: 

Break, 9:05 am, 16 Beale St. Dot's Smoke Shop. 
Under investigation. 

Break, 10:11 am, 18 Beale St. Christian Science 
Reading Room. Under investigation. 

Total Services: Total Calk-1207; Total Arrests-49; 
Stolen Cars-22. 

If you have any information on any of the above 
crimes, or any crime, please call the Quincy Police 
Detective Bureau at 479-1212 ext. 312. You will not be 
required to identify yourself, but it could help. 

Woodward School 



Registration Underway For Ceramic Classes open House Saturday 



The Quincy Recreation 
Department is conducting 
registration for its second 
session of ceramic classes 
which are open to boys 
and girls age eight through 
middle school who are 
Quincy residents. 

Basic and intermediate 



instruction in painting, 
glazing, staining and 
cleaning of ceramic 
greenware are included. 

The program will be 
conducted at the Dawes 
Memorial Estate, 
Channing St. and Quincy 
Shore Drive, opposite the 



Squantum Yacht Club. 

The classes are 
Monday, 3-4:30 p.m.; 
Wednesday, 3-4:30 p.m.; 
and Saturday, 9-10:30 
a.m.; and 10:30 a.m. to 
nooa 

Registration will be 
held Saturday Feb. 1 from 



9-11 a.m., Monday, Feb. 3 
or Wednesday, Feb. 5 from 
3-4:30 p.m. at the Dawes 
Memorial Estate. 

The program runs 10 
weeks and cost is $12. 
Classes begin the day of 
registration. For 

information call 376-1386. 



The Woodward School 
will hold an admissions 
open house for grades 6-12 
Saturday, Feb. 1 at 10 a.m. 
for parents and students 
interested in attending for 
the 1992-93 school year. 

Admissions personnel 



will be available to answer 
questions and provide a 
tour of the school. Students 
may take an entrance test 
as part of this morning 
program. 

For more information, 
caU 773-5610. 



"WORLD OF PRODUCTS" 

Is looking for demonstrators/and Hostesses for 
a unique gift party plan. Make more money in 
one evening, than any other party plan. No 
experience needed, no kit to buy. After 3 mos. 
you will have the option to own your own 
business, and keep all the profits for yourself. 
Call for details 740-1214. Ask for Claire. Also 
booking parties. 




HANCOCK 



Before It Snows! 



BLOW OUT OIL CHANGE 





$9.95 



(WOW) 



I- 



Premium Quality Lube, Oil, Filter 
14 Point Safety Inspection 

With Thisj^d f i?l?i^^f I 

^'THE^BLUE AND WHITE BUILDINGS" 



^ 



PETAR'S ERIC 

AUTOMOTIVE AUTO I 

(617)786-9080 (617)47 

324-330 Quincy Ave., Quincy 



ERIC'S 

AUTO BODY 

(617)472-6759 



It's the new North 

Quincy branch address 

of the South Boston 

Savings Bank. 

• STRONG • CONSERVATIVE 
•RELIABLE •PROFITABLE 

HOURS 

MON - TUES - WED - FRI - 9 AM to 5 PM 

THURSDAY 9AM to 7PM 

SATURDAY 8:30AM to 12 NOON 

Telephone 773^100 



Visit our Other 
Quincy branch 
office located at 
690 Adams St. 
Lakin Square 



South Boston . 
Savings Bank 

^ ALWAYS THE LEADER' ^ 






Page 10 Qulncy Sun Thursday, January 30, 1992 

'Love Never Gives Up' 

Sermon Sunday At 

Wollaston Congregational 



Rev. Elden D.J. Zuem 
will preach on the topic 
"Love Never Gives Up" at 
the 10 a.m. worship service 
Sunday at Wollaston 
Congregational Church. 

During the service, the 
church will observe the 
annual installation of 
church officers and share 
in communion. 

The senior choir, under 
the direction of Ralph 
Opie, will provide music. 
Scripture reader will be 
Leslie Phipps. Usfiers will 
be Edgar Hubley and 
Charles Todd with Jennifer 
Hettman as acolyte. 

All children, including 
those of high school age, 
are welcome to the church 



school and nursery 
facilities. They are 
welcome to attend the 
fellowship hour following 
the service. 

Activities during the 
week include Wednesday 
evening prayer service, 
South Shore Camera Club, 
Scout Troop meetings and 
Wollaston Mothers Qub. 

The congregation is a 
service group for 
"SHARE" and welcomes 
calls to the church office 
regarding any event or 
SHARE participation. 

For more information, 
caU 773-7432 between 10 
a.m. and 1 p.m. Monday 
through Friday. 



Religion 



'No Substitute For You' 
Bethany Sermon Topic 



Six New Members To Join 
Point Congregational 



Six adults will formally 
enter into membership of 
the Quincy Point 
Congregational Church 
Sunday at the Ceremony 
for the Reception of New 
Members that will take 
place during the 10 a.m. 
worship service. 

All church members, 
friends and visitors are 
invited to attend and 
participate in the service. 
The church is located at 
Washington St. and 
Southern Artery where 
there is excellent off-street 
parking. The pastors are 
the Revs. Fred and Carol 
Atwood-Lyoa 

Denise Ard of Wareham 
will join the church by 
Affirmation of Faith. 
Entering into membership 
by Reaffirmation of Faith 
will be Ronald Keams of 
Melrose, Ann SterUng and 
Richard and Jane 
Raymond, all of Quincy. 
Douglas Anderson will join 
the church by Transfer of 
Membership from Christ 
Congregational Church in 
Brockton. 

The service will also 
include the Sacrament of 
Holy Communion, to be 



administered by the 
pastors and members of 
the Diaconate. Chris 
Sherriff, a member of the 
1992 Confirmation class, 
will serve as acolyte. 

Sunday the Rev. Carol 
Atwood-Lyon will preach 
on "Seeing Salvation" as 
her sermon topic. The Rev. 
Fred Atwood-Lyon will 
assist as liturgist. Dr. 
Herman Weiss, church 
organist and choir director 
will play and the Chancel 
Choir will sing. 

Church School classes 
will meet at 10 a.m. 
Infants, nursery and 
kindergarten children 
should be taken directly to 
their classrooms; all other 
children and young people 
will gather in the 
sanctuary with their 
families and go to their 
classrooms following 
"Time With The 
Children." Parents desiring 
to register their children in 
the Church School can 
speak to superintendent 
Debbie Tait on Sunday 
mornings or call the 
church office at 773-6424, 
Mondays through Fridays, 
8 a.m. to 4 p.m. 



"No Substitute For 
You" will be the sermon 
topic preached by the Rev. 
Roger Ketcham at the 10 
a.m. worship service 
Sunday at Bethany 
Congregational Church, 
Spear and Coddington Sts. 

Assisting Rev. Ketcham 
in serving Holy 
Communion will be 
members of the board of 
deacons Corinne Mikami, 
Vivian Miller, Betty 
Newton and James Ross. 
Scripture reader will be 
Shirlet Pyne. Music by the 
Chancel Choir will be 
directed by Gregory Flynn, 
organist. Greeters will be 
Robert and Diane 
DelVecho. 

Hosting the fellowship 



hour after the worship 
service will be Fairlie 
Kinnecom and Beverly 
Capobianchi. 

Church School classes 
are held at 10 a.m. in the 
parish house. Rev. 
Ketcham will conduct the 
weekly Bible study at 8:30 
a.m. Sunday in Room 3 of 
the parish house. Child 
care is provided by infants 
and toddlers at both hours 
to enable parents to attend 
the Bible study and 
worship service. The 
church also offers Dial-A- 
Prayer 24 hours a day at 
773-4500. 

For more information 
concerning Bethany 
programs call the church 
office at 479-7300. 



'What Really Matters' Sermon 
Topic At United Methodist 



"What Really Matters" 
will be the Holy 
Communion meditation of 
the Rev. Harry Soper Jr. 
Sunday at the 10 a.m. 
worship service at Quincy 
Community United 
Methodist Church, 40 
Beale St. 

Scripture Reader will 
be Kim Barr. Greeters will 
be Annie Ohman and 
Margaret Troupe. 
Hostesses for the 
fellowship hour following 
the service wUl be Cindy 
McAUster, Kelley Carrillo 
and Kim Barr. 

Following the pastor's 
Young Disciples message, 
Sunday School will meet. 
Church facilities are 
handicapped accessible 



and nursery care is 
provided. Rev. Soper will 
meet at noon with 
prospective Confirmation 
class participants. The 
junior high fellowship will 
meet at 6 p.m. with youth 
director Derek Schmitt. 

Open recreation in the 
church gym will be at 7 
p.m. Monday. 

The Christian Serenity 
Support Group will meet at 
7 p.m. and the Council on 
Youth Ministries will meet 
at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. 

The annual Church 
Charge Conference will be 
held at 7:30 p.m. 
Wednesday. 

The pastor's weekly 
Bible class will be held at 
10 a.m. and choir rehearsal 
at 8 p.m. Thursday. 



'In The Same Boat' 
Covenant Sermon Topic 



Houghs Neck SHARE 
Registration Feb. 5 



Registration for Houghs 



will be 
5 fi"om 5 



SHARING... 

your time and talents 
as a volunteer can be 
satisfying and fun. The 
United Way Voluntary 
Action Center (VAC) 
can match your time 
and talent with reward- 
ing volunteer opportu- 
nities, whatever your 
interests, wherever you 
live. Call the VAC at 
617-422-6775. 




United Way 

Voluntary 
Action Center 



Neck SHARE 
Wednesday, Feb. 
to 7 p.m. at the Houghs 
Neck American Legion 
Post on Sea St. 

For information call 
Holly Barrieau at 479- 
5059. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Quincy Sun iicfne delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



Rev. Kathleen Graves, 
co-pastor with Rev. Kirk 
Johnson, will preach at the 
10:45 a.m. worship service 
of the Covenant 
Congregational Church, 
WTiitwell and Granite Sts. 

Her sermon topic will 
be "In The Same Boat." 

The Diaconate will 
serve Communion and 
collect the offering for the 
Benevolence Fund. The 
choir, directed and 
accompanied by 

organist/pianist Richard 
Smith, will sing an introit 
and two anthems. Smith 
will also play an organ 
prelude, offertory and 
postlude. 

Sunday School, with 



The Covenant Congregational Church 

315 Whitwell Street. Quincy 

Invites YOU to worship 
with them each Sunday 

Morning Worship 

10:45 a.m. 

Rev. Kathleen J. Graves 

Rev. Kirk E. Johnson 

Pastors 




classes for all ages, 
nursery through adult, will 
begin at 9:30 a.m. During 
the service, an attended 
nursery is available for 
children age four and 
under. For children up to 
age 12, there is junior 
church. 

Immediately following 
the service, coffee will be 
served in the fellowship 
hall downstairs. 

Choir rehearsal will be 
held Thursday at 7 p.m. 
Coming events include a 
farewell reception on 
Sunday, Feb. 9 following 
the worship senrice for the 
pastors. They have 
accepted a call to be 
developmental pastors in 
Mirmesota. 

For more information 
about church activities 
caU 479-5728. 



^ 



St. Joseph School 

Celebrating Catholic 

School Week 



St. Joseph School, 22 
Pray St., is celebrating 
Catholic Schools Week. 

The school was 
estabUshed 65 years ago to 
teach Catholic children 
from the parish and from 
surrounding areas where no 
Catholic school is 
available. A coeducational 
school, it includes eight 
grades and a full day 
kindergarten and has been 
fully accredited through 
the Archdiocese of Boston. 
More than 1,200 students 
have graduated from the 
school. 

All faculty members are 
teachers wlio hold State of 
Massachusetts credentials. 
St. Joseph School is 
administered by the 
Archdiocese of Boston 
Superintendent of Schools, 
Sister Ann Dominic, OP; 
Father Daniel Graham, 
pastor of St. Joseph's 
Church; and Sister Anne 
Judge, SND, principal of 



St. Joseph School and 
school board. 

The school's curriculum 
includes religion, math, 
language arts, social 
studies, science, heahh, 
art, music and physical 
education; special 
programs such as French, 
computer science, after 
school sports and others; 
and extra curricula 
programs such as choir, 
student council, the 
National Junior Beta Club, 
and others. 

A child who is five 
years old by Dec. 31 may 
be admitted into 
kindergarten. A child who 
is six years of age by Dec. 
31 may be admitted into 
first grade. Information 
regarding tuition and fees 

may be obtained by 
calling the school office. 

For more information 
call Sister Aime Judge at 
773-8080. 



Bishop Hart Party Feb. 7 



A party to honor the 
Most Rev. Daniel A. Hart, 
Auxihary Bishop of Boston 
and regional bishop of the 
South Region, will be held 
Friday, Feb. 7 at 
Lombardo's in Randolph. 

This year's reception 
marks the 11 consecutive 
year that Bishop Hart, who 
is headquartered at 
Cardinal Gushing General 
Hospital in Brockton, has 
been honored in this way. 

The proceeds of the 
dinner party will benefit 
the "CHRISM" (Christian 
Responsibility in Shared 
Ministry) program, which 
is sponsored by Bishop 
Hart. CHRISM was 
founded in an effort to 
bring spiritual and 
educational programs to 
the regions as a means of 
enrichment for those 
people involved in lay 



ministry. 

The program has since 
extended to all the people 
of the South Region and 
the archdiocese as well. 
Many programs, presented 
by leading philosophers 
and theologians, qualify 
for credits in degree work 
for Masters candidates. 

The Bishop Hart Party 
has grown in the past 11 
years from a small 
reception of friends and 
supporters to as many as 
800 attendees in recent 
years. This year's event 
will also celebrate Bishop 
Hart's 15th anniversary as 
Bishop in the Archdiocese. 

The event begins with a 
social hou. at 6:30 p.m and 
dinner at 7:30 p.m. For 
ticket information, call 
CHRISM at 331-5194 or 
any local parish church. 



Four Chaplains Sunday 
At HN Congregational 



American Heart 
Association 



Four Chaplains Sunday 
will be observed this 
Sunday at the Houghs 
Neck Congregational 
Church, Manet Ave. 

Members of the Houghs 
Neck American Legion 
Post will be present at the 
service, which will mark 
the 49th anniversary of the 
sinking of the USS 
Dorchester off the coast of 
Greenland. 

Two ministers, a priest 
and a rabbi gave their hfe 
jackets to save the ti^oops 
during the sinking of the 
Dorchester. The service is 
a remembrance of the four 
chaplains who gave their 
lives for others on Feb. 3, 
1943. 

A new guest book will 
be placed in the vestibule 
and everyone attending 
church this week will be 
asked to sign the book. 

There will be two 
services of worship, 9 a.m. 
and 10:30 a.m. Dr. Peter V. 
Corea will preach on 
"Four Heroes Of The 
Human Race" as his 
sermon topic at both 



services. 

Carol Sargeant will be 
the greeter at the 9 a.m. 
worship service and Rob 
Gordon and Ada Freeman 
will be the Diaconate 
members serving. Miriam 
Coombs will be the guest 
organist. 

At the 10:30 a.m. 
worship service, Susan 
Catrambone will be the 
greeter. Jacqui Freel and 
Rod Hicks will serve for 
the Diaconate. The choir 
will sing under the 
direction of Arden T. 
Schofield and offertory 
music will be a duet sung 
by Lois Bassett and Joan 
Kirby. There will be a 
service of church 
membership conducted by 
Dr. Peter V. Corea during 
the 10:30 a.m. worship 
service. 

The coffee hour 
between the services will 
be hosted by Suzanne 
Dennis. 

The church is equipped 
for the physically 
challenged. 



Thursday, January 30, 1992 Qulncy Sun Page 11 




DISCOVER 

CATHOLIC SCHOOLS 




counselor, Sr. «> 






SAINT 
JOSEPH 
SCHOOL 

QUINCY. MASSACHUSETTS 

ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE 
• STRONG CURRICULUM 
• VALUE ORIENTED INSTRUCTION 
• DEDICATED, CARING FACULTY 
• CATHOLIC TRADITION 
• PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT 
• FOSTERS SELF-DISCIPLINE 

Subject Matter Disciplines 

Religion 

Math 

Language Arts 

Social Studies 

Science 

Health 

Art 

Music 

Physical Education 

Special Programs 

French 

Computer Science 

Family Life education 

Leadership training through student 

government 

Health screening Science fairs 

Cultural arts activities 

After school sports 

Achievement testing and placement 

On-site full time counselor 

Instrumental music, Arts and Crafts, 

and Drama 

Chapter I Tutorial Program 

Human Development/Human Sexuality 



"We believe in children and their 
abihty to creatively shape the future." 



•«««'«f5:^*^«*<iep.„ 



*ip. 



'o^ W^, 



sbio, 



'^o«. /).< 



Oq 




^ots at r ^ 

*' ^-earning 



Ceatt 








»ad 



oader 
Afrs. 



A LESSON on the computers. 



** . i-n, with members of 

School Board. 






Page 12 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 30, 1992 




Halcyone Cosman, 95 

Journalist, Boating Enthusiast 



A private funeral service 
for Halcyone (Wright) 
Cosman, 95, of Quincy, was 
recently held. 

Mrs. Cosman died Jan. 19 
at Carney Hospital in Boston. 

A fomier journalist and 
boating enthusiast, she 
learned celestial navigation 
aiKl was qualified to navigate 
any type of ship anywhere in 
the world. She was the first 
woman to become a full- 
fledged navigator through the 
many United States Power 
Squadron courses sV took. 

She was bom in Little 
Rock, Ark., and Uved briefly 
on a farm in Quebec, Canada. 
She grew up in Medford 
where she was voted the 
prettiest girl in the senior class 
in 1914, a received a bberal 
arts degree from Boston 
University. 

She lived in Quincy from 
1 938 until moving to the Elihu 
White Nursing Home in 
Braintree four years ago. 

She was the former secre- 
tary of the Merrymount As- 
sociatioa 



She was a proofreader and 
compositor for the Christian 
Science Monitor in Boston, 
assistant editor of National 
Sportsman Magazine and 
worked for Antiques Maga- 
zine, which is published by 
the same publisher. During 
her magazine years, she be- 
came a skilled skeet shooter 
and met many celebrities, 
including actor Qark Gable. 

As book editor for River- 
side Press she edited an un- 
abridged Webster's Dictio- 
nary in the 1950's. 

She is survived by her 
husband, Howard E. "Pop" 
Cosman; two sons, Howard 
P. Grant Jr. of East Hartford. 
Conn., and David C. Grant of 
Groveland; a sister, Ruth 
Stockwell of Vancouver, 
British Columbia, Canada; 
eight grandchildren, six great- 
grandchildren and several 
nieces and nephews. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Deware Funeral 
Home, 576 Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to charity. 




D. Scott Deware 



A THOUGHT F0« THE WEEK 



It has b««n said that 
frisndshlps ars fragile 
things, and require as 
much care In handling as 
any other fragile and 
precious thing. 



In our youth we call most of our 
acquaintances ... 'our friends.' But as we 
grow older we begin to better understand the 
true meaning of friendship. The man or woman 
who has reached the middle of life and has 
half a dozen real friends who will bear the 
tests of friendship Is indeed fortunate. 

A partial quote from SI. John Ervlne 
expresses this thought quite beautifully. "To 
be everybody's friend Is to be nobody's 
friend. For friendship Is the feeling you 
possess for a particular person as distinct 
from ail other persons, it is a very beautiful 
and Intimate and close relationship which Is 
destroyed If It Is bestowed casually. To be 
able to say that you have a friend Is to know 
that there Is one person to whom your affairs 
are as important as his own, on whose aid and 
counsel and affection you can count In all 
times of trouble and distress, to whose aid 
you will fly the moment you hear he needs 
your help. 

It Is Impossible for any man or woman to 
feel like that for more than a few persons." 

Deware Funeral Home 

576 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 

472-1137 

Member of the "New England Funeral Trust" 

and your Suburban Boston Pra-Need 

funeral specialist 

Serving All Religious Faiths 

Services Rendered To Any Distance 



Beatrice L. Hemmings, 80 

Member Of First Nazarene Church 50 Years 



A funeral service for 
Beatrice Lavinia "Bca" 
(Estabrook) Hemmings, 80, 
of Quincy, was held Jan. 25 
in Bethel Church of the 
Nazarene, 41 Empire St. 

Bom in Salem, she was 
educated in Beverly and was 
a graduate of Beveriy High 
School. 

She was a midwife at the 
Florence Crittenden Home for 
unwed mothers in 
Swampscott before attending 
Eastern Nazarene College in 
Wollaston. 

She lived in East 
Rockaway,LongIsland,N.Y. 
from 193 3 to 1983, where she 
was a 50-year memberof First 
Church of the Nazarene and a 
member of the Nazarene 
Women's Mission Society 
and the Lend-A-Hand Soci- 
ety. She moved to Quincy in 
1983. 

She was a member of 



Bethel Church of the 
Nazarene. 

Wife of the late Ransford 
J. Hemmings, she is survived 
by two sons, Keith R. 
Hemmings of Quincy and 
Albert E. Hemmings of 
Woodlawn, Tenn.; two 
daughters, Barbara 

Hemmings Gray of 
Weymouth and Vivian H. 
Dunning of Woodlawn; two 
daughters-in-law, Betty 
Hemmings of Woodlawn and 
Linda Hemmings of Quincy; 
and three grarxlchildren. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Deware Funeral 
Home, 576 Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to Bethel Church of the 
Nazarene or the Hospice of 
the South Shore, 100 Bay 
State Drive, Braintree, MA 
02184. 



Eleanor E. Gutterson, 75 

Retired Howard Johnson's Clerk 



A funeral service for 
Eleanor E. (Miller) Gutterson, 
75, of Quincy, was held Jan. 
24 in Mt. Wollaston Cem- 
etery. 

Mrs Gutterson died Jan. 
22 at DelManor Nursing 
Home, Rockland. 

She was aclerk for Howard 
Johnson's for four years be- 
fore retiring in 1981. 

She was a member of the 
Sunshine Qub of Quincy. 

Bom in Peabody , she lived 
in Quincy all her life. 



Wife of the late George T. 
Gutterson, she is survived by 
two daughters, Barbara A. 
Laing of Halifax and Judith 
F. Brueggeman of Manomet; 
10 grandchildren and 11 
great-grandchildren. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St., 
Wollaston. 

Donations may be made 
to the American Heart Asso- 
ciation, 33 Fourth Ave., 
Needham, MA 02192. 



Anna C. Moran 



A funeral Mass for Anna 
C. (Driscoll) Moran of 
Quincy, formerly of West 
Roxbury, was celebrated Jan. 
22 in Holy Name Church, 
West Roxbury. 

Mrs. Moran died Jan. 18. 

Wife of the late Joseph A. 



Moran, she is survived by 
three nieces. 

Burial was in St. Joseph's 
Cemetery, West Roxbury. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Robert J. Lawler 
Funeral Home, West 
Roxbury. 



MONUMENTS 


QUINCY 




Cemetery Lettering 




MEMORIALS Inc. 




Cleaning 








Vases 








Vigil Lights 




JgWillardSt. 




Sculpturing 
Rose Quartz 




Quincy 02169 




Mausoleums 








Markers 
Colonial Tablets 




"On The Expressway" 




Stant Markers 




Exit 9 Near E. Milton Sq. 


^^V Bronze Markers 


L 


Free Illustnited Catalog 
Budget Terms Available 


J617-471-025 


D 



William J. Driscoll, 63 

Construction Worker, Yacht Club Member 



A fijneral Mass for Wil- 
ham J. Driscoll, 63, of Quincy, 
was celebrated Jan. 22 at Most 
Blessed Sacrament Church. 

Mr. Driscoll died Jan. 20 
at home after a long illness. 

He was co-owner of His- 
torical Restoration Inc. in 
South Boston before his re- 
tirement two years ago. He 
also spent more than 50 years 
working in the construction 
industry. 

He was a member of 
Structural Iron Workers 
Union Local 7 and a life 
member of Old Colony Yacht 
Club. 

Bom in Providence, R.I., 
he lived in Roxbury before 
moving to Quincy 20 years 
ago. 

He is survived by his wife, 



Dorothy (McCaffrey) 
Driscoll; four sons, Robert 
M. Driscoll of Stuart, Fla., 
Bryan F. Driscoll of Brockton, 
Kevin J. Driscoll of 
Dorchester and Steven J. 
Driscoll of Delray Beach, 
Fla.; three daughters, Joyce 
M. Andrews and Deborah D. 
Brennan, both of Randolph, 
and Kelly A. Driscoll of 
Quincy; two stepsons, Ralph 
M. Donohue of Springfield 
and Michael T. Donohue of 
Azusa, Calif; a brother, Jo- 
.seph M. Driscoll of Seekonk; 
and 1 8 grandchildren. He was 
the father of the late William 
J. Driscoll Jr. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St., 
Wollaston. 



Kathryn R. Burke, 87 

Former Professional Dancer 



A funeral Mass for 
Kathryn R. (Daly) Burice, 87, 
of Quincy , was celebrated Jan. 
25 in St. Ann's Church. 

Mrs. Burke died Jan. 22 at 
home after a long illness. 

She was an inventory 
control employee for Kinney 
Vacuum Co. in Boston for 10 
years. She was also a former 
professional dancer. 

She retired in 1975. 

Bom in Boston, she lived 
in Jamaica Plain before 
moving to Quincy 18 years 
ago. 



Wife of the late Edmund 
C. Burke, she is survived by a 
son, E. Scott Burke of 
Weymouth; a daughter. 
Sherry Ann Bergonzi of 
Quincy; and eight grandchil- 
dren. 

Burial was in St. Joseph's 
Cemetery, Taunton. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to the Visiting Nurse Asso- 
ciation, 1354 Hancock St., 
Quincy, MA 02169. 



Raymond L. French, 91 



A private funeral service 
for Raymond L. French, 91, 
of Quincy was held recently 
in Blue Hill Cemetery, 
Braintree. 

Mr. French died Jan. 20 in 
the John Adams Nursing 
Home, Quincy, after a long 
illness. 

He was a retired supervi- 
sor forthe Massachusetts Bay 
Transit Authority. He worked 
for the MBTA for 43 years 
before lOtiring in 1966 and 



was a 50-year member of 
MBTA Union Local 589. 

He was a 1918 graduate of 
Holbrook High School and 
attended Burdette College for 
two years. 

He is survived by his wife 
of 64 years, Effie L (Morrill) 
French; and a si.stcr-in-law, 
Dorothy A. Magec. 

Donations may be made 
to the American He;u1 Asso- 
ciation, 33 Fourth Ave., 
Necdliam, MA 02194. 



John F. Maliff, 71 



A funeral service for John 
F. Maliff, 71, of Quincy, for- 
merly of Rockland, was held 
Jan. 24 at Magon Funeral 
Home, Rockland. 

Mr. Maliff died Jan. 21 at 
Quincy Hospital after a long 
illness. 

He was a retired employee 
of F.L. and J.C. Codman Co. 
in Rockland. 

He was an Army veteran 
ofWorldWarll. 



Bom in Boston, he lived 
in Boston for many years be- 
fore moving to Quincy seven 
years ago. 

Son of the late John and 
Alice (O'Brien) Maliff, he is 
survived by a brother, James 
M. Maliff of Hanson; a sister, 
Dorothy Lincoln of Brockton; 
and many nieces and neph- 
ews. 

Burial was in Mount 
Pleasant Cemcterv. 



1 



Swcenej/ Sroitiers 

HOME FOR FUNERALS 

RICHARD T. SWEENEY, JR. 
JEFFREY F. SWEENEY 

I INDEPENDENCE AVENUE • QUINCY, MASS. 

472-6344 



I 



CHRISTIAN DIOR • SOPMIA LOHEN • JOAN COLLINS • VUAHNET • PIERRE CAHDIN 



Eyeglasses 

$25 Off 

Complete 
Rx 



Jn OPTICAL & Jl 

• D« HEARING AIDS 41 



1361-A Hancock St., Quincy Sq. 4(1 
773-3505 • 773-4174 

^A^r $499 ^- 

Complete 

30 Day Trial 2 Yr. Warranty 

FREE VALIDATED PARKING 



1 YEAR WARRANTY 
ON ALL FRAMES _ 

HAI^TON • AVANTGABDF • OSC AR DEL A RENTA 9 YVES SAINT > AUBfNT • TUB* 



raM 



Marie F. Hackett, 81 

Worked For Boston Gas Co. 



A funeral Mass for 
Marie F. Hackett, 81, of 
Weymouth, formerly of 
Quincy, was celebrated 
Jan. 22 in St. John the 
Baptist Church. 

Miss Hackett died Jan. 
26 at the Colonial Nursing 
Home. 

She was a customer 
service representative for 
Boston Gas Co. for 47 
years. She retired in 1974. 

She was a Red Cross 
volunteer, a member of the 
Sodality and Senior 
Citizens Qub of St. John's 
Church, Quincy Catholic 



Club and the Proparvulis 
Qub. 

She is survived by two 
sisters, Margaret H. Brown 
of Needham and Annamae 
B. Driscoll of Quincy; and 
many nieces and nephews. 

Burial will be in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for 
Funerals, 1 Independence 
Ave. 

Donations may be made 
to the South Shore Region, 
American Red Cross, 15 
Front St., Weymouth, MA 
02188. 



P. Leahy, 20, of Quincy, was 
celebrated Jan. 25 at Most 
Blessed Sacrament Church. 

Mr. Leahy died Jaa 22 in 
Quincy Hospital in Quincy 
Hospital after a shooting in 
Quincy Point. 

He was a salesman for 
Massachusetts Environmen- 
tal Services in Boston. 

Bom in Stoughton, he 
moved to Quincy in 1980. 

He enjoyed sports and 
fishing. He played peewee 
football and was a wrestler at 
Broad Meadows Middle 
School. 

Son of James P. Leahy and 



Mark J. Mulkern-Mulkerrin 

Boston Public School Teacher 



A funeral Mass for Mark. 
J. Mulkern-Mulkerrin of 
Quincy was celebrated Jan. 
24 in Sacred Heart Church, 
North Scituate. 

Mr. Mulkern-Mulkerrin 
died Jan. 21 at home after a 
long illness. 

A teacher in flie Boston 
public school system for 30 
years, he taught at Boston 
Technical High School for 1 
years and was a member of 
the American Federation of 
Teachers. 

A Worid War n veteran of 
both the Navy and Coast 
Guard, he was a member of 
the Dorchester McKeon Post. 

He was bora in Boston. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Elizabeth "Betty" (Landers) 
Mulkem; a son, Patrick J. 
Mulkem of Quincy; two 



daughters, Lisa M. Mulkern 
of Quincy and Monica 
Mulkem Hicks of 
Newburyport; a son-in-law, 
Michael Hicks; four sisters, 
Barbara Day of Maynard, 
Maiy O'Brien of Falmouth, 
Maigaret Cummings of South 
Boston and Frances 
Mulkerrin of Lynnfield; a 
brother, Morgan Mulkem of 
Norwell; and a granddaugh- 
ter. 

Burial was in Massachu- 
setts National Cemetery, 
Bourne. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Lydon-Russell 
Funeral Home, 644 Hancock 
St. 

Donations may be sent to 
the Quincy Visiting Nurse 
Association, 1354 Hancock 
St., Quincy, MA 02169. 



Esther G. Ringquist, 83 

Member Of Viking Club, Stenkil Lodge 



A funeral service Esther 
G. (Lang) Ringquist, 83, of 
Quincy, formerly of 
Braintree, was held Jaa 25 in 
Faith Lutheran Church, 209 
Granite St. 

Mrs. Ringquist died Jan. 
21 in Vermont after a brief 
illness. 

She was a member of the 
Viking Qub, Stenkil Lodge, 
and the Vasa Order Skandia 
Lodge in Braintree. 

A native of Boston, she 
gtew up in Sweden and moved 
back to the United States at 
age 16. She lived in Braintree 
53 years before moving to 



Quincy six years ago. 

She is survived by her 
husband, A. Lennart 
Ringquist; Jr. of Beveriy 
Hills, Calif.; two daughters, 
Harriet A. Barlow of 
Femandina Beach, Fla., and 
Carolyn V. Maloney of Ply- 
mouth; a brother and sister, 
Arthur Lang and Martha 
Anderson, both of Sweden; 
10 grandchildren and nine 
great-grandchildren. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St. 



William A. Rideout, 74 

Machinist, WWII Army Veteran 

A funeral service for Wil- QuiiKy. 



Thursday, January 30, 1992 Quincy Sun Page 13 

Thelma Bell, 71 

Worked For Schrafft's Candy Co. 



Jason P. Leahy, 20 

Environmental Services Salesman 

A funeral Mass for Jason the late Bonnie Ann 



liam A. Rideout, 74, of 
Quincy, was held Jan. 24 at 
the Mortimer N. Peck Funeral 
Home, Braintree. 

Mr. Rideout died Jan. 20 
at home. 

He was a former machin- 
ist for Nieco Microwave Co., 
Hopkington. 

An Army staff sergeant 
during World War II, he 
served in the European-Af- 
rican-Middle Eastern Theater 
and the Asiatic-Pacific The- 
ater. 

He was a member of the 
Castle Island Association, 
South Boston, and the 1000 
Southern Artery Association, 



A native of Boston, he 
lived in Medford before 
moving to Quincy 15 years 
ago. 

He is survived by a son, 
Kenneth Rideout of Maiden; 
twodaughters, Nancy Duncan 
of Hollis, N.H., and Kathleen 
Perrault of Wilmington; a 
brother, Robert Rideout of 
Stoughton; a sister, Florence 
Moore of Sandwich; a friend, 
Yvonne Connor of Quincy; 
and seven grandchildrea 

Burial was in Massachu- 
setts National Cemetery, 
Bourne. 

Donations may be made 
to the Veterans Shelter, 17 
Court St, Boston, MA 02108. 



A funeral service for 
Thelma (Gunn) Bell, 71, 
of Quincy, was held Jan. 
26 at the Hamel,.Wickens 
and Troupe Funeral Home, 
26 Adams St. 

Mrs. Bell died Jan. 23 
at Quincy Hospital after a 
brief illness. 

She was a retired 
employee of the Schrafft's 
Candy Co, where she 
woiked for 10 years before 
retiring in 1982. 

She was raised and 
educated in Atlanta, Ga., 



and previously lived in 
Tennessee and in 
Dorchester. 

She is survived by two 
sons, Charles Russell Bell 
of Brockton and Vincent 
W. Bell of Quincy; three 
daughters, Sandra D. 
Dowdall of Rockland, 
Pamela J. Giorlando of 
Rochester, N.H., and Paula 
J. Broadway of Tennessee; 
a sister, Clyde Ulcinskas 
of Connecticut; 15 
grandchildren, and five 
great-grandchildren. 

Burial was private. 



'Abortion And Human Spirit' 
Sermon Topic At First Parish 



(McKenzie) Leahy, he is 
survived by three sisters, 
Kerrie A. Holyoke and 
Johanna Leahy, both of 
Quincy, and ShaunaL. Leahy 
of Brockton; his grandpar- 
ents, James F. and June R. 
(Blair) Leahy of Bridgewater 
and Bemice (Starr) Landolfi 
of Brockton; and many 
uncles, aunts and cousins. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney Broth- 
ers Home for Funerals, 1 In- 
dependence Ave. 



Dora Rosati, 93 



A funeral service for Dora 
(Rems) Rosati, 93, of Quincy, 
was held Jaa 24 in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Mrs. Rosati died Jan. 22 in 
Cohasset Nursing Home. 

She lived in North Quincy 
for 60 years. 

Wife of the late Thomas 



Rosati, she is survived by a 
grandson, Ronald Roberts, 
formerly of Chicopee; a sis- 
ter-in-law, Sarah DiCario of 
South Boston; and a nephew, 
Harvey liken of Hollywood, 
Calif. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Levine Chapel, 
Broddine. 



M. Frances Smith, 63 

Former Telephone Operator 



A funeral Mass for M. 
Frances (Farragher) 
Smith, 63, of Quincy, was 
celebrated Monday at 
Sacred Heart Church. 

Mrs. Smith died Jan. 23 
in Quincy Hospital. 

She was a former 
telephone operator for 
Boston Financial Data 
Service in Quincy, where 
she worked for 10 years. 

She was a lifelong 
resident of Quincy. 

She is survived by her 
husband, Gerard E. Smith; 
three sons, Gerard E. 
Smith Jr. of Marshfield, 
Michael J. Smith of 
Boston and Richard J. 
Smith of Quincy; a 
daughter, Peggy Smith of 
Quincy; three brothers, 
James Farragher of 
Randolph, Dennis 



Farragher of Weymouth 
and Peter Farragher of 
Brockton; five sisters, 
Christina Panioto of 
Connecticut, Annabelle 
Nee of Roslindale, Joanie 
Sands and Pauline 
O'Malley, both of 
Weymouth, and Claire 
Green of Holbrook; and 
three grandchildren. 

Burial was in 
Knollwood Memorial Park, 
Canton. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to the New England 
Medical Center Boston 
Floating Hospital, 755 
Washington St., c/o 
Development office, 
Boston, MA 02111. 



INVITATION FOR BIDS 



INVITATION FOR BIDS 

CITY OF QUINCY. MASSACHUSETTS 

PURCHASING DEPAR71VIENT 

1305 HANCOCK ST., QUINCY, MA 02169 

Invites sealed bids/proposals for furnishing and delivering 
to the City of Quincy: 



School Dept.: 

Fall Athletic Supplies 



February 1 8, 1 992 @ 10:00 AM 



Detailed specifications are on file at the office of the 
Purchasing Agent, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock St., 
Quincy, MA 02169. 

Bids must state exceptions, if any, the delivery date and 
any allowable discounts. 

Firm bid prices will be given first consideration arKJ will be 
received at the office of the Purchasing Agent until the 
time and date stated above, at which time and date they 
will be publicly opened and read. 

Bids must be in a sealed envelope. The outside of the 
sealed envelope is to be clearly marked, 'BID 
ENCLOSED,' with time/date of bkJ call. 

The right is reserved to reject any or all bkjs or to accept 
any part of a bkJ or the one deemed best for the City. 



This Sunday Dr. 
Sheldon W. Bennett, 
minister, will preach on 
"Abortion And The Human 
Spirit" as his sermon topic 
during the 10:30 a.m. 
service at United First 
PiAsh Church (Unitarian 
Universalist). 

The church choir, 
directed and accompanied 
by organist Norman Corey, 
will sing at the service. 

Visitors are welcome 
and are invited to the 
social hour hosted by Nell 



Slawson following the 
service. Bob Simpson and 
Matt Malloy will usher. 

The women's group and 
the men's group will meet 
at noon following the 
social hour. 

Historic First Parish, 
"Church of the 
Presidents," is located at 
1306 Hancock St. in 
Quincy Center, opposite 
City Hall. Church School 
and child care are 
provided (Brenda Chin, 
director). For more 
information call 773-1290. 



Family To Receive Telephone 

For Hearing Impaired 

From Quincy Lions Club 



The Quincy Lions Club 
has arranged for the 
purchase of a specially 
adapted telephone for the 
hearing impaired. 

The telephone is being 
presented by the Lions 
Club to a Quincy family. 
Because of hearing 
disorders, two of the 
children in this family 



have not been able to use 
a conventional telephone. 
The TDD unit will give the 
children access to a 
telephone. 

The need for such a 
phone was brought to the 
attention of the Lions by 
Ward 3 Councillor Larry 
Chretien. 



Free Vision Screenings 
At Lambert Eye Center 



The Lambert Eye 
Center, 100 Congress St., 
is offering complimentary 



vision screenings every 
Friday from 1 to 4 p.m. 
The screenings are 



given to check 
glaucoma, cataracts 
other eye disorders. 



for 
and 



For more information or 
to schedule an 
appointment, call 471- 
5665. 



A Few Words on 
FUNERAL SERVICE 



t 



Who can help me? 



1/30/92 



James A. Sheets, Mayor 
Robert F. Denvir, Jr., Purchasing Agent 



3 



Our area has fine. Ihoujihtliil 
tuiit-ral dirt-dors who can consult 
w ith \ou about plannin}; a tiiniTal 
in ad\ance at no cost to \oii. 
Here at our funeral home, xu' iii- 
lorni \ou completelx about all ser- 
\ ices and costs. Alter \ou set \our 
own price ranjie. we will discuss 
music. cler^\man. caskets, and 
scripture readings, thinus most 
meaningful to \ou. 
Pre-planniim funerals is a re(|iiesi 
we hear more and more often. 
( ontact usalxtut this \er\ jxrsonal 
ser\ice at nocharKeor ohli^ation 
to \ou. 



Hamel, Wickens & Troupe 
Funeral Home, Inc. 

26 Adams Street • Quincy, MA 
Roger G. Hamel 617-472-5888 

Funeral Director 



FUNERAL PRE-NEED SPECIALISTS 



Page 14 Quincy Sun Thursday, January 30, 1992 



Sun Sports 



Basketball 



Osgood Plymouth State Standout 



North Edged By 
B.C. High, 50-48 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

Last Friday's North 
Quincy-Boston College 
High basketball game at 
Noith Quincy lived up to 
all expectations as the 
Eagles, coached by 
Quincy 's Brian Buckley, 
squeezed by the Raiders, 
5048. 

B.C. High, a Catholic 
Conference power, 
improved its record to 10- 
2, while North, having one 
of its best seasons in some 
time, fell to 8-4. Ted 
Stevenson's club is 6-2 in 
the Old Colony League. 

North Quincy played at 
Plymouth Tuesday night, 
will host Quincy Friday at 



7 p.m. and will be at 
Taunton Monday at 7 p.m. 

There was plenty of 
Quincy interest in the 
North Quincy-B.C. High 
game. Quincy's Mike 
Chiccino, Matt Fennessy 
and Jay Schnabel play for 
the Eagles and assisting 
Buckley are Quincy 
natives Paul Donoghue, 
Bob Evans, Fred Murray 
and Norm Walsh. 

Angelo Catenza scored 
12 points, including a free 
throw with seven seconds 
remaining to clinch the 
win. Cornell Mills led the 
Eagles with 13 points and 
Dave McLaughlin scored 



10. 

Desmond Bellot and 
Sean Donovan continued 
their outstanding play with 
Bellot scoring 15 points 
and Donovan, the league's 
number four scorer, 13. 

North led at halftime, 
37-35, and cut B.C. High's 
lead to one point with 30 
seconds left. 

Earlier in the week 
North Quincy turned in one 
of its best efforts to 
soundly defeat Weymouth, 
6(M2. 

Donovan scored 14 
points, Bellot added 10 
with seven rebounds and 
Chris Olsen had 10 points 
aixl six rebounds. 



JoUey Hot But 
Quincy Cool 



Quincy tri-captain Dave 
Jolley, the number two 
scorer in the Old Colony 
League, had his second 
outstanding game of the 
week last Friday, but the 
Presidents lost to 
Bridgewater-Raynham ' s 
undefeated league leader 
(12-0), 87-68, dropping 



their record to 5-7. 

Quincy met Weymouth 
Tuesday, will play at 
North Quincy Friday night 
and will host Plymouth 
Monday. 

Jolley bad 25 points and 
13 rebounds in the loss to 
B-R, while tri-captain Joe 
Crespi added 17 points. 



Quincy, North Winter 
Home Sports Schedule 



Jan. 29 Through Feb. 4 



Wednesday, Jan. 29 

•NQHS Hockey vs. Falmouth, JV 5:30 p.m., 
Varist}' 7 p.m. 
•QHS Wrestling dual vs. Bridgewater-Raynham, 
7 p.m. 

Thursday, Jan. 30 
•NQHS Boys Swimming vs. Duxbury, 4 p.m. 

Friday, Jan. 31 
•NQHS Boys Basketball vs. Quincy (at NQHS), 
Freshman 3:30 p.m., JV 5:30 p.m. and Varsity, 7 
p.m. 

•QHS Girls Basketball vs. NQHS (at QHS), 
Freshman 3:15 p.m., JV 5:30 p.m. and Varsity, 7 
p.m. 

Saturday, Feb. 1 
•NQHS Hockey vs. Weymouth, JV 6:40 p.m.. 
Varsity 7:50 p.m. 

•State Relays in Boys and Girls Track at B.U. 
Commonwealth Armory. 
•NQHS Wrestling, double dual meet at Randolph 
(NQ and Durfee vs. Randolph and Milton), noon, 
•QHS Wrestling, double dual meet at Braintree vs. 
Agawam and Hingham, 1:30 p.m. 
Monday, Feb. 3 
•QHS Boys Basketball vs. Plymouth, Freshman 
3:30 p.m., JV 5:30 p.m. and Varsity, 7 p.m. 
NQHS Girls Basketball vs. Taunton, Freshman 
3:15 p.m., JV 5:30 p.m. and Varsity 7 p.m. 

Tuesday, Feb. 4 
•NQHS Boys Swimming vs. Westwood, 4 p.m. 



B-R's Jim Bolan had 24 
points and Rich Rumbill 

16 as the Trojans led at 
the half, 47-29. 

Earlier in the week the 
Presidents rolled over 
Falmouth, 71-50, as Jolley 
scored a career-high 31 
points and took down 14 
rebounds. 

Crespi contributed 12 
points and sophomores 
Harold Mortel, Mike 
Baitlett and Joe Kelley all 
played outstanding defense 
for the Presidents. 

Steve Watson led 
Falmouth with 14 points. 

Beston Wins 
Gym Title 

Sarah Beston, 11, of 
Quincy, won the all around 
gymnastic title at the 
recent Pilgrim Meet in 
Algonquin. 

Beston bad the high 
score of 33.3 among 81 
gymnasts from a'^ound the 
state. She scoied an 8.4 on 
the floor exercise; an 8.2 
on the vault; 7.9 on the 
balance beam; and 8.8 on 
the uneven bars. 

She is a sixth grade 
student at Central Middle 
School and is a member of 
the Ellis School of 
Gymnastics team. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-3100 



Quincy's Jay Osgood, a 
senior co-captain at 
Plymouth State College in 
Plymouth, New 

Hampshire, is a major 
contributor to the PSC 
men's basketball team. 

Osgood, a 6'4", 235 
pound center, leads the 
team in rebounds with an 
average of 10.0 per game. 
He is third on the team in 
scoring averaging 12.0 per 
game. 

The former Ledger All- 
Scholastic graduated from 
Archbishop Williams High 
School. The son of Dawn 
and John Osgood, he works 
summers for the Quincy 
Recreation Department as 
a counselor at the Happy 
Acres Day Camp for 
special needs youngsters. 




JAY OSGOOD 



Girls Basketball 



Quincy, North Girls Bow 



It was a losing week for 
the Quincy and North 
Quincy girls' basketball 
teams. 

North Quincy, in its 
only game of the week, 
lost to Weymouth, 47-40, 
dropping its record to 8-4 
(6-2 in the Old Colony 
League). 

Tricia Hughes led the 
North girls with 14 points. 

The Quincy girls, 
following their second win 



Swimming 



of the year, turned in an 
excellent effort against 
Falmouth but dropped a 
51-49 squeaker. 

Friday night Quincy 
proved no match for 
Bridgewater-Raynham's 
Old Colony League 
leaders (10-1) and lost, 73- 
25, dropping its record to 
2-8. 

Despite its record, 
Quincy has one of the 
league's top players in 



Kim Maisden, the number 
four scorer in the league 
with an average of nearly 
16 points a game. 

The North girls played 
Plymouth Tuesday, will 
play at Quincy Friday 
night and will be home to 
Taunton Monday. 

Quincy played at 
Weymouth Tuesday, will 
host North Quincy Friday 
and will play at Plymouth 
Monday at 5 p.m. 



North Wins Pair 



The North Quincy boys' 
swim team improved its 
record to 6-2 with victories 
last week over Durfee, 
105-78, and Cambridge 
Rindge & Latin, 109-69. 

North's 200 freestyle 
relay team of Dan Reilly, 



Erik Delorey, Barry 
Canavan and Michael 
Ploof set a school record. 

North's winners were 
Ploof, Reilly, Canavan, 
Delorey, Dennis Reichert, 
Jacky Lei and Jim 
Flaherty. 

Second place finishers 



were Alan Morse, Tom 
Meade, William Lee, Dan 
Bermongham and Nader 
Sid^hmed. 

Placing third were Scott 
Harris, Erik Oster, Shawn 
Burke, John Aliberti and 
Greg MacKay. 



NQHS Football Boosters 
Awards Banquet Feb. 2 



The North Quincy High 
School Football Boosters 
Club will hold its annual 
awards banquet Sunday, 

Feb. 2, at 3 p.m. at the 
Sons of Italy Hall on 



Bowling 



Quany Street. 

Several individual 
awards will be presented 
following dinner and a 
fomier North player will be 
the featured speaker. 



The North football team 
finished with an 8-2 record 
this past fall, the best in 
Ken McPhee's 10 years as 
coach. The Raiders ended 
the season with a 7-0 
victory over Quincy. 



Saluti, Grande Teams Tied 
For Top In St. John's League 



St. John's Holy Name 
Bowling League opened 
the second half with Aldo 
Saluti's team and John 
Grande's team tied for first 




United Way 



place with 8-0 records. 

The rest of the 
standings : Jim 

Mastrantonio, 6-2; Bud 
McAlhster, 2-6; Karl Von 
Hartenstein, 0-8; Joe 
Matarazzo, 0-8. 

Grande rolled a season's 
high single of 145 and 
Mastrantonio had 131. 
Grande also had the high 
three of 339 and 
Mastrantonio had 334. 

Grande's team rolled 



the high team single of 
414 and Mastrantonio had 
386. Grande also had the 
high team three of 1134 
and Mastrantonio 1098. 

The Top Ten: Grande, 
104.13; Bob Saluti, 102.89; 
Mastrantonio, 102.06; 
Dave Nolan, 96.11; Mike 
Hart, 95.85; Don Gilliland, 
95.60; Dan Dieso, 94.23; 
McAlhster, 93.54; Rich 
Warner, 93.41; Matarazzo, 
93.07. 



Thursdaj, Jaaiiary 30, 1992 Quincy Sun Page 15 




SEAN VERMETTE tries to get puck around Silver Lake goalie. 

(Quincy Sun photos by Tom Gorman) 



Hockey 



NORTH QUINCY goalie Dennis Ruggerie deflects Silver Lake shot. 

Heartbreak For Quincy 



North Keeps Title 
Hopes Alive By 
Tying Barnstable 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

The North Quincy 
hockey team kept its Old 
Colony League title and 
state tournament hopes 
alive by tying defending 
Div. 1 champion 
Barnstable, 3-3, last 
Satarday at Barnstable. 

The Raiders improved 
to 6-3-3 (4-2-3 in the 
league). 

North Quincy hosted 
Falmouth last night 
(Wednesday, will be home 
to Weymouth Saturday 
night at 7:50 at the Youth 
Arena and will play at 
Bridgewater-Raynham 
next Wednesday at 6 p.m. 
Tom Benson's Raiders 
trailed, 3-1, going into the 
last period at Barnstable 
but sophomore Jim 
Sapienza scored with an 
assist for Sean Vemette 



and John Gladu scored the 
tying goal with Sean 
Vernette and Bob 
Fitzpatrick assisting. 

Andrew Vermette had 
scored for North in the 
opening period with 
Sapienza and Fitzpatrick 
assisting. 

Junior Sean Connelly 
had another outstanding 
game in goal for the 
Raiders, making 36 saves. 
Barnstable's goalie had 29 
saves. 

Earlier in the week 
North Quincy blanked 
Silver Lake, 2-0, as goalie 
Dennis Ruggere had one of 
his best nights with 35 
saves in recording his 
second shutout. 

Chris McCallum scored 
his first goal of the season 
with 4:28 left in the game 



and Mike Christopherson 
scored an insurance goal 
with 19 seconds remaining. 

Steve O'Brien assisted 
on McCallum 's goal and 
Fitzpatrick and Andrew 
Vermette assisted on the 
final goal. 

"These were two good 
games for us and the boys 
played well in both," 
Benson said. "It is awfully 
tough playing in 
Barnstable, which has an 
open rink with no roof. 
Ruggere and Connelly are 
playing very well in goal 
and the defense continues 
to play well. I think we 
have a good chance at the 
state tournament and 
possibly winning the 
league title." 



Girls Hockey 
Clinic Feb. 7 



The Quincy Youth 
Hockey Girls Team will 
sponsor its fourth and final 
clinic for girls age 12 and 
under for beginners, 
novice, intermediate and 
advanced Feb. 7 at 6:40 
p.m. at Quincy Youth 
Arena. 

Registration begins at 
5:45 p.m. A parent or 
guardian (18 or older) 



must be present, girls must 
have a completed 
individual membership 
registration form required 
by USA Hockey, the fee is 
$5 and proper equipment, 
hockey skates, helmet 
with face shield, gloves 
and stick are required. 

For information call 
Mary EUen at 847-4246 or 
Jean at 288-7692. 



Always Buying 
New&Old 

TAJ 

COIN, 

STAMPS 

and 

SPORTS CARDS 

9 Maple St., 
Quincy, MA 02169 

479-1652 

QxTf^sto Line of StifipUes 



Admit 1 Free Refreshments 

NQHS Girls Basketball 

LAS VEGAS NITE 

Saturday, February 1, 7:30-12:00 

Montellos Hall, Quincy 

at Washington St. & Mass Ave. 

CASH PRIZES 



It was a heartbreaking 
week for the Quincy 
hockey team, which 
dropped two squeakers, 5-4 
to Old Colony League- 
leading Plymouth and 4-3 
to Falmouth. 

The twin losses dropped 
the Presidents to 4-5-4 (3- 
4-3 in the league) and may 
have ended their hopes of 
making the state 
tournament for the first 
time in many years. 

Quincy will play Silver 
Lake Saturday night at 
6:45 at Pembroke and will 
host Weymouth next 
Wednesday at 6:40 at the 
Youth Arena. 

Last Saturday against 



Falmouth the Presidents 
scored a goal in each 
period 

Dave Mullen scored in 
the first with Dan Morrell 
assisting, Jimmy Smith 
scored in the second 
period with Steve Barrett 
getting an assist and Steve 
Miller tallied in the final 
session with Jeff Craig and 
Jimmy Schatzl assisting. 

Freshman Mark Smith 
was in goal and turned in a 
fine performance. 
Falmouth scored twice in 
the first period and once 
again in each of the 
second and third. 

Earlier in the week 



Plymouth exploded for four 
goals in the opening period 
and scored the winning 
goal in the final period. 

Scott MacPherson 
scored twice in the first 
period and finished with 
his third hat trick of the 
year. He also had an assist 

Smith scored the other 
goal for the Presidents aixl 
Miller had an assist. 

MacPherson is having 
an outstanding season and 
has 17 goals and six 
assists for 23 points. 
Schatzl is the number two 
scorer with four goals and 
10 assists for 14 points. 



Youth Baseball Coach Vacancies 



Quincy Youth Baseball 
has several coaching 

positions available for the 
coming season. 



Anyone interested in 
coaching a team should 
call Joe Duffy at 472-3282 
or Mike Gallagher at 479- 
0784. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chanoe to earn 
extra money by building a 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 







SAVE UP TO $1 

BEFORE THE 
OPPORrUNIlY 
PASSES YOU BY! 

Why buy last year's leftovers wheal 
you can save up to $1000 oa a brmd new 
1992 Pdbris. Polaris has taken 
the chttt out of winter and put 
more fun back into it with big 
savisigs on Aeir 1992 IndyS. 
Take delivery (horn dealer 
stock) BER)EE 
FEBRUARY 29, 19921 
See your Pdbrfe dealer ^ 
d^sakaixvi savkigs on other 
moddb* We need trade'Uts! 
Act &st toe iauntastic saving^l 



III 




On xpfrtii^en4<>-^ 



1992 
MODEL 



MFG. SUGGESTED SALE 

RETAIL PRICE PRICE 



YOU 
SAVE 



Indy Sport 
Indy 650 



B3799 
66399 



63199 
65399 



5600 
51000 



NOT ALL MODELS AVAILABLE AT ALL DEALERS 



EFFECTIVE JANUARY 15 - FEBRUARY 29, 1992 



"ficiMv' 



^ CYCLE CENTER 



92-94 FRANKUN STREET 
QUINCY, MA 02169 



TEL: 617-847-0001 
FAX: 617-471-6692 



EklicNc It. 



■ Hix-s n* iikIikW iTciBhi. set-up and lax« • Offer c^J >' pMKipMtnt: Polaris IValen, • £1992 Polans InJuslne- 



>, LP 



Page It Qnincy Son Thursday, Janumry 30, 1992 



Track 



North Strong In 
Auerbach Meet 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

Noctb Quincy track 
made a strong showing in 
the eighth annual Red 
Auerbach Development 
Meet last Saturday at MIT. 

The meet pits the best 
freshmen and sophomores 
against each other in a 
two-day meet, which is 
directed by former North 
Quincy High coach Lou 
Tozsd. 

Sophomore Tony 
Licciaixii was the star of 
the meet, winning the 50- 
yard dash in a m.'et record 
5.6, also breaking the 
school record of 5.7 held 
by several runners. 

With less than 10 
minutes rest, Licciardi 
came back to anchor the 
mile relay team along with 
Josh WsJty, Jeremy Gott 
and Eric Torvi, which won 
in 3:49.5. 

Gott placed second in 
the 600 and Torvi placed 



sixth in the mile. 

On the girls' side, Erin 
Duggan placed fourth in 
the two-mile. 

"These young people 
have worked hard and now 
they know it pays off," 
said coach Peter Qirisom. 
"In a meet like this 
against their peers, a 
talented kid can really 
shine. Sprint coach Chris 
Morton did a flne job 
working with Licciardi and 
Gott." 

In the final dual meets 
of the season both squads 
lost to undefeated 
Falmouth. 

The girls lost, 67-24, to 
the number one ranked 
team in the state, to finish 
with a 4-2 record. 

North's Suzanne Lewis 
won the two-mile. 
Finishing second were 
Amy Wong in the 50, 
Cbrissy Herman in the 
hurdles, Jen Nutley in the 



300, Katie McNamara in 
the mile and Duggan in 
the two-mile. 

Placing third were Mel 
Gaziano in the 1000, 
Kristy Kabilian in the 
mile. Heather Rendle in 
the high jump and Trish 
McNamara in the shot. 

The boys lost, 63-28, to 
finish with a 3-3 mark, 
their first .500 season in 10 
years. 

Licciardi won the 50 in 
5.6, the best time in the 
Old Colony League this 
year. 

Taking second places 
were Gott in the 600, Torvi 
in the mile, Greg Buck in 
the two-mile, Mike Yee in 
the hurdles, John 
O'Donnell in the high 
jump and Mark Cucuzzo 
in the 50. 

Taking third places 
were Omar Hernandez in 
the 300, Ken Duncan in 
the two-mile and Scott 
Kohler in the shot put. 



Youth Hockey 



Johnson Widens Lead 



Johnson Motor Parts 
widened its Squirt House 
League lead to four points 
with a 6-2 victory over 
Granite Auto Electric. 

Scott Mattson had a hat 
trick and Nick Pizziferri, 
Chad Fitzpatrick and Jeff 
Glynn a goal each. 
Fitzpatrick had two assists 
and Glynn, Kevin CeUucci 
and Shawn Dooley one 
each. Andrew Nestor and 
Shawn Kabilian scored for 
Granite Auto and Kabilian 
had an assist. 

Doran & Horrigan 
edged Burgin Platner on 
goals by T.J. Wilson and 
Josh Silverman. Matt 
Gibbons had an assist. 
Mike Cunniff scored for 
Burgin and Didier Alther 
assisted. 

Green Environmental 
rolled over the Quincy 
Sun, 10-2, as Jesse Winter 
had a hat trick. Matt Holt 
two goals and Brian 
Quinn, Paul Burke, John 
Barron, Stephanie Allen 
and Matt Allen one each. 



Barron has four assists, 
Quiim and David Germain 
two each and Charlie 
Sorrento, Winter and Matt 
Allen one each. Steve 
McGonagle and Pat 
Grogan scored for the Sun 
and Mike Carioni and Tom 
Gaeta had assists. 

Dooley and Glynn had 
four goals each and Jon 
Paquette a hat trick as 
Johnson crushed Doran & 
Horrigan, 16-3. Mike 
Whalen, John Bertucci, 
Mattson, Billy Norris and 
Joe Prad had a goal 
apiece. Whalen and 
Pizziferri had three assists 
apiece, Dooley, Norris, 
Mattson and Chris Griffin 
two each and Paquette, 
Glynn and Jon Healy one 
each. Ryan Krueger, Chris 
Lumaghini and Steven 
Goff scored for Doran and 
Jeff Brophy and Silverman 
had assists. 

Burgin Platner and 
Green Environmental tied, 
4-4. Mike Sullivan and 
Alther had two goals each 



for Burgin. Alther and Dom 
Papile had two assists 
each and Ron Gamel and 
Sullivan one apiece. 
Germain, Burke, Sorrento 
and Stephanie Allen 
scored for Green. Sorrento 
had two assists and Kevin 
Mason, Frank Curreri, 
Germain and Allen one 
each. 

Granite Auto topped the 
Quincy Sun, 6-3, as Jim 
Sullivan had a hat trick. 
Matt O'Connell two goals 
and Kabilian, Sean 
McCusker and Kevin 
Regan one each. 
McCusker had two assists 
and Kabilian, Regan and 
Brian Nolan one each. 
Steve Ford had two goals 
and Joe Ardagna one for 
the Sun and Ford and Sean 
Garvey had assists. 

The standings: Johnson 
Motor Parts, 10-3-1; Doran 
& Horrigan, 8-5-1; Green, 
6-6-2; Quincy Sun, 6-6-2; 
Burgin Platner, 5-7-2; 
Granite Auto Electric, 3- 
11-0. 



Panthers, Cheerleaders 
Receive Awards At Dinner 



Colonial On Roll 



Colonial Federal 
increased its Pee Wee 
House League lead to nine 
points with a 4-3 victory 
over New England Deli. 

Mike Martin, Chris 
Knox, Scott Shepherd and 
Bill Graney scored a goal 
each and Chris O'Donnell, 
Shepherd, Knox and Jon 
Haddad had assists. Tim 
Sheehan had two goals 
and Chris Geary one for 



Deli and Matt 
McDonough, Rich Delisle 
and David Rowell had 
assists. 

Marina Bay Taxi 
topped Keohane's, 7-5, as 
Bill Barron had a hat trick, 
Paul Princiotto two goals 
and Matt Radzevich and 
Mark Glynn one eacti. 
Radzevich had three 
assists, Glynn two and 
Barron, Tim Lewis and 



Chris Dimattia one each. 
Brian Beaton and Mike 
Balducci had two goals 
each and Mike Gallagher 
one for Keohane's. 
Balducci had two assists 
and Beaton and Lucas 
Chenette one each. 

The standings: Colonial 
Federal, 10-1-3; Marina 
Bay Taxi, 7-7-0; 
Keohane's, 6-7-1; N.E. 
Deli, 2-10-2. 



Brillo On Westfield State Grid Team 



Timothy Brillo of 
Quincy was a member of 

the Westfield State 
College football team this 



past fall. 

Westfield finished with 
a 4-6 record under second- 
year coach Steve Marino. 



Brillo is a senior 
movement science major. 
He is the son of Frank and 
Maureen Brillo of 15 Main 
Sl 



The Quincy Point 
Panthers, lunnersup in the 
Quincy Youth Football 
League, recently held their 
annual Awards Night at 
the Fore River Clubhouse 
with more than 200 family 
members attending. 

Trophies were presented 
to the 32-man football 
squad and 22 members of 
the cheerleading squad. 

The following 

individual trophies were 
awarded: 

Players Trophy (MVP), 
Sean Joyce; Coaches 
Trophy, Chris McArdle; 
Most Improved Player, 
John Michael Lopriore; 
12th Player Award, Joe 
Donahue; Memorial Award 
(Panther of the Year), 
David Gunther. 

The following junior 
varsity awards were 
presented: 

Players Award, Brad 
Smith; Coaches Award, 
Eric Oliva; Most 
Improved, Mark Joyce; 
i2th Player, Jack Daley. 

QYFL Commissioner 
Tom Ford presented 
league all-star trophies to 
Joyce, McArdle, Gunther, 
Jeff Russell, Kurt 
Palluccio and Lopriore. 

Other members of 
the football squad, which 



finished with a solid 
performance in the 
championship game, won 
by the Manets, 20-14, 
included A.J. Gilmore, 
Ross Magnoli, Bobby 
Walsh, Brian Miller, Mark 
Miller, Jonathan Brillo, 
Tom Daley, Alex 
Robertson, Mike Martin, 
Mark Doyle, Nick Reed, 
John Tandy, Josh 
Maloney, Ben Sharkey, 
Stan Westland, Richard 
Garcia, Carmen 

Lorenzano, Joe Mariano, 
Todd SuUivan, Joe Walsh, 
and Rick McCray. Steve 
McMahon and Michael 
Dunlea were equipment 
managers. 

The following 

cheerleader awards were 
presented: 

Most Spirited, Kathie 
Ford; Most Dedicated 
(Coaches Trophy), Lisa 
Robertson; Most Improved, 
Leah Robertson. 

Special recognition was 
also given to three-year 
member Angela Martinson. 

QYFL cheerleading all- 
star awards went to Ford, 
Susan Deskins and 
Melissa Link. 

The Panther 

cheerleaders, one-point 
runnerups in the QYFL 
cheer competition, entered 



the Kaepa Cheer-Off 
Invitation^ at Pope John 
High School and placed 
first in the junior high 
division and third in the 
overall standings, which 
included high school 
teams from Massachusetts, 
Connecticut and New 
Hampshire. 

Eleven members were 
presented first-place 
ribbons and Kathie Ford 
and Olivia Chamberland 
were selected Kaepa all- 
stars and received plaques. 
Other members of the 
varsity cheerleading squad 
were Christine Caporale, 
Melissa Christopher, Beth 
Crowley, Tricia Oliva and 
Carrie Burke. 

Junior varsity members 
were Melissa DeBonis, 
Mandi Barter, Natalie 
DiBona, Stacy Gilmore, 
Kara McSweeney, 
Nicolette Martinson, 
Danielle Robertson, 
Patricia Kelly, Jane 
Bagen, Bonnie Ford and 
Nicole DeMaggio. 

Staff members were 
Tom Donovan, Mike 
Dunlea, Jack Kilrain, Bill 
Myers, Patty Myers, Anita 
Curran, Kara Bagen, 
Andrea Roche, Beth 
Barter and Christine 
Curran. 



Squirt B's Advance To Finals 



Quincy's Squirt B 
hockey team advanced to 
the finals of the Cj^ Cod 
Coca-Cola Invitational 
Tournament at the Gallo 
Rink in Boume. 

Quincy defeated West 
Bay, N.Y., 9-1, in its 
opening game as Mike 
Welch had a hat trick. 
Spike Bertucci and John 
Barron two goals apiece 
and Steve Ford and Kevin 
Regan one each. Ryan 



Barrett and Chad 
Fitzpatrick had two assists 
each and Regan, Barron 
and Paul Markarian one 
apiece. 

In game two Quincy 
defeated Cape Cod Canal, 
5-1, on goals by Regan, 
Barron, Sean Haidul, 
Patrick Kenney and Joe 
Ardagna. Barrett had two 
assists and Mike Welch 
and Jim Sullivan one each. 

Quincy advanced to the 



finals with a 6-0 victory 
over South Shore 
Seahawks. 

Fitzpatrick had a hat 
trick and Bertucci, 
Sullivan and Barrett a goal 
each. Barron, Regan and 
Barrett had two assists 
apiece and Fitzpatrick and 
Kenney one each. 

Markarian, Ford, Brian 
Nolan, Billy Griffin and 
Sean Slattery came up 
with key defensive plays. 



Squirt C's Win 9th 



Quincy's Squirt C 
hockey team improved its 
record to 9-0-1 with a big 
6-1 victory over Canton in 
the first of a series of state 
playdown games. 

Joe Vallontini scored in 
the first period with Mike 



Hastings assisting. Jeff 
Glynn scored in the second 
period unassisted and 
Quincy added four goals in 
the final period. 

Hastings, Ron Gamel, 
Joshua Silverman and 
Kevin Cellucci scored the 
goals and Cellucci, 



Hastings, Brian Erlich, 
Glynn and Matt O'Connell 
had assists. 

Paul Burke, making his 
debut in goal filling in for 
an ailing John Sullivan, 
was outstanding and Nick 
Piziferri played strong 
defense. 



Purdy's, Samoset Lydon Win 



Purdy's Ice Cream 
rolled over the Paul Harold 
Club, 9-2, in Mite House 
League action. 

John Chevalier, John 
Segalla and Chris Murphy 
scored two goals apiece 
and Joe Cox, Joe 
Cunningham and Brian 
Lewis one each. 
Cunningham bad two 
assists and Ken Reichel, 
Steve Segalla and 
Chevalier one each. 
Andrew Ross and Jordan 



Virtue scored for Harold 
and Ryan Graeber had an 
assist. 

Samoset Pharmacy 
defeated Balducci 's, 6-1, 
as Ryan Doyle had two 
goals and Scott Cawley, 
Ryan Barry, Matt Kenney 
and Mark Gibbons one 
apiece. John Alves had 
two assists and Doyle, 
Billy McKeon and Barry 
one each. Ryan Conley 
scored for Balducci 's and 
Brendan Conley and Bruce 



Maggio had assists. 

Lydon-Russell topped 
Neponset Valley Survey, 
6-2, with Bryan Petit 
scoring twice and Ryan 
Donahue, Mark Giese, 
Graham McShane and 
Matt Minicucci once each. 
Minicucci, McShane, 
Mike Maloney and Steve 
Wilkins had assists. Matt 
Conso scored both 
Neponset Valley goals and 
Tom Piscatelli assisted on 
each. 




In 1952, Bill Mosienko of the hockey team thp rhimo^ di»«u u — "T^ 
scored an amazing three goals in justln^JondJ!"'^^" "*"* "^*'''' 



Thursday, January 30, 1992 Quincy Sun Page 17 



Michael 

Michael Sopp of 
Quincy has been named to 
the faU trimester honor roll 
at Johnson & Wales 
University, Providence, 

LEGAL NOTICES 

CX)MMONWEALTHOF 
MASSACHUSETTS THE 

TRIAL COUFTT THE 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT 

NORFOLK DIVISION 

DOCKET NO. 92P0001E1 

Estate of UWRENCE G. 

HEGNER late of 

MELBOURNE, FLORIDA 

having an estate in tlie 

County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that JANE A. HICKEY of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
executrix named in the will 
without surety on the 
bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 26, 
1992. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-first 
day of January one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-two. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGMES 
REGBTER Of PROBATE 

1/30/92 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS THE 

TRIAL COURT THE 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT 

NORFOLK DIVISION 

DOCKET NO. 92P0095E1 

Estate of ETHEL F. 

DeCOSTE late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 

presented in the above- 

captioned matter praying 

that the last will of said 

decedent be proved and 

allowed and that 

DEBORAH A. CORCAINE 

of BRAINTREE in the 

County of NORFOLK be 

appointed executrix 

named in the will without 

surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 26, 
1992. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) In accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-first 
day of January one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-two. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REOBTER OF PROBATE 
1/30/92 



Sopp Named To Honor Roll 

j(j commendation. 

Students must earn a 
cumulative grade point 
average of 3.40 or above to 
receive Dean's List 



Sopp. a resident of 49 
Vercbild St., is majoring in 
hotel-restaurant 
management. 



LEGAL NOTICES 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS THE 

TT^IAL COURT THE 
PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT 
NORFOLK DIVISION 
DOCKET NO. 92P0060E1 
Estate of JOSEPH W. 
DEVONSHIRE late of 
QUINCY In the County of 
NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that HELEN G. 
DEVONSHIRE of QUINCY 
in the County of NORFOLK 
be appointed executrix 
named in the will without 
surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 26, 
1992. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such otiier time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-first 
day of January one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-two. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REG6TER OF PROBATE 

1/30/92 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS THE 

TRIAL COURT THE 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT 

NORFOLK DIVISION 

DOCKET NO. 91 P2924E1 

Estate of VICTOR J. 

FERRIS late of QUINCY In 

the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 

presented in the above- 

captioned matter praying 

that the last will of said 

decedent be proved and 

allowed and that PAULINE 

S. FERRIS of QUINCY in 

the County of NORFOLK 

be appointed executrix 

named in the will without 

surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 19, 
1992. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the fourteenth 
day of January one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-two. 

THOMAS PATRKK HUGHES 
RBMSTER OF PROBATE 

1/30/92 



LEGAL NOTICES 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS THE 

TRIAL COURT THE 
PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT 
NORFOLK DIVISION 
DOCKET NO. 91 P2916E1 
Estate of FRANCES E. 
BARTLEY late of QUINCY 
In the County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 
A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that MARION 
CHRISTO of SOMERVILLE 
in the County of 
MIDDLESEX be appointed 
executrix named in the will 
without surety on the 
bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 19, 
1992. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within tfiirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
witii Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the fourteenth 
day of January one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-two. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGSTER OF PROBATE 

1/30/92 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS THE 

TRIAL COURT THE 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT 

NORFOLK DIVISION 

DOCKET NO. 92P0096E1 

Estate of BLANCHE C. 

PERSON late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that WILLIAM 
A. FERSON of DUXBURY 
in the County of 
PLYMOUTH be appointed 
executor named in the will 
without surety on the 
bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 26, 
1992. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, wrthin tiiirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
witii Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-first 
day of January one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-two. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REQBTER OF PROBATE 

1/30/92 



LEGAL NOTICES 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS THE 
TRIAL COURT THE 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT 
NORFOLK DIVISION 
DOCKET NO. 92P0042E1 
Estate of DORA SCRIBI 
late of QUINCY In the 
County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 
A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that VINCENT 
R. SCRIBI of QUINCY in 
the County of NORFOLK 
be appointed executor 
named in the will without 
surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 26, 
1992. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving tiie specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such otiier time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-first 
day of January one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-two. 

THOMAS PATRKK HUGHES 
REQBTER OF PROBATE 

1/30/92 



COMM0^IWEALTH0F 
MASSACHUSETTS THE 

TRIAL COURT THE 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT 

NORFOLK DIVISION 

DOCKET NO.92P0034E1 

Estate of JOSEPH M. 

NAPOLITANO late of 

QUINCY In the County of 

NORFOLK 

NOTICE 
A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will and codicil 
of said decedent be 
proved and allowed and 
that PHILIP NAPOLITANO 
of QUINCY in the County 
of NORFOLK and JOSEPH 
P. CUTRUFO of HANOVER 
in the County of 
PLYMOUTH and HENRY T. 
DUNKER of WEYMOUTH in 
the County of NORFOLK 
be appointed executors 
named in the will without 
surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 26, 
1992. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such otiier time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
witii Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-first 
day of January one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-two. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGBTER OF PROBATE 

1/30/92 



LEGAL NOTICES 



CITY OF QUINCY 
INCOUfJCIL 



ORDER NO. 24 
ORDERED: 



January 21, 1992 



Be it ordained by tiie City Council of the City of Quincy that 
the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1 976, as 
amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 12. Motor Vehicles and Traffic. Article IV. 
Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 69A. Requiring 
designated parking space-disabled Veterans and 
Handicapped persons. Add the following: 

"Murdock Avenue. On tiie northerly sWe starting at a point 

1 53 feet from AmokJ Street for a distance of 20 feet in a 

westerly direction,' (12 Murdock Avenue) 

A True Copy 

ATTEST: John M. Gillis 

Clerk of Council 



1/30/92 



ORDER NO. 25 
ORDERED: 



CfTY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



January 21, 1992 



Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy as 
follows: 

That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1976, 
as amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 12. Motor Vehicles and Traffic. Article IV. 
Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 58. Parking 
prohibited on certain streets at all times. Add the following: 

"Edison Park. On the south side, 120 feet in an easterly 
direction from the easterly skJeline of Washington Street." 

A True Copy 
ATTEST: John M. Gillis 
Clerk of Council 



1/30/92 



ORDER NO. 26 
ORDERED: 



CriY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



January 21, 1992 



Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy as 
follows: 

That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1976, 
as amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 12. Motor Vehicles and Traffic. Article IV. 
Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 60. TWO HOUR 
PARKING between 8:00 A.M. and 6K)0 P.M. on certain 
streets, exception. 

Add the following: 

"Marlboro Street. On the south side between Beach Street 
and Bm Avenue." 

A True Copy 

ATTEST: John M. Gillis 

Clerk of Council 



1/30/92 



ORDER NO. 26A 
ORDERED: 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



January 21, 1992 



Be it ordained by the City Council of tiie City of Quincy as 
follows: 

That tiie Revised Ordinances of tiie City of Quincy, 1976, 
as amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 12. Motor Vehicles and Traffic. Article IV. 
Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 58. Parking 
prohibited on certain streets at all times. Add the following: 

"Marlboro Street. On the northerly side between Beach 
Street and Elm Ave." 

A True Copy 
ATTEST: John M. Gillis 
Clerk of Council 
1/30/92 



WANTED 

FREE LANCE 
PHOTOGRAPHER 

For News Photo Assignments 

The Quincy Sun 

1372 Hancock St. 

Quincy, MA 

471-3100 



Page 18 Qolncy Sun Thursday, January 30, 1992 

fr" ■■ LEGAL NOTICES 



ORDER NO. 27 
ORDERED: 



crrvoFQuiNcv 

IN COUNCIL 



January 21, 1992 



Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy as 
follows: 

That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1976, 
as amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 12. Motor Vehicles and Traffic. Article V. One 
Way Street. Add the following: 

Section 89A. Do Not Enter Monday thru Friday 4:00 P.M. 
to 6:00 P.M. 

"Piermont Street at the intersection of Harvard Street." 

A True Copy 
ATTEST: John M. Gillis 
Clerk of Council 
1/30/92 



ORDER NO. 27A 
ORDERED: 



CrrV OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



January 21, 1992 



In Accordance with the provisions of Chapter 89, Section 
9, of the General Laws the following streets are 
designated as Stop Streets at the intersection and in the 
direction indicated: 



Street Name 
Piermont Street 



1/30/92 



ORDER NO. 28 
ORDERED: 



Intersection 
Sherman Street 



Direction 
Southbound 



A True Copy 

ATTEST: John M. Gillis 

Clerk of Council 



CfTY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



January 21, 1992 



Be tt ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy as 
follows: 

That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1976, 
as amended, be further amerxied as follows: 

In Chapter 12. Motor Vehicles and Traffic. Article IV. 
Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 58. Parking 
prohibited on certain streets at all times. Add the following: 

"West Squantum Street on the southerly sWe from 

Amesbury Street to a point 265 feet in an easterly 

direction. 

A True Copy 
ATTEST: John M. Gillis 
Clerk of Council 
1/30/92 



CrTY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



ORDER NO. 28A 
ORDERED: 



January 21, 1992 



Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy as 
follows: 

That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1976, 
as amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 12. Motor Vehicles and Traffic. Article IV. 
Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 59. ONE HOUR 
PARKING on certain streets: exception. Strike out the 
following: 

"West Squantum Street on the southerly side from 

Amesbury Street to a point 265 feet in an easterly 

direction." 

A True Copy 
ATTEST: John M. Gillis 
Clerk of Council 
1/30/92 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



ORDER NO. 30 
ORDERED: 



January 21. 1992 



Be rt ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy as 
follows: 

That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1976, 
as amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 12. Motor Vehicles and Traffic. Article IV. 
Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 58. Parking 
prohibited on certain streets at all times. Add the following: 

"Palmer Street. On the westerly side beginning at a point 

250 feet southerly of the southerly line of Utica Street for a 

distance of 400 feet." 

A True Copy 

ATTEST: John M. Gillis 

Clerk of Council 

1/30/92 



Cafeteria Plan Advisors 
Lease Presidents Place Space 



Cafeteria Plan 

Advisors, retirement and 
health care consultants, 
have leased 1,355 square 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chanct to earn 
•xtra money by building a 
Quincy Sun home dellvtry 
route. 

Telephont: 471-3100 



feet of space at Presidents 
Place, a 350,000-square- 
foot office complex on 
Hancock St. in Quincy 
Center. 

Cushman and 

Wakefield brokers Tom 
Powers and Paul Simard 
represented Cafeteria Plan 
Advisors in the lease 
agreement. 



LEGAL NOTICES 



CfTY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



ORDER NO. 31 
ORDERED: 



January 21, 1992 



Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy as 
follows: 

That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1976, 
as amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 12. Motor Vehicles and Traffic. Article IV. 
Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 69A. Requiring 
designated parking space-disabled Veterans and 
Handicapped persons. Strike out the following: 

"Appleton Street. On the northerly skJe beginning at a 

point twenty (20) feet easterly of East Squantum Street in 

an easterly direction for twenty feet (20)." (25 Appleton 

Street) 

A True Copy 

ATTEST: John M. Gillis 

Clerk of Council 

1/30/92 



CFTY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



ORDER NO. 32 
ORDERED: 



January 21, 1992 



Be rt ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy as 
follows: 

That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1976, 
as amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 12. Motor Vehicles and Traffic. Article IV. 
Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 58. Parking 
prohibited on certain streets at all times. Add the following: 

"Harvard Street. On the east skJe 50 feet south in from 

West Squantum Street and on the west skJe 100 feet 

south of West Squantum Street 

A Tme Copy 

ATTEST: John M. Gillis 

Clerk of Council 



1/30/92 



ORDER NO. 32A 
ORDERED: 



CITY OF QUINCY 
INCOUI^IL 



January 21, 1992 



Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy as 
follows: 

That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1976, 
as amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 12. Motor Vehicles and Traffic. Article IV. 
Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 58. Parking 
prohibited on certain streets at all times. Add the following: 

"Evans Street. Both skJes 50 feet in from West Squantum 
Street north of West Squantum Street." 

A True Copy 

ATTEST: John M. Gillis 

Clerk of Council 



1/30/92 



ORDER NO. 32B 
ORDERED: 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



January 21, 1992 



Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy as 
follows: 

That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1976, 
as amerxjed, be further amended £is follows: 

In Chapter 12. Motor Vehicles and Traffic. Article IV. 
Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 58. Parking 
prohibited on certain streets at all times. Add the following: 

"West Squantum Street. Both skJes 1 00 feet west of 
Han/ard Street and 1 00 east of Harvard Street." 

A True Copy 
ATTEST: John M. Gillis 
Clerk of Council 
1/30/92 



Lance Connolly In 
'Who's Who Students' 



Lance W. Connolly, son 
of Linda A. Connolly of 
Freeman St., North 
Quincy, and Paul M. 
Connolly of Standish St., 
Weymouth, will be 
included in the 1992 
edition of "Who's Who 
Among Students in 
American Universities and 
Colleges." 

Connolly is a senior 
majoring in politics at 



Saint Anselm College in 
Manchester, New 
Hampshire. 

Saint Anselm 

nominating committees 
and editors of the annual 
directory have included 
Connolly based on his 
academic achievement, 
leadership in 

extracurricular activities 
and potential for continued 
success. 



LEGAL NOTICES 



ORDER NO. 33 
ORDERED: 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



January 21,1 992 



Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy as 
follows: 

That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1 976, 
as amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 12. Motor Vehicles and Traffic. Article IV. 
Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 69A. Requiring 
designated parking space-disabled Veterans and 
Handicapped persons. Add the following: 

"Dysart Street. On the northerly side at a point beginning 

325 feet in from Scammell Street for a distance of 20 feet 

in a westerly direction." (76 Dysart Street) 

A True Copy 

ATTEST: John M. Gillis 

Clerk of Council 



1/30/92 



ORDER NO. 34 
ORDERED: 



CfTY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



January 21, 1992 



Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy as 
follows: 

That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1976, 
as amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 12. Motor Vehicles and Traffic. Article IV. 
Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 69A. Requiring 
designated parking space-disabled Veterans and 
Handicapped persons. Add the foltowing: 

"Butler Road. On the northerly side starting at a point 85 

feet from So. Artery for a distance of 20 feet in a westerly 

direction." (122 Butler Road) 

A True Copy 
ATTEST: John M. Gillis 
Clerk of Council 
1/30/92 



ORDER NO. 36 
ORDERED: 



CriY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



January 21 , 1 992 



Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy as 
follows: 

That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1976, 
as amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 12. Motor Vehicles and Traffic. Article IV. 
Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 69A. Requiring 
designated parking space-disabled Veterans and 
Handicapped persons. Add the following: 

"Gay Street. On the southerly side beginning at a point 

140 feet in from Summer Street for a distance of 20 feet in 

a westerly direction." 

A True Copy 

ATTEST: John M. Gillis 

Clerk of Council 
1/30/92 



ORDER NO. 39 
ORDERED: 



CfTY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



January 21, 1992 



In Accordance with the provisions of Chapter 89, Section 
9, of the General Laws the following streets are 
designated as Stop Streets at the intersection and in the 
direction indk:ated: 



Street Name 
Goddard St 



Intersection 
IrKJependence Ave 



Direction 

East and West 

Bound 



1/30/92 



A True Copy 

ATTEST: John M. Gillis 

Clerk of Council 



Thnrsday, January 30, 1992 Qulncy Sun Page 19 




EVERYBODrS IIMRKETPUCE 



■UMMAUUUUUd 



HALLS FOR RENT 

N«wly Renovated 
Sons of Italy Social Center 
Golden Lion Suite 
Capacity - 300 
Venetian Room 
Capacity - 140 
Call 472-! 



TF 



HALL FOR RENT 

North OuJncy K of C 

Building 

5 Hollis Avenue 

For information please call 

32S-5967 



HALL FOR HIRE 

Weddings, Showers. 

Meetings. Banquets 

Elks Home. 440 E Squantum St 

Ouin£y 

472-2223 

TF 



HALL FOR RENT 

(completely remodeled) 

Hougtis Neck Post No 380, 

American Legion. 1116 Sea St 

479-6149 

TF 



SHOOTERS PUB 
FOR RENT 

Available for any occasion. A 
setting reminiscent of an Old 
English Pub. 4 antique Bil- 
liaid tables, dart boards. For 
more information call 

472-0771 1/30 



HALL FOR RENT 

Fumace Brook Golf Club. 
Small groups, 50-90. 
Contact Mai Holm 

472-8466 2^ 



LEGAL NOTICE 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS THE 
TRIAL COURT THE 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT 
NORFOLK DIVISION 
DOCKET NO.92P0009A1 
Estate of PHYLLIS M. 
SEGERSTEDT late of 
QUINCY In the County of 
NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that HARRY P. 
SEGERSTEDT of QUINCY 
in the County of NORFOLK 
be appointed administrator 
of said estate with surety 
on the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court 
at Dedham on or before 
10:00 in the forenoon on 
February 26, 1992. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-first 
<lay of January one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-two. 

'THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
AEQBTER OF PROBATE 

1/30/92 



WANTED 



WANTED TO BUY 

Old woodworking tools, planes, 
chisels, surplus hand tools; all 
trades. Precision machinist tools. 
Also wanted: oU Ixioks, paintings, 
frames, antiques, estate kXs. 

1-617-558-3839 -^ 



WANTED: 

Actors for TV Commer- 
cials; movie extras and 
game show contestants. 
Many needed. Call 1 -805- 
682-7555 ext.T-3806. 3/i» 



HELP WANTED 

AIRUNES NOW HIRING 

Travel Agents, Flight At- 
tendants Mechanics, etc. 
Entry level and up. Sala- 
ries to $1 05K. Call 1 -805- 
682-7555 ext.A-3654.an» 



TRAVEL FREE or on a 

shoestring. Air couriers 
needed - also overseas 
and cruiseship help 
wanted. Call 1-805-682- 
7555 Ext. F-3844. 



3/1B 



POSTAL JOBS 
AVAILABLE! 

Many positions. Great 
benefits. Call 1-805- 
682-7555 ext. P-4029 



3/1 » 



GOVERNMENT JOBS 

NOW HIRING in your 
area. $16,000-$68,000. 
Call 1-805-682-7555 ext. 
J-3865 for current federal 

list. 3/19 



TELEPHONE 
COMPANY JOBS 

Starts $7.80-$15.75/hr, your 
area. Men and women needed. 
No experience necessary. For 
Information call 1-900-740- 
4761. ext. 4143 6 am-8 am - 7 
days - $12.95 fee 2/6 



FORflENT 



OFFICE FOR RENT 

Quincy Insurance Agency 
has 250 sq. ft. including 
utilities $250 a month. Call 
Carol between 9 am and 5 
pm at 617-770-4700 2«o 



PERSONALS 



ST. JUDE'S NOVENA 

May the Sacred Heart of Jesus 
be adored, glorified, loved and 
preserved throughout the worid 
now and forever. Sacred Heart 
of Jesus, pray for us. St. Jude, 
helper of the hopeless, pray for 
us. St. Jude, woil^er of miracles, 
pray for us. Say this prayer 9 
times a day for nine consecutive 
days without mentioning the 
favor. On the eighth day your 
favor will be granted, no matter 
how unobtainable it seemed. 
Publication of this prayer must 
be promised. SMP 1/30 



Sun 

Classified 

Ads 

Get 

Results 



SERVICES 



Caprpet & Upholstery 

Cleaning by JK&K 

'Winter Speciar 
25% OFF 
with this Ad 

• Dry Foam Method 

• Better than Steam 

• Leaves No Residue 

• No Shrinking 

• Fully INsured 
Call 471-6319 1/30 

iPaintin£ & 
'Wattcovering 

Sy'Ed'Barr 
The lugfiest quality worfi 
performed TuatUf at tea- 
sonaBU rates, fru esti- 
mates, referrences avail- 
a6(e, over 18 years t?(pe- 
rience. 

Call479-3284 
today 3/5 

RUBBISH REMOVAL 

Complete cleanouts - attics- 
cellars-garages-yards. Re- 
moval of appliances-boilers- 
oil tanks-water heaters. Fast 
service-reasonable 

472- 0877 2/6 

• Tar and Gravel 

• Shingles 
•Gutters 
•Repairs 

HEALY ROOFERS 

'Flat Roof Specialists' 
Jim Healv 471-2123 4/9 

FOR SALE 

REPOSSESSED & IRS 
FORECLOSED HOMES 

available at below market 
value. Fantastic savings. You 
repair. Also S&L bailout prop- 
erties. Call 1-805-682-7555 
ext. H-6705 for repo list your 
area. 3/19 




SERVICES 




EXPERT 

lAMP RIPAIR 

t Kwwmc 



SERVICES 



SERVICES 



SEIZED CARS 

trucks, boats, 4 wheelers, 
motortiomes, by FBI, IRS, 
DEA. Available your area 
now. Call 1-805-682-7555 
ext. C-6368 



3/10 



(^ 



United W^y 

It brings oul th» bfsl in lU of us. 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO. 

472-2177 

755 SOUTHERN ARTERY 
QUINCY TF 



TAX RETURNS 
Very Very Low Rates 

Richard C. McDonough, EA 
Professional Service In 

Your Home 
20 Years Experience 
472-2694 41 e 



ROOFS AND ADDITIONS 
Dormers, Decks, Bath- 
rooms, Quincy and So. 
Shore area. Quality work, 
good prices. Jordan Const. 
1-800-649-6720 ?/6 

LEGAL NOTICE 



COI^MONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 
PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT 
Norfolk, ss. 

91 P0993-E1 

To all persons 
interested in the estate of 
Karin T. Wadsworth late of 
Quincy in said County, 
deceased, testate. 

A petition has been 
presented to said Court for 
license to sell - at private 
sale - certain real estate 
of said deceased, which is 
situated in Quincy, in said 
County, in accordance 
with the rules set out in 
said petition. 

If you desire to object 
thereto you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham before 
ten o'clock in the forenoon 
on February 5, 1992, the 
return day of this citation. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court, this 
Feb. 5, 1992. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGISTER 

1/16,23,30/92 



LARRY'S 
HOME REPAIR 

• Carpenters 
e Painters 

• Decorators 
General Contractor 
20 Years Experience 
Licensed • Insured 
Interior-Exterior Painting 
Scroll Ceiling 
All Home Repairs 
Small or Large 

659-7471 328-8735 

TF 

DIGITAL DJ 

Let us entertain you. Mu- 
sic for ail ages, includes 
free video. 

Call PJ Lowe 
773-9823 2/20 



UCENSED #69301 
DAY CARE 

In Quincy. Mother of one, 
EMT, BS in Elementary 
Education will care for your 
child. 

773-9823 2/13 



E.J. TANTILLO 

Plumbing & Heating 

Boilers, Water Heaters, 

Gas Piping, 

Master Lie. #9904. Insured 

479-5667 3/12 

GENERAL CARPENTRY 

Porches, decks, stairs, new 
work or repairs. Roof 
shingles, skle wall shingles, 
windows, etc. No job too 
small. 

Mike 471 -1379 2/13 

iNSTRUCTIONI 

WORD PRO CESSING IS IN 

CEMANDl LEARN MORE 

QUICKLY AND THOROUGHLY 

WITH PRIVATE INSTRUCTIONS: 

CALL WORD CONNECTIONS 

(617)849-8002 

Leave Message 

All calls promptly returned 1/30 

MISCELLANEOUS 



A & T Vacuum 

• 14.95 Overhaul Special 
on any vacuum 

• Sewing machine repairing 

• VCR repairing and cleaning 

• Sharpening 

(sciisort, knivM, etc ) 

• Oreck XL Vacuums 

• Electrolux w/power nozzle 

$150 
• Used Vacuum's $45 & up 
27 Beale St. 
Wollaston 
479-S06C 



Your South Short 

HtadqiMrlers 

For 



Appliance 
Service 

ON ALL 
MAJOR 
APPLIANCES 



HANCOCK TIRE 

& APPLIANCE 

115 Franklin SI, So Quincy 

4/2-1710 

TF 




WALLPAPERING 

Frank Montani 
Highest Quality Workmanship 
and Service. Neat, clean, 
professiionai; reasonable 
ates; ceilings painted. Please 
leave message 698-9472 2/6 



SULLIVAN Landscape 
& Tree Service 

Pruning, Removals, brush 
chipping, Bobcat service. Fully 
Insured. Reasonable rates. 

472-3595 4«3 



BINGO 

North Quincy K of C 

W«d., 7 pm • Hard Cards 

PrIzeo-Snacks 

Relaxed Atmoaphara 

Rafraahmanta. Partcing 

Call 328-9822 2/13 



CUSTOM WINDOW 
TREATMENTS 

by experienced profes- 
sional. Very reasonable 
rates. 
Please Call 471-3932 

1/30 



HOUSECLEANING 
and WINDOW CLEANING 

on Wednesdays and 
Saturdays. Call 
773-6816 nights 1/30 




MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN, 1372 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169 
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment must accompany order. 



INDEX 



a Sarvlcei 

D For Sal* 

O Auto* 

a Boats 

a For Rent 

D Wanted 

a Help Wanted 

O Pets, Livestock 

a Lost and Found 

a Real Estate For Sale 

O Real Estate Wanted 

a Miscellaneous 

a Work Wanted 

a Antiques 

a Coins A Stamps 

Rest Homes 

a Instruction 

Day Care 

a Personal 

a Electrical A Appliances 



RATES 
IWECK 
S-7 WEEKS 

••12 WEEKS 

19 WEEKS 

OR MORE 



a $5.00 for on* Inaartlon, up to 20 word*, 1 0* for each additional word. 
D $4.60 per Insertion up to 20 words for 3-7 1 nsertlons of the sarrte ad, 

109 each addlttonal word. 
D $4.30 per Insertion up to 20 words for 8-12 insertions ofthosamead, 

10* more each additional word. 
D $4.00 per Insertion up to 20 words for 13 or more insertions of the 

same ad, 10* each additional word. 



D Enclosed is $ — 
in The Quincy Sun 



.for the following ad to run 



.weeks 



COPY:. 



NO RCniND WIU K MADE AT THIS CONTRACT HAlt IN THE EVENT OF CANCEUATION. 
OCAOUNC: MONDAY, ■.-00 PM. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR PHONE NUMBER IN AD. 



Page 20 Quincy San Thursday, January 30, 1W2 



One-Day Ski Trip To Gunstock 



The Quincy Recreation 
Department will sponsor a 
one-day ski trip to 
Gunstock Ski area in 
Gilford, New Hampshire, 
Sunday, Feb. 9. 

The trip is open to all 
Quincy residents age 10 
through adult. Those under 
10 may attend if 
accompanied by an adult. 



The fee for round trip 
coach bush and all-day life 
ticket is $32 for 12 and 
under and $40 for those 13 
and older. Reduced rates 
for rental equipment and 
optional lessons can also 
be arranged. 

The trip will be 
supervised by Quincy 
Recreation Department 



Winter Rates 25% OFF Carpet and 

Upholstery Cleaning Without Steam 

by JK&K 

Joseph Pulera Proprietor 

Only Dry Foam 
TouchesThe Carpet ... Result? 



• Beautiful Cleaning 

• Fast Drying 

• No Shrinking or Mildew 

• Insured 

• Free Quotes by Phone 



Call 471-6319 



staff. 

Registration will be 
held in the Recreation 
Office, 100 Southern 
Artery, beginning today 
(Thursday) and continue 
weekdays from 9 a.m. to 4 
p.m. as long as openings 
exist. 

Gunstock Ski Area has 
28 trails and slopes, seven 
lifts including one quad 
chairlift, three triple 
chairlifts and two double 
chairlifts. Gunstock has 
complete lodge facilities 
including restaurant, ski 
school, rental shop, retail 
store and a ski patrol. 

Participants are urged 
to register early as 
previous trips have been at 
capacity and space is 
limited. For more 

information, call 376-1394. 

Saw Gat and Monay 
Shop Locally 



HAIRCUT, PERM, HIGHLIGHTING, ETC. 



LOOK FABL'LOl'S FOR... 

VALENTINE'S 
DAY! 



40% OFF!! 




40% OFF!! 



-*(ll3tnx 



SWEETHEART ^ 

SPECIAL: 40% OFF ALL SERVICES* 
(*with ihis ad) 
While appointment's last! 



Located in the 

^iver 'Bay CtuS 

Corner of So. Artery & Brackett St., Quincy 
Next to Bentley's Restaurant 
(617) 770-9356 



Tues, Fri, Sat 
Thur 



9AM-5PM 
11AM-7PM 



FREE PARKING 

'thru 2/29/92 



Quality Printing 

at a 
Reasonable Price. 





VJe have computerized our 
typesetting department 
and we're expanding our 
] printing division. 



We Specialize in: 
Program Books, Brochures, Newspapers, 

Newsletters, Political Flyers, Tickets, 
Stationery, Envelopes and Typesetting. 



€^^ilnc23r 



1372 Hancock St., Quincy Square 

471-3100 



North Quincy Bar 
License Suspended 30 Days 



(Cont'd from Page 1) 

stiffer penalty. 

"From the families' 
point of view the evidence 
was substantial enough for 
a revocation of the 
license," Traft said. 

Attorney for Quincy 
Motel Corp. (Quincy Bay 
Inn), Brian Gilligan, said 
the fact that the two men 
were killed influenced the 
board's decision more than 
the conduct of the 
nightclub. 

"I feel the decision was 
based on the accident--not 
what happened at the 
lounge that night," he said. 

Clancy's father, Donald 
Clancy, Sr., addressed the 
board before they made 
the decision. 

"The place was bad 20 
years ago, 10 years ago, 
two years ago... It's still 
bad," he said. "I just hope 
you people (the License 
Board) do the right thing." 

In voting down the 
charge of serving underage 
persons the board cited the 



fact that Ward had a false 
ID and circumstantial 
evidence showed that 
Clancy may have used a 
fake ID to gain entrance to 
Aquarius. No proof was 
shown that Clancy had 
used his own driver's 
license, showing him to be 
19, to get in as Traft 
contended. 

"It's a sorry time for the 
City of Quincy. We lost 
two decent young men. 
But, I think the Quincy 
Bay Inn did the job to the 
best of their ability to 
prevent admission to 
underage people," Gillis 
said. 

"Regardless of what we 
decide here today, these 
families will live the rest 
of their lives with grief," 
assistant city solicitor 
James Timmins, told the 
board during his summary. 

Concerning the charge 
of serving intoxicated 
persons, Timmins said the 
fact that Quincy Bay Inn 
admitted to "sufficient 
facts" to warrant a guilty 



finding is "compelling 
evidence" that the 
nightclub was negligent. 
Quincy Bay Inn made that 
plea during the criminal 
trial at Norfolk County 
Superior Court in Dedham 
last year. 

Admitting sufficient 
facts is a legal procedure 
which allows a judge to 
continue a case without a 
finding for a certain time 
period. If no further 
charges are filed during 
that time the original 
charges are usually 
dismissed. 

On the charge of 
serving underage 
individuals, Timmins cited 
the results of Det. Sgt. 
Richard Laracy's 
investigation .in his 
summary. Laracy, the 
city's liquor inspector, told 
the board he did not have 
enough evidence to pursue 
the charge in court. 

"Sgt. Laracy's 

conclusion had been 
validated by the testimony 
here," Timmins said. 



License Board Briefs 



The Quincy Board of 
License Commissioners 
took the following action 
at its meeting Tuesday: 

•Granted a request from 
the South Quincy Bocce 
Club, 112 R Liberty St., 
for a change of their club 
manager from Carmen 
DeThomaso to Donald 
Martell. 

•Withdrew, without 
prejudice, a request from 
The Trainor's Womens' 
Softball Team for a One- 
day Liquor license for a 
fundraiser, "The Charity of 
Your Choice Snoball 



Softball Tournament," at 
the Fore River Qubhouse, 
Saturday, Feb. 8 from noon 
to 6 p.m. 

•Granted, subject to a 
police background check 
of the new owner, a 
request from Balducci's, 
35 Billings Road, 
(Kenneth Balducci), to 
transfer the Common 
Victualer license to Arthur 
Kyranis. 

•Continued, for two 
weeks, a bearing regarding 
a request from D.S.S. Food 
Services, (Brian Shea) 
doing business as Seaside 



Grille, for the transfer of 
the Common Victualer- 
Wine and Malt license 
from Periwinkles by the 
Bay, Inc., d/b/a Seaside 
Grille at Marina Bay, 315 
Victory Road. 

•Continued, for one 
week, a bearing regarding 
the request from Jonathan's 
Seafood, Inc., 588 
Washington St., 

(Athanasios Kotoulas) for 
permission to extend their 
business hours to 24 hours 
on Wednesdays, 

Thursdays, Fridays and 
Saturdays. 



DID YOU KNOW? 

If you own a home in Massachusetts, you may t)e able to protect some 
of your property from future claims of creditors by filing a Declaration of 
Homestead. Homestead protection can be useful if you are sued as a 
result of an auto accident, business debts, a loan guarantee gone bad or 
other misfortune. A properly filed and recorded Homestead will protect up 
to $1 00,0(X)* of equity in your homestead property against attachent, 
seizure, or execution of judgement by your creditors. (*up to $200,000 if 
you are over age 62 or disabled) 

For more information regarding the preparation of this document or 
other legal documents, call our office today. 

DOC-U-PREP OF NEW ENGLAND 

15 Chauncy Street • South Weymouth, MA 02190 • (61 7) 337-6194 

SELF FILING 
LEGAL DOCUMENTS SERVICE 
We are not Lawyers, and do not give Legal Advice. 



SAME DAY SI 



(E-6 PROCESS) 
only at 

Photo Quick of Quincy 

1363 Hancock St. 
Quincy Center 

472-7131 



I / 






f 





VOL. 24 No. 20 



Thursday, February 6, 1992 




First Family 




^ Acting Superintendent 
Outlines Goals 



QUmCY DEPARTMENT HEADS were reappointed by Mayor James Sheets, 
seated, far right, and sworn in Monday by City Clerk John Gillis, seated, far left. 
Front row, second fk*om left. Health Commissioner Jane Gallahue and Personnel 
Director Kathleen Yaeger. Second row, from left, Michael Wheelwright, DPW 
program manager; Saeed Mlrza, city engineer; Joseph ''Jay" MacRitchie, assistant 
city solicitor; and Kevin Madden, assistant dty solicitor. 




OTHER DEPARTMENT HEADS reappointed Monday by Mayor James Sheets, 
ft-ont row, middle, arc first row fk-om left, Lester Gerry, DPW operations manager; 
Conservation Enforcement Officer Heather Sargent; Data Processing Director 
Robert Brennan; and Jane Relkard, rent grievance board secretary. Second row. 
Treasurer Dana Childs; Purchasing Agent Robert Denvir; City Solicitor Stephen 
McGrath; Recreation Director Barry Welch; and James Tlmmlns, assistant city 
solicitor. 

(Qidncy Sun photos by Tom Gorman) 



6-Month Moratorium 
On Downtown Restaurants 



By STEVE KAVANAGH 

There will be no new 
restaurants in Quincy 
Square... at least for the 
next six months. 

The City License Board 
voted, S-0, to establish a 
moratorium on Common 
Victualer licenses in 
downtown Quincy until the 
board's first meeting in 
September. 

Fire Chief Thomas 
Gorman proposed the 
moratorium "until this city 
gives us some guidelines 
on the direction we want 
to take." 

Last week the board 
denied a request for a 
change of location in the 
Square for a Quincy 
Center tavem after Mayor 
James Sheets sent a letter 
of q>position to the boaiu. 
Ilie board will not hold 



any hearings on CV 
applications for Quincy 
Square at least until 
September. 

"The mayor should have 
some plans on the cross- 
town connector by then," 
said Board Chairman John 
Gillis. 

"We are not doing 
anyone any favors if this 
big plan (Quincy Plan) is 
in the works and we grant 
a license. Then a few 
months later they (new 
business) are out in the 
street," said Building 
Inspector Matt Mulvey. 



Health Commissioner 
Jane Gallahue said it was 
important to specifically 
"define the Square." 

The board agreed the 
area in question would be 
Hancock Street from 
Dimmock to School 
Streets, the Ross 
Paridngway, Granite Street 
from the Star Market area 
back to Hancock Street. 

"We are saturated (with 
restaurants)," Gillis said. 

"We have to be fair to 
the businesses that are 
there now," Gorman said. 



Fuel Assistance 

Persons who have been Home owners and 

unemployed for 30 days or renters may be eligible 

more may be eligible for even if their heat costs are 

Fuel Assistance Program included in their rent, 
at Quincy Community For information call 

Actioa 479-8181 



Creedon Proposes 

Creation Of 13 
Task Committees 

By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

Acting School Superintendent Eugene Creedon delivered his "vision 
statement" to the Quincy School Committee Wednesday, outlining his 
goals for a "community of learners" and asking members to establish 13 
task-oriented educational committees. 



Creedon ' s appe arance 
before the School 
Committee at its meeting 
Wednesday evening was 
his first since he was 
appointed acting 

superintendent in 
November. He replaced 
former Supt. Dr. Robert 
Ricci, who stepped down 
last Friday after four and a 
half years as head of the 
city's public school 
system. 

Creedon, a 26-year 
veteran of the Quincy 
public school system, 
began bis tenure as acting 
superintendent on Monday. 
He is considered to be the 
number one candidate for 
the permanent 

superintendent's position 
since the School 
Committee named his 
acting superintendent 
unanimously. 

Creedon will serve as 
acting superintendent of 
the city's 16 schools and 
8,000 students until a 
permanent superintendent 
is selected. Mayor James 
Sheets, who is vice 
chairman of the school 
committee, and other 
school committee 
members, will assess 
Creedon's abilities as 
acting superintendent and 
then determine whether to 
make his appointment 
permanent. 

Addressing the School 
Committee at its meeting 
Wednesday evening, 
Creedon told members "It 
may be somewhat 
presumptuous of me to 




Acting School Supt. 
EUGENE CREEDON 



place before you a vision 
statement but I believe 
that this is a necessity in 
order for us to establish a 
clear direction and to set 
goals and priorities. 

"As a I reflect upon the 
past 26 years as as a 
Quincy teacher, principal 
and central office 
administrator, I firmly 
believe that if we are to 
plan for the future, then we 
must not only appreciate 
and respect the past, but 
we must build upon that 
solid foundation." 

Essentially, Creedon 
said his vision for the 
Quincy public school 
system stems from the 
same directive give to 
Francis Parker, the city's 
first school superintendent, 
by the Quincy School 
Committee in 1875: 
"Make the people 



understand what you are 
doing." 

To increase awareness, 
Creedon told the 
committee he intends "to 
make meetings with 
teachers, principals and 
parents the central means 
of moving this school 
system from the 
excellence its has known 
in the past to an even 
greater excellence in the 
future. I know of genius 
among our teachers and 
administrators. 

"The authority that I 
have as acting 
superintendent I intend to 
give to them and in return 
I will demand creative 
thinking, observation, 
restructuring, 

independence, research 
and careful planning." 

(Cont'd on Page 20) 



19 Applicants For 
Traffic Engineer Post 



A field of 19 
candidates, including three 
Quincy residents, have 
applied for the vacant Qty 
Traffic Engineer position. 

Quincy Personnel 
Director Kathy Yaeger 
said she will begin 
reviewing resumes this 
week and start 
interviewing applicants 
next week. Yaeger said a 
replacement should be 



named by early March for 
David Kinnecom who 
resigned last week to take 
a job as an engineering 
supervisor with the State 
of Utah's Department of 
Transportation. 

Quincy's traffic 
engineer is responsible for 
the design, operation and 
maintenance of city traffic 
signals, signs, pavement 
markings, parking meters. 



and the city parking 
garage. 

The new traffic 
engineer will have plenty 
to do including work on 
the proposed cross-town 
connector from Burgin 
Parkway to Route 3A and 
the reconstruction of the 
intersection at East 
Squantum Street and 
Quincy Shore Drive this 
year. 



Page 2 Qnlncy Sun Thursday, February i, 1992 



Charles Debrjeczeni Candidate 
For Republican State Committee 



Charles Debreczeni of 
Quincy announces his 
candidacy for Andrew 
Card's open Republican 
State Committee seat in 
the March 10 Presidential 
primary. 

Debreczeni lives with 
his wife Flory on Adams 
St. He is the president of a 
local manufacturing 
company and also operates 
as a business consultant 
from his office on Willard 
St. in West Quincy. 

Debreczeni says he is 
currently forging new 
economic business ties 
between Massachusetts 
and eastern Europe. He is 



also president of a 
charitable organization 
that aids Romanian 
children orphaned by the 
fallout communist regime. 

Debreczeni says he has 
staunchly supported all 
Republican candidates, 
from the president to local 
candidates. He is an active 
member of a number of 
Republican organizations. 

"The major role and 
obligation of the State 
Committeeman is to help 
and support Republican 
candidates during their 
campaign for political 
office," Debreczeni said. 
"Of the three candidates 



Winter Rates 25% OFF Carpet and 

Upholstery Cleaning Without Steam 

by JK&K 

Joseph Pulera Proprietor 

Only Dry Foam 
TouchesThe Carpet ... Result? 



Beautiful Cleaning 

Fast Drying 

No Shrinking or Mildew 

Insured 

Free Quotes by Phone 



Call 471-6319 



for State Committeeman, I 
alone have a track record 
showing help and support 
for all Republican 
candidates! 

"During 1990's most 
critical election in 
decades, my opponent did 
not help nor support our 
brave Republican 
legislative candidates! In 
fact, he was helping and 
supporting Democrats! 
Now, this same man seeks 
election to the State 
Committee, offering 
excuses and questionable 
promises. I strongly 
believe that actions speak 
louder than words and my 
actions speak louder than 
his words!" 

Blood Pressure 
Screening 

Medical personnel will 
conduct a free blood 
pressure screening test 
Friday, Feb. 21 from 10 
a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Super 
Stop & Shop, 141 Newport 
Ave., Quincy. 

No appointment is 
necessary. 

Save Gm and Monay 
Shop Locally 




QUD«JCY POLICE OFFICER Thomas Bolinder receives his sergeant's badge from Chief 
Francis Mullen as Bollnder's wife, Susan, looks on. Sgt. Bolinder, an ll-year veteran of 
the department, was recently promoted to replace Sgt. Denis Cronin who has retired. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Robert Bosworth) 

Thomas Bolinder Promoted 
To Quincy Police Sergeant 



Thomas Bolinder, an 
11-year veteran of the 
Quincy Police 

Department, has been 
promoted to sergeant, 
replacing Sgt. Dennis 
Cronin who recently 
retired. 

Bolinder, 43, and a 
resident of Hanson, was 
sworn in as the city's 
newest poUce sergeant by 
Qty Qerk John Gillis at a 
ceremony Thursday 
morning in the office of 
Mayor James Sheets. 
Among those attending the 



Quality Printing 

at a 
Reasonable Price. 





We have computerized our 

fypesetting department 

and we're expanding our 

printing division. 



We Specialize in: 
Program Books, Brochures, Newspapers, 

Newsletters, Political Flyers, Tickets, 
Stationery, Envelopes and Typesetting. 




1372 Hancock St., Quincy Square 

471-3100 



ceremony were Police 
Chief Francis Mullen, 
Captain Robert SiJvaggio, 
Executive Secretary 
Thomas Koch, Asst. City 
Clerk Joseph Shea and 
Bolinder's wife, Susan. 

Mullen praised 
Bolinder, a detective in 
the departments' criminal 
investigation bureau, for 
his dedication to the 
police department and 
community. "Tom 

Bolinder has been a very 
good police officer in 
many ways: public 
relations, community 
service and investigations. 
He gets along well with 
his peers and shares the 
department's common 
goals to go ahead. 

"I think he's a credit to 
his family, a credit to the 
Quincy police department 



and a credit to the citizens 
of Quincy," Mullen said. 

The chief also spoke 
kindly of the man Bolinda 
is replacing, retired Sgt. 
Denis Cronin. Mullen 
noted that he and Sgt. 
Cronin came on the force 
at virtually the same time 
35 years ago. 

"I'll miss him because 
he's a good guy. If we had 
to swap officers, this is a 
good swap." 

Koch, speaking on 
behalf of Sheets who was 
in Washington, DC. 
attending a labor 
conference, congratulated 
Bolinder. 

"I've never heard 
anything bad about Tom 
Bolinder. He's a 

professional and well 
respected by his peers. 



Ward 3 Democrats 
To Elect Delegates Feb. 29 



Quincy's Ward 3 
caucus to elect 12 
delegates and four 
alternates to the 
Massachusetts Democratic 
Convention will convene 
Saturday, Feb. 29 at 2 p.m. 
in Granite Place, 125 
Granite St. 

The Massachusetts 
Democratic Convention 
will be held May 30 at the 
Worcester Centrum. 

Ward 3 Chairman John 
Lydon said the caucus will 



not discriminate in its 
selection process against 
minorities or handicapped 
jiersons. 

"In its order to achieve 
equal opportunity in 
representing minorities and 
handicapped persons, we 
have made every good 
faith effort to rectify any 
under utilization of 
minorities and 

handicapped persons in our 
delegate selection 
process," said Lydon. 



'Homework* Topic 
At Chapter 1 Meeting 



The Quincy Chapter 1 
Parent Advisory 

Committee and the 
Lincoln-Hancock PTO 
invite parents to a meeting 
Thursday, Feb. 13, at 7:30 
p.m. at Lincoln- Hancock 
School. 

Guest speaker, Ellie 



Blute, will discuss 
homework. Parents will 
receive practical 
homework ideas to use 
with their children. 

For information call 
Linda Demeo, Chapter 1 
Parent Coordinator, at 328- 
1971 or 984-8737. 





"Rockin into the 90's" 
D.J. STEVE KAVANAGH 
Music for all Occasions 



''MuBic for people who 

take their fun seriouslyr 

773-4936 



nnnday, Fcbnuur (, 1992 Qnlncy Son Page 3 



Quincy Officials, New 

MWRA Director Meet, 

Tour Sludge Facility 



By ROBERT 
BOSWORTH 

Several city officials, 
including Mayor James 
Sheets, met with new 
MWRA Executive 
Director Douglas 
MacDonald Tuesday 
morning in the mayor's 
office, and later toured the 
authority's sludge 
treatment facility in 
Quincy Point. 

Sheets said the 
meeting. which he 
described as a "private 
discussion," did not focus 
on any specific issues such 
as sewer rates. Instead, 
the mayor said the 
meeting centered on 
getting acquainted. 

"It was an effort to 
meet with one another and 
evaluate each others style. 
I think it was very 
successful," he said. 

Although Sheets and 
MacDonald did not discuss 
specific issues involving 
the city and the MWRA, 
the mayor said the new 
director impressed him as 
someone who will be more 
accessible than former 
director Paul Levy. 

At times. Levy's rapport 
with Quincy officials was 
more contentious than 
harmonious, as the 
MWRA and city often 
found themselves at 



opposite sides on authority 
issues, most notably the 
MWRA's refusal to locate 
its headquarters to the 
Fore River staging area. 

Sheets welcomed 
MacDonald's difference in 
style. 

"His (MacDonald's) 
whole behavior indicated 
that he would be more 
accessible. He intends to 
work very, very closely 
with mayors and 
selectmen in the MWRA's 
district. 

"He has a more honest, 
warmer style than Paul 
Levy and that's not a 
knock against Paul. He 
just approaches problems 
differently," Sheets said. 

Ward 2 Councillor Ted 
DeCristofaro and Asst. 
City Solicitor Joseph 
"Jay" MacRitchie also 
attended the meeting. 
DeCristofaro's ward 
includes the Fore River 
staging area and 
MacRitchie is the city's 
representative on the 
MWRA Board of 
Directors. 

Quincy officials and 
MacDonald also toured the 
interim sludge facility at 
the Fore River staging 
area. For MacDonald, an 
environmental attorney 
who wrote the legislation 
creating the MWRA, it 



was his first trip to the 
facility. 

The group also visited 
residents neighboring the 
sludge facility. Among the 
concerns residents raised 
were odor and noise fi'om 
the plant. 

For MacDonald, his trip 
to Quincy was sort of a 
homecoming. He was bom 
here on Greenview St.. 
His great-grandfather also 
worked for the city's sewer 
division and was 
responsible for laying 
sewer pipes in the 
Greenview St. area where 
he lived during the 1940s 
and 1950s. 

MacDonald, who was 
appointed executive 
director by the MWRA 
Board of Directors last 
week, is expected to take 

the reigns of the authority 
March 1. 

As executive director, 
MacDonald will oversee 
1764 employees 

responsible for operating 
and maintaining the 
region's waterworks and 
sewerage systems; manage 
a current expense budget 
of $273 million in 1992 
and coital budget of $578 
million; and direct the $6.1 
billion Boston Harbor 
project, the largest public 
works project in New 
EnglatKl history. 



Fire Dept Fees May Be Increased 



By MICHAEL WHALEN 

The City Council 
Monday night discussed 
the possibility of 
increasing the amounts of 
fire department fees 
charged for permits and 
inspections. 

Asked by Ward 3 
Councillor Lawrence 
Chretien how large the 
increases would be, Fire 
Chief Thomas Gorman 
said they would be 
minimal. 

"They (the increases) 
would only be about $25 in 
some instances, a bit more 
in other instances," said 
Gorman. 

However, the council 
decided to study the 



CASH 

FOR YOUR 

Gold, 

Diamonds 

and Jewelry 

Any Condition 



Quincy 

Jewelry 

Exchange 

543 Washington St. 
(Rte3A) Quincy 

773-1501 



matter further to see how 
the increases compared to 
those in neighboring towns 



and communities. 

The matter was put into 
committee. 




Enlarged to show detail 



O J & S Ferrata Co.., In& 



Give l-ler a Kiss 
For Valentine's Day 

This beautifully crafted sterling silver kiss 
by J & C Ferrara is a perfect gift for any 
occasion when you want to show affection. 
And, how about wrapping it with a package 
of real Hershey's Milk Chocolate Kisses to 
satisfy her sweet tooth. Then, the rest is up 
to you -- a kiss or two of your own wouldn't 
be bad. 

KJss in Sterling Silver ...$19.95 

Also available in 14K Gold and 18K Gold 

Exclusively licensed Tradmark of Hershey Foods Corp. 
J&C Ferrara Co., Inc. Licensee 

LeColson's Jewelry 

730 Hancock Street 
Quincy, MA 02170 




ONE BIG WINNING FAMILY--Richard P. Skehan of Wollaston is accompanied by his 
family after claiming his $100,000 cash prize in the Jan. 13 drawing of Mass Cash. Front 
row from left, daughter Kerl and Richard. Rear, daughter Erin, son Billy, wife Alice 
and daughter Colleen. The winning ticket, sold at Christy's in Quincy, earned the 
store a $1,000 bonus. 



License Board Briefs 



The Quincy Board of 
License Commissioners 
took the following action 
at its meeting Tuesday: 

•Granted a request from 
the Woodward School 
Parents Club, 1102 
Hancock St., (Ann 
Silverman), for a One-day 
Liquor license for a Las 
Vegas Night at the school, 
Saturday, Feb. 8 from 7 
p.m. to midnight 

•Granted a request from 
Quincy Auto Village, 150 
E. Howard St., (Thomas 
Sarruda), for a Motor 2 
Used Car license. 

•Continued a hearing 
regarding the request from 
the Old Railroad Cafe. 273 



Willard St., (Antone 
Katsakis) for permission to 
extend business hours from 
6 a.m. to 10 p.m. seven 
days a week. 

•Granted a request from 
the Quincy High School 
girls' basketball team 
(Betty McLean) for 
permission to conduct a 
canning drive Feb. 8 and 9. 



•Granted a request fix>m 
the North Quincy High 
School Drama Club for a 
permit to conduct a 
canning drive April 10, 11 
and 12. 

•Postponed, for one 
week, a hearing regarding 



a request from the Center 
for Health and 
Development Atlantic 
House, 338 Washington 
St., (EUen Bruder), for a 
Second-Hand (Thrift Shop) 
license. 

•Granted a request from 
G.J. Coddington's, 1250 
Hancock St., (George 
Cook), for an 

Entertainment license. 

•Granted a request from 
G.J. Coddington's, 1250 
Hancock St., (George 
Cook), for a one-day 
extension of its Liquor 
license, Saturday, Feb. 22 
from 7 p.m. to midnight, in 
the Galleria, Presidents 
Place, for an Easter Seals 
fundraiser. 



SAME DAY SLIDES 

(E-6 PROCESS) 
only at 

Photo Quick of Quincy 

1363 Hancock St. 
Quincy Center 

472-7131 



Blackwood Pharmacy 
471 -3300 

Very Personalized Service by Bonnie Seely, 
and her Staff 

FREE DELIVERY Quincy and Milton 



BONNIE SEELY BS-RPh 



30% OFF ALL 

Russell Stover Candies 

Now Through Valentine's Day 



Blackwood Pharmacy 



Hours: Open Daily 9-8 

Saturday 9-6 

Sunday 8:30-2 



k 



663 Hancock St. 

Quincy 

471-3300 



Page 4 Qulncy Sun Thursday, February 6, 1992 




Lcy 






USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co Inc 

1372 Hancock St , Quincy. Mass 02169 

Henry W Bosworth Jr , Publisher 
Robert H Bosworth Editor 



30« p«f copy. $12.00 p«r year by mail in Quincy 
$14.00 par yaar by mail outside Quincy. $17.00 out of state 

Telephone 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 
Second class postage paid at Boston, Mass 

Postmaster Send address change to 
The Quincy Sun. 1372 Hancock St Qumcy Mass 02169 



The Qumcy Sun assumes nc fmanctal responsibility tor 
typographies' errors in advertisements but will reprint that 
part ol an atJverirserrent in which the typographical error 
occurs 



'-$fe?^' 



Registration Deadline 
Feb. 11 For State 
Presidential Primaries 



The deadline for 
unregistered voters to 
register to vote for the 
March 10 Presidential 
Primaries is Tuesday, Feb. 
11. 

On Feb. 11, registration 
hours in Quincy will be 
extended bom 8:30 a.m. to 
10 p.m. at Quincy City 
Hall, 1305 Hancock St. 
Special registration hours 
have also bee established 
for Saturday, Feb. 8 from 9 
a.m. to 5 p.m. at City Hall. 

Unregistered voters may 
also register weekdays at 
City Hall from 8:30 a.m. to 
4:30 p.m. 

Any U.S. citizen who is 
a Massachusetts resident 



and who will be 18 years 
old by the March 10 
Presidential Primaries may 
register at the regular or 
extended registration 
periods. 

For those who cannot 
get to the polls Tuesday, 
March 10 can contact the 
city clerk's office at 376- 
1131 to obtain an 
application for voting by 
absentee ballot. 

For more information on 
registering, or other voting 
matters, contact Secretary 
of State Michael 
Connolly's Voter 
Information Hotline at 1- 
800-462-VOTE. 



Ward 4 Association 
To Discuss Lincoln School 



The Quincy Ward 4 
Neighborhood Association 
will meet Tuesday, Feb. 
11 at 7 p.m. at Faith 
Lutheran Center, 65 

Roberts St. to discuss 
concerns of the South and 
West Quincy areas 
including the vacant 
Lincoln School building. 



Quincy School 

Committee member Dan 
Raymondi will discuss the 
official committee being 
formed to resolve problems 
caused by the Lincoln 
School building. 

All residents are 
invited. For information 
call Assn. president Ernie 
Aristide at 472-6312. 



Medically 
Speaking 



by Michael M. Bakenmn, M.D., F.A.(.(. 




BEWARE OF BRONCHITIS 



Colds are everywhere. 
When the cough of a coki 
turns into bronchitis, 
special care is in order. 
Bronchitis is an 
inflammation of the mucus 
membrane that lines the 
main airways of the lungs, 
called the bronchi. Deep 
coughing, which can be 
painful, brings up yellowish 
or grayish phlegm. 
Breathlessness and fever 
may also occur. Nearly 
everyone gets acute 
bronchitis occasionally, 
and it usually clears up on 
its own. Treatment 
includes fever and cough 
medication, plus rest in a 
warm room with a vaporizer 
or humidifier. Repeated 
attacks, however, can 
damage the lining of the 
bronchi and lead to chronic 
bronchitis and serious 
consequences for the 



entire respiratory system. 
P.S. Call your doctor if 
you cough up blood, 
become breathless, have 
a temperature over 101 
degrees, or suffer 
repeated attacks of 
bronchitis. 

If you are experiencing 
the symptoms of acute 
bronchitis, it is important 
that you contact a doctor 
as soon as possible. If you 
would like to learn about 
this topic, or about how 
you can modify your 
lifestyle to help ward off 
heart disease, call 
COMPREHENSIVE 
CARDIAC CARE at 472- 
2550. Office hours are by 
appointment at 101 Adams 
St., Suite 24, in Quincy. I 
am affiliated with Quincy 
Hospital and South Shore 
Hospitals. 




Sunbeams 

By Henry Bosworth 



We Need A FuU-Time Uncle Sam 




You might say he's now Quincy's best known 
resident. 
And, the most popular. 

Everybody certainly knows his name. He's greeted 
warmly whether he's walking Hancock St., QuiiKy, 
Beacon Hill, Boston, Fifth Ave., New York or Pennsyl- 
vania Ave., Washington. 

Everyone smiles and says hello when they see him. 
They like to have their picture taken with him. They 
never forget his name. 

Who? 

Uncle Sam Roimseville. 

Since making Uncle Sam his offi- 
cial name with court approval last 
June on Flag Day, the former Quincy 
businessman and former LeRoy 
Rounseville has received hundreds of ROUNSEVILLE 
letters from aroimd the coimtry most 
of them addressed simply to "Uncle Sam, Quincy, 
MA." 

His fame is spreading. He recently received a letter 
from the Aleutian Islands. And one from Russia. 

From Gorby? 

"No," says Roimseville. "I think it is from a runner 
from the Ukraine who was in the Boston Marathon last 
April." 

Roimseville is still trying to find an interpreter to 
help him decipher the letter's contents. 

He has had his photo taken with President George 
Bush in Boston. And with the First Lady who was 
visiting in Springfield. 

Rounseville was in his full Uncle Sam regalia but 
carrying his hat in his hand when he met the Bushes. 

"You look lovely, but why don't you put your hat 
on," Barbara Bush asked him. 

"The White House staff doesn't want me to in the 
presence of the President or First Lady," Rounseville 
repUed. 

She took the hat from him and placed it over her 
heart. 

"She's a real nice person," Rounseville says. 

He' s had his picture taken with Roger Clemens, Jeff 
Reardon, Wade Hoggs, Lou Gorman, "China Beach" 
actress Dana E>elany. 

Also with Gov. William Weld who sent him a 
personal invitation to attend his State of the State 
address ceremonies. 

He attended last year's Baseball Hall of Fame induc- 
tion ceremonies at Cooperstown, N.Y. hobnobbing 
with the inductees. He made a big hit — and a big photo 
splash — in a number of newspapers holding a sign 
proclaiming: "America's Favorite Uncle Loves 
America's Favorite Pasttime." 

He was on the ice and in the national TV spotlight 
during the singing of the American and Canadian 
national anthems before the Team USA and Team 
Canada Olympics game at Albany, N.Y. 

He led an Olympic Parade fundraiser parade at the 
Sheraton, Boston, sponsored by Blue Cross to aid 
Massachusetts' Olympians. 

He made another hit during the Boston First Night 
festivities New Year's Eve with a sign urging: "Buy 
American, 1992." 

Rounseville got the idea to become Uncle Sam as a 
member of the group that formed the Heroes ' Welcome 
Fimd for returning veterans from the Persian Gulf. 

"It was easy," he said, "to open corporate doors, "for 
contributions." 

When someone asked "Who's caUing?", Rounseville 
would reply: "Uncle Sam." He had no trouble getting 
in. The group raised something like $750,000. 

Rounseville then decided he would really like to be 
Uncle Sam. 



He went into Norfolk County Probate Court and got 
his name changed. The judge said he could but told 
him, "I don't want to see you doing any beer commer- 
cials." 

Rounseville opened headquarters in downtown 
Quincy and launched a campaign to become the offi- 
cial Uncle Sam. 

The campaign is still on. 

Just before the Christmas holiday he sent out 3,000 
greeting cards including ones to every member of the 
U.S. House of Representatives and Senate. 
"And I hand signed every one of them," he says. 

Rounseville has also had his driver' s license changed 
to read: "Uncle Sam Rounseville." He is now working 
on a license plate, something like "USA SAM." 

He lives at 77 Adams Place, just down the street 
from the Adams Mansion. 

"John and John Quincy are my neighbors," he 
muses. 

And he is actually listed in the telephone directory as 
Uncle Sam. 

He hopes someday to be recognized as the nation's 
official Uncle Sam. 

Why does he want to be Uncle Sam? 

"Somebody has to do it," he says. "We need a full- 
time Uncle Sam — not just a Fourth of July Sam. 

"There are too many problems out there that need 
Uncle Sam's attention. I'm working on plans now to 
help solve those problems — including health care." 

He says when he has the plans finalized he is going 
calling on Congress. 

JOSEPH LaRAIA finished out of 

the money as a City Council at-large 

candidate last fall in a futile comeback 

bid. 

So that ' s the end — as many beUeve 

— of LaRaia on the campaign trail? 

"Wrong," says a close friend of his. LaRAiA 

"He'll be back again when he picks the right spot." 

U 

Fr.JOHNM cMAHON. retired pastor of St. Mary's 

Church, West Quincy, likes to look 

and plan ahead. 

He will celebrate the 50th 

aimiversary of his ordination at St. 

Mary's Sunday, May 16, 1993 at a 2 

p.m. Mass. And simultaneously cel- 
McMAHON ^ 

ebrate his 80th birthday at Morrisette Legion Post 
following the Mass. 

Fr. McMahon served 24 1/2 years at St. Mary's — 
23 as pastor. He is now at Regina Cleri in Boston but 
frequents Quincy. 

Q 

SMILE DEPT: Quincy District Cou rt Clerk Ma g- 
istrate Arthur Tobin was called to the 
Quincy police station Sunday to post 
bail for a resident charged with 
drunken driving. 

A police officer told the man "Now, 
listen to Mr. Tobin." 

And the guy apparently wanting to impress them 
with his political knowledge and coimections said: "I 
know your uncle, the mayor." 

"And I know that other mayor — Leo Haimon." 

Arthur Tobin of course was Quincy mayor — not his 
uncle. And Walter Hannon was Quincy mayor. Leo 
Harmon would have liked to have been. 






TOBIN 




The longest living President was John Adams, who 
died at the age of 90 years and eight months in 1826. 



Thursday, February 6, 1992 Qulncy Sun Page 5 



Readers Forum 



Not Dashed By Loss Of Lexington 



Editor, The Quincy Sun; 

The decision by the 
U.S. Navy to award the 
U.S.S. Lexington to the 
City of Corpus Christ, 
Texas, has dashed no 
dreams of this Quincy 
resident who chose to live 
in the City of Presidents in 
1984. 

I was not bom and 
raised here and, perhaps, 
that is why I never fully 
understood the campaign 
to bring the Lady Lex to 
the Town River site along 
Southem Artery. Once the 
shipyard site was ruled out 
due to reconstruction work 
on the U.S.S. Lexington, 
Quincy was doomed. 

While I commend all 
those Quincy residents 
who worked endless hours 
to bring the aircraft carrier 
back home, I always 
believed that bringing the 
"Gray Ghost" home would 
not be the tourist attraction 
many hoped it would be. 

Some supporters have 
suggested that Quincy was 



done in by the Navy, by 
the City of Corpus Christi 
and by US Senators Lloyd 
Bentsen, D-Texas and Phil 
Gramm, R-Texas. But 
were we done in and out- 
done by what that Texas 
city had to offer? 

The Lexington isn't 
going to some Mexican 
Mayberry, it's going to a 
city with a population 
approximately 325,000. It 
is nearly twice as large as 
Worcester, New England's 
second largest city. The 
ship, we are told, will now 
be moored on the 
downtown waterfront next 
to a new golf course and 
the Texas Aquarium which 
drew over 700,000 tourists 
in its first year (1990). The 
Navy looked at hard facts 
and not simply pork barrel. 

Many outside Quincy 
questioned whether a 
Town River site could 
draw the estimated 
200,000 to 300,000 tourists 
to earn its keep. 

The only way 



Massachusetts could have 
won the USS Lexington is 
if the City of Boston had 
entered the bidding war for 
it. And, then, only if the 
sites offered included Long 
Wharf next to the New 
England Aquarium or over 
in Charlestown at the 
Navy Yard moored next to 
the destroyer U.S.S. Cassin 
Young and Old Ironsides. 

Quincy put up a good 
fight. The city never gave 
up until the effort was 
ended by Navy officials. 

I congratulate the City 
of Corpus Christi for its 
good fortune and wish it 
well. The City of Quincy 
still has its proud history 
intact. We were here at 
the birth of this Nation. 
Two U.S. Presidents came 
from here and no other 
community across the 
country can make the 
same claim. We have 
history wherever we turn. 
The Navy can't take this 
away when the Lexington 
heads south. One ship's 



loss won't sink this 
community's pride. 

I know that Mayor Jim 
Sheets is disappointed but 
as Henry Bosworth in his 
Sunbeams column said, 
"...there should be no 
shame to losing a good 
fight... We'll get over 
losing Lady Lex. And we 
should~and will— keep on 
trying— to make things 
better for Quincy." 

Remember, the 
Lexington is only a ship- a 
visible symbol of Quincy- 
built pride-but that brand 
of community pride can be 
found within each of us as 
we try and build up our 
community. We are many 
people with many cultures 
but our common bond is 
making Quincy a better 
place for the future and our 
children. We never needed 
the Lexington to do that 
for us. From the jaws of 
defeat, we can still find a 
victory in all this, right? 
Sal J. Giarratani 
184 Atlantic St. 



The Winter Of Our Discontent 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 
Now is the winter of our 

discontent 

Made even worse by 

Presidential politics. 

We face a dearth of 
competent candidates 

Equalling the erosion of 
our economy. 

We must conclude we 
have only one choice 



Which is to continue 
existing mediocrity. 

Assessing the 

incumbency of Bush and 
Quayle 

We find the announced 
alternatives cannot 
compete: 

A caterwauling 
columnist committing 
political Fratricide; 

A Californian 



Quincy Hospital Hosting 
Voter Registration Drive 



Quincy Hospital will 
host a community voter 
registration drive for the 
Massachusetts Presidential 
Primary Election today 
(Thursday) fi-om 11:30 a.m. 
to 2:30 p.m. in the main 
lobby. 

All community 

residents are invited. 

"There are many issues 
which affect us 
individually and as a 
community," said Renee 
Buisson, director of public 
relations for Quincy 
Hospital. "Our strength as 
a community depends on 
our ability to organize and 
make our voices heard. 
We possess no single 
power greater than our 
power to vote. If you are 
not registered to vote, I 
urge you to take advantage 
of this opportunity to do 
so. 

In order to vote in the 
March 10 primary election 

you must be a citizen of 
the United States, 18 years 
old by election day, and 
registered to vote. If you 
recently moved from 
another city or town, you 
must re-register. 

To register, new voters 
sign an affidavit which 
includes name, address 
and date of birth. Anyone 
unable to attend the 
Quincy Hospital drive can 
register in person at the 



Quincy Election 

Department, 6 Heritage 
Rd., Monday through 
Friday. You must register 
by Feb. 11 to vote in the 
March 10 primary election. 



caparisioned in 

catastrophe; 

A Governor involved in 
media-implied adultery; 

A pedant long removed 
from Massachusetts 
stature; 

A dreamer who 
proposes economically 
disastrous health 
protection; 

A Legislator whose 
record rings of failure. 

Well, the giants of our 
land live only in the past. 

And even they are 
tainted by History's 
microscope. 

Perhaps like the final 
fall of Rome 

We are destined to 
repeat the tragedy of time 

That does not permit 
the renaissance of hope 



That our Phoenix can 
arrive from Democracy's 
cold ashes. 

But still there stands 
our incandescent dreams 

Of government by 
someone touched by 
greatness; 

And we can hope that 
there will surface soon 

Some faintly flawed but 
capable individual 

Who, next November, 
will provide a catalyst 

To return our Nation to 
remembered glory 

And as an optimist I'll 
wait with patient faith 

That from our unique 
and varied populace 

There will appear a 
logical leader for our land. 
Charles T. Sweeny 
Ames St., Quincy 



City of Quincy 
Presidential Primary Election 

TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 1992 
VOTER REGISTRATION DATES 



Evening Hours: 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM 
Wednesday, February 5, 1 992 

Fore River Club House - Nevada Road 

Lincoln-Hancocl< Community School - Water Street 

Montclair School - 6 Belmont Street 

Quincy Community United Methodist Church - Beale Street 

Atlantic Neighborhood Center - Hunt Street 



Saturday, February 8, 1992 

9:00 AM to 5:00 PM 

Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street 



Tuesday, February 11, 1992 

8:30 AM to 10:00 PM 

Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock Street 

February 1 1 , 1 992 is the last day for registrations before the 

Presidential Primary - March 10, 1992. You may also register 

weekdays at City Hall from 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM. 

John M. Gillis 
City Clerk 



Quincy 's 
Yesterdays 



Bethany Church 
Starts $182,000 
Building Drive 



Members of Bethany Congregational Church pledged 
more than $56,000 at the kickoff dinner of a fundraising 

campaign to build a new church at 

the comer of Coddington and iTph 5*11 
Spear Sts. tM^^ 

The goal of the drive was 1927 

$182,000. 65 Years Ago 

It was planned to build the 
church in Gothic-style with gran- 
ite blocks of various colors to be mined from a Quincy 
quarry opened especially for that purpose. 

The Bethany congregation was being aided in its efforts 
to build a new church by the Granite Tnist Co. which 
planned to build a tower on the site of the old church, 
Hancock and Chestnut Sts. 

ASSESSOR SHAKEUP 

New Mayor Thomas J. McGrath shook up the Board of 
Assessors, accepting the resignations of Joseph Wrightman, 
George H. Bean and Chairman Michael T. Sullivaa 

He named Albert Nelson and J. Winthrop Pratt to replace 
Wrightman and Bean and reaH>ointed Sullivan to another 
term as chairman. 

DOG OWNERS ANGRY 

Dog owners besieged a City Council meeting seeking 
modification of an ordinance that required all dogs in the city 
to be mizzled or otherwise restrained for 90 days. 

The Public Health Department advocated the restraint as 
a health measure following a state report that called rabies 
more dangerous to the public than small pox. 

QUINCY-ISMS 

A building permit was granted in the Rev. Michael J. 
Cuddihy, pastor of St. Joseph's Church, Quincy Point, for 
the construction of a $75,000 school building (» Pray St ... 
Fred A. Caulfield was elected chairman of the Quincy 
Veterans Council, which was made up of the GAR, USWV, 
VGW and American Legion posts ... Dr. Payson Smith, state 
commissioner of education, called Quincy a pioneer in 
education at the dedication of the new North Quincy Junior 
HighSchoolin AUantic ... Raymond Coughlinofl35Babcock 
St., Houghs Neck, reported robins, pussy willows and other 
signs of spring in ttie vicinity of Echo Lake and Wendell's 
Ledge near the Quincy-Braintree line ... A 1923 Maxwell 
coupe was $295 at the J.F. Rogers Auto Co., 430 Hancock 
St., Norfolk Downs ... Jim Richards of Mathewson Machine 
Works set a record of 379 for three strings and 152 for a 
single string in Quincy Industrial Bowling League play at the 
YMCA ... A box car on a Maybrook, N.Y. to Boston freight 
train was derailed in the second such accident in four days at 
the Granite branch crossover near Atlantic station ... W.T. 
Thomas Dry Goods Store moved into its new home at 1473 
Hancock St.. "The Great K&A Train Robbery," starring 
Tom Mix and "The Return of Peter Grimm," with Janet 
Gaynor, were playing at the Regent Theater, 440 Hancock 
St., Norfolk Downs ...Gerard A. Halpin of 57 HighfieldRd., 
Merrymount, a Boston lumber broker, was commissioned 
ensign in the Naval Reserve ... The SS Eastern Tempest 
airived at Fore River to be converted from a freighter to a 
collierunder a$225,000 contract ... Rep. Edward J. Sandberg 
(R-Quincy) was pushing a bill in the legislature that would 
build a roadway from Squantum to Hull across the bay ... 
Frank A. Tirrell, a Quincy attorney, was req)pointed to a 
sixth five-year term as master of chancery, a post that had 
been held by his father, James,from 1883 to 1904 ....Chuck 
roast was 28 cents a pound at Arthur E. Dorr Division stores 
in Quincy and Norfolk Downs ... Major Philip Hanley of 38 
Edgemere Rd., Quincy Center, was appointed chief prohibi- 
tion investigator under Asst. Treasury Secretary Andrews in 
Washington ... Mayor McGi«ih signed an order dividing 
Ward y into three precincts, raising the total number of 
precincts in the dty to 17 ... Francher scored 17 points and 
MacLean 15 as the Quincy YMCA walloped the Providence 
Y 52-54 in a Two State Basketball League game ... Henry G. 
Poole of 54 Grand View Ave., Wollaston, was visiting Civil 
War battlefields in Virginia ... Mrs. Anna Sabean of 74 
Curlew Rd, Adams Shore, was back from the WCTU 
convention in Washington. 



Page 6 Qulnqr Sun Thursday, Febnury 6, 1992 




Marie s 
Kitchen 



B\ M\l<i» .1. DOI IMIMO 



Hot Chicken Salad 



When two friends tell you about a 
recipe in the same week, you know it 
has to be great! This past week, my 
friend Alpha visited me and told me 
about a great chicken dish she had at a 
church luncheon. Then a couple of days 
later, Alicia came to the house and 
raved about the same thing. So here it 
is. 

HOT CHICKEN SALAD 
2 cups cooked chicken 
2 cups diced celery 
1/2 cup toasted almonds 
salt and pepper to taste 
2 tsps grated onion 
2 Tbsps lemon juice 
1 cup mayonnaise 
1/2 cup shredded cheese 



1 cup potato chips, crushed 

Mix the first six ingredients. Add the 
mayonnaise and mix until blended. Pile 
Hghtly into a slightly greased casserole 
dish and sprinkle the top with the 
shredded cheese and potato chips. Bake 
in a 450 degree oven for IS minutes. 
You'll have to go off the diet for this 
one! 

Marie D'Olimpio is the author of 
"Simply Italian-And then Some," a 
collection of her own recipes. Copies 
of the book are available at Previte's 
Market, Sumner St., Quincy Point, 
Samoset Pharmacy, Samoset Ave., 
Merrymount and Winfield Gift 
Emporium, Hancock St., Quincy 
Center. 



Legal Secretaries To Tour New Jail 



The Norfolk County 
Legal Secretaries 
Association will sponsor a 
tour of the new Norfolk 
County House of 
Correction, Dedham, 
Wednesday, Feb. 19 from 
6:30 to 7:30 p.m. The 
pubUc is welcome. 



Deadline for 

reservations is Feb. 5. Call 
Susan Greenfield at (508) 
660-2500 or (617) 828- 
3 1 1 1 for information. 

The association is 
dedicated to furthering the 
legal education of its 
members through speakers 



at monthly meetings, as 
well as seminars, legal 
education and the 
exchange of ideas and 
procedural updates. The 

association stresses high 
standards of ethics and 
professionalism. 



Beechwood Center Receives Grant 



Beechwood Community 
Life Center, 225 Fenno 
St., Wollaston, has been 
identified as recipient for a 
Foundation for the Arts 
grant award. 

The award was given 
for the upcoming Quincy 
Multicultural Festival and 
will partially fund the 
festival's opening night 
Sunday, Feb. 23. 

The opening program, 
"Voice of the Turtle," to 
be held at North Quincy 
High School Sunday, Feb. 
23 at 3 p.m., will feature 
Jewish musical traditions. 



the Sephardim 

incorporated the sounds of 
their adopted homes into 
their music. The ensemble 
performs on ancient and 
modem instmments. 



"Voice of the Turtle" is 
a Cambridge based, four 
person ensemble that 
specializes in Sephardic 
music. The Sephardim, 
Jews who had lived in 
Spain for 1,500 years, 
were expelled from that 
country in 1492. Travelling 
to safer harbors in the 
Ottoman Empire, North 
Africa and Eastern Europe, 

Special Ed. Parent's Meeting 

The Quincy Parent Shop Community Meeting 



The 1992 Multicultural 
Festival extends through 
March 14. 

For more information 
caU 471-5712 or 328-9200. 



Advisory Council to 
Special Education will 
meet Thursday, Feb. 13 at 
7:30 p.m at the Stop & 



Room on Newport Avenue. 



Meetings are 
the public. 



open to 




QUINCY RESIDENTS Ann and Joseph Amcndolare and Lorraine Paoluccl, at the 
unveUing of the plaques Usting the distinguished donors of the class of 1988, 1989, 1990 
and 1991 of Aqukas College in Milton at the donors' reception at the college. 

(Sam Greenwald photo) 

Andrea Scott Works 
With Orphans In Romania 



Andrea Scott of Quincy 
was one of seven students 
from Eastern Nazarene 
College (ENC) to travel to 
Romania for the month of 
January. 

The students and other 
adults and health 
professionals from the U.S. 
and Ireland, in association 
with the Free Romania 
Foundation, helped care 
for some of the 140,000 
institutionalized children 
in Romanian state-run 
orphanages. 

Miss Scott was 



stationed in the village of 
Nicoresti, where she 
played with sick and 
malnutritioned children 
daily. For the least 
developed children, she 
also helped feed, bathe, 
and change their clothing. 
The students saw the 
experience as an 
opportunity to share 
compassion and love 
through Christian outreach. 
The daughter of Jon and 
Margaret Scott of Quincy 
who are also foreign 
missionaries, she is a 1990 



graduate of Lajes High 
School in Azores, 
Portugal. While in high 
school, she was president 
of the Foreign Language 
Club, yearbook editor, and 
worked on the school 
newspaper. Miss Scott was 
also a member of the 
Drama Club and National 
Honor Society. 

A sophomore English 
major at ENC, she has 
also attended the European 
Nazarene Bible College in 
West Germany. 



Former Editor Women's Club Speaker 



The Squantum 

Women's Club will meet 
Thursday, Feb. 13 at 12:15 
p.m. at First Church of 
Squantum's Fellowship 
Hall. 

A mini-luncheon will be 
hosted the Community 



Service Committee with 
co-chairmen Edith 
MacDonald and Mae 
Lauwers. 

Terry Cataldo will 
preside at the Business 
Meeting. 



Dorothy Kavka, former 
editor of the women's 

pages of the Brockton 
Enterprise will speak on 
people she has interviewed 
including Ginger Rogers 
and Kitty Dukakis. 



Quincy Toastmasters Club 
Meets At Fore River Clubhouse 



The 



Quincy 






Toastmasters Club, which 
helps people v/ith public 
speaking, meets every 
Monday night (except 
hohdays) from September 
through May at the Fore 



River Clubhouse, 16 
Nevada Rd., Quincy. 

Telephone number is 
472-9479. 

Guests are welcome. 



John, Joanne Flaherty 
Parents Of Son 



RECEPTION HALLS 



ISTYUSHIZO-SEATEr 

DISCOVERB)NEAR 

MAIUNABAY. 

THOUGHT TO BE 

AMBJA'S. 

The sflott's out 

! functton room dt Amelia's 

I has bacoRW one of B<^ton's 

I most popular spots lor u«d 

dir.gs. shotwes. corporate 

meetings, and get logethtrt 

of all kmds \Ue feature an 

I extensive menu at affordable 

prtces \^te oucrlooli Marma 

I Bay arvj the Boston skylir^ 

Wed like to make your next 

function really fly 

|l Pleaw uO 617471 14S3 



\ 



FLORISTS 



Flowers by Helen 

367 BILLINGS ROAD 

WOLLASTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02170 

F lowers For All Occasions 

Specializing m Woc^dings 

471-3772 

Certified Weddmq Consultants 



Quint's 
Florists 

761 So Artery 
Quincy 

773-7620 



MUSIC 



Bands loo expensive? 
DJs too txNing? 
Pm your answerlll 

Chuck Palmer 

Th« IMknai* on* man show 
' Waddings • Functions •Clubs 
Cirfl 340-2107 «M 



HAIR STYLING 



RACHELLE FOX 
HAIR CREATIONS 

591 South St., Quincy 

Call 479-9435 
Wash & Cut $8.00 
Perms $30.00 

Walk Ins or Appointments 



4/30 



John and Joanne 
(Mahoney) Flaherty, 21 
Oakhilj Rd., Braintree, are 
parents of a daughter. 

Saw Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



Siobhan Geraldine, bom 
Jan. 27 at St. Margaret .s 
Hospital for Women in 
Boston. 

Grandparents are Mrs. 
and Mrs. John F. Mahoney 
Sr. of Quincy and Mrs. 
Mary Flaherty oi 
Braintree. 



PHOTOGRAPHER 



Photography _ 

H^clnti'^L,., 

679 Hancock Street. Ouincy 

(Wollaston) 

479-6686 



BAKERY 



O'BRIEN'S 
BAKERIES 

9 Beale Street 
Wollaston 
472-4027 




JEWELRY 



C^OlSOn Fine Jewelry 

Quality and Integrity a Tradition 

The Cotetti Family A! -Dave -Mark 
730 HANCOCK ST., WOLLASTON 02170 786-7942 



Bruce AytTS 



A YCKwerot. 

CAN WE HELP YOU 



DRIVING EQUIPH/IENT FOR THE 
PHYSICALLY CHALLEI^GEO 



HANDICAPPED VANS 



• N«w t Ut*d Varw lo 

modiltcations 

• Used Detnoj 

• All popular lifts 

• Hand conlrolj 

• Raised roots 

• Drop floors 

• Wheelchair TIe-dotmt 

• Power Seal 

• Handicap Rental Vans 



Call or write I"' 
tree broctiiir'" 




iiOH East Sqiinnluni Slrm 
Qiiiiuy. \f 1 02/7/ 



:{28-00.'ih 



Thursday, February 6, 1992 Quincy Sun Page 7 



JoAnn Bragg President 
Citywide Parents* Council 



JoAnn (Grazic) Bragg 
was recently elected 
president of the Quincy 
Citywide Parents' Council, 
succeeding Bruce 
Adukonis who resigned. 

Officers re-elected are 
Don McCarthy, vice 
president; Peter Griswold, 
corresponding secretary 
and Sheila Petrucelli, 
treasurer. 

The council has refined 
its goals for the year. 
Goals approved at the 
meeting were: 

•More community 
involvement in Quincy 
public schools. 

• Reinstate middle 
school foreign language. 

•Maintain class size 
within present school 
committee guidelines. 

•Change screening 
process to insure parental 
and staff involvement. A 
sub- committee was set up 
to review policy. 

•Support site-based 
decision making and 
management. 

•Support seeking world 
class standards with local 
(school-based) decision 
making as to how to 
implement those staixlards. 

•Support more positive 
public relations for city 
schools. 

•Support more in-depth 
media coverage of the 
impact of proposed school 
budget cuts. Asking the 
media to give specific 
examples of how proposed 
cuts will impact the 
classroom and community. 
Compare the delivery of 
services today with past 
years. 




JO ANN BRAGG 



•Support extra- 
curricular activities, 
especially additional youth 
activities. 

The council also 
discussed expanding 
recycling in schools and to 
suggest other schools 
consider running back-to- 
back enrichment programs- 
sharing cost of program 
with other school; more 
than one school participate 
together. 

The Merrymount and 
Atherton Hough 

Elementary Schools were 
successful in this 
endeavor. All elementary 
principals receive copies 
of what other schools are 
doing. 

The Citywide Parents* 
Council has also requested 
information regarding the 
availability of a 
handicapped accessible 
building to move its 
meetings to. The council's 
next meeting will be held 
Monday, Feb. 10 at 7:30 
p.m. in the Quincy High 
School Pride Room. 

All interested citizens 
are encouraged and 
welcome to attend. 



Emblem Club Hears 
Detox Center Director 



Maryann Jurkiewitz, 
R.N., director of the 
Mattapan State Hospital 
Detox Center, was the 
guest speaker at a recent 
meeting of the Quincy 
Emblem Qub. 

Jurkiewitz spoke on 
counseling for drug 
addiction and alcoholism 
and counseling expectant 
mothers who are acidicted 
to drugs. 

The next Emblem Qub 



meeting will be 
Wednesday, Feb. 12 at 7: 
30 p.m. at the Elks Hall, 
East Squantum St. 

Two new members, 
Mary Sheehan and Peggy 
De Young, were recently 
initiated. 

A workshop for Emblem 
Qubs will be held Sunday, 
Feb. 23, at Winthrop 
Emblem Club sponsored 
by the Massachusetts 
State Association of 
Emblem Clubs. 




TEL 328-1700 



F ASf [[ON OLIALITV CLEANl-.RS 



LAUNDRY - DRY CLEANING - ALTERATIONS - STORA(3E 



WEDDING GOWNS A SPECIALTY 



PETER LIO 

O^/NER 



67 BILLirJGS HD. 
NO. OUINCY, MASS. 



Comimg Semday, Febraairy 16th 



Children's Clothing Sale 



11 am -2 pm 

at the 

Knights of Columbus Hall 

Hancock Street 



North Quincy, MA 

TomTheTS 



(acroM from 1 



r Station) 



featuring: 




Buster Brown, Ocean Pacific, Gerber 

Boys and Girls Sizes 
Newborn, Toddler - Up to Children's Size 10 

/YflV !^pring & Summer '92 Fashions 
All at 50% Off! T/icA A Checks Onh! 



Social 




Mr. and Mrs. ANTHONY MONACO 

(Hobbs Studio) 

Katherine Crosby Wed 
To Anthony Monaco 



Katherine Crosby, 
daughter of Edward and 
Marion Hardiman of Fort 
Myers, Fla., was recently 
married to Anthony 
Monaco, son of Elaine 
Walsh of Milford, Q., and 
Richard Swozowski of 
Orlando, Fla. 

The double ring 
ceremony was celebrated 
at Bethany Congregational 
Church, Quincy, and was 
officiated by the Rev. 
Roger Ketchum. A 
reception followed at 
Heritage Hall, Milton. 

The bride was given in 
marriage by her father. 

Diane Warzel of 
Milford, Ct., served as 
Matron of Honor for her 
sister. 

Bridesmaids were Carol 



Virtue of Quincy and 
Donna Nolan of South 
Boston. 

Joseph Nolan of South 
Boston served as Best 
Man. 

Ushers were Dave 
Warzel of Milford, Ct., 
brother-in-law of the bride, 
and Steve Regal of South 
Boston. 

The bride is a graduate 
of Quincy Vocational 
Technical School of 
Nursing and is employed 
at the Quincy Post Office. 

The groom is a graduate 
of Wentwoith Institute and 
is employed by Fletcher, 
Thompson Associates. 

Following a wedding 
trip to Niagra Falls the 
couple are residing in 
Quincy. 



Quincy ITC Meeting 



Quincy ITC (formerly 
Toastmistress) was 
scheduled to meet 
yesterday (Wednesday) at 
7:30 p.m. at the Atlantic 
Neighborhood Center. 

An educational, self 
improvement organization, 
ITC meets the first and 



third Wednesdays of each 
month at 7:30 p.m. 

For more iiibrmation on 
how you can increase your 
self esteem, call 328-0214. 
Visitors are welcome at all 
meetings. 



WELCOME WAGON 
WANTS TO (^\ 
VISIT YOU f-^l 
WITH ^ .^ 

GIFTS -^i^-'/ ^^ 




NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 




BEN SOUTHER and TONI CARLISLE 

(Photo by Robert Souther) 

Toni Carlisle Engaged 
To Ben Souther 



Ms. Barbara Cariisle of 
Weymouth announces the 
engagement of her 
daughter, Toni of 
Wollaston, to Ben 
Souther, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Emilio DaFomo of 
Quincy. 

Miss Carlisle attended 
Somerville High School 



and is a graduate of Saluti 
Associates Corporate 
Education Program. She is 
employed as a musician. 

Mr. Souther attended 
Rockland High School and 
is employed as a musician. 

An August wedding is 
planned. 



Patricia Morrell On Plymouth 
State College President's List 

Patricia Morrell of for achieving a grade point 

Quincy has been named to average of 3.7 or better 
the Plymouth State 

College President's List during the fall semester. 

Mr. and Mrs. David Blaton 
Parents Of A Son 

Mr. and Mrs. David and s°°' ^^ ^^ *9' ^^^2, at 
Susan (Cook) Blaton of 
Quincy are parents of a 



South Shore 
Weymouth. 



Hospital, 






-^t4w 



Winfield 
Gift Emporium 

Yankee Candles 
Lilliput Lane 

Maud Humphrey 
Pauline Dolls 



Hours: Tucs-Sat. 10:00 aiii-5:00 pm 

0)}en Sunday 12-5 pm 

Closed Mondays 

853 Hancock St^ Quincy 479-9784 




WM WW WM WM W^ WM M^ WM WM MM MM Wtf WM WW Mtf irw MW VM W 



ALL FREE TO YOU 

If you've become engag- 
ed, are a new parent or 
moved, I'd like to call on 
you with gifts in my 
basket, intormation and 
cards you can redeem 
for more gifts at local 
businesses. Free to you 
and a helpful way to 
learn answers to your 
questions 

BARBARA MENDEZ 



MONDAY SPECIAL 

WASH • CUT • BLOWDRY 

HERS '20 



Long hair 
slightly higher 



479-2SS7 



'lte?lfe(( 



% 



TUES. & THURS. 
BLOW CUT SPECIAL 

I 11^^ I O Includes 



WEDNESDAY SPECIAL 

PERM SPECIAL ^ - 

UNIPERM *L 



GOLDWELL 
FOAM PERM 

All specials performed by one of Russell's staff 



Includes Shampoo 



Long hair 
iQQ slightly higher 
**** Complete 



Russell Edward's 



Complete 
slightly higher Nail Tipping and Overlay S60 
for longer hair Sculptured Nail. S60 

ft Pedicures S25 

"Body and Facial Waxing Available " 



^in^^i/^zce ('^"ne ay/^u/ ^ 



OPEN 9-5 DAILY AND WED & THURS EVENINGS -, ncn 

Corner Hancock, Chestnut Sts , 1 Maple St., Quincy 472-1 060 



P»ge 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 6, 1992 



Arts/Entertainment 



Auditions For ^ Annie' 
At Woodward School 



Quincy Community 
Theatre in cooperation 
with The Woodward 
School and JM 
Productions, will hold 
auditions for its spring 
production of "Annie" 
Wednesday, Feb. 12 and 
Thursday, Feb. 13 at the 
Woodward School, 1102 
Hancock St., Quincy. 

Girls ages 9-16 are 
invited to attend from 7 to 
8 p.m. and adults are 
invited from 8 to 10 p.m. 
either night. All should 



wear comfortable shoes 
and pants for dance 
audition. 

Those auditioning 
should have a ballad and 
up tempo song prepared, 
preferably from the show 
but not required. All roles 
are open except the role of 
Miss Hannigan. 

The group is working to 
fill roles for 13 girl 
orphans, including Annie, 
in addition to 16 adult 
positions. Anyone 

interested in a backstage 



position should also attend. 

John F. McDonald Jr. of 
Quincy Community 
Theatre will direct. Ken 
Ziengenfuss, who last 
worked with QCT of 
"Mame" will be the 
musical director and 
Patricia Finnegan of New 
Neponset Players will be 
the choreographer. 

The production is 
scheduled to go up May 1 , 
2 and 3, 7, 8 and 9. 

For more information, 
call 288-5953. 




Quincy Resident To Perform 
Berklee Music Concert Feb. 13 



Berklee College of 
Music Professor Steve 
Wilkes of Quincy will 
present a concert entitled 
"The Secrets of Shadows" 
Thursday, Feb. 13 at 8:15 
p.m. at the Berklee 
Performance Center. 

Wilkes' two-month 
journey through Japan 
inspired the conceit. His 



original song impressions 
were composed as tributes 
to various Japanese sites, 
and each incorporates 
Asian music and 
instrumentation into 
American pop/rock 
settings. 

Wilkes, a 1980 
graduate of Berklee 
College of Music, is a 



professor of percussion at 
the college and co-author 
of the textbook "Art of 
Digital Dnimming." 

Tickets are $4, $1 for 
senior citizens and are 
available at the Berklee 
Performance Center Box 
Office, 136 Massachusetts 
Ave., Boston. 



ARTS IS EDUCATION was the theme of a workshop for Quincy Public Schools art and 
music staff held recently at Atlantic Middle School. From I to r, Catherine Carnabuci, 
music department head; Eugene Creedon, acting Superintendent of Schools; Linda 
Stice, Quincy School Committee; guest speaker Erik Oddleifson, president of the Center 
for Arts in the Basic Curriculum; Robin McGoff, art department head. 

'Arts In Education' Workshop 
Held At Atlantic Middle School 



Creates a Lifetime of Confidence 



'DiantTurdy's 

Children's 

Theatre 

Workshop 



FREE Showinji of 

'The Enchanted 

FlulTatoo" 

2/Sl:(K)PM 



6now Uiie IN 




Register Saturday, February 8th 
11:00 AM -1:00 PM 



Call for FREE Brochure 



Erik Oddleifson, 
president of the Center for 
Arts in the Basic 
Curriculum, presented a 
workshop on "The 
Importance of the Arts in 



CINEMAS 

Quincy Fair Mall 
2/6-2/12 



HAND THAT RCX;KS 
THE CRADLE-R 

11 :40 - 2:10 ■ 4:30 ■ 7:30 - 10«0 



[princeoftides-r| 

1 2:15 -3.-00- 7:08 -tiSO 



"k Excellent Speaking Roles 

for all Cast Members 
^ Easy Payment Plans 



617-472-9233 

Woodwind School 

1 102 Hincock St. 

Quincy Square 



Beginners 4-8 years old 

Monday! 5-6:15 

Saturdays 10-11:15 

Regular 8>13 years old 

Wednesdays 4-6 

Fridays 4:15-6:15 

Saturdays 11:30-1:30 

Advanced 14 & UP 

Wednesdays 7:00 -9:00 



FREE JACK -R 

11:46-10:00 



FATHER OF 
THE BRIDE-PG 

1 1 :45 - 2.-05 - 4:X - 7:20 - a:SO 



Education" at Atlantic 
Middle School recently. 

The workshop, co- 
chaired by Catherine 
Carnabuci, music 
department head, and 
Robin McGoff, art 
department head, was 
attended by Quincy Public 
Schools' music and art 
staff members and parents. 

Oddleifson discussed 
how the arts have 
impacted academic 
performance across the 
country and in 
international programs. He 
gave many reasons to 
teach the arts within the 
traditional core curriculum 
and introduced evidence 
showing that schools 
which increased the time 



HOOK-PG 

12:10-3:15 



fjsfiiii 





* 



214 Washington Street • Quincy, MA • 847-3940 

Formerly Brittany's 



M'S 



2 fori 
Lunch 
Special 

Buy 1 Lunch 

get second Free! 

M-F 11-4 

With This Coupon 



Cheese Pizza $1.00 

BBQ'd Wings $1.00 

12-9 

Specials Served 

Every Sunday 

Take Out Excluded 



KUFFS-PG-13 

2:10-4:36-7:19 



ISHININGTHROUGH-Rl 

12:10-3:10-7«0-»:90 



FRIED GREEN 
TOMATOES-PG-13 

12:15- 3:15 -7.-00- 950 



RNALANALYSIS-R 

1 2:10 -3M-7K)S- 0:49 



RUSH-R 

7:10-»-.4S 



Bargain Matinees 

First Three Shows 

$3.75 

773-5700 



Our Own Homemade 
SEAFOOD 
CHOWDER 

lenrlitfl 
FRESH FISH 



vHnnip 



Your Cliotee of 
BroNtd or Frtod 

Everyday Special 

Open BrMkfMi 
Everyday Except Sunday 

HOURS 
Mon-Sat 6 a.m. -9 p.m. 

TAKEOUT ORDERS 
FAST SERVICE 

308 QUINCY AVE. 
CALL: 773-9854 j 




^*= 




OUR HOURS ARE: 
8:00 AM- 1:00 am 
NOON -1:00 am 



MONDAYS-SATURDAYS 
SUNDAYS 



Full Menu Always Available 



1 



I 



HOMEMADE 
ICE CREAM CAKES & PIES 

"There's No Taste 
Like Homemade" 

6tA BMIngt Rd. 
N. Oulncy, MA 

472-8558 



iMl 



rfta 



i#ta 



teaching the arts produced 
students with superior 
academic abilities, 
excellent thinking skills. 
self-esteem, enthusiasm 
and discipline. 

He praised parents in 
attendance and 

encouraged them to 
become advocates in the 
Quincy schools. 

School Committee 
member Linda Stice also 
spoke and expressed 
concern and interest in the 
QPS arts programs. 

Other department beads 
attending were Dr. Janet 
DiTullio, head of 
curriculum; Dr. Mary 
Lydon, physical education 
head; Catherine Roeder, 
head of Ubrary services. 

Copies of Oddleifson'.s 
speech may be obtained 
by calling 984-8712 or 
984-8736. 



SECONDARY 
LUNCH 



Feb. 10-14 

Mon: pizza, green 
beans, apple crisp, milk. 

Tues: Early release day- 
Middle and High School - 
hot dog on a roll, 
vegetarian beans, fruit 
juice, milk. 

Wed: American cold 
cut sandwich, chopped 
lettuce with dressing, fruit 
juice, milk. 

Thurs: turkey fricassee, 
mashed potato, peas, fresh 
baked wheat roll, milk. 

Fri: breaded veal 
cutlets with sauce, side 
order of rotini, fresh apple, 
fresh baked Italian roll, 
milk. 

Happy Valentine's Day! 



WOLLASTON 
THEATER 



14BEALEST 773-4600 



Wed&Thure Feb. 5&6 
MACAULEY CULXIN-ANNA CHLUMSKI 

"MY GIRL" (PG) 
Eve's 7:00 Only 



Starts Fri Feb 7 

ROBERT OtNIRO-JESSICA LANGE 

"CAPE FEAR" (R) 

An Adult Thriller 

Fri & Sat 6:55 & 9:20 

Sun-Thurs 7:00 Only 

Mon & Tues DoHar Night 



ALL SEATS $3.00 



Thursday, February 6, 1992 Quincy Sun Page 9 



Financial Planning 

Program Introduced 

To QHS Students 



Quincy High School 
announces it will 
incoiporate the high school 
financial planning program 
into its curriculum. The 
program is a nationwide 
effort to teach young 
people essential concepts 
of personal finance aixi 
sound money management. 

Quincy High School 
will offer the program in 
its Automobile Insurance 
Qass anVEST), taught by 
Harry Carter. 

The Financial Planning 
Program materials are 
geared to the 16 to 18 
year-old group, and 
emphasize such concepts 
of understanding the 
financial planning process, 
earning income to meet 
goals, protecting assets, 
savings, and planning to 
meet financial goals. 

The program was 
developed by the Denver, 
Colorado-based College 
for Financial Planning and 



is provided without charge 
as a public service. The 

college is an independent, 
nonprofit, educational 
institution that offers 
educational curricula to 
professionals in financial 
services. 

The teacher designated 
to implement the program 
at Quincy High will work 
in conjunction with Philip 
Boncaldo, Associates, 
Inc., who will assist in the 
presentation of materials 
and be available to answer 
questions from students. 

The High School 
Financial Planning 
Program is evaluated by 
those participating in the 
program and the feedback 
is used to refine course 
content. 

For more information 
about the program, call 
Harry Carter at 984-8836, 
or the director at the 
College of Financial 
Planning, (303) 220-1200. 



Lincoln-Hancock School 

Students Learn About 

Respiratory System 



Third grade students at 
the Lincoln-Hancock 
Community School 
recently learned the 
answer to the question 
"How long can you go 
without breathing" as well 
as other information on 
lung health and smoking 
during a recent 
presentation by the Norfolk 
County-Newton Lung 
Association. 

The program features a 
discussion of the 
respiratory system 



including visual aids, a 
velcro board and a video 
called Octopuff. In 
addition, ways to keep 
lungs health, especially 
not smoking and avoiding 
passive smoke, are 
presented. 

The program is fee of 
charge to any schools in 
the area. Anyone 

interested in the program 
can call the Norfolk 
County-Newton Lung 
Association at (508) 668- 
6729. 



North Quincy Seniors To Meet 



The North Quincy 
Senior Citizens Club will 
meet today (Thursday) at 
12:30 p.m. at Quincy 
Community United 
Methodist Church, 40 



Beale St. 

A whist party will be 
held Feb. 13 at 12:30 p.m. 
Refreshments will be 
served. 



Alliance For Mentally 
111 To Meet Feb. 12 



The South Shore 
Alliance for the Mentally 
111 will meet Wednesday, 
Feb. 12 at 7 p.m. at the 
Quincy Mental Health 
Center cafeteria, 460 
Quincy Ave. 

A videotape will be 
shown on "Understanding 
and Communicating With 
a Person Who is 
Experiencing Mania," by 



Mary Mollen, R.N., 
concerning Manic 
Depressive Illness. 

Refreshments will be 
served. 




CITY CHAIRMAN Susan Gallagher, right, honors 
Richard and Coleen Lockhead. 




JUDY BALZANO receives her Golden Elephant award 
from Vice-Chairman Joiin McDufT 




CHESTER FREEMAN, treasurer, presents Richard 
Harris, left, with liis Golden Elephant award. 

GOP City Committee 
Honors Former Officers 



The Quincy Republican 
City Committee presented 
"Golden Elephant" 
certificates of appreciation 
to former officers during a 
recent dinner at Dimitri's 
Restaurant in Quincy. 

Honored were former 
City Chairman Richard 
Lockhead and his wife, 
Coleen; former Vice- 
Chairman Richard Harris; 



and former Secretary and 
1990 candidate for state 
representative, Judy 
Balzano. 

The awards, initiated 
this year, will be given 
annually to persons who 
have "rendered outstanding 
service to the Republican 
Party and to the cause of 
good govemmenL" 






INSURANCE Ar;F,Nrv,IN( 



"Be Sure Now - Not Sorry Later" 

OUR NEW LOCATION IS: 
62 DERBY STREET, HINGHAM, MA 

PO BOX 522 ACCORD STATION 02018-0522 

Rear BIdg., behind SHEARSON & LEHMAN 

(OFF RTE 3, EXIT 15 NEXT TO HINGHAM PLAZA) 

TEL: (617)740-4070 
COME BY AND VISIT OUR NEW OFFICE 



CORBIN'S FASHIONS 

Women's Apparel 




S'-A 



trs.^^*^:--^? 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO 

SIRVICE f\>I MOBILE 



AUTO-HOME-IUSIHESS 

• OUDIOITS INS'. AILED' 

• LOCKS REKETED . " 

• DOOR CLOSERS fi 

• PANIC HARDWAME > 

• AUTO KEYS FIHED ^s 



VISIT OUR SHOWROOM 
^756 SO. ARTERY. QUINCY I 



Hours: 

Tuesday - Saturday 

9:30 - 5:30 



68 Billings Rd. 

North Quincy 

328-1926 




PENNY SALE 

Buy One Dress At Regular Price 
Buy Second Dress For A Penny 

30% OFF ALL 

Blouses - Jackets - Robes - Skirts - Slacks - Sweaters 




Appel Robes 
Barclay Square 
Boston Travler 
Designers Original 



Graff of California 
Judy Bond 
Leslie Fay Petites 
Northern Isle 



Child Passenger 
Safety Awareness Week 



As part of "Child 
Passenger Safety 
Awareness Week" Feb. 9- 
15, Police Chief Francis 
Mullen has directed newly 
appointed Safety Officer 
Dave Doberty to visit 
Quincy schools and remind 
children that the proper 
use of seat belts can save 
lives and prevent injuries. 

Massachusetts law 
requires all children 12 
and under to be fastened in 
a safety belt or child car 
seat when driving in a 
motor vehicle. There is a 
fine of $25 for every child 
12 years and under not 
fastened in a safety belt or 
child car seat. 

Parents should secure 



their children properly to 
help save their lives and 
reduce injuries in the 
event of a motor vehicle 
accident. Proper use of 
seat belts and child car 
seats can reduce death and 
injuries by more than 50 
percent 

Mullen will institute 
selective enforcement 
throughout the city to 
ensure voluntary 

compliance with the 
Massachusetts Child 
Passenger Safety Law and 
reminds all parents and 
guardians that the leading 
cause of child death can 
be eliminated in a sn^. 

'Suckle up our most 
valuable resource, our 
children," Mullen said. 



$6,400 For City 
Data Processing Supplies 



The City Council 
Monday night unanimously 
q>proved the appropriation 
of $6,400 to the Data 
I>rocessing Department for 
various supplies. 

"These expenses were 
completely 

unanticipated," said Data 
Processing Department 
Director Robert Brennan. 



"Our budget has no way of 
handling them at this 
time." 

Among the expenses 
were electrical work in the 
department's computer 
room, repairs to the printer 
in the Collector's office, a 
UPS battery replacement, 
software fix Keystone, and 
a perforator for tax bills. 



Yim Kuen Lee Enrolled 
At Wheelock College 



Yim Kuen Lee of 
Quincy has registered at 
Wheelock College, 
Boston. 

Founded in 1888, 
tVheelock College is 
nationally known for its 
programs in child 



development and human 
services. Its students are 
trained as professionals to 
work with children and 
families in schools and 
day care settings, hospitals 
and clinics, museums and 
social service agencies. 




Enlarged to show detail 



O J & C Fenara Co., Inc. 



HEARTS & DIAMONDS 

Exquisite double hearts 

in 14 Karat Gold and 

sparkling diamonds 
Beautifully designed and 
crafted by J & C Ferrara 

LeColson 
Jewelry 

730 Hancock Street 
Quincy, MA 02170 



Page 10 Quincy Sun Thursday, February i, 1992 



Gospel Singers At First 
Parish Unitarian Sunday 



This Sunday Freda 
Battle and Shirley White 
will sing Gospel music in 
honor of Black History 
Month during the 10:30 
a.m. service at United First 
Parish Church (Unitarian 
Universalist) in Quincy 
Center. 

Battle is a Gospel 
songwriter, pianist and 
singer, and 

White sings soprano. 
Battle is also the founder 
and creative force behind 
"Family," a contemporary 
Gospel choir. They will 
also be presenting a 
special concert of Gospel 
music Sunday, Feb. 23 at 
3 p.m. at the church. 

Dr. Sheldon W. 
Bennett, minister, will 
give the sermon 
"Dimensions Of Marriage" 
during the service. 

Norman Corey, music 



director, will also play 
organ pieces by Bach and 
Buxtehude. Julie 

Dzengeleski and Matt 
Malloy will usher. 

Visitors are welcome 
and are invited to the 
social hour following the 
service. Linda Riddle and 
Robert Cook will be the 
hosts. 

Sunday at 7 p.m.. Dr. 
Bennett will lead 
discussion in the on-going 
series "Understanding the 
Bible from a Liberal 
Perspective." Future dates 
are Feb. 23 and March 8. 

Historic First Parish, 
"Church of the 
Presidents," is located at 
1306 Hancock St. in 
Quincy Square opposite 
City Hall. Church School 
and child care are 
provided. For more 
information call 773-1290. 



'Out Of The Ordinary' 
United Methodist Sermon 



Friendship Sunday will 
be observed Sunday at the 
10 a.m. worship service at 
Quincy Community United 
Methodist Church, 40 
Beale St., Wollaston. 

"Called Out Of The 
Ordinary" will be the 
sermon topic of the Rev. 
Harry Soper Jr. He will 
also give his Young 
Disciples message 
following which Sunday 
School will convene. 

Greeters will be Janet 
McGonigle and Melvia 
Sears. Ushers will be 
William and Marion Cross. 

Church facilities are 
handicapped accessible 
and nursery care is 
provided. A fellowship 
hour follows the service. 
Kathleen Emerson and her 
children and Dan BoUen 
and Brenda Cardarelli and 
children will be the hosts. 
At noon, a luncheon will 
be served by the Sigma 
Phi members with 
proceeds to benefit their 
church grounds Pridav. 

Interfaith Shelter 
Receives $500 Grant 

Quincy Interfaith 
Sheltering Coalition has 
received a $500 grant from 
NYNEX Foundation 
through its Volunteer 
Recognition Program. 

The program recognizes 
NYNEX employees who 
are active community 
volunteers by contributing 
to the organizations that 
benefit from their efforts. 



beautification project. That 
evening, the junior high 
youth fellowship will meet 
at 6 p.m., directed by 
Derek Schmitt. 

Events for the week 
include: 

Open recreation in the 
gym at 7 p.m. Monday; 

The Qiristian Serenity 
Group will meet at 7 p.m. 
Tuesday; 

The senior high youth 
fellowship meets at 7 p.m., 
the Adams Shore Circle 
meets at 7:30 p.m. at the 
home of Adele Hamilton, 
and the Sigma Phi at the 
home of Joanne Nolan 
Wednesday; 

The pastor's Bible study 
class meets at 10 a.m., the 
Wesley Bell Ringers 
rehearse at 6 p.m., and the 
senior choir rehearses at 8 
p.m. Thursday; 

The 3M's Club has its 
monthly pot luck supper 
with the movie "Home 
Alone" as entertainment 



Religion 



Farewell For Co-Pastors 
At Covenant Congregational 



World Marriage Day 
At Blessed Sacrament Feb. 9 



The 10:45 a.m. worship 
service of the Covenant 
Congregational Church, 
Whitwell and Granite Sts., 
will mark the final Sunday 
for co-pastors Rev. 
Kathleen Graves and Rev. 
Kidc Johnson. 

They have accepted a 
call to become 
developmental pastors in 
Minnesota. 

The sermon, "Hope For 
The Future," will be 
preached by Rev. Graves. 
There will be a brief 
farewell ceremony and 
presentation. Following the 
service, there will be a 
reception in the fellowship 
hall downstairs. 

Richard Smith, minister 
of music, will direct and 
accompany the choir in a 
choral introit and an 
anthem. Soprano Luisa 
Dano will sing a solo. Mr. 
Smith will also play an 
organ prelude, offertory 
and postlude. 

Sunday School, with 
classes for all ages, 



nursery through adult, will 
begin at 9:30 a.m. During 
the worship service, an 
attended nursery is 
available for children age 
four and younger. For 
children up to age 12, 
there is junior church. 

Activities for the week 
are: Bible study on 
Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. at 
the home of Florence 
Anderson and choir 
rehearsal on Thursday at 7 
p.m. 

Coming events include 
Covenant Women's 
Ministries Sunday, Feb. 
23. The Naomi Society 
will be in charge of the 
worship service and a 
special musical tribute to 
the hymn writer, Fanny 
Crosby, will be presented 
by the choir. On March 29 
one of the Covenant 
missionaries to Zaire will 
be the guest preacher. 

For more information 
about any of the church's 
activities, call the church 
office at 479-5728. 



World Marriage Day 
will be celebrated by the 
Most Blessed Sacrament 
Church, Sea St., Houghs 
Neck, Sunday, Feb. 9, at 
the 10:30 a.m. Mass. 

Couples will renew 
their marriage vows at the 
Mass. 

The day is set aside 
each year to honor the 



couple as the head of the 
family, the basic unit of 
society. World Marriage 
Day elevates public 
awareness to the positive 
aspects of marriage. 

There will be a 
reception at St. Thomas 
Aquinas immediately 
following Mass for all 
those who attend the Mass. 



Taith Slipping Away' 
Bethany Sermon Topic 



Second Greatest Fish Story 
At Point Congregational 



years. Consolazio 
organized "Sunday Night 
at the Movies" for guests. 
They have enjoyed rented 
videos each Sunday 
evening during the past 
five years. 



The Rev. Fred Atwood- 
Lyon will deliver the 
morning sermon titled 
"The Second Greatest Fish 
Story" Sunday at 10 a.m. 
at Quincy Point 
Congregational Church, 
Washington St. and 
Southern Artery. 

He will be assisted by 
the Rev. Carol Atwood- 
Lyon who will serve as 
liturgist. The acolyte will 
be Michelle Thorahill, a 
member of the 1992 
Confirmation class. 

This Sunday will also 
be Scout Sunday at the 
Quincy Point Church. All 
Cub Scouts affiliated with 
Cub Pack One and all Boy 
Scouts who are in Scout 
Troop One, their leaders 
and families are invited to 
attend Sunday's service. 

Scouts and their leaders 
will meet at the church at 
9:30 a.m. to prepare for the 
processional into the 
sanctuary and for their part 



in the service. 

The church has 
sponsored the Cub Pack 
for more than 40 years and 
the Scout Troop for more 
than 70 years. Both groups 
will present their charters 
to the pastors. 

Dr. Herman Weiss, 
church organist and choir 
director, will play and the 
Chancel Choir will sing. 

Church School classes 
take place at 10 a.m. 
Infants, nursery and 
kindergarten children 
should be taken directly to 
their classrooms by their 
parents; all other children 
and young people gather 
first in the sanctuary 
before departing for their 
classes. 

For more information 
about the Quincy Point 
Congregational Church, 
call 773-6424 Monday 
through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 
p.m. 



Catherine Consolazio, 
senior system analyst, has 
been active in the Quincy 
Interfaith Sheltering 
Coalition for the past five 



"The grant will be used 
towards the purchase of a 

new refiigerator for the 
shelter," said Joe Finn, 
Executive Director of 
Quincy Interfaith 
Sheltering Coalition, 
sponsors of Fr. Bill's 
Place. 



St. Mary School 
Registration Feb. 11 



St. Mary School, 121 
Crescent St., West 
Quincy, will conduct 
registration for gr^des pre- 
kindergarten through eight 
Tuesday, Feb. 11 from 
noon to 1:30 p.m at the 



school. 

Parents should bring the 
student's baptismal record, 
birth certificate and 
immunization record. 

For more information, 
call 773-5237. 



I 




FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 

20 Greenleaf St.. Quincy 

Cordially invites you ana 

your family to attend 

Sunday Services at 10:30 a.m. 

Sunday School is held at 

the same time. 

Wednesday Evening 
Meetings begin at 7:30 p.m. 

Child Care is available both 
Sunday and Wednesday 

Come and hear how Bible truths heal. 



Child Care Academy Raises 
$161 For Cystic Fibrosis 



Child Care Academy, 
500 Victory Rd., North 
Quincy, raised $161.50 in 
a recent Mini March to 
benefit the Cystic Fibrosis 
Foundation. 

All monies were raised 
by children age 2.9 years 
to five years. 

Proceeds will aid cystic 



fibrosis research. CF is 
the number one genetic 
killer of children and 
young adults in the U.S. 

Recently, researchers 
made a historic discovery 
by identifying the gene 
which causes cystic 
fibrosis and the defective 
protein it produces. 



The Rev. Roger 
Ketcham will conduct the 
10 a.m. worship service 
Sunday at Bethany 

Congregational Church, 
Spear and Coddington Sts., 
Quincy Center. 

His sermon topic will 
be "When Your Faith Is 
Slipping Away." Scripture 
reader will be Robert 
Caliri. 

A quartet consisting of 
Brenda Bonoli, soprano; 
Rosemary Way, contralto; 
Paul Fraser, tenor; and 
Matthew Murphy, bass 
will sing two selections 
accompanied by Gregory 
Flynn, bass.will sing two 
selections accompanied by 
Gregory Flynn, organist. 

Greeters will be Janet 
Hassler and Margaret 
Kelsey. Hosting the 
fellowship hour in the 
Allen Parlor following the 
worship service will be 



Clayton and Gladys 
Simpson and Paula Aluisy. 
Church School classes 
are held in the parish 
house beginning at 10 a.m. 
Rev. Ketcham will 
conduct the Bible study in 
Room 3 of the parish 
house beginning at 8:30 
a.m. Sunday. Child care for 
infants and toddlers is 
provided during both hours 
for the convenience of 
parents who might wish to 
attend both the Bible study 
and the worship service. 

From 4:30 to 7 p.m. 
next Sunday a meeting 
will be held for parents 
and confirmands with their 
respective mentors and 
members of the Church 
Committee. The program 
will be concluded with a 
supper. 

For more information 
concerning church 
activities call 479-7300. 



9 a.in., 10:30 a.m. Services 
At HN Congregational 



"New Hope For An Old 
Covenant" will be the 
sermon delivered by the 
Rev. M. Alicia Corea at 
the 9 a.m. service Sunday 
at Houghs Neck 
Congregational Church. 

Diaconate members 
serving will be Dorothy 
Sparks and Michael Freel. 
Greeter will be Carole 
Sargeant. 

At the 10:30 a.m. 
service. Dr. Peter Corea's 
sermon will be "The Right 
To Your Own Faith and 
Religion." Rod Hicks will 
be the greeter and Michael 
Stewart and Ruth Gordon 
will serve for the 
Diaconate. 

The choir will be 
directed by Arden 
Schofield. Offertory music 
will be sung by Dorothy 
Sparks, Christine 
Prendergast and Gayle 
Mackay. 

The coffee hour 
between services will be 



hosted by Suzanne Dennis. 
The annual "Valentine 
Dessert Sunday" will be 
held during the coffee 
hour. Desserts and 
Valentine gifts may be 
purchased with proceeds 
benefitting the M. Alicia 
Corea Student Fund. 

The Annual Blue and 
Gold Dinner for Boy Scout 
Troop 6 and Cub Scout 
Pack 6 wiU be held at 2 
p.m. in Fellowship Hall. 
The scouts and their 
parents will be invited to a 
roast beef dinner followed 
by awards and 
entertainment. 

The church is equipped 
for the physically 
challenged. The 

congregation is asked to 
bring donations for the 
baskets in vestibule for Fr. 
Bill's Place and the PSSB 
Pantry Shelf. Every 
Sunday is "Welcome 
Sunday." 



Easter Seal Program 
At YMCA Feb. 26 



Youngsters at the South 
Shore YMCA Day Care 
will have an opportunity to 
learn about physical 
disabilities through the 
Easter Seal Hop-N-Ing 
program during the week 
of Feb. 26. 

The program, sponsored 
by T.J. Maxx, teaches 
children about the causes 
of disabilities and their 
effects on everyday lives. 
Children also leara about 
wheelchairs, crutches and 
other specialized 
equipment. 



Youngsters get a 
chance to help by hopping 
as many times as they can 
in three minutes. They 
earn money pledged for 
each hop by family and 
fiiends. 

Funds raised help 
provide Easter Seal 
services for people with 
disabilities. Services 
include summer camp, 
therapeutic swim program, 
home health care, 
and information and 
referral services. 



Thunday, Fcbniary (, 1992 Qnlncy Sua Page 11 



No Regrets As School Superintendent 

Ricci: 



By STEVE KAVANAGH 

Dr. Robert Ricci 
cleaned out his desk in the 
Superintendent of Schools 
office last week. But he 
left behind a legacy of 
integrity, hard work, vision 
and accomplishment. 

Ricci and his wife 
Josephine were honored 
Friday afternoon at a 
farewell reception at the 
Neighborhood Club 
attended by more than 200 
people including parents, 
teachers, students, 
administrators, city 
officials, and business and 
civic leaders. 

His sometimes stormy 4 
1/2-year tenure was 
highlighted by the 
revitalization of the 
vocational-technical high 
school, the merging of 
Quincy Point and Sterling 
Middle Schools, national 
recognition for Snug 
Harbor Community School 
and Broad Meadows 
Middle School, an 
outstanding business- 
school partnership, a 
reduced drop-out rate, 
controversy over prayer at 
graduation and North 
Quincy High's "Yakoo" 
mascot, and most recently 
concerns over students 
bringing weapons to 
school. 

Ricci told his friends 
and well-wishers he had no 
regrets about his time with 
the Quincy Public Schools. 
"I tried my very best," 
be said. He compared 
himself to former Mayor 
Francis McCauley (who 
attended with bis wife 
Sandra) whom he praised 
as "a man who tells it like 
it is. I believe that's the 
way I am. You may not 
agree with me but I tell it 
like it is." 

"One of the things Dr. 
Ricci did very, very well 
is the relationships he 
established with the 
community. He got a lot of 
community agencies, the 
Rotary Club, Boy Scouts, 
etc., to work in concert 
with the school system," 
said Dr. Carol Lee Griffith, 
assistant superintendent for 
pupil personnel services. 

"The educational 
system, police and fire 
departments have worked 
closely with local 
businesses and city hall. 
And the schools are better 
off for it," Ricci said. 

"I think he's been great. 
I wish he were here for 
another 10 years," Mary 
Collins, School 

Committee vice chairman, 
said. "In a short time he 
has done a great deal 
including the infusion of 
technology into the 
curriculum, the drop-out 
rate, and his general 
innovativeness in tough 
financial times. I'll miss 
him a lot." 

"I think he deserves a 
lot of credit for the 
successes in the past five 
years," School 

Committeeman Steve 
Duridn said. 

Durkin, Collins and 
Peggy Nigro were the 
three Committee members 



1 Tried My Very Best* 




SOMETHING IN COMMON-PoUce Chief Francis MuUen (left) and Safety OfHcer 
Robert Hanna extend thier l>est wishes to outgoing Superintendent of Schools Robert 
Ricci and his wife Josephine. Ricd, a former police officer, was instrumental in 
developing a partnership between the police and school departments. 



JWF^ 




PHOTOGRAPHS AND MEMORIES-Quincy High School Heritage Program students 
Mary Quilty, Jody Ravida and Maria Marineau present a scrapbook of photos IVom the 
Heritage Program to outgoing School Superintendent Dr. Robert Ricci and his wife 

Josephine. 

(Quincy Sun photos by Robert Bosworth) 

If all communities could making Snug Harbor 



who initially supported 
Ricci's appointment in 
1987. Ricci was hired after 
Dr. Richard Chrystal 
withdrew his name from 
consideration for the job. 

"I thought at the time 
that the city and school 
department could benefit 
from bringing someone in 
with an outside 
perspective. I think that 
assessment was validated 
by his performance," 
Durkin said. "I admire him 
for his integrity and his 
unwillingness to bend to 
political pressure. I regret 
he's leaving." 

Ricci himself said he 
has "mixed feelings about 
leaving" Quincy. 

"I arrived here to a 
similar reception. Quincy 
is full of very warm 
people. It doesn't matter 
what strata they are from. 
They turn out in numbers 
and they are there when 
you need them." 

Ricci, who sometimes 
skirmished with school 
committee members and 
Quincy College president 
O. Clayton Johnson, said 
he will always have good 
memories of the city. 

"Despite the acrimony I 
experienced sometimes 
with the school 
committee—which was not 
great~my feelings have 
grown stronger for Quincy. 



be as close as Quincy the 
country would be a lot 
better off," Ricci said. "I 
have very positive 
emotions for the city." 

Johnson and Ricci 
traded compliments during 
the r jeption 

"Somethings Dr. Ricci 
and I were able to work on 
together, that escaped 
publication in the 
newspapers, were the 
Heritage (drop-out 
prevention) Program, 
technology program and 
the Project 2000 program," 
Johnson said. 

The latter program is an 
innovative incentive 
program for fifth graders at 
Snug Harbor. Quincy 
College has invested 
money to pay tuition for 
the students begiiming in 
the year 2000. The college 
will also provide tutoring 
and support services to the 
students as they progress 
through middle and high 
school. 

"Our school has 
benefited tremendously 
from Dr. Ricci being here. 
He was the first who 
noticed Snug Harbor 
needed programs that other 
schools didn't," Deanna 
White-Hebert, a teacher at 
Snug Harbor, said. 

White-Hebert said 
Ricci was instrumental in 



eligible for Chapter 1 
federal funding which 
helped provide Snug 
Harbor with a computer 
lab and a pre-scbool 
program. 

Ricci said he feels 
comfortable turning the job 
over to Assistant 
Superintendent Eugene 
Creedon and that Quincy 
schools are heading in the 
right direction. 

"I came to do a job and 
make some changes in 
five to seven years," Ricci 
said. "I didn't plan on 
coming to Quincy and 
retiring." 

"I would have Uked to 
do more at the high 
schools by implementing 
the team teaching 
concept... but that's 
coming," he said. 

Ricci gave credit to 
Quincy teachers and 
administrators for the 
positive changes of his 
tenure. 

"I think as our ideas 
reach fiuition Quincy will 
be out front," he said. 

"Quincy is going in the 
direction the state should 
go. 

The former Providence, 
R.I., Superintendent of 
Schools said being an 
outsider helped him in his 
Quincy job. 

"Seeing things from an 




GOOD LUCK BOB-Dr. Robert Ricci, former 
Superintendent of Schools, and his wife Josephine were 
honored last week during a reception at the 
Neighborhood Club. 



outside perspective—not 
that I see things better 
than anyone else— but 
sometimes things can be 
done differently," he said. 

Many perceived Ricci 
as a problem solver who 
was adept at recognizing 
problems and addressing 
them. 

"He saw the problem 
with space at our school," 
said Bernazzani School 
principal Morrie Hibbard. 
"And this year he provided 
us with extra personnel 
that we needed at our 
crowded upper grades." 

Incidents of students 
bringing guns and knives 
to school this year 
prompted Ricci to draft a 
school security plan. 

Last spring Ricci faced 
two difficult issues which 
captured the public's 
attention--prayer at 
graduation and the Yakoo. 
Ironically, neither was an 
educational issue. 

Ed Grogan, the Atlantic 
Middle School teacher 
who spearheaded the drive 
to change the Yakoo 
symbol, praised Ricci. 

"I think he's been a 
good superintendent. He's 
gone out on a limb on 
Yakoo— a very sensitive 
issue. We're trying to 
educate the city about how 
it offends native 
Americans. 

"I thought it was a 
courageous position Dr. 
Ricci took. He helped 
move the issue forward," 
Grogan said. 

Ricci was presented a 
number of plaques and 
gifts including a photo 
scrap book from Quincy 
High students Jody 
Ravida, Maria Marineau 
and Mary Quilty 



representing the Heritage 
Program. 

City Councillor Pat 
Toland, representing 
Mayor James Sheets, 
presented a proclamation 
fiom the mayor. 

"I hope the Quincy 
school system will nurture 
those outstanding programs 
Dr. Ricci leaves behind," 
Toland said. 

The Supt.'s secretary, 
Tefta Burrelli, made a 
warm and humorous tribute 
to Ricci. She joked about 
his swift speaking style 
and Rhode Island accent. 

"It's too bad he's 
leaving. We were just 
starting to understand 
him." 

John "Butch" Mahoney, 
Social Health Coordinator, 
presented a plaque to the 
former police officer. 

"Thanks for your 
commitment to kids, 
particularly the safety of 
kids," Mahoney said. 

Collins presented Ricci 
with the Distinguished 
Educator Award on behalf 
of the School Committee. 

Carmen Mariano, 
former Deputy 

Superintendent, who 
worked closely with Ricci, 
praised Ricci for bis 
character and dedication. 

Sen. Paul Harold 
presented Ricci with a 
citation from the State 
Senate. 

Officials fi^om the Boys 
Scouts of America and the 
Rotary Club also 
commended Ricci for 
developing relationships 
between the schools and 
the community. 

Creedon concluded the 
tribute by telling Ricci he 
is always welcome to visit 
at Quincy schools. 



Quincy High PAC 
To Meet Feb. 11 



The Quincy High 7:15 p.m. 
School Parent Advisory Room. 



in the Pride 



Council meeting will be 
held Tuesday, Feb. 11 at 



All parents and teachers 
are welcome to attend. 



Page 12 Qoincy San Thursday, February (, 1992 



Obituaries 



Marie R. Crowther, 74 

Retired N.E. Telephone Employee 



A funeral Mass for Marie 
R. (Qeary) Crowther, 74, of 
Quincy, was celebrated Feb. 
1 at St Francis XavierChurch, 
Weymouth. 

Mis. Crowther died Jan. 
28 at home after a brief illness. 

She woiked for New En- 
gland Telephone for 16 years 
before retiring in 1983. 

She was a member of the 
South Shore Breathing Qub. 

Born and educated in 
Boston, she lived in 
Dorchester for many years 
and in Weymouth for 27 years 
before moving to Quincy 15 
years ago. 

Wife of the late Basil 
Crowtijer, she is survived by 



two sons, Allan D. Crowther 
of Merrimack, N.H., and 
Dwight Crowther of 
Hingham; a brother, Joseph 
Cleary of Canton; three 
grandchildren, and several 
nieces and nephews. 

Burial was in New Cavalry 
Cemetery, Boston. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney Broth- 
ers Home for Funerals, 1 In- 
dependence Ave. 

Donations may be made 
to the Hospice of the South 
Shore, 100 Bay State Dive, 
Braintree, MA 02184 or 
Norfolk County Lung Asso- 
ciation, 25 Spring St., 
Walpole, MA 02081. 



Angela M angano 



Secretary For N.Y. 

A funeral Mass for Angela 
Mangano of Quincy was 
celebrated Jan. 28 in St Ann's 
Church. 

Miss Mangano died Jan. 
26 at home after a long illness. 

She was a secretary for the 
New York Central Railroad 
for 35 years before retiring in 
1974. 

Bom in Wateitown, N.Y., 
she lived in Somerville and 
the North End in Boston be- 



Central Railroad 

fore moving to Quincy 22 
years ago. 

She is survived by a sister. 
Rose Ramsden of San Diego; 
and several nieces, nephews, 
grandnieces aixl grandneph- 
ews. 

Burial was in New Calvaiy 
Cemetery. 

Donatioi]s may be made 
to the Hospice of the South 
Shore, 100 Bay State Drive, 
Box 334, Braintree, MA 
02184. 



Margaret M. Conaghan, 97 



A funeral Mass for Marg- 
aret M. (Ryan) Conaghan, 97, 
of Quincy, was celebrated 
Feb. 1 in St Joseph's Church. 

Mrs. Conaghan died Jan. 
29 at home after a brief illness. 

Wife of the late Cormac 
Conaghan, she is survived by 
a daughter, Marie Drace of 
California; two nieces, 
Dolores McSherry of 
Framingham and Maureen 



Kiley of Quincy; five grand- 
children and two great- 
grandchildrea She was the 
mother of the late James 
Conaghan, Myles Conaghan 
and William Conaghan. 

Burial was in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney Funeral 
Home, 74 Elm St 




A THOUGHT F0« THE WEEK 



On th* occasion of 
Abraham Lincoln's birthday 
w« hop* th* man who hold 
poaltlons of laadarshlp In 
thia country pay haad to 
soma of hia advic*. 
„ „ Soma of Mr. LIncoln'a 

D Scott Deware ,jj,^„, ^.ar rapaating 
bacauaa thay war* baalc than and ar* baalc atlll. 
Kara ara soma of tham: 

1. You cannot bring about proaparlty by 
diacouraging thrift. 

2. You cannot atrsngthan th* wsak by 
waakaning th* atrong. 

3. You cannot halp tha amall man by 
taaring down th* big m*n. 

4. You cannot halp th* poor by dostroying 
th* rich. 

5. You cannot lift th* waga aarn*r by 
pulling down Ih* wag* payar. 

6. You cannot k**p out of troubl* by 
spsnding mor* of your Incoms. 

7. You cannot fur«Sar th* brotharhood of 
m*n by Inciting claaa hatrad. 

8. You cannot aatabllah sound aacurlty on 
borrowad monay. 

8. You cannot build charactar and couraga 
by taking away a man's Inltlativs and 
Indapsndanca. 

10. You cannot halp man p*rmanantly by 
doing for Iham what th*y could and ahould do 
for th*maalv*a. 

On Lincoln's birthday lat ua all, Isadora 
and cHlzana allka, think upon th*a* thoughts 

Deware Funeral Home 

576 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 

472-1137 

Member of the New Englana i-uneral rrust" 

and your Suburban Boston Pre-Need 

funeral specialist 

Serving All Religious Faiths 

Services Rendered To Any DistanQ9—^—^-,— 



Kendall RKiely, 83 

Worked For AT & T 44 Years 



A funeral Mass for Kendall 
H. Kiely, 83, of Quincy, was 
celebrated Feb. 1 at St. 
Agatha's Church, Milton. 

Mr. Kiely died Jan. 30 at 
Quincy Hospital after a brief 
illness. 

He was a former district 
manager for AT&T in Boston 
and a member of the executive 
board of the Quincy CouiKil 
on Aging. 

He graduated from Provi- 
dence College while working 
for AT&T. He remained with 
the company for 44 years 
before retiring in 1972. 

After retiring from AT&T, 
he worked for a time with the 
Occupational Health and 
Safety Administration as an 
inspector. 

He grew up in Providence 
and attended Technical High 
School there. 

He enjoyed painting in 
both oils and watercolors as a 
hobby. He also enjoyed golf- 



ing and was a fan of both 
track and field events and the 
Boston Red Sox. 

He was a member of the 
Telephone Pioneers of 
America. 

He lived in Quincy for 43 
years. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Nina Marie (McKeown) 
Kiely; a son, Kendall Kiely 
ofLouisville,Ky.; adaughter, 
Nancy Kinchla of Cohasset; 
and eight grandchildrea He 
was the father of the late Nina 
Mary Kiely and brother of the 
late Daniel J. Kiely, Mary F. 
Kiely and Eleanor Muldoon. 

Burial will be in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to the John Adams Nursing 
Home Activity Fund, 211 
Franklin St., Quincy, MA 



02169. 

Lois M. Sbardella, 66 

A funeral Mass for Lois Lucille Reed of Quincy, 

Donna Sbardella of Quincy 
and Mary Lou Murano of 
Braintree; four brothers, Jo- 
seph Sabia of Texas, James 
T. Qeggett of Fort Lauder- 
dale, Fla., Braintree Police 
Patrolman William Cleggett 
and Joseph Cleggett, both of 
Braintree; and a grand- 
daughter, Kristen Leigh 
Murano of Braintree. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the MortimerN. Peck 
Funeral Home, Braintree. 



Maiy (Lyons) Sbardella, 66, 
of Quincy, was celebrated 
Feb. 1 at the Church of St. 
Clare, Braintree. 

Mrs. Sbardella died Jan. 
28 at Palm Beach Garden 
Medical Center in Floridadue 
to complications from heart 
disease. 



She was bom in Waltham 
and educated in Braintree. 

She is survived by her 
husband, Joseph Sbardella; a 
son, Joseph Sbardella Jr. of 
Hyde Park; three daughters. 



Jane Kozowyk, 77 

A funeral Mass for Jane Kozowyk, she is survived by 

a son, Richard Kozowyk; a 
daughter, Janet Kozowyk; a 
brother, Walter Baranowski; 
and four grandchildren. 

Burial was in St. Michael 's 
Cemetery, Roslindale. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Szulewski & Son 
Funeral Home, East Cam- 
bridge. 

Elizabeth R. Murphy 

She is survived by her 
husband, Joseph B. Murphy; 
and a sister, Maiy Groover of 
Weymouth. 

Burial was private. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St., 
Wollaston. 



(Baranowski) Kozowyk, 77, 
of Quincy, formerly of South 
Boston, was celebrated 
Monday at St. Hedwig's 
Church, East Cambridge. 

Mrs. Kozowyk died Jan. 
29 at Quincy Hospital after a 
brief illness. 

She was bom in Boston. 

Wife of the late Peter 



A private funeral service 
for Elizabeth Rita (Duffy) 
Murphy of Quincy was re- 
cently held. 

Mrs. Murphy died Jaa 28 
at Quincy Hospital. 

Bom in Boston and for- 
merly of Cambridge, she lived 
in Quincy for 20 years. 



Bernado W. Luggelle HI 

Truck Driver For Suburban Disposal 



A funeral Mass for 
Bernardo W. "Chico" 
Luggelle in of Quincy was 
celebrated yesterday 
(Wednesday) in Most Blessed 
Sacrament Church. 

Mr. Luggelle died Feb. 1 
at home. 

He was a truck driver for 
Suburban Disposal Company 
in Abington for nine years. 

Bom in Boston, he was a 
graduate of Quincy Voca- 
tional-Technical High 
School. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Michelle (Cignarella) 
Luggelle; two sons, Mark 
Luggelle and Bernardo 
Luggelle, both of Weymouth; 
his father, Bernardo W. 
"Chico" Luggelle Jr. of 
Quincy; a brother, Clifford 



K. Luggelle of Painesville, 
Ohio; four sisters, Lynda M. 
Hanly of Quincy, Rutharm 
Benson of Lawrenceville, 
Ga., and Patricia A. Johnston 
and Darline L. Battaglia, both 
of Quincy; and an aunt, 
Quincy School Committee 
member Margaret Nigro of 
Quincy. He was the son of the 
late Ruth L. (Geddes) 
Luggelle. 

Burial will be in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney Broth- 
ers Home for Funerals, 1 In- 
dependence Ave. 

Donations may be made 
to the Ruth Luggelle Schol- 
arship Fund, Houghs Neck 
Community Council, 1193 
Sea St. Quincy, MA 02169. 



Evelyn E. Sullivan, 95 

Former Senior Cleric For DES 

A memorial service for of Roslindale and John J. 



Evelyn E. (Saccoach) 
Sullivan, 95, of Quincy, was 
held Tuesday at Christ Epis- 
copal Church. 

Mrs. Sullivan died Feb. 1 
in the John Adams Nursing 
Home in Quincy. 

She was a senior cleric for 
the Division of Employment 
Security from 1%2 to 1970. 

She was a member of the 
Women's Club of Christ 
Episcopal Church in Quincy 
and the Mother's Club of St. 
Mary's Episcopal Church in 
Boston. 

Bom and educated in Bos- 
ton, she lived in Dorchester 
before moving to Quincy 26 
years ago. 

Wife of the late John J. 
Sullivan, she is survived by 
two sons, Albert G. Sullivan 



Sullivan of Florida; nine 
daughters, Betty V. LeQair 
and Virginia F. Goldberg, 
both of Quincy, Evelyn 
Giuffre of Newton, Helen M. 
Happel of Scituate, Barbara 
Simon and Marilyn Strachan, 
both of Roslindale, Ruth 
D'Atillio of Italy, Joyce M. 
Glassman of Rorida and 
Gloria McNeeley of Newton; 
aixl many grandchildren and 
great-grandchildren. She was 
the mother of the late Phyllis 
Sweeney. 

Burial was in the church 
cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Hamel, Wickens 
and Troupe Funeral Home, 
26 Adams St., Quincy. 

Donations may be made 
to the memorial fund of Christ 
Episcqjal Church. 



M, 'Joe' Walsh, 73 

Former Railroad Carman 



A funeral Mass for M. 
"Joe" Walsh, 73, of Quincy, 
was celebrated Monday at St. 
Agatha's Church, Milton. 

Mr. Walsh died Jan. 29 at 
Carney Hospital in Boston 
after a long illness. 

He was a carman for the 
New York, New Haven and 
Hartford Railroad for many 
years before retiring in 1973. 

He was an Army veteran 
of World Warn. 

He was a native of 
Roxbury and lived in Quincy 



CHRISTIAN DIOR • SOPHIA LOREN • JOAN COLLINS • VUARNET • PIERRE CAROtN 



Fashion 
Eyewear 

SAVE 

*35 



HEARING AIDS^ 

1361-A Hancock St., Quincy Sq. ^ 
773-3505 • 773-4174 

"S^ $499 ' 

Complete 

30 Day Trial 2 Yr. Warrantv 



1 Y€AR WARRANTY 
ON ALL FRAMES 



30 Day Trial 2 Yr. Warranty 

FREE VALIDATED PARKING 



w 3 m teSi 



MAISTON • AVANTGARDf • OSCAROELARENTA » WES SAINT lAURENT • TIIRA 



for 24 years. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Elinor G. (Bishop) Walsh, and 
a brother-in-law, Robert L. 
Bishop. He was the brother of 
the late Thomas F. Walsh. 

Burial was in Forest Hills 
Cemetery in Boston. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Chapman, Cole 
and Gleason Funeral Home. 

Donations may be made 
to the Quincy Hospice, 1354 
Hancock St., Quincy, MA 
02169. 

Edward Mullin 

A funeral Mass for Ed- 
ward J. Mullin of Quincy was 
celebrated Monday at St. 
Augustine's Church, Boston. 

Mr. Mullin died Jan. 29. 

He was a retired employee 
of the Wonder Bread Co. and 
a member of the Bakery 
Drivers Union Local 25. 

He was known to family 
and friends as "Beepa." 

He is survived by his wife, 
Leonora (Scappini)MuHin; a 
daughter, Rita Murphy of 
Quincy; four grandchildren, 
nine great-grandchildren and 
a great-great-grandchild. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the O'Brien Funeral 
Home, Boston. 



Thursday, February i, 1992 Qulncy Sun Page 13 



Chinese New Year (4690) 
Festivities Continue 



The Chinese New Year 
festivities continue 
Saturday, the fifth day of 
the New Year 4690. 

The highlight of the 
festival in Quincy will be 
the Chinese Lion Dance 
Troupe sponsored by the 
Chinese Language School 
in Quincy. 

The Lion Dance Troupe 
will visit stores throughout 
the city beginning at 11 
a.m. in WoUaston Center. 
The troupe will parade up 



Beale Street to Newport 
Avenue and on to Franklin 
Street in South Quincy. 
The group will then go 
down Hancock Street 
through Quincy Center and 
on to North Quincy. 

The Chinese Language 
School will celebrate the 
New Year at 2:30 p.m. in 
the Sacred Heart School 
auditorium. It wiU feature 
the Lion Dance, Chinese 
folk dancing, Indonesian 
folk dancing, and the 



Galapagos Puppet Troupe. 
Admission is $3. Chinese 
Dim Sum will be served 
and there will be a raffle 
for gift certificates to 
various restaurants in 
Chinatown. 

The Lunar New Year is 
the most important of the 
three main festivals 
celebrated in China and by 
Chinese communities. The 
celebration is also known 
as the Spring Festival. 



Quincy DET Office Offering 
Job Search Workshops 



The Quincy office of 
the Massachusetts 
Department of 

Employment and Training 
is sponsoring a series of 
job search workshops for 
professionals on Thursday 
mornings from 10 a.m. to 1 
p.m. 

The workshops will be 
held Feb. 6, 13, 20 and 27, 
March 5 and 12 in the 
board of directors room of 
Soiith Shore Bank. The 
board room is located in 



the workshop building on 
Chestnut St. behind the 
main bank building at 
1400 Hancock St. 

The series covers most 
aspects of a successful job 
search during the present 
recession. Topics include 
networking, resumes and 
cover letters, training and 
testing and stress 
management. 

An overview of the 
economy, relocation, 
salary negotiation, 



overcoming obstacles, age 
and other forms of 
discrimination, 
interviewing strategy and 
research will also be 
discussed. There wiU be a 
guest speaker at each 
sessioa 

The sessions are closed 
to the public and 
admission is by pre- 
registration only. For more 
information call 471-2750 
ext. 338. 



Pro-Life Groups Issues 

Positions On Abortion For GOP 

State Committee Candidates 



The positions on 
abortion of the candidates 
for Republican State 
Committee Man and 
Woman in the Norfolk 
senatorial district have 
been issued by the South 
Shore Chapter of 
Massachusetts Citizens for 
Life as part of its 
education program. 

In the election for 
committeeman, Charles 



DeBreczeni and Francis 
McCauley, both of 
Quincy, are pro-abortion. 
Thomas Hamill of 
Braintree is pro-Ufe. 

On the ballot for 
committeewoman, 
Kathleen Krumpleman is 
pro-life and Kathy Roberts 
is pro-abortion. Both are 
residents of Quincy. 

Feb. 11 is the deadline 
for registration to vote in 
the March 10 election, the 



same day as the Super 
Tuesday Presidential 
Primaries which includes 
Massachusetts. 

All registered 

Republicans and 

unenrolled voters, who 
chose to take a 
RepubUcan ballot, will be 
eligible to vote in the 
Republican primary. 

The district includes 
Quincy, Avon, Braintree 
arxl Holbrook. 



Open House Fall Registration At Beechwood 



The Beechwood 
Community Life Center 
will hold an Open House 
Fall Registration for all 
PreSchool and 

Kindergarten programs 
Sunday, Feb. 9, from noon 
to 3 p.m. The Center is 
located at 225 Fenno St. in 
Wollaston. 

■ The PreSchool Program 
includes Toddler Time for 
ages 18 months to 2.9 
years, Tuesday and 
Thursday or Wednesday 
and Friday from 9-11:15 
a.m.; Fun Factory for 
three-year olds on Tuesday 



and Thursday or for four- 
year olds on Monday, 
Wednesday and Friday. 

Both have morning 
sessions from 9-11:15 a.m. 
and afternoon sessions 



from 12:15-2:45 p.m.; and 
Kindergarten, half-days or 
whole days. 

Families are 

encouraged to attend the 
Open House or call 471- 
5712 for information. 



Two Residents Named To 
Salem State Dean's List 



Two Quincy residents 
have been named to the 
Dean's List for the fall 
1991 semester at Salem 
State College. 

They are: Richard M. 
Connelly and Sharon 
Steen. 



To earn Dean's List 
status, a student must 
carry 12 credits or more 
per semester, and attain a 
grade point average (GPA) 
of 3.0 with no incomplete 
or missing grades during 
the semester. 




GOLDEN HOOP DANCE-Part of the Asian New Year Celebration at North Quincy High 
Sunday was the Golden Hoop Dance performed by students ft-om the Chinese Language 
School of Quincy celebrating the Year of the Monkey. 




FUN FOR ALL AGES-Alex Man and hb parents Arlene and Adrian Man and their 
cousin Sue Cheung (left) enjoy the Asian New Year Celebration at North Quincy High 
School Sunday attended by more than 100 people. 




NEW YEAR'S DANCE-Ka Kl Chan of Wollaston Lutheran Church performs the Black 
Pony Dance during the Asian New Year Celebration Sunday at North Quincy High 

School. . ^ „ 

(Quincy Sun photos by Tom Gorman) 




RESTAURANT 

Weymouth Landing 



% 



Is pleased to announce we're now open 

THURSDAY • FRIDAY • SATURDAY 

NIGHTS 
6:00am-3:30pni'Reopens Il:00pm-morn 



33 Washington Street - Weymouth Landing 

337-3270 . 



DOC-U-PREP 

OF NEW ENGLAND, INC. 

You must know what you need and want t)efore we can help you. We help you 
prepare your legal documents. All of our documents are computerized, and are 
prepared with state of the art computers and Laser printers. We take the worry, 
time, and confusion out of the preparation of your Legal Documents. 

We will do your: 

WILLS $45.00 CORPORATION 250.00 PROMISSORYNOTE 30.00 

DIVORCE 125.00 LIVING TRUST 499.00 NAME CHANGE 99.00 

BANKRUPTCY 279.00 EVICTION 50.00 TRADEMARK OR COPYRIGHT 185.00 

HOMESTEAD 30.00 and many more 

1 5 Chauncy Street • South Weymouth, MA 021 90 • (61 7) 337-61 94 

SELF FILING 

LEGAL DOCUMENTS SERVICE 

We are not Lawyers, and do not give Legal Advice 



Page 14 Qnincy Sua Thursday, February 6, 1992 



Sun Sports 



Basketball 



North Roars 
Back To Edge 

Quincy, 69-68 



It wasn't an easy week 
for the North Quincy boys' 
basketball team, but the 
Raiders managed to eke 
out two close decisions, 
including the comeback of 
the year against Quincy, to 
improve its record to 10-4 
(8-2) in the Old Colony 
League). Quincy fell to 6- 
8. 

Ted Stevenson's Red 
Raiders overcame a 17- 
point deficit (49-32) in the 
last 12 minutes to squeeze 
by the Presidents, 69-68, 
defeating Quincy for the 
second time and claiming 
the city championship. 

North (^iocy, still very 
much in the running for the 
league title, hosted Silver 
Lake last night 
(Wednesday), will be 
home to league-leading 
Bridgewater-Raynham 
Friday night at 7 and will 
be at Barnstable next 
Tuesday night at 7. 

John Franceschini's 
Quincy team will play at 
Taunton Friday night and 
will host Silver Lake next 
Tuesday night. 

Calling a timeout with 
North trailing by 17 points, 
Stevenson told his players 
to go out and show Quincy 
what North basketball is 
all about. 

The Raiders came back 
strong with a 29-12 run and 
eventually tied the game 
at 61. 

After Brian McPartlin 
put Quincy ahead, 68-67, 
Sean Donovan, the number 
four scorer in the league, 
just beat the buzzer, 
converting a Desmond 
Bellot miss, to give North 
its big victory. 

"When we were down 
by 17, 1 told our guys to 
keep up the defensive 
pressure, to force some 
turnovers and to start 
playing like we're capable 
of," Stevenson said. "They 
came out of that timeout 
and showed just what they 
were made of." 

Paced by Steve Jolley, 
the number two scorer in 
the league, and the 



backcourt duo of Joey 
Crespi and Robbie Kane, 
Quincy led, 38-30, at 
halftime. 

When Steve Loud 
followed JoUey's basket 
with one of his own, the 
Presidents appeared to be 
home free, but, ignited by 
seven points from Luke 
Sheets and successive 
three-pointers from Bo 
Smith and Donovan, North 
got back into the game. 

Jolley had another big 
night with 29 points for 
Quincy, while Donovan 
had IS and Bellot 14, 
including four straight 
down the stretch, for North. 

"Our guys worked hard 
all game long, but we had 
a three-minute stretch 
where we started to come 
undone," said 

Franceschini. "I feel badly 
for the boys because the 
game came down to the 
simple task of boxing their 
guys out on that last shot. 
If we box Donovan out, we 
win the game. Still, it was 
just another great Quincy- 
North Quincy game." 

Earlier in the week 
North was expected to 
have a breather at 
Plymouth as it faced the 
Blue Eagles, who were 
only 1-12. But, it proved 
otherwise as North was 
forced into overtime before 
taking a 67-65 decision. 

Donovan, who led the 
way with 23 points, sank a 
jumper with just three 
seconds left in regulation 
to send the game into OT. 

Smith tapped in a shot 
with 21 seconds left in 
overtime to give North the 
win. Bellot scored 14 
points and Chris Olsen 
chipped in with 10. 

Quincy turned in a fine 
all-around performance to 
defeat Weymouth, 58-43, 
led by JoUey's 17 points, 
13 rebounds and four 
blocked shots. 

Kane had 11 points and 
five steals and Crespi 
scored 10 points. 
"TOM SULLIVAN 



Fontbonne On 
Win Streak 



The Fontbonne 

Academy basketball team 
defeated Arlington 
Catholic and Cardinal 
Cushing following a big 
72-61 victory over 
previously unbeaten 
Archbishop Williams. 

Fontbonne is 9-1 and 
WilUams is 8-1. 

A highhght for the Abp. 
Williams girls was the 
achievement of Peggy 
Sweeney, who became the 



all-time leading Williams 
scorer with 1052 career 
points. 

Fontbonne raced out to 
a 19-6 lead against 
Williams as Cara Egan, a 
senior center who is 
closing in on the 1000- 
point mark, scored 22 
points and had six 
rebounds. Her sister, 
sophomore Tracy Egan, 
had 14 points. 





NORTH QUINCY'S Trida Hughes takes a shot in a 
recent game with Falmouth as Regina Murphy (22) and 
Norecn McDonagh (32) get in on the action. 

(Quincy Sun photos by Tom Gorman) 



QUINCY'S Kim Marsden, one of the top scorers in the 
Old Colony League, goes up for a shot in a recent game 
against Silver Lake. 



North Girls Breeze By Quincy 



The North Quincy girls' 
basketball team displayed 
a strong defense which led 
to two easy victories last 
week, improving its record 
to 10-4 (8-2 in the Old 
Colony League). 

Last Thursday night the 
North girls breezed past 
Quincy, 47-23, as the 
(Juincy giris fell to 3-10. 

North Quincy played at 
Silver Lake last night 
(Wednesday), will host 
Bridgewater-Raynham 
Friday and will be home to 
Barnstable next Tuesday. 

The Quincy girls are at 
Arlington today (Thursday) 
at 5:30, will host Taunton 
Friday night and will play 



at Silver Lake next 
Tuesday. 

In defeating Quincy for 
the second time to claim 
the city championship. 
North raced out to a 23-9 
advantage in the first half. 

North thwarted the 
Quincy attack while 
seniors Tricia Hughes, 
Cindy White and Jen 
White scored eight points 
each, leading a balanced 
attack. 

Senior Cindy Mitton 
scored seven points for 
North while Holly 
McDonough paced the 
Quincy girls with 10 
points. 



Earlier in the week 
North Quincy held 
Plymouth to 10 points in 
the first half to jump out to 
a 28-10 lead and defeated 
the Blue Eagles, 40-26, 
despite being held to 12 
second half points 
themselves. 

North's strong defense 
held Heather Morin, the 
third leading scorer in the 
league with a 26.6 point 
per game average, to 14 
points. 

"Our plan was to stop 
Morin," said North coach 
Ken Panaro. "We held her 
to six points in the first 
half and the game was 
over at the half. We felt 



we could let their guard 
(Kara Porter) shoot from 
the outside and she wasn't 
hitting early on, so our 
strategy worked." 

Noreen McDonagh and 
Nicole Sapienza were 
responsible for keeping 
Morin from her favorite 
shooting spot. McDonagh 
had nine points and three 
rebounds. 

Cindy White had eight 
points and seven rebounds 
and Jen Santry 11 points 
and six rebounds. 

Hughes and Regina 
Murphy also turned in 
excellent all-around games 
for North Quincy. 
--TOM SULLIVAN 



3 From Quincy On 
UMass. Women's Team 



Former Quincy High 
star Sue Parry, a senior 
guard, and former North 
Quincy High teammates, 
freshman forward Joanna 
Rugnetta and freshman 
guard Tara Miles, are 
members of the 
UMass/Boston women's 
basketball team. 

Parry, one of four 
returnees from last year's 
team, is a key defensive 
player for the Beacons, 
who play in the Little East 
Conference, one of the 
premier Division 3 leagues 
in the country. 

Last season she was the 
team leader in steals and 
second in assists. She also 
captained the volleyball 
team. 

Parry played basketball 
and volleyball for four 
years at Quincy during 
which time the Quincy 
girls won the state 
volleyball championship. 

Rugnetta, an excellent 
shooter and agr'.ressive 
defensive player, played 






SUE PARRY 

basketball for four years 
and volleyball for three at 
North Quincy High. 

Miles, a versatile 
guard, is one of the 
Beacons' top three-point 
shooters. She excelled in 
basketball, softball, soccer 
and track at North Quincy, 
was the basketball team's 



TARA MILES 

MVP and was a Suburban 
League all-star in 
basketball and an Old 
Colony League all-star in 
Softball. 

The trio add balance to 
coach Dana Brown's 
squad, which plays a tough 
schedule. In addition to 
two games with 



JOANNA RUGNETTA 

conference rivals Southern 
Maine. Rhode Island 
College, UMass- 

Dartmouth, Eastern 
Connecticut and Plymouth 
State, the team meets 
Tufts, Connecticut 
College, Emmanuel, 
Colby and Salem State. 



Stephen Harris Receives Ouimet Caddy Scholarship 

Stephen Harris of '^^'* »— -^ : j- .. — _ 



Quincy, a senior at Eryant 
College in Rhode Island, 
has been aw<.rded a 
scholarship grant by The 
Francis Ouimet Caddie 
Scholarship Fund. 



The award is made to 
students who have worked 
three summers as a caddie 
or helper in pro shop or 
course superintendent 
operations at a 
Massachusetts golf club. 



The Fund was 
established in 1949 in 
honor of Ouimet, the 
legendary golfer, and has 
since awarded more than 
$5.7 million to 2,700 
individuals. 



Thursday, February (, 1992 Qninqr Son Page 15 



Hockey 



North Closer To Tourney 



The North Quincy 
hockey team took another 

step toward the state 
tournament by coming 
from behind to tie 
Weymouth, 3-3, last 
Saturday and improve its 
record to 7-3-4 (5-2-4 in 
the Old Colony League). 

With six games 
remaining the Red Raiders 
need six points to qualify 
for the tournament. 

North played at 
Bridgewater-Raynham last 
night (Wednesday), will 
face Quincy Saturday 
night at 6:40 at the Youth 
Arena and will play at 
league-leading Plymouth 



next Wednesday night. 

The Raiders trailed, 3- 
1, going into the final 
period against Weymouth 
but Sean Vermette scored 
in the last period and 
Aidan O'Donoghue scored 
the tying goal. 

Joe Carinci had scored 
North's first goal in the 
opening period. 

Junior Sean Connelly 
had another outstanding 
game in goal. 

tiarlier m the week 
North defeated Falmouth, 
3-1, with goalie Dennis 
Ruggere having another 
spectacular game with 35 
saves. 



Chris McCalJum scored 
the first goal with Dave 
Pacino getting the assist. 
Bob Fitzpatrick, recently 
declared eligible by the 
MIAA after transferring 
from Catholic Memorial, 
scored his first goal (he 
has three assists) with 
Vermette assisting, and 
Matt Riley scored the final 
goal with McCallum 
having an assist. 

"These kids have 
worked awfully hard and it 
would be a shame if they 
didn't make the 
tournament," said second- 
year coach Tom Benson. 



Quincy Hopes Derailed 



The Quincy hockey 
team lost its fifth game in 
a row last Saturday, 
bowing to Silver Lake, 4- 
1, ending any hopes it had 
of finally qualifying for the 
state tournament. 

The Presidents fell to 4- 
7-4 (3-6-3 in the Old 
Colony League) with five 
games remaining. 

Quincy had a tough 
week ahead, facing three 
of the top teams in the 
league. It hosted 
Weymouth last night 
(Wednesday), will meet 



North Quincy Saturday 
night at 6:40 at the Youth 
Arena and will be home to 
Barnstable next 

Wednesday at 5:30. 

The Presidents had no 
chance against Silver 
Lake after falling behind, 
2-0, in the opening period 
as Laker goalie Rich 
Yahonb had 23 saves, 
many of the spectacular 
variety. 

Jeff Craig scored the 
lone Quincy goal with 
Jimmy Smith and Scott 
MacPherson assisting. 



Earlier in the week 
Quincy played one of its 
poorest games of the year 
in losing to Bridgewater- 
Raynham, 7-4. 

Jim Schatzl had bis 
best game of the season 
with two goals and two 
assists. MacPherson scored 
his 18th goal and Craig 
had the other. Craig and 
Steve Miller also had 
assists. 

MacPherson now has 18 
goals and seven assists for 
25 points and Schatzl has 
six goals and 12 assists for 
18 points. 



Ladies Volleyball At Beechwood 

In preparation for the beginning training from 9-10 a.m. 



upcoming Quincy Senior 
Olympics and the first 
State Senior Olympics this 
year, Beechwood 
Community Life Center is 



sessions. Other training programs 

On Tuesday mornings are being scheduled for the 

throughout February a horseshoe, shotput. 

Ladies Volleyball javelin, and softtall 

Workshop is being held events. 



POLRRI5 

Siioivilo'virti 
Clearance 

SAVE UP TO $1000 
BEFORE IHE 
OPPORTUNITY 
PASSES YOU BY! 



Why buy la.st year's leftovers vf hen 
you can save up to $10CX) on a brand 
new 1992 Pdaris. Polaris has taken 
the chill out of winter and put 
more fun back into it with big 
savings on their 1992 Indys. 
Take delivery {(rom dealer 
stock) BEFORE 
FEBRUARY 29, 1992! 
See your Poiaris dealer for 
details and savings on 
other models. We need 
tradclnsJ Act fast for 
fantastic savings! • a, i.,,!,.,, ,t.i. ii..-.ir, 




.■itNoi»:^y,;C|er 

/hRO IXnVN, NO INTtREST, NO PAYMENTS 
\OH oO HAYS IIN Al I POLARIS NfOlH 1 s. 



'.Kn.lM 



1992 MFG. SUGGESTED SALE 

MODEL RETAIL PRICE PRICE 



YOU 
SAVE 



Inily Sport 
Indy 650 



$5799 
$6399 



U199 
15399 



$600 
SI 000 



NdT ALL MOPLLS AVAILABLE AT ALL HEALERS 



EFFECTIVE JANUARY 15 - FEBRUARY 29, 1992 

^ieJtfy^ CYCLE CENTER POLRRIS 



BclicN'c It. 



92-94 FRANKUN STREET TEL: 61 7-847-0001 
QUINCY. MA 021 M FAX: 61 7-471 -6692 




JOHNSON MOTOR PARTS, Squirt House League leader, won the recent league 
jamboree. Front, from left, Nick Pizziferri and Chad Fitzpatrick. Second row, Jon 
Healy, Scott Mattson, Scott MacDonald, Kevin Cellucci, Jon Paquette, Kevin Patten and 
Sean Dooley. Third row, Billy Morris, John SuUivan, Joe Prada, Jeff Glynn, Mike 
Whalen,and Mike Chenette. In back are head coach Jeff Paquette, left, and assistant 
coaches Rick Patten and Roger PugUsi. Missing are Chris Griffin and John 'Spike' 
Bertucci. 



3 Named To Shriner's 
All-star Classic 



Desmond Bellot and 
Mark Zych of North 
Quincy and Chris Walker 
of Quincy have been 
named to the South team 
for the annual Shriners' 
All-Star Schoolboy 
Football Classic to be 
played June 19 at Boston 
University. 

Bellot, a 6-1, 185-pound 
wide receiver and safety, 
had an outstanding season 
last fall. He was ranked 
ninth in the country among 
defensive backs, had many 
interceptions and saved a 



number ot touchdowns 
with open field tackles. He 
was named to every all- 
scholastic team. 

Zych, a 255-pound 
offensive and defensive 
tackle was one of the top 
linemen in the state. 

Walker, a 6- foot, 175- 
pound wide receiver and 
defensive back, had a 
sensational year for 
Quincy. He scored 11 
touchdowns, 10 on pass 
receptions and the other on 
a kickoff return. He had a 
number of pass 
interceptions and 



numerous tackles. He also 
gained good yardage when 
used as a running back. 




The first winter Olympics were held in France in 1924. 



Ahvays Buying 
New & Old 

TAJ 

COIN, 

STAMPS 

and 

SPORTS CARDS 

9 Maple St., 
Quincy, MA 02169 

479-1652 

Qn^lete Line of Sqiplies 



WORLD GYM 

Fitness and Aerobic Center 
North Quincy 




95 Holmes St. 
North Quincy 

1 block from N. Quincy T 




, Ask About / 
Our ^ 

>$24.00< 

A Month ^ 
membership \ 

\/V "^ 




Call For Info: 

472-9525 



■^■•^i*a-::ic.%.M^ KCKiHi-.mc 



y hm.^1 Hi u t>i 



^^OFF a Silver Memberships 
Enrollment Fee 

^ |Redeemable at World Gym 
1st Time Visitors Only 

472-9525 

Expires 2/19/92 



inn (B:^!]: III'XUUKIi l>C»U.u\U«» 







■ 
■ 
■ 



$$ JOIN TODAY AND SAVE! $$ 



d. 



Page 16 Quincy Sun Thursday, February 6, 1992 



Track 



Youth Hockey 



North Strong squirt B's win Tourney 

In State Relays 



Johnson, Sun, 
Granite Rack Up Wins 



The North Quincy track 
team made an excellent 
showing in the State Relay 
Meet at Boston 
University's 
Commonwealth Armory. 

The girls' team took a 
second and two thirds for 
20 points, tying it for 
fourth place behind 
Reading, Dartmouth and 
Andover. 

The 4x800 meter team 
ran 10:27 to finish second 
with Suzanne Lewis 
running an excellent 2:27 
leg on the anchor. She was 
joined by liana Cobban, 
Melanie Gaziano and 
Katie McNamara. 

The same foursome 
came back an hour later to 
take third in the distance 
medley with Lewis running 
the mile anchor leg in 
5:24.4, her best time ever. 

The shuttle dash team 
of Amy Wong, Katy 
Deady, Susanne Hamilton 
and Jen Nutley also took 
third to close out the 
scoring. 

On the boys' side, the 
shuttle hurdle relay team 
of Mike Yee, Kevin Price, 
Shawn Doherty and Marc 
Larson took sixth. Several 
boys' teams finished just 
out of the scoring as a 



tenth of a second 
separated the first six 
places. 

The 4x800 relay 
qualified for the State 
Meet with Jeremy Gott 
running his first ever 800- 
meter race, turning in an 
outstanding 2:07 split. 
Other runners included 
Josh O'Donnell, Eric Torvi 
and Greg Buck. 

The mile relay also did 
well, missing a scoring 
spot by a tenth of a 
second. The team was 
made up of Mark Sinclair 
(53.2), Gott (55.1), Yee 
(57.8) and O'Donnell 
(53.9). 

North and Quincy took 
part in the Old Colony 
League Meet yesterday 
(Wednesday) at Taunton. 

Sunday North will run 
in the State Qass B Meet 
at noon at Harvard 
University. Representing 
North will be Wong, 
Hamilton, Deady and Tony 
Licciardi (55 meter dash), 
Yee (55 meter hurdles), 
Sinclair (600), Lewis 
(two-mile), Heather 
Rendle and John 
ODonnell (high jump) and 
the boys' and girls' 4x800 
relay and boys' 4x400 
relay. 



Quincy's Squirt B 
hockey team, sponsored by 
Quincy Cablesystems, won 
the recent Coca Cola 
Invitational Tournament at 
Gallo Rink in Bourne by 
edging Canton, 3-2, in the 
championship game. 
Quincy finished 4-0 in the 
tournament. 

Jeff Langille, who had 
an outstanding tournament, 
was the winning goalie. 

Sean Haidul, Paul 
Markarian and John 
Bertucci scored the goals 
and Kevin Regan, Chad 
Fitzpatrick and Ryan 
Barrett had assists. 

Steve Ford, Maricarian, 
Brian Nolan, Billy Griffin 
and Sean Slattery played 
solid defense. Jim 



Sullivan, Mike Welch, 
John Barron and Pat 
Kenny were excellent on 
the forward lines and 
Barron also did some fine 
backchecking. 

The Squirt B's also 
edged Canton by the same 
score in overtime in a 
state playdown game. 

Barron had two goals 
and an assist, carrying the 
puck the length of the ice 
past two defenders with 
the winning goal with a 
minute and 15 seconds left 
inOT. 

Bertucci had the other 
goal and an assist 

Joey Ardagna also 
played well on the forward 
line. The team is coached 
by Rick Fitzpatrick. 



Ryan's Hat Trick 
Powers Squirt A's 



Quincy's Squirt A 
hockey team edged 
Waltham, 5-4, sparked by 
Mike Ryan's hat trick. 

Mike Fitzpatrick had 
the other two goals. Bobby 
Harvey, Billy Norris, Pat 
McGann, Billy Connolly, 



Sean Maiming and Mike 
Sullivan played well on 
offense and Matt Allen, 
Mark Hawes, Mark Foster 
and Derek McTomney 
played strong defense. 
Chris Carthas played well 
in goal. 



Johnson Motor Parts 
widened its Squirt House 
League lead to six points 
with a 7-2 victory over 
Green Environmental. 

Jeff Glynn scored two 
goals and Kevin Cellucci, 
John Sullivan, Chad 
Fitzpatrick, Nick Pizziferri 
and Billy Norris one each. 
Chris Griffin, Glynn, Joe 
Prada, Scott Mattson and 
Fitzpatrick had assists. 
John Barron and Jesse 
Winter scored for Green 
and Winter, and Brian 
Quinn and Barron had 
assists. 

Jim Cashins' hat trick 
led the Quincy Sun over 
Burgin Platner, 7-4. Tom 
Gaeta, Joey Ardagna, 
Patrick Grogan and Steve 
Ford had a goal apiece. 
Brian Correia and Ryan 
Murray had two assists 
each. Sean Slattery, Kevin 
Lynch, John Katsarikas 
and Paul Markarian scored 



Squirt C's Win Pair 



Quincy, North Winter 
Home Sports Scliedule 



Quincy's Squirt C 
hockey team continues to 
roll, adding two more wins 
during the past week. 

Quincy defeated 
Hanover, 6-2, with Mike 
Dempsey and Brian Erlich 
displaying fine hustle. 



In its second state 
playdown game, Quincy 
defeated Walpole, 3-0, 
with Joshua Silverman , 
having a hat trick. Joe 
Vallatini and Paul Burke 
did some outstanding 
forechecking and passing. 



Mite A's Win 



Feb. 5 Through Feb. 11 



Wednesday, Feb. 5 
•NQHS Boys Basketball vs. SUver Lake, Fresh- 
man 3:30 p.m. (at Atlantic); JV 3: 15 p.m., Varsity 
4:30 p.m. 

•QHS Boys Basketball vs. Archbishop Williams, 
Freshman 3 p.m. 

•QHS Hockey vs. Weymouth, Varsity 5:30 p.m., 
JV 6:40 p.m. 
•NQHS-QHS Wrestling, at NQHS, 7:30 p.m. 

Thursday, Feb. 6 
•No Home Games Scheduled. 

Friday, Feb. 7 
•NQHS Boys Basketball vs. Bridgewater- 
Raynham, Freshman 3:30 p.m., JV 5:30 p.m., 
Varsity 7 p.m. 

•QHS Girls Basketball vs. Taunton, JV 5:30 p.m., 
Varsity, 7 p.m. 

Saturday, Feb. 8 
•NQHS-QHS Hockey, JV 6:40 p.m.. Varsity 8 
p.m. 

•Boys & Girls Track, State Qass Meet at Harvard. 
•NQHS Wrestling Quad Meet, NQ, Brockton, 
Stoughton and Norwood, noon. 

Monday, Feb. 10 
•No Home Games Scheduled 

Tuesday, Feb. 11 
•QHS Boys Basketball vs. SUver Lake, Freshman 
3:30 p.m., JV 5:30 p.m.. Varsity 7 p.m. 
•NQHS Girls Basketball vs. Barnstable, JV 5:30 
p.m.. Varsity 7 p.m. 



Quincy's Mite A hockey 
team defeated Medfield, 
5-1, with Scott Mattson 
and Dan Kennedy scoring 
two goals apiece. Sean 
Dooley scored the other 
goal. 

Dooley had two assists 
and Kennedy, Tom 
Sullivan and Frank Curreri 
one each. 



Ryan Kruegar was 
outstanding in goal and 
had 15 saves. 

Didier Alther, Sean 
Kabilian, Steve Goff, Jim 
Cashins, Ryan Murray, Jill 
Mclnnis, Scott MacDonald 
and Chris Griffin all turned 
in outstanding 

performances. 



Quincy-North 
Sports OnCh. 3 



Quincy 
Television 



Community 
will cover 



ELEMENTARY 
LUNCH 



Feb. 10-14 

Mon: pizza, fruit juice, 
fruit cup, chocolate chip 
cookies, milk. 

Tues: NO LUNCH 

Wed: tuna salad on a 
roll, chopped lettuce with 
dressing, fruit cup, milk. 

Thurs: American chop 
suey, vegetable, carrot 
sticks, fresh baked wheat 
roll, milk. 

Fri: peanut butter and 
jelly sandwich, fresh 
celery sticks, fruit cup, 
milk. 

Happy Valentine's Day! 




'OvjitedW^ 

(F MASSACHUSETTS aw 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Htre't a chanc* to earn 
•lira monay by building a 
Quincy Sun hoirw dallvary 
roula. 

Talaphona: 471-3100 



many of the Quincy High 
School-North Quincy High 
School sports action during 
the month of February. 

QCTV will cover 
Quincy-North Quincy in 
girl's basketball, boy's 
basketball, hockey and 
wrestling. 

The following is a list 
of dates and times for high 
school action on QCTV: 

Quincy vs. North 
Quincy Hockey— Monday, 
Feb. 10 at 8:30 p.m., 
Tuesday, Feb. 11 at 9 a.m. 
and Wednesday, Feb. 12 
at 1 p.m. 

Quincy vs. North 
Quincy Wrestling-- 
Monday, Feb. 10 at 8:30 
p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 11 at 
10:30 a.m. and 
Wednesday, Feb. 12 at 
2:30 p.m. 

Quincy vs. North 
Quincy Boys Basketball- 
Thursday, Feb. 6 at 1 p.m. 



for Burgin and Didier 
Alther, Markarian, Brian 
Sylvester and Jake 
Fleming had assists. 

Granite Auto Electric 
defeated Doran & 
Horrigan, 8-2, as Jim 
Sullivan and Brian Nolan 
had two goals apiece and 
Shane Kabilian, Sean 
McCusker, Mike Hastings 
and Mike Welch one each. 
Kabilian and Sullivan had 
two assists each and Chris 
Carthas, Welch and 
McCusker one apiece. 
Chris CuUen and Bobby 
Harvey scored for Doran 
and Chris Lumaghini, 
Merri Langille, Ryan 
Barrett, and Joe VaUatini 
had assists. 

The standings: Johnson 
Motor, 11-3-1; Doran & 
Horrigan, 8-6-1; Quincy 
Sun, 7-6-2; Green, 6-7-2; 
Burgin Platner, 5-8-2; 
Granite Auto, 4-11-0. 



Marina Taxi Cuts 
Colonial* s Lead 



Marina Bay Taxi cut 
Colonial Federal's lead in 
the Pee Wee House 
League to seven points by 
defeating CF, 7-4. 

Mark Glynn had two 
goals and Carlos 
Ashmanskas, Bill Barron, 
A.J. Quinn and Matt 
Radzevich a goal each. 
Glynn had two assists and 
Justin Schuboth, Nestor 
and Radzevich one apiece. 

Justin Whitman had two 
goals and Mike Martin and 
Scott Shepherd one each 
for Colonial Federal and 
Chris O'Donnell, Joe 
Bracken and Martin had 



assists. 

New England Deli 
blanked Keohane's, 6-0, 
with goalie John 
Laukkanen recording the 
shutout. Gene Silverman 
had two goals and Chris 
Geary, Tim Sheehan, Rich 
DeLisle and Tim Hunter 
one each. Brian Gates had 
four assists and Hunter, 
Dave Rowell, Glenn 
Chase and Sheehan one 
each. 

The Standings: 
Colonial Federal, 10-2-3; 
Marina Bay, 8-7; 
Keohane's, 6-8-1; NE Deli, 
3-10-2. 



Harold, Samoset Tie 



The Paul Harold Club 
and Samoset Pharmacy 
tied, 1-1, in Mite House 
League action. 

Mike Campanale 
scored for Harold with 
Jordan Virtue assisting. 
Ryan Doyle scored for 
Samoset with Matt 
Kenney and Matt Miller 
getting the assists. 

Neponset Valley Survey 
defeated Balducci's, 3-1, 
on goals by Mike Sullivan, 



Matthew Conso and John 
Walsh. Shawn Richardson, 
Shaun Lynch and Conso 
had assists. Bruce Maggio 
scored for Balducci's. 

Lydon Russell edged 
Purdy's Ice Cream, 3-2, 
with Mark Giese scoring 
twice and Steve 
Romanowski once. Ryan 
Donahue and Shaun 
Flaherty had assists. John 
Segalla and Jim Chiocchio 
scored for Purdy's and 
Billy Ryan had an assist. 



DesRoche Receives Card 
From Quincy Players 



Mike DesRoche, the 
top scorer of the North 
Quincy hockey team, 
received a card signed by 
all the Quincy players and 
coaches after be was 
sidelined for the season 
with torn knee hgaments 
suffered in the Marshfield 
game. 

"Mike not only is an 
outstanding hockey player 
but is a real nice kid and I 



thought it would be nice if 
our players sent him a 
card," said Quincy scorer 
and statistician George 
Peachy. "We at Quincy 
are sorry to see Tom 
(Benson, North coach) 
lose such an excellent 
player, but he has some 
other outstanding players 
and we expect North to 
still be a tough club to 
beat." 




The walking catfish lives for days out of water and 
even walks " on land from one lake to another 



Thursday, February <, 1992 Qutncy Sun Page 17 



Fire 
Alert 



by WILLIAM ARIENTI 
Quincy Firefighters Local 792 




Business 



Keeping Safe 
And Warm 

We all try to heat our homes as economically as 
possible, however some ways are safer than others. 
Here are some safety tips to keep warm and safe in the 
winter. 

Always maintain a safe water level in the boiler of 
your furnace. Today, most boilers come with automatic 
water feeds, but if your furnace is older, you may have 
to do this manually. Although most furnaces have a low 
water shut off, this is only a safety device to make sure 
the burner cannot run without water. If the shut off 
malfunctions there is a chance the furnace may 
overheat and cause a fire. It is important to keep the 
water at the level recommended by the manufacturer or 
heating technician. Every spring have your furnace 
cleaned by a certified technician. 

If you have a forced hot air furnace, make sure your 
filters are clean. Filters should be changed on a regular 
basis in the winter time, this is not only safe, it will 
insure the maximum efficiency of the furnace. 

Electric base board heaters should be dusted and 
vacuumed out regularly. Dust, dirt and pet hair have a 
tendency to collect under the baseboard and may 
compromise the electrical connections. Remember also 
to never run wires from other electrical devices on top 
of, or across an electric or any other base board heater. 

Space heaters may sometimes be economical, but 
are often dangerous. Numerous fires and fire related 
deaths are caused by space heaters. If you feel 
compelled to use a space heater there are some safety 
tips to abide by: 

• Never leave a space heater unattended. 

• Never sleep whole a space heater is on in the 
room./ 

• Never use a space heater around children. 

• Never use a space heater on or near any 
combustibles. 

• Never use a space heater near a bed. 

• Never put a space heater where it may tip. 

• Never use a damaged space heater. 

If you use electric blankets, be careful not to put 
other blankets on top of them when in use. Piling other 
blankets on top of an energized electric blanket may 
cause the electric blanket to overheat and cause a fire. 
Try not to get the blanket wet in any way, this may 
cause a shock hazard. When the blanket gets dirty, 
have it dry cleaned unless specified by the 
manufacturer. 

Lydon-Russell Renews 
Lofty Oaks Membership 



Lydon-Russell Funeral 
Home of Quincy has 
renewed its affiliation with 
Lofty Oaks Association, a 
New Hampshire 

organization dedicated to 
reforestation and 
conservation efforts in 
Massachusetts. 

The firms arranges to 
have a tree planted for 
each service that they 
perform to provide a living 
memorial in honor of the 
deceased and to renew the 
forest life of 

Massachusetts. 

The memorial trees are 
planted in the rpring and 
fall. This program is part of 
a large endeavor, to 
restore the landscape and 
our environment with the 
eternal beauty of living 
trees. 

After each service, 



close family members and 
friends are informed that 
the memorial tree has 
been ananged for by John 
j. Lydon Jr. of the Lydon- 
Russell Funeral Home. 
When a certified 
nurseryman has planted 
the tree, the designated 
people will receive a 
certificate of planting 
suitable for framing and 
keeping in the family's 
history. 




Thomas Galvin Named 
Chamber President 

Thomas M. Galvin, a 
vice president at Quincy- 
based Boston Gear, is the 
1992 president of the 
South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce. 

Galvin, a Quincy 
resident, takes over the top 
volunteer post in the 
nearly 2,000-member 
business organization, 
from Winthrop Sargent IV, 
chairman of the board and 
CEO of the Bank of 
Braintree. 

"Without question, the 
economic vitality of our 
region is closely tied to 
the South Shore 
Chamber's vigorous efforts 
to attract businesses to the 
region, improve 

transportation and 
strengthen the overall 
business environment," 
said Galvin. 

Galvin said he would 
focus on sustaining the 
rate of membership growth. 

Serving with Galvin on 
the group's executive 
committee are first vice 
president Arthur R. 
Connelly of South 
Weymouth, president of 
the South Weymouth 
Savings Bank; second vice 
president Dwight L. 
Conant of Scituate, 
general manager of the 
Rockland-based American 
Automobile Association; 
and vice president of 
membership development 
Brian P. Curtis of 
Hingham, president of 
Curtis Realty Management 
Corp. of Hingham. 

Vice president of 
business and transportation 
Paul Alpert of Randolph, 
vice president of Boston 
Financial Services, Inc.; 
vice president of 
community development, 
Franklin N. Meissner of 
Weymouth, president of 
Electro Switch Corp. of 
Weymouth. 

Vice president of 
government affairs Charles 
R. Simpson Jr. of Norwell, 
president and CEO of 
Quincy-based Quincy 
Savings Bank/Excel 
Bankcorp, Inc.; vice 
president of 

communications Catherine 
M. Scifi-es of Brookline, 
director of human 
resources at Quincy-based 
National Fire Protection 
Association; and South 
Shore Economic 

Development Corporation 
I SUBSCRIPTION FORM 



PAUL MOLLICA 

president Paul F. Mollica, 
regional vice president of 
Reet Bank. Also serving 
on the executive 
committee is Ronald E. 
Zooleck, the Chamber's 
executive vice president 
and CEO. 

Joining the Chamber's 
36-member board of 
directors are Donald E. 
Baltucci of Hingham, 
president and CEO of 
Weymouth Co-operative 
Bank in South Weymouth; 
Mary Barrett Costello of 
Scituate, treasurer of North 
Abington-based Barrett 
Restaurants, Inc.; Gerald 
P. Good of Randolph, 
president of Randolph- 
based Good Brothers Ford; 
Vincent J. Lombardo of 
Milton, COO of The 
Lombardo Companies, 
based in East Boston; 
Christy Peter Mihos of 
Cohasset, president and 
CEO of Brockton-based 
Christy's Markets, Inc.; 
Judi Pearlstein of Milton, 
president of Canton-based 
Pearlco of Boston, Inc.; 
and Warren Pierce III 
Duxbury, 

treasurer/president of North 
Abington-based Christie 
Transfer, Inc. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Quincy Sun l,OfT>e delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAIL TO 



^%xa.±xxc3r 



^S'fv 



1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 



NAME 



STREET 



CITY 



STATE 



ZIP- 



CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 



L 



{ ) 1 YEAR IN QUINCY 

( ) 1 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY 

( ) 1 YEAR OUT OF STATE 



$12.00 
$14.00 
$17.00 



( ) CHECK ENCLOSED 
( ) PLEASE BILL ME 



J 



Crime 
Watch 



By ROBERT HANNA 
Crime Prevention Officer 
Quincy Police Department 




Feeling "Funny" 
About Being Touched? 

You kids know all the safety rules for home and 
school and outdoors, but I want to be sure you know 
these special rules. Take some tips from me, McGruff, 
the Crime Dog: 

• Remember that you're allowed to say NO, loud 
and clear, if any adult - even if it's someone you know 
- wants to touch a part of your body and you don't want 
them to. 

• If you feel "funny" about what somebody older 
than you says or does to you, BE SURE to tell an adult 
you trust about it. Tell them exactly what makes you 
feel "fiinny." 

• Remember that you can trust most adults. They 
want you to be safe, and they want to know about 
things that happen to you that you don't Uke. They have 
to know, too, because if adults do things to children 
that they shouldn't do, it takes another adult to get 
them to stop. 

• Strangers don't usually ask kids to let them take 
their pictures, and you shouldn't let anyone take 
pictures of you ~ even if someone says they'll give you 
something "nice". You remember that you're not 
supposed to take any gifts from strangers, right? And 
you remember that a stranger is anyone you and your 
parents don't know well. 

• If anybody asks you to walk with them to "show" 
them something, or how to get somewhere, you don't 
go. Tell them you don't know how to get to the place. 
Remember: You don't take walks with strangers, either. 

If you remember these special rales, and especially 
remember that your body belongs to you and no one 
should touch it if you don't want them to, then you'll 
really be helping to keep yourself safe! 

Ellen Zane Appointed Director 
Of Cooperative Central Bank 

Quincy Hospital Cooperative Central Bank 
Director Ellen Zane has is operated and wholly 
been appointed to the owned by all 92 
Board of Directors of The Massachusetts 
Cooperative Central Bank Cooperative Banks, solely 
of Massachusetts. for the mutual benefit of 

Zane is serving as a 
public interest director, 
replacing Jack Conway of 
Conway Realty whose 
term expired. 

Established in 1932, the 



their depositors. 

It serves as a source of 
cash reserves and 
borrowings for its member 
banks. 



AFFORDABLE FAMILY PLANNING CARE 

• CONVENENT SCHEDULES • SLIDING FEE 

• COMPLETE CONFIDENTIALITY • RESPONSIVE HEALTH TEAM 

• PREGNANCY TESTING AND COUNSELING 

• AFFORDABLE BIRTH CONTROL SUPPLES 



quincy family planning 
ournewlcx:ationis: 

148 PARKINGWAY, QUINCY, MA 02169 
g|^ (617)773-7331 ^j^ 





HEALTX CARE OF SOUTHEASTERN HASSACHUSETTS, MC< 



Quincy 
Pound 



Adoptables 







Airedale/Terrier-mix, male, 1 1/2 years, curly 
black/brown coat, 50 pounds, friendly, would be 
nice pet. 

Terrier/Sheepdog-mix, male, tan/white, 40 
pounds, 2 years, cute. 

Husky-cross, male, 9 months, black/brown, busby 
coat. 

Cairn Terrier-cross, female, 2 years, 20 pounds, 
blonde, wavy coat, very good pet. 

Husky, female, 6 months, redAvhite. 

Basset Hound, male, 6 years. 

( ontact OfdcM Phylli< Berlucchi and Bruce DiBella, 

773-6297. daily hours, «:.^0 am-4:30 pm 

Except Sundays 



Page 18 Qulncy Sun Thursday, February (, 1992 

Ham And Bean Supper 
At Squantum Church 



Bernazzani PTO Offering 
Two $250 Scholarships 



SuDday, the pastor of 
the First Church of 
Squantum, the Rev. Dr. 
Gene Langevin, preached 
on "The Power to 
Become." 

The scripture lessons 
were read by Dore Klock 
and Barbara Sorensen. 



I PEfiSONALS 

PRAYER TO THE 
BLESSED VIRGIN 
(Never Known to Fail) 
Oh most beautiful 
flower of Mt. Carmel, Fruitful 
vine, splendor of Heaven, 
Blessed Mother of the Son of 
God, Immaculate Virgin, As- 
sist me in my necessity. Oh 
Star of the Sea, help me and 
show me herein you are my 
mother. Oh, Holy Mary. 
Mother of God, Queen of 
Heaven and Earthl I humbly 
beseech you from the bot- 
tom of my heart to succor me 
in this necessity. There are 
none that can withstand your 
power. Oh, show me herein 
you are my mother. Oh Mary 
conceived without sin, pray 
for us who have recourse to 
thee (3x) Holy Mother, I place 
this cause in your hands (3x) 
Holy Spirit, you who solve all 
problems, light roads so that 
I can attain my goal. You who 
gave me divine gift to forgive 
and forget all evil against me 
and that in all instances in my 
life you are with me. I want in 
this short prayer to thank you 
for all things as you confirm 
once again that I never want 
to be separated from you in 
eternal ^ory. Thank you for 
your mercy toward me and 
mine. The person must say 
this prayer 3 consecutive 
days. After 3 days the re- 
quest will be granted. This 
prayer must be published 
after the favor is granted. 

A.M.D. 2/6 

LEGAL NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS THE 

TRIAL COURT THE 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT 

NORFOLK DIVISION 

DOCKET NO. 92 P0095E1 

Estate of ETHEL F. 

DeCOSTE late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that 
DEBORAH A. CORAINE of 
BRAINTREE in the County 
of NORFOLK be appointed 
executrix named in the will 
without surety on the 
bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 26, 
1992. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-first 
day of January one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-two. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUOHES 
REOSTER OF PROBATE 

2/6/92 



The Giancel Choir sang 
an arrangement by 
William Bradbury. The 
congregational singing was 
accompanied by Mary 
Ruth Scott on the organ 
and Janet Williamson on 
the piano. 

Deacons assisting the 
pastor were Craig 
Zaehring, Ann Wallin, 
Richard Hendry, Hazel 
Mayne, Dana Olson and 
Louise Randall. The pastor 
also led a special prayer 
for the installation of the 
churdi ofiGcers for 1992. 

Greeters were Richard 
and June Hendry. Ushers 
were Luther Swenson and 
Joan Hansen. Fellowship 
Hour was hosted by Mary 
Donnelly and Cynthia 
Stanton. 

Bible Study meets 
Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. 
Sunday School meets each 
Sunday at 9:30 a.m. 
Sunday worship begins at 
10:30 a.m. Child care is 
available during the 
service. 

A group for teens, The 
Way Up, meets Sundays 
from 2 to 6 p.m. and at 
various times during the 
week. 

A "Ham and Bean 

Supper" will be held 

Saturday, Feb. 8 at 6:30 

p.m. at Fellowship Hall 

sponsored by the Evening 

Friendship Qrcle. Dinner 

will be foUowed by a slide 

show of the Holy Land 

narrated by Luther 

Swenson. Tickets are $6.50 

and may be reserved by 

calling Barbara Anderson 

at 328-7053. 

LEGAL NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS THE 

TRIAL COURT THE 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT 

NORFOLK DIVISION 

DOCKET NO. 92 P0136E1 

Estate of AUNE H. 

CELLUCCI late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that BRENDA 
J. BAXTER of ABINGTON 
in the County of 
PLYMOUTH be appointed 
executrix named in the will 
without surety on the 
bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on March 4, 
1992. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-eighth 
day of January one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-two. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUOHES 
REG6TER OF PROBATE 
2/6/92 



The Charles A. 
Bernazzani School PTO is 
sponsoring two lottery 
scholarships of $250 each 
to two students from the 
1992 graduating class of 
the Bernazzani School, 
formerly the Furnace 
Brook School 

Applications are 
available at the school 
office and must be 



returned by April 1. 

To qualify for the 
scholarships, students 
graduating in the current 
school year must have 
been accepted to an 
accredited institution of 
higher education. 

The winner will be 
chosen by lottery in early 
April. 



Chronic Pain Self-Help 
Group Meets At Hospital 



Dave Maynard To Speak 
At Beechwood Breakfast 



The South Shore 
Chapter of Uniting People 
in Pain Society (UPPS), a 
non-profit self-help group 
designed to teach people 
who suffer from chronic 
pain, meet every other 
Tuesday evening at 
Quincy Hospital. 

Chronic pain continues 
long than six months and 
is not relieved by 
medication or medical 



treatment. UPPS helps 
people reduce the impact 
pain has on working and 
personal lives. 

All prospective 
members are welcome to 
contact Executive Director 
Barbara Appel-Siddall at 
617-471-1865 between 10 
a.m. and 4 p.m. Monday 
through Friday for more 
information and location of 
meetings. 



Boston radio personality 
Dave Maynard will be the 
featured speaker at the 
"Current Events 

Continental Breakfast" at 
the Beechwood 

Community Life Center, 
Thursday, Feb. 13 at 8 a.m. 

Reservations are 
required and can be made 
by calling 471-5712. 



Maynard is expected to 
focus on the upcoming 
"Swim for Sight" which he 
hosts each year. He will 
also be available to 
answer questions about his 
career, the evolution of 
radio, and his ongoing 
efforts to raise funds for 
those with failing eyesight. 

The Beechwood Center 
is located at 225 Fenno Sl 



Sterling Students 
In Celtics Shoot-Out 



Students at Sterling 
Middle School in Quincy 
will shoot baskets in the 
Boston Celtics-Easter Seal 
Basketball Shoot-Out 
Monday, Feb. 10 to raise 
money for services for 
people with disabilities. 

Celtics star Kevin 
McHale is Honorary 
Chairman of the event, 
sponsored annually by T.J. 
Maxx, WLVI-TV56 and 
WWLP-TV22. The 
program teaches 

youngsters about 

LEGAL NOTICE 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS THE 

TRIAL COURT THE 
PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT 
NORFOLK DIVISION 
DOCKET NO. 92P0118E1 
Estate of MARY THERESA 
QUINN late of QUINCY In 
the County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 
A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that WILLIAM 
V. QUINN of QUINCY in 
the County of NORFOLK 
be appointed executor 
named in the will without 
surety on the Iwnd. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on March 4, 
1992. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-eighth 
day of January one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-two. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUOHES 
REQBTER OF PROBATE 

2/6/92 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS THE 

TRIAL COURT THE 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT 

NORFOLK DIVISION 

DOCKET NO. 91 P2903E1 

Estate of MARY A. 

HOWARD late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 

presented in the above- 

captioned matter praying 

that the last will of said 

decedent be proved and 

allowed and that DALTON 

E. SMART of QUINCY in 

the County of NORFOLK 

be appointed executor 

named in the will without 

surety on the bond. 

tf you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on March 4, 
1992. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-eighth 
day of January one 
thousand nine hundred 
and ninety-two. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUOHES 
REQBTER OF PROBATE 

2/6/92 



Inter- Agency Council 
Lunch Meeting Feb. 18 



"Home Health Care 
Makes The Difference" 
will be the topic at the 
Inter-Agency Council noon 
luncheon meeting 
Tuesday, Feb. 18 at the 
Quincy Hospital 

Conference Room. 

The program will be 
presented by Margaret 
Johnson, clinical 
supervisor of VNA of the 
South Sboie and Stephen 



Robbins, executive 
director of the Quincy 

VNA. 

Cost of lunch and 
meeting is $5. Annual dues 
are $10. Payments should 
be made before Thursday, 
Feb. 13, and may be sent 
to Inter-Agency Council, 
c/o Pat Peers, Treasurer, 
St. Boniface Church, 26 
Shed SL, Quincy, 02169. 



disabilities—then gives 
them a chance to help. 

Students participating 
in the Shoot-Out sink as 
many baskets as they can 
during a three-minute 
period in the school gym. 
Each basket earns money 
pledged by families and 
friends. The money funds 
Easter Seal services for 
people with disabilities. 

One hundred Basketball 
Shoot-Out fundraisers will 
participate in a basketball 
clinic with Kevin McHale 

LEGAL NOTICE 



Dance For Heart Aerobathon 
At South Shore YMCA 



South Shore Y.M.C.A., 
79 Coddington St., Quincy, 
is sponsoring a Dance for 
Heart Aerobathon to 
benefit the American 
Heart Association this 
week through Saturday. 

The event is a national 
fundraising event which 
promotes the benefits of 
cardiovascular fitness 
through aerobic exercise, 
while raising funds to 
support :he American 
Heart Association's 



programs of heart research, 
public and professional 
education and community 
services. 

Qub members from the 
area are collecting pledges 
from friends, families and 
neighbors based on each 
minute they dance. Prizes 
of water bottles, towels, t- 
shirts, sweatshirts and 

sports bags will be 
awarded according to the 
amount of money 
participants raise. 



Free Eye Screenings 



Lambert Eye Center, 
100 Congress St., is 
offering free vision 
screenings every Friday 



from 1 to 4 p.m. 

For more information 
caU 471-5665. 



LEGAL NOTICES 



THE CFTY OF QUINCY 
DEPARTMENT OF PUBUC WORKS 
NOTICE OF A 
PUBLIC INFORMATIONAL HEARING 

The City of Quincy, Department of Public Works will hold a 
public information meeting on Thursday, February 20, 
1992 at 7:30 PM in the City Hall Council Chambers, 1305 
Hancock Street, Quincy, MA 02169 to discuss the 
proposed reconstruction of East Squantum Street. 

The project limKs extend from Quincy Shore Drive/East 
Squantum Street intersection to approximately 300 feet 
west of Heath Street, including modification of the East 
Squantum Street/Victory Road intersection. The project 
will entail geometric improvements to East Squantum 
Street and addre<*sing current flooding problems. The 
project also includes upgrading the signalized intersection 
with Quincy Shore Drive to improve traffic flow conditions 
and public safety. 

2/6, 13/92 

QUINCY MASSACHUSETTS 

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS 

URBAN AND ENGINEERING DESIGN SERVICES 

The City of QUINCY, Massachusetts is soliciting 
proposals from experienced urban design and engineering 
firms for its Downtown Improvement Project Phase 2 to 3 
conceptual designs for each of the four (4) planning areas 
within the Quincy Center. The CITY will select one 
CONSULT AhH" to develop further the concept designs the 
City has selected for the 4 areas - The Consultant 
selected will prepare schematic designs and part of the 
final plans and specifications. 

RFP packages can be obtained from the Department of 
Planning and Community Development (PCD), 1305 
Hancock Street, Quincy, MA 02169 or by calling (617) 
376-1362. A Pre-Submittal Conference will be held in the 
2nd Roor Conference Room, City Hall Annex on February 
18, 1992 at 2:00 PM. 

Proposals must be received by the PCD no later than 
February 27, 1992. 

2/6/92 



Thonday, February C, 1992 Qnincy Son Page 19 




EVERYBODY^ MARKETPIACE 



FOR RENT 



OFRCE FOR RENT 

Quincy Insurance Agency 
has 250 sq. ft. including 
utilities $250 a month. Call 
Carol between 9 am and 5 
pm at 617-770-4700 zr^o 



HALL FOR RENT 

Fumace Brook Golf Club, 
Small groups, 50-90, 
Contact Mai Holm 

472-8466 2/« 



HALL FOR RENT 

North Quincy K of C 

Building 

5 Mollis Avenue 

For information please call 

328-5967 



HALLS FOR RENT 

Nawly Renovated 
Son* of Italy Social Center 
Golden Lion Suite 
Capacity - 300 
Venetian Room 
Capacity - 140 
Call 4n-S$00 



TF 



HALL FOR HIRE 

Weddings. Stiowers, 

Meetings. Banquets 

Elks Home. 440 E Squantum St 

Ouin^y 

472-2223 

TE 



HALL FOR RENT 

(completely remodeled) 

Houghs Neck Post No 380. 

American Legion. 1116 Sea St 

479-»U» 

TF 



SERVICES 



SERVICES 



SERVICES 



MililMM*MMa**l*a 




WE 
REPAIR 



LAMPS • WINDOWS • SCREENS 

at 3 Convenient Locations 



370COPELAND ST. 

WEST QUINCY 

472-8230 



53 BILLINGS RD.. 

NORTH QUINCY 

773-7711 



190 QUINCY AVE. 

BRAINTREE 

843-1616 



ALL STORES OPEN MON THRU SAT 7a0^50»Ptenly of PaiWng 4^ 



HELP WANTEDS 

TRAVEL FREE or on a 

shoestring. Air couriers 
needed - also overseas 
and cruiseship help 
wanted. Call 1-805-682- 
7555 Ext. F-3844. an. 



POSTAL JOBS 
AVAILABLEI 

Many positions. Great 
benefits. Call 1-805- 
682-7555 ext. P-4029 



3/19 



WANTED 



AIRUNES NOW HIRING 

Travel Agents, Flight At- 
tendants Mechanics, etc. 
Entry level and up. Sala- 
ries to $105K. Call 1 -805- 
682-7555 ext. A-3654.3AH 



WANTED: 

Actors for TV Commer- 
cials; movie extras and 
game show contestants. 
Many needed. Call 1 -805- 
682-7555 ext. T-3806. 3/i» 



WANTED TO BUY 

Old woodwortdng tools, pianos, 
chisels, surplus hand tools; all 
trados. Precision machinist tools. 
Also wanted: okl books, paintings, 
frames, antiques, estate k)ts. 



1-617-558-3839 



IF 



LOOKING FOR 
a weekly playgroup 
In Quincy. My son 15 
months. Call Nina 
786-9425 



3/9 



FOR LEASE 



FOR LEASE 

Weymouth Landing 3 
stores. Two have 1,000 
sq. ft. Corner store has 
1 600 sq.ft. Call 61 7-926- 
3869 after 7 pm 



2/20 



PERSONALS 



Thank You 

St. Jude 

For Favors Granted 



B.M.H. 2/13 



GOVERNMENT JOBS 

NOW HIRING in your 
area. $16,000-$68,000. 
Call 1-805-682-7555 ext. 
J-3865 for current federal 
list. a'" 



TELEPHONE 
COMPANY JOBS 

Starts $7.80-$15.75/hr, your 
area . Men and women needed 
No experience necessary. For 
information call 1-900-740- 
4761 . ext. 41 43 6 am-8 am - 7 
days -$12.95 fee 2/6 

HELP WANTED 

Make $15 to $20 Dollars an 
hour guaranteed selling 
jewels by Park Lane. Full 
time-part time postions 
avaiable. Call Karen: 

617-666-4881 2/6 



• POSTAL JOBS • 

Quincy Area. $23,700 per 
year plus benefits. Postal 
can'iers, sorters, clerks. For 
an application and exam in- 
formation call 1-219-736- 
9807, ext. P4143, 9 am to 9 
pm, 7 days 



2«7 



Sun 

Classified 



Ads 



Get 



Results 



KAREN'S 
CLEANING 

Honest & Dependable 
328-9378 

Quincy - Milton za? 



RUBBISH REMOVAL 

Complete cleanouts- 
attics,cellars-garages-yards. 
Removal of appliances- 
boilers-oil tanks-water heat- 
ers. Fast service-reasonable. 
472- 0877 2^7 

• Tar and Gravel 
•Shingles 
•Gutters 
•Repats 

HEALY ROOFERS 

'Flat Roof Sfwclalteto' 
Jim H«alv 471-2123 »» 




FOR SALE 



REPOSSESSED & IRS 
FORECLOSED HOMES 

available at below market 
value. Fantastic savings. You 
repair. Also S&L bailout prop; 
erties. Call 1-805-682-7555 
ext. H-6705 for repo list your 
area. ^* 



SEIZED CARS 

trucks, boats, 4 wheelers, 
motortiomes, by FBI, IRS, 
DBA. Available your area 
now. Call 1-805-682-7555 
ext. C-6368 



ant 



fainting & 

By'Ed'Barr 
IfU fugfust quality luor^ 
performed matfy at rea- 
sonaBU rates, jrrec esti- 
mates, referrcnces avaii- 
oBU, over 18 years e^cpe- 
rience. 

CalC479-3284 
today 3« 




EXPERT 

LAMP REPAIR 
(REWIRING 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO. 

472-2177 

755 SOUTHERN ARTERY 
QUINCY TF 



TAX RETURNS 
Very Very Low Rates 

Richard C. McDonough, EA 
Professional Service In 

Your Home 
20 Years Experience 
472-2694 4/i6 



ROOFS AND ADDITIONS 
Dormers, Decks, Bath- 
rooms, Quincy and So. 
Shore area. Quality work, 
good prices. Jordan Const. 
1-800-649-6720 in 



SERVICES 



LARRY'S 
HOME REPAIR 

• Carpenters 
• Painters 

• Decorators 
General Contractor 
20 Years Experience 
Licensed • Insured 
Interior-Exterior Painting 
Scroll Ceiling 
All Home Repairs 
Small or Large 

659-7471 328-8735 

TF 

DIGITAL DJ 

Let us entertain you. Mu- 
sic for all ages, Includes 
free video. 

Call PJ Lowe 
773-9823 2«o 



UCENSED #69301 
DAYCARE 

In Quincy. Mother of one, 
EMT, BS in Elementary 
Education will care for your 
child. 

773-9823 2^3 



E.J. TANTILLO 

Plumbing & Heating 

Boilers, Water Heaters, 

Gas Piping, 

Master Lie. #9904. Insured 

479-5667 3/12 

GENERAL CARPENTRY 

Porches, decks, stairs, new 
work or repairs. Roof 
shingles, skle wall shingles, 
windows, etc. No job too 
small. 

Mike 471 -1379 2/13 



INSTRUCTION 



WORD PROCESSING IS IN 

DEMAND! LEARN MORE 

QUICKLY AND THOROUGHLY 

WITH PRIVATE INSTRUCTIONS: 

CALL WORD CONNECTIONS 

(617) 849-8002 

Leave Massage 

All calte promptly returned i/so 

MtSClLLANEOilS 
BINGO 

North Quincy K of C 

Wed., 7 pm - Hm^ Carde 

Prbee-SMck* 

Relwced Atmoepher* 

RefrMhment*. Pwlcing 

Call 328-9822 2m 



SERVICES 



A & T Vacuum 

• 14 95 Overhaul Special 
on any vacuum 

• Sewing machine repairing 

• VCR repairing and cleaning 

• Sharpening 

(scissors, knivas. etc ) 

• Greek XL Vacuums 

e Electrolux w/power nozzle 

$150 

• Used Vacuum's $45 & up 

27 Beale St. 

Wollaston 

47»-5066 



Your South Short 

Headquarters 

For 



Apjpliance 
Service 

ON ALL 

MAJOR 

APPLIANCES 



HANCOCK TIRE 

& APPLIANCE 

115 Franklin St . So Quincy 

4/2-1710 

TF 




WALLPAPERING 

Frank Montani 
HighestQuality Workmanship 
and Service. Neat, clean, 
professiional; reasonable 
rates; ceilings painted. Please 
leave message 698-0472 sm 



SULUVAN Landscape 
&TrMSMVIoo 

Pruning, Removals, brush 
chipping, Bobcat service. Fully 
Insured. Reasonable rates. 

472-3595 4/23 



QUAUTY 
Painting A Paperhanglng 

from professional prepara- 
tion to a spectacular finish. 
Neat, affordable & environ- 
mentally safe. 

Jim Foley 328-7151 s/i4 



HOUSE CLEANING 

No job too big or small. 
Let me do the cleaning 
while you enjoy other 
things. Call Sandy 

843-9875 2/13 



^-, 






MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN, 1372 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169 
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment must accompany order. 



INDEX 



RATES 
1WEEK 
8.7 WEEKS 



D Services 

D For Sale 

D Autos 

Boats 

O For Rent 

a Wanted 

a Help Wanted 

a Pets, Livestock 

a Lost and Found 

a Real Estate For Sale 

D Real Estate Wanted 

D Miscellaneous 

a Work Wanted 

a Antiques 

O Coins A Stamps 

Rest Homes 

a Instruction 

Day Care 

D Personal 

a Electrical & Appliances 



••12 WEEKS 



IS WEEKS 

OR MORE 



D $5.00foroneiniertlon.upto20word». 10« for each additional word. 
D $4.80 per Intertlon up to 20 word* for 3-7 inaartlona of the —w ad, 

10« each additional word. 
D $4.30 per Intertlon up to 20 words for 8-12 inaertlorw of theaamead. 

10< more each additional word. 
D $4.00 per inaertlon up to 20 words for 1 3 or more insertions of th« 

same ad, 10( each additional word. 



D Enclosed is $ — 
in The Quincy Sun 



Jor the following ad to run 



_weeks 



COPY: 



NO REFUND WMX K MADE AT TMI« CONTRACT RATE IN TWE EVENT OF CANCELLATION. 
DEADLINE: MONDAY. S.-00 PJi. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR PHONE NUMMR IN AO. 



PMgc20 QuiocjSnn Thursday, Fd>nuu7 (, 1992 



$25,000 For DPW 
Environmental Consulting 



By MICHAEL WHALEN 

The City Council 
Monday night unanimously 
approved the appropriation 
of $25,000 to the 
Department of Public 
Works for additional 
environmental consulting 
services to be performed 
by David Standley. 

Standley has been 
involved as a consultant 
regarding the noise issue 
at the interim sludge 
processing plant in the 
Fore River area, as well as 
other matters relating to 
the plant. Nut Island, and 
the contamination of the 
city's storm drain system. 

The council had already 
approved a previous 
allocation for Standley 's 



services. 

Public Works 

Commissioner David 
Colton noted that 88% of 
Standley 's bills for fiscal 
year 1992 have been 
reimbursed by the 
Massachusetts Water 
Resources Authority. The 

other 12% was not 
reimbursable because it 
was work related to other 
non-MWRA matters such 
as the Town Brook Flood 
Control Project and the 
landfill site. 



Speaking in favor, 
Councillor Michael 
Cheney said "David offers 
the expertise to find 
pitfalls we might not 
otherwise find." 

Council President 
Charles Pbelan agreed, 
saying he was "impressed" 
by Standley during an 
earlier meeting between 
the two. 

"His expertise and 
knowledge are of value," 
said Phelan. "This is 
money well spent." 



Financial Assistance For 
Montclair Home Owners 



Financial assistance for 
moderate and low income 



AGNITTI 

INSURANCE 

AGENCY, INC. 

Let us give you a 

competitive quote on your 

AUTO, homeowner, business, 

life and health 

• Registry Service 

• Free Notary Service • Time Payments 

• Fully Computerized 
• Quotes By Phone 

21 Franklin St. 

Quincy, 02169 770-0123 







Montclair home owners 
will be discussed tonight 
(Thursday) at 7:30 p.m. at 
the Lutheran Church of the 
Good Shepard, West 
Squantum and Harvard 
Streets. 

Tbe meeting of the 
Montclair/Wollaston 
Neighborhood Association 
will feature guest speakers 
Norman Grenier of Quincy 
Neighborhood Housing 
Services and Angelito 
Santos of The Office of 
Housing Rehabilitation. 

Grenier will discuss 
loans and grants for home 
repairs and rehabilitation 
projects in the area of 
Arlington, Fayette, 
Farrington and Safford 
streets. 




HANCOCK 





It's the new North 

Quincy branch address 

of the South Boston 

Savings Bank. 

• STRONG • CONSERVATIVE 
•RELIABLE •PROFITABLE 

HOURS 

MON - TUES - WED - FRI - 9 AM to 5 PM 

THURSDAY 9AM to 7PM 

SATURDAY 8:30AM to 12 NOON 

Telephone 773-8100 



Visit our Other 
Quincy branch 
office located at 
690 Adams St. 
l^n Square 




South Boston 
Savings Bank 

- ALWAYS THE LEADER 



Creedon Proposes 

Creation Of 13 
Task Committees 



(Cont'd from Page 1) 

Quoting Roland Barth, 
director of Harvard 
University's Principal 
Center, Creedon said 
wants to make the Quincy 
school system a 
community of learners. 

"A good school system 
is one where everyone is 
teaching and everyone is 
learning. A major 

responsibility of adults in a 
community of learners is 
to engage in their own 
learning, to make their 
learning visible to others 
in the community to enjoy 
and celebrate their 
learning and to sustain it 
over time even when 
swamped by the demands 
of their work." 

To support his vision 
statement, Creedon said 
he has three common 
goals: to help students 
become competent as self- 
fulling individuals, 
citizens and workers. 

He also said he shares 
the same goals outlined by 
President Bush and the 
nation's governors which 
were recently accepted by 
the Quincy School 
Committee. The goals 
include preparing all 
children for the start of 
school, increasing the high 
school graduation rate to 
at least 90 percent and 
making students 

competent in such subjects 
as English, mathematics, 
science, history and 
geogr^hy. 

Other goals call for 
making U.S. students first 
in the world in science and 
mathematics, making 
every American adult 
literate and every school 
&ee of drugs and violence. 

With his vision and 
goals, Creedon asked the 
School Committee to 
establish 13 new 
educational committee, 
each with a specific 
"mission." 



If established, Creedon 
would place before the 
School Committee the 
names of teachers, 
administrators and parents 
who have agreed to serve 
on the committees at a 
subsequent meeting. 

The new committees 
are: 

•Strategic Planning 
which would continue the 
work begun by Ricci in 
formalizing the Strategic 
Planning Report to the 
School Committee and 
community. 

•Space and Enrollment, 
which would study space 
concerns and present a 
series of short and long 
range options to resolve 
space problems. 

•School Governance 
which would concentrate 
on bringing participatory 
decision making and site- 
based management to 
Quincy. 

•Elementary School 
Evaluation, which would 
plan a program for 
involving the city's 10 
elementary schools in a 
self-study initiative similar 
to the programs completed 
by Snug Harbor School 
Principal Dr. Richard 
DeCristofaro and 
Merrymount School 
Principal Kathleen Morris. 
•Alternative Education, 
which would focus on 
establishing the Bethany 
Program, a state model for 
alternative education 
programs. 

•Middle School APC 
Evaluation, which would 
use the Middle School 
Evaluation Criteria in 
assessing the QPS APC 
program at Central Middle 
School. 

•Early Childhood and 
After School Day Care, 
which would continue the 
work of Supt. Paul Gossard 
in Early Childhood 
Education. 

•High School 



Restructuring, which 
would focus on seven 
areas: student discipline 
and attendance, including 
low levels of achievement 
and suspension rate; 
academics and curriculum; 
physical plant; equipment 
and supplies; teaching 
personnel; administrative 
personnel; and student 
activities including 
athletics. 

•Health Education, 
which would study and 
evaluate the school's 
health education program, 
especially in light of 
recent recommendations of 
theEDC. 

•Technology and 
Occupational Education, 
which would continue the 
work begun by Maurice 
Daly, retired assistant 
superintendent of 
Vocational-Technical 
Education. Under his 
leadership, the Vo-Tech 
was recognized by the 
Ford Foundation as one of 
four exemplary programs 
in tbe United States. 

Creedon said his vision 
statement is "primarily an 
agenda that deals with 
organization and 
administration. 

"At a later date, I will 
be discussing with you a 
much more important 
'Ssue, namely, curriculum, 
nd more specifically bow 
children and young people 
come to know," he said. 

"I am confident that we 
can count on the 
competence of our 
teachers and 

administrators to address 
these issues for 
competence is the 
capacity to do what needs 
to be done and we have 
that capacity in the 
Quincy public schools," 
Creedon said, adding, "I 
ask for your support as 
well as frank and wise 
criticism, advice and 
suggestions." 



Before It Snows! 



BLOW OUT OIL CHANGE 

^9.95 



(WOW) 



Premium Quality Lube, Oil, Filter 
14 Point Safety Inspection 

I W'Jl'JW^Ad, _„____ Expires 2/1/92 

L^ '"niE BLUB AND WHITE BUILDINGS''"' 






PETAR'S 
AUTOMOtlVE 
(617)786-9080 



lAR-S ERIC'S 

•MOTIVE AUTO BODY 

786-9080 (617)472-6759 

324-330 Quincy Ave., Quincy 










VOL.14 No. 21 



Thursday, February 13, 1992 





LINCOLN-HANCOCK COMMUNITY School student Caitlin Crowley presents check to 
Jaya Sarkar, Global Education coordinator for Plan International, an organization that 
helps Third World countries, during a recent assembly. 

Story Page 4 (Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 

Mayor Hopes To Balance 
Budget With No Layoffs 



City officials have 
begun formulating the FY 
93 budget and Mayor 
James Sheets expressed 
optimism Tuesday that for 
the first time in a number 
of years, there may be no 
layoffs. 

"It's my sense that if 
we could coordinate some 
functions and consolidate 
some functions, we could 
get away with no layoffs. 
That's always the bottom 
line goal," he said. 

Consolidation and 
restructuring of city 
services and departments 
were major themes of the 



mayor's second inaugural 
address in January. 

Sheets said he and 
Auditor Bob Foy have 
started their revenue 
projections for the new 
fiscal year which will 
begin July 1. "We'll 
determine what the 
revenue flow will be and 
then back a budget into it. 

"We should have a 
handle on it in two 
weeks," the mayor said, 
adding "Very soon we'll 
be instructing departments 
at what they should bring 
their budgets in at." 

Much of the spending 



Cheney Asks Restaurant 
Moratorium Be Reconsidered 



City Councillor-at- 
Large Michael Cheney has 
asked the License Board 
to reconsider its six-month 
moratorium on restaurants 
in Quincy Square. 

"After speaking with 
individuals who are in the 
restaurant business, I have 
concluded that additional 
food outlets in the 
Downtown area will 
actually draw people to 
the Square, creating 
additional foot traffic for 
the merchants," Cheney 
said in a letter to the 
boaid. 

"With regard to the 



Mayor's Downtown Plan, 
one would not expect to 
see any meaningful 
construction for at least 
one year even if a plan 
were decided on today. At 
this point we are not even 
sure as to whether or not 
someone might be 
displaced under the new 
plan. 

"I would also like to 
point out that new business 
residts in employing more 
people and with the high 
unemployment of today, I 
am sure that many 
individuals who are 
looking for work need all 
the opportunities possible," 



Cheney continued. 

Cheney's letter 
commended the board for 
its concern about the 
downtown area. He 
suggested that the issue be 
turned over to the Planning 
Department in lieu of a 
mmatoriimi. 

Last week, the License 
Board imposed the 
moratorium. Fire Chief 
Thomas Gorman said there 
is a glut of restaurants 
downtown and that the 
board should wait for 
guidance from the Mayor's 
office in regard to Mayor 
James Sheets plans for 
downtown revitaUzation. 



March 26 Deadline To File 
FY 92 Real Estate Exemptions 



Mayor Will Also Seek Sound 
Barriers For Red Line Noise 

Transportation Head, 

Sheets To Meet On 
RR Station, Connector 

By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

State Transportation Secretary Richard Taylor was scheduled to meet with 
Mayor James Sheets and Planning Director Richard Meade Friday afternoon to 
discuss the main components of the mayor's downtown revitali2ation plan: the 
crossway connector and a commuter rail station in Quincy Center, 



package puzzle depends 
on local aid. In recent 
years, the state has 
reduced the amount of 
local aid to Quincy as well 
as other cities and towns, 
leading to budget cuts and 
layoffs. 

If the stream of local 
aid and revenue is lower 
than anticipated, cuts will 
be made. If the stream is 
higher, money will be 
added to department 
budgets, Sheets said. 

After the budget is 
completed, the package 
will be sent to the City 
Council for passage. 



The trio wUl also get a 
birds-eye view of the 
proposed sites for the 
projects from the top story 
of the either the 
Campanelli building or 
South Shore Bank tower in 
Quincy Square. Sheets 
said the high perspective 
will give Taylor a good 
vantage point to view the 
Parkingway area. The 
mayor wants the MBTA to 
locate an Old Colony 
Railroad station in the 
Parkingway between 
Granite St. and School St. 

The view will also help 
show Taylor where the 
crossway connector would 
go "in general" and how 
the two projects 
"interrelate," the mayor 
said. 



As proposed, the 
connector would Unk the 
Burgin Parkway with 
Route 3A. 

As the secretary of 
transportation, Taylor is 
overseeing the MBTA's 
restoration of the Old 
Colony railroad. The 
mayor, who met with 
Taylor in December, 
called Friday's meeting a 
major step in getting state 
and federal support for the 
two projects. 

"I see this as a major 
step in the integration of 
the three levels of 
government, federal, state 
and city, in developing the 
connector and station as 
well as mitigation for 
noise," Sheets said. 

The mayor said he 



would discuss existing 
noise along the Red Line 
in Quincy as well as 
mitigation to curb that 
noise, such as sound 
barriers. 

To prevent future noise 
caused by the Old Colony 
line, the mayor said he 
wanted to talk to Taylor 
about "the technology of 
trains and cars and the 
track to make sure the 
quietest equipment is used. 

"Noise mitigation is an 
important part of it," he 
said, adding he hopes 
sound barriers could be 
erected within a year to 
absorb Red line noise. 

Sheets said Taylor's 
visit to Quincy is unique 
and gives credibility to the 

(Cont'd on Pag' 20) 



Electorate Now Over 45,000 

Registration Surge For 
Presidential Primaries 



Thursday, March 26 is 
the last day veterans, 
elderly, the blind, widows 
and widowers can file for 
real estate bill exemptions 
for FY 92. 

Those eligible to 
receive their exemption 
should file their forms as 
soon as possible. 



The assessors office 
will have representatives 
available Wednesday, 
Feb. 19 from 9 to 11:30 
a.m. to explain the filing 
procedures and answer 
questions regarding the 
ehgibility requirements. 
They will meet in the 
second floor conference 



room in Gty Hall annex. 

Mayor James Sheets 
said he is pleased to offer 
the program for the public, 
with the cooperation of the 
assessor's office. He is 
asking those with 
questions to attend in order 
to leara if they are eligible 
for an exemption. 



By ROBERT 
BOSWORTH 

A steady stream of 
Quincy residents filed into 
City Hall Tuesday to 
register to vote in the 
March 10th presidential 
primaries, increasing the 
city's electorate by 
approximately 600 new 
voters, registrars said. 

With the surge of new 
voters, the total number of 
registered voters in Quincy 
was certain to climb above 
45,000. Before the latest 
registration period, there 
were 44,746 registered 
voters in Quincy. Of that 
total, 26,264 were 
registered Democrats, 
11,846 unenrolled and 
6,636 RepubUcans. One 
resident is enrolled with 
the new Independent High 
Tech Party. 

Gty registrars attributed 
the surge of jew voters to 
the Presidential Primaries 
which will be held in 
Massachusetts Tuesday, 
March 10. Polirical 
advertisements, especially 
from the Democratic 
hopefuls which have been 
airing in New Hampshire, 
are also being seen locally 
increasing election 







ft 




m 




■F' ^HF 


* 


- 


\ ■ 








'1 


-3. 


^S 


* 


U ^^ 


^^ £ 


S 



NEW VOTER-Karen Roche of Newbury Ave., North 
Quincy, registers to vote Tuesday in the Council 
Chamber of City Hall as Registrar John Papile looks on. 
Roche was one of several hundred residents who 
registered in time for the March 10th presidential 
primary. (Quincy Sun photo by Robert Bosworth) 



awareness. 

City Qeik John GiUis, 
who is chairman of the 
Quincy Board of 
Registrars, said 

registration for this year's 
presidential primaries was 
heavier than four years ago 
when former Gov. Michael 
Dukakis was on the 
Democratic ballot. 

Of the newly registered 
voters, many are new 
Quincy residents, registrars 



said. Other new voters 
include those who have 
turned 18 years old or 
older since the last 
presidential election four 
years ago. 

Registrars said most of 
the new voters enrolled in 
the Democratic party or 
opted for the unenrolled 
ranks. 

The city's voter 
registration dnyt for the 

(Cont'd on Puge 20) ( 



sm 



P«gt 2 Qnlncj Sun Thursday, Fdmury 13, 1992 



Gen. Gordon Sullivan Quincy 
College Commencement Speaker 



Quiocy native Gen. 
Gordon R. Sullivan, Chief 
of Staff of the U.S. Amy, 
will deliver Quincy 
College's commencement 
address this year, 
announces President 0. 
Gayton Johnson. 

Gen. Sullivan became 
the Chief of Staff last 
June. He holds a long and 
distinguished history of 
service with the Army 
including four tours of duty 
in Europe, two in Vietnam, 
and one in Korea. Prior to 
becoming Chief of Staff he 
served as Deputy Chief of 
Staff for Operations and 
Plans and as the Vice 
Chief of Staff of the Army. 

Gen. Sullivan has 
commanded at the platoon 
through the division level. 
He has received numerous 
awards for his service 
including the 

Distinguished Service 
Medal, the Defense 




GEN. GORDON 
SULLIVAN 

Superior Service Medal, 
the Legion of Merit, the 
Purple Heart and the 
Combat Infantryman 
Badge. 

• "Quincy College is 
proud to have such a 
distinguished son of our 
city speak at our 
commencement 
ceremony," said Johnson. 
"His example to our 
students reminds us that 



concern and service are 
the true steps to the top of 
one's profession. We 
would hq)e that the people 
of Quincy join with us to 
celebrate our graduates 
and our distinguished 
speaker." 

Gen. Sullivan will be 
greeted with a 19-gun 
salute and four ruffles as 
he is entitled to by virtue 
of his office. The college 
plans to invite special 
guests including 
representatives from the 
armed forces of the United 
States stationed in 
Massachusetts, the 
National Guard and the 
Ancient and Honorable 
Field Artillery of which 
Johnson is a member. 

According to Registrar 
Joanna Hill, this promises 
to be Quincy College's 
largest graduating class to 
date with over 500 
graduates. 



License Board Rejects 
Pizza, Sub Shop 



Ward 6 Democrats 
To Caucus Feb. 29 



Registered Democrats 
in Ward 6 will hold a 
caucus Saturday, Feb. 29 
at 2 p.m. at the Atlantic 
Neighborhood Center, 
Hunt St., North Quincy, to 
elect delegates to the 1992 
Massachusetts Democratic 
Convention. 

Ward 6 will elect 11 
delegates and four 
alternates, equally divided 
between men and women, 
to send to the convention. 
The apportioned number of 
delegates has been 
allocated on the basis of a 
formula giving equal 
weight to the Democratic 
Party registration and the 
average vote for 
Democratic candidates in 
the last general elections 
for governor and president 
for which figures were 
available at the time 
delegate tabulations were 
prepared. 

Marcia McCarthy, 



chairperson of the Ward 6 
Quincy Committee, will 
call the caucus. The 
caucus is open to all 
registered Democrats, 
persons ineligible to 
register and media 
representatives. The only 
persons eligible to 
participate in any portion 
of the caucus are those 
who are registered 
Democrats in Ward 6 as of 
Dec. 31, 1991. There will 
be no absentee or proxy 
voting. 

Candidates for 
delegates and alternates 
must also be present, 
voting and give his or her 
written consent to be 
nominated and that 
nomination must be 
seconded by two persons 

present at the local 

caucus. 

All ballots will be 

written and secret. Those 

candidates receiving the 



DRV 




TEL 3aB.1700 



FASHION QUALITY CLEANERS 



LAUNDRV - DRY CLEANING - ALTERATIONS - STORAGE 



WEODING GOWNS A SPECIALTY 



PETER l_IO 
Owner 



07 BILLINGS HO. 
NO. QUINCY. MASS. 



greatest number of votes 
on the first ballot will be 
elected. 

Each candidate will be 
allowed to make a two- 
minute speech and to 
distribute on his/her behalf 
one sheet of paper listing 
qualifications and ideas. 

Slate making is 
allowed, but no special 
preference shall be given 
to slates. There is no 
quorum requirement for the 
caucus. 

There will be no 
admission or expense 
charge at the caucus, 
although donations may be 
solicited. 

Discrimination on the 
basis of race, sex, age, 
color, creed, national 
origin, religion, ethnic 
identity, philosophical 
persuasion or economic 
status in the conduct of the 
caucus is strictly 
prohibited. 

Challenges to the 
delegate selection process 
can be filed in writing with 
the Compliance Review 
Commission, c/o The 
Massachusetts Democratic 
Party, 45 Bromfield St., 
Boston, MA 02108 no 
later tha n Mar di 2. 

8«vt Qm and Money 
Shop Locally 



SAME DAY SLIDES 

(E-6 PROCESS) 
only at 

Photo Quick of Quincy 

1363 Hancock St. 
Quincy Center 

472-7131 



By STEVE KAVANAGH 

A proposed pizza and 
sub shop on Adams Street 
has been rejected despite 
claims that the building 
will be boarded up 
otherwise. 

The License Board 
voted 5-0 to deny a request 
for a Common Victualer 
license to John 
Tassiopoulos for T.J.'s 
Pizza & Sub Shop, 646 
Adams St., across from the 
Dairy Freeze. 

City Councillors Tom 
Fabrizio of Ward 4 and 
Larry Chretien of Ward 3 
spoke against the sub shop 
citing opposition by 
neighbors, traffic in the 
area and other concerns. 

The owner of the 
property, Antonio 
Parlavecchio, told the 
license board he has been 
working for three years to 
find a suitable tenant for 
the building. He said the 
empty storefront is putting 
a financial burden on him. 
"Do you want the bank 
to take it over and board it 
up?" he asked the License 
Board. "No one wants to 
open a business in 1992 
with the economy the way 
it is," Parlavecchio said. 
He added he was "lucky" 
to find a businessman like 



Tassiopoulos, who nms the 
Canton House of Pizza in 
Canton and has over 20 
years experience. 

"Let it happen. If there 
are complaints—shut him 
down," Parlavecchio said. 

Board members and 
Chretien argued that there 
are already many food 
estabUshments in the area 
which cause litter and 
traffic problems. 

Attorney for the 
applicants Frank Marinelli 
argued that the sub shop 
would have minimal traffic 
impact, drawing customers 
from the neighborhood and 
existing traffic. 

Chretien told the board 
that Parlavecchio had 
been before the board in 
the past and had been told 
that a fast-food restaurant 
was against the wishes of 
the neighbortiood. 

"Adams Street is 
choked with traffic. There 
are already a number of 
establishments of that type 
there. When Mayor Sheets 
was Ward 4 Councillor we 
held neighborhood 
meetings and it was made 
clear that this type of 
proposal was not 
acceptable," Chretien said. 

"There is already a 
litter problem in the 



neighborhood," Fabrizio 
said. "I have received 
some calls in favor of it 
(sub shop) but the majority 
have been against it." 

"It would be nice to fill 
the building but it's not the 
place to have a takeout," 
said nearby resident 
Norma Rodberg of 32 
Campbell St. She said the 
area is already saturated 
with places which 
contribute to congestion 
and other problems 
including 7-11, Burger 
King, Dairy Freeze, Villa 
Rosa, Atlas Liquors, Curtis 
Farms, The Hollow, The 
Common Market, Darcy's 
Pub and others. 

Rodberg also said she 
feared that this type of 
establishment would 
attract gangs of youths. 
"I'm afraid to go out at 
night," she said. 

Marinelli told the board 
that Parlavecchio has 
looked for other types of 
tenants. In the past three 
years a florist and an 
insurance agency have 
gone out of business at the 
sight. 

"The only calls I get 
now are for Chinese 
restaurants and sandwich 
shops," Parlavecchio said. 



February Vacation Gym Schedule 



Recreation Director 
Barry Welch announces 
the Quincy Recreation 
Department will supervise 
nine local neighborhood 
gymnasiums on an 
expanded schedule during 
the upcoming school 
vacation period. 

Activities are schedules 
at various times and all 
programs are coed for boys 
and girls age eight through 
high school. The basic 
schedule is fro 9 to 10:30 
a.m. for elementary age; 
10:30 to 11:45 a.m. for 
middle school and 11:45 
a.m. to 1 p.m. for high 
school age. Depending on 
enrollment variations may 
occur at some locations. 

The program is free and 
participants are requested 
to wear sneakers at all 



locations. The program 
includes such activities as 
floor hockey, gym games, 
aixl basketball. 

The schedule for each 
location is: 

Atherton Hough, 
Wednesday, Feb. 19 and 
Friday, Feb. 21. 

Atlantic Middle, 
Tuesday, Feb. 18, 
Wednesday, Feb. 19, 
Thursday, Feb. 20 and 
Friday, Feb. 21. 

Merrymount, Tuesday, 
Feb. 18 and Thursday, Feb. 
20. 

Montclair, Tuesday, 
Feb. 18 and Thursday, Feb. 
20. 

Point, Tuesday, Feb. 
18, Wednesday, Feb. 19, 
Thursday, Feb. 20 and 
Friday, Feb. 21. 

Snug Harbor, Tuesday, 



Feb. 18 Wednesday, Feb. 
19, Thursday, Feb. 20 and 
Friday, Feb. 21. 

Squantum, Wednesday, 
Feb. 19 and Friday, Feb. 
21. 

Wollaston, Wednesday, 
Feb. 19 and Friday, Feb. 
21. 

The Beechwood Knoll 
Community Life Center 
gymnasium will be 
supervised Wednesday, 
Feb. 19 from 1 to 4 p.m. 
and Thursday, Feb. 20, 
from noon to 3 p.m. 

The regular schedule of 
programs will also be held 
on Saturday, Feb. 15 and 
Feb. 22. 

For more information 
caU the Quincy Recreation 
Department at 376-1394. 



Braintree Sons Of Italy Ladies Lodge 
Donates Clothing To Quincy CP Center 



The Braintree Ladies 
Lodge of the Sons of Italy 
recently donated hundreds 
of articles of clothing 
including hand knit hats. 



mittens and sweaters to 
the children at the 
Children's Developmental 
Disabilities Center in 
Quincy. 



BROPHY TAXI 
of MILTON 

Serving the area with 
Clean Cabs and Milton's 



LOWER FARES 



Wait a Little 
SAVE a Lot 

698-0340 



"Many of these children 
come from low income 
homes and could use 
additional hats and 
mittens," said Ann 
Connor, clinical director of 
the center. 

The Children's 
Developmental 
Disabilities Center of 
Cerebral Palsy of the 
South Shore services 
children from two months 
to six years who live in the 
South Shore and Greater 
Boston area and can 
benefit from a therapeutic 
based and educational 
program. 

For more information 
about Cerebral Palsy and 
its progr;jns, call 479- 
7443. 



Thnnday, February 13, 1992 Qolncj Son ?•(• 3 



Mayor's Planning Partnership 
Order Before Council Feb.18 



By ROBERT 
BOSWORTH 

Mayor James Sheets 
said Tuesday he will ask 
City Solicitor Stephen 
McGratb to send an order 
calling for the creation of 
a public-private planning 
partnership to the City 
Council" for its next 
meeting, Tuesday, Feb. 18. 

The mayor considers 
the planning partnership as 
the driving force of his 
downtown revitalization 
project. He expects the 
council will address the 
order, hold a bearing on it 
and then pass it within a 
month. 

The order would then 
need approval by the state 
legislature before it could 
be enacted.. Sheets hopes 
the partnership is in place 
by May. At that time, the 
partnership would meet 
and establish by-laws. 

According to the mayor, 
the partnership would 

consist of a development 
corporation of 30 to 35 
members, of which 10 
would form a board of 
directors. The board. 
Sheets says, would "meet 
on a needs basis and make 
sure projects move 



forward." 

The partnership would 
also include a full-time 
executive director of 
planning and an 
administrative assistant 
who would work on Quincy 
Center, WoUaston and 
North Quincy 

revitalization projects. 

Besides the mayor, 
other public officials who 
would serve on the 
partnership are the 
planning director and 
president of the city 
council. Sheets said the 
chairman of the council's 
Downtown Economic and 
Development Committee 
may also sit on the 
partnership. The c urren t 
chairman is Councillor 
TimCahill. 

In addition, there would 
be a financial advisory 
council comprised of 
seven elected partnership 
members. "They would 
have a basic financial 
interest, like bankers and 
trade unions and other 
groups with lending 
capabilities," Sheets said. 

Through membership 
fees and community 
development block grant 
money, the partnership 



would fund programs for 
improving store facades, 
make no-interest loans 
available to small business 
and market vacant retail 
spaces. 

Sheets hopes the 
partnership could start with 
a budget of approximately 
$450,000 its first year. Of 
that amount, $150,000 
would be paid by 
membership fees and 
another $300,000 by 
CDBG, a federal grant 
which requires City 
Council approval for 
appropriation. 

"It would be up to the 
partnership to determine 
how to invest that money," 
the mayor said. 

Together, the 

partnership would work on 
creating a comprehensive 
development plan for the 
downtown. Sheets added. 

The mayor said he is 
anxious to get the 
partnership in place. 

"I'm very anxious to get 
an executive director of 
planning on board to 
market the retail area. 

I'm hopeful by May 
we'll be on our way." 



Braintree Cabs At S. Quincy 
T Station Raises Complaints 



License Board 

Chairman John Gillis said 
he will send a letter to 
MBTA Police concerning 
Braintree taxi cabs at the 
Quincy Adams MBTA 
Station. 

Gillis is responding to a 
complaint that cabs 

Sa«« Gm and Mon«y 
Shop Locally 



licensed in Braintree are 
waiting for fares at the 
statioQ, taking business 
away from Quincy cabs. 
Cabs are allowed to pick 
up customers in other 
towns if they are called 
but may not solicit walk- 



up business. 

Quincy Police Chief 
Francis Mullen said his 
department does not have 
jurisdiction at the MBTA 
stations and recommended 
that Gillis contact MBTA 
Police. 



Always Buying 
New&OW 

TAJ 

COIN, 

STAMPS 

and 

SPORTS CARDS 

9 Maple St., 
Quincy, MA 02169 

479-1652 

Complete Line of Supplies 




GRANITE 
LOCK CO 



SfRVICE 



MOIIIE 



AUTO-HOME-IUtlNltS 
,• OUDUITS INS'.«llED| 
)• LOCKS RERETfD 
• DOOR CLOSERS 
. • r«NIC HARDWARE 
f • AUTO Kns FinED 



[visit our showroomI 

1755 so. ARTERY. QUINCVl 

472-2177 



Enlarged to show detail 



O J & S Farrata Co.., Inc. 



Give Her a Kiss 
For Valentine's Day 

This beautifully crafted sterling silver kiss 
by J & C Ferrara is a perfect gift for any 
occasion when you want to show affection. 
And, how about wrapping it with a package 
of real Hershey's Milk Chocolate Kisses to 
satisfy her sweet tooth. Then, the rest is up 
to you -- a kiss or two of your own wouldn't 
be bad. 
Kiss in Sterling Silver ...$19.95 

Also available In 14K Gold and 18K Gold 

Exchjsively licensed Tradmark cf Hershey Foods Corp. 
JiC Ferrara Co., Inc. Licensee 

LeColson's Jewelry 

730 Hancock Street 
Quincy, MA 02170 




'classmates today, neighbors tomorrow Breakfast was recenUy held at 
Temple Beth Israel by the Jewish War Veterans Post 193 to honor four local high school 
students for their outstanding efforts for helping their community and for their 
academic achievements. From left, Commander Dr. Bertram Schaffer, KJmberly 
Robinson, Weymouth High; Jennifer WUte, North Quincy High; Suzanne Daly, Hull 
High; Marianne McSweeney, Quincy High; Harvey Soloman, program chairman; and 
Jim Goldberg, senior vice commander, State JWV. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 



In Third Norfolk District 

Miller Takes Out Papers 
For State Representative 



By ROBERT 
BOSV^^ORTH 

George Miller, who 
made an impressive yet 
unsuccessful political 
debut in the city election 
last fall, is eyeing a run for 
state representative in the 
Third Norfolk District. 

Miller, who came in 
fifth in last fall's city 
council at-large race, took 
out nominating papers for 
the state lep seat Tuesday 
afternoon, the first day 
papers became available 
for this fall's state 
election. 

An attorney who lives 




GEORGE MILLER 

at 120 Sumner St., Quincy 
Point, Miller said he will 
challenge State Rep. 
Ronald Mariano in the fsJl. 



He said he took out papers 
early to get a quick start 
on his campaigning. 

"This time, I'll have 
plenty of time to woik. I 
don't want to waste time," 
Miller said in a brief 
interview at City Hall 
Tuesday afternoon shortly 
after taking papers out. 
After campaigning for 
councillor-at-large for only 
three months and coming 
up short, he said he 
realizes more time is 
needed for a run at state 
rep, especially since the 

iConi'd on Pane 9) 



WOLLASTON REDEMPTION CENTER 

9 Brook Street, Quincy, MA 

(off Newport Ave/Across from Wollaston T) 



Now Reopen 



i^ur One Stop Bottle Drop 

1"^^^^^^^^^^^^^ SoitiiMJeer : 



wA^ittuUiUtfidtfi 



472-6297 

Tues.-Fri. 9:30-5:00 Saturday 8:00-2:00 



Blackwood Pharmacy 

471-3300 

Very Personalized Service by Bonnie Seely, 

and her Staff 
FREE DELIVERY Quincy and Milton 



BOfNESSLYBS-RPh 



30% OFF All Russell Stover Candies 

Reg. Now! 

1 Lb Foil Heart 6.95 4.87 
ILbBox 525 3.68 

2 Lb Box 1025 7.18 
5 1/2 oz. Foil Heart 2.75 1.93 



Blackwood Pharmacy 



Hours: Open Dally 9-8 

Saturday 9-6 

Sunday 8:30-2 



M 



663 Hancock St. 

GKilncy 

471-3300 



Page 4 Qulncy Sun Thundjiy, February 13, 1992 



Opinion 



LOy 



mv-^- 



USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co . Inc 

1372 Hancock St . Quincy, Mass 02169 

Henry W Bosworlh Jr . Publisher 
Robert H Boswonh. Editor 



3M par copy. $12.00 p«r y«ar by mall in Quincy 
$14.00 par yaar by mail outaide Quincy. $17.00 out of state 

Telephone 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 
Second class postage paid at Boston, Mass 

Postmaster Send address change to 
The Quincy Sun, 1372 Hancock St Quincy Mass 02169 



The Quincy Sun assumes nc financial fesponsib,iiIy lof 
typogrsphicai errors in aOvertisemenls txjl will repnnl thai 
part o( an adverrsefrenl in which the typographical error 
occurs 



'"A^- 




Sunbeams 

By Henry Bosworth 



It Might Have Been Hancock 
Q 



Native American 

Awareness Celebration 

Here March 7 



uincy this year is marking — rather quietly — 
its 200th anniversary as a separate community. 
Or, if you wish, the 200th anniversary of its 
independence from Braintree. 

And, did you know that if some folks had had their 
way back then, you'd be hving today in the c'ty of 
Hancock instead of Quincy? 

Quincy, like George Washington, was bom on Feb. 
22. But not the same year. 

On Feb. 22, 1792 the General Court of Massachu- 
setts passed an act incorporating the North Precinct of 



A celebration of Native 
American Awareness Day 
- Spring Moon Pow-Wow, 
will be held Saturday, 
March 7, from 11 a.m. to 5 
p.m. at the National Guard 
Armory, Hancock Street 
and Furnace Brook 
Parkwav. 

The celebration, 
sponsored by the 
Massachusetts Center for 
Native American 

Awareness, will be 
highlighted by Native 
American drumming and 
singing, legends and 
storytelling, and Native 
Americans dancing in their 
traditional costumes. There 



will be Native American Old Braintree as the separate town of Quincy. 



vendors selling their arts, 
crafts, food, jewelry, 
tapes, sweatshirts and 
more. 

Slow Turtle, Supreme 
Medicine Man of the 
Wampanoag Nation will 
open the Circle for grand 
entry at noon. He will 
bless the Circle and offer 
thanksgiving to the 
Creator. The cultural 
program will then begin. 

The public is invited. 
Cost is $3 adults; $1.50 
children ages 6-12; $2 
seniors and members; free 
for under age 5. For 
information call 884-4227. 



Quincy Lions Club 
Donates $400 Toward 
Infants Eye Operations 



The Quincy Lions Club 
recently donated $400 to 
help defray the cost of eye 
operations for two very 
young Czechoslovakian 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Oulncy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



children who were flown 
here f.om Europe to have 
the operations performed. 

The children were 
staying in Quincy prior to 
the operation and have 
since returned to 
Czechoslovakia. 

Eye research and 
programs for the visually 
impaired are the special 
charity of the Lions Oub. 



The act also separated an area known as Squantum 
and the Farms from Dorchester and made them part of 
the new town of Quincy. 

Residents in the North Precinct wanted to break 
away from Old Braintree because the Middle and South 
Precincts outnumbered them and outvoted them. North 
Precinct residents believed that the Middle and South 
Precincts were ganging up on them so they wanted to 
break away and do their own thing as a separate town. 

There were some people in the ne w town who 
wanted it named after native son John 
Hancock instead of Boston bom Col. 
John Quincy. 

Colonel Quincy, the maternal 
grandfather of Abigail Smith who be- 
came the wife of President John Adams HANCOCK 
and the mother of President John Quincy Adams, had 
represented Old Braintree in the General Court. 

John Hancock, who was bom in the North Precinct 
of Old Braintree, was governor of Massachusetts when 
the General Court passed the act incorporating the new 
town of Quincy. He signed the act the following day — 

apparently feeling the name Quincy was more appro- the way the Quincy family pronounced it. 
priate for the town than his own name. The 1 8 other Quincys who were named after John 

But at the first town meeting of the new town in May, Quincy Adams apparently thought John Quincy pro- 
a petition was presented to change the name of Quincy nounced it Quin-cee. 

Ayers To Hold Community Meeting 




to Hancock in honor of the patriot. 

That move was finally defeated after a stormy verbal 
battle on the town meeting floor. 

Opponents argued that Hancock was still alive and 
that the honor should go to a distinguished but deceased 
person. 

Colonel Quincy met those requirements. He was 
both distinguished — and deceased. 

He had represented Old Braintree in the General 
Court from 1717 to 1741 — 12 of those years as 
Speaker of the House. He died July 1 3, 1767 at age 77 
— two days after John Quincy Adams was bom. 

But a lot of people today still think Quincy was 
named for the sixth president. 

At the time of its incorporation, the town of Quincy 
had a population of 900 and less than 200 families. 

Today the city of Quincy has a population of over 
88,000; according to the latest state census. 

Quincy was incorporated as a city June 11,1 888 and 
began functioning as a city in January, 1889. 

Quincy celebrated its centennial as a city with nu- 
merous events in 1988 and 1989 but is observing its 
bicenteimial as a conmaunity in a much lower key. 

The latter may reflect today's hard economic times. 

There are 18 other Quincy 's in the United States. 
Most of them pronoimce it Quin-cee. 

We pronounce it Quin-zee. 

Why? 

Very simple. 

WilUam C. Edwards, late Quincy historian, spent a 
good part of his life-time explaining the pronunciation 
to tourists. 

We pronounce it Quin-zee, he said, because that's 




^ Medically 
^ SpeaUng 

by Michael M. Bakerman, M.D., PA.C.C. 




A community meeting 
will be held Thursday, 
Feb. 20 at 7:30 p.m. in the 
Council Chambers at City 

Hall regarding the 
widening and improvement 
of the intersection at East 
Squantum St. and Quincy 
Shore Drive. 



The traffic study 
observation was done in 
October, during the 
morning and evening peak 
hours. Three plans were 
submitted and reviewed by 
the Engineering, Planning 



Commission. meeting and to voice their 

Ward 6 Councillor opinions and concerns. 
Bruce Ayers and State "This is a highly 

Rep. Michael Morrissey, traveled roadway and it is 

along with the traffic "^y hope to make it as safe 



engineers, will make a 
presentation on the future 



and Traffic Departments in plans of the intersection 
Quincy and the Ayers encourages all 
Metropolitan District residents to attend the 



as possible and to ease the 
traffic flow," said Ayers. "I 
encourage residents to 
attend the meeting and let 
their voices be heard." 



GOP City Committee Candidates Forum March 5 



PROMISING TREATMENT FOR SKIN CANCER 

A new treatment 
involving ultraviolet light 
may offer victims of one 
type of skin cancer an 
alternative to the 
harrowing sjde effects of 
traditional chemotherapy. 
Blood samples taken from 
patients with cutaneous T- 
cell lymphoma, a 
sometimes fatal form of 
skin cancer, are exposed 
to ultravk>let light arKJ then 
returned to the body. This 
apparently triggers an 
immune response that 
stops malignant cells from 
spreading to other parts of 
the body. The treatment 
may relieve the symptoms 
of the disease, which 
Include, red, scaly rashes 
that often turn into 
mushroom-like lesions. - 



Known as photopheresis, 
this new method may 
improve survival odds. 

P.S. About 1,000 
Americans annually are 
affected by the above- 
mentioned skin cancer. 

Today doctors are 
developing many new 
treatments for cancer. If 
you would like to learn 
more, call COMPREHEN- 
SIVE CARDIAC CARE at 
472-2550. Wo are 
dedicated to the 
compassionate and caring 
practice of medicine. 
Office hours are by 
appointment at 101 Adams 
St., Suite 24, in Quincy. I 
am affiliated with Quincy 
Hospital and South Shore 
Hospitals. 



The Quincy Republican 
City Committee will hold 

a candidates forum 
Thursday, March 5 from 7 
to 9 p.m. at United First 



Parish Church, 1306 
Hancock St., Quincy 
Square. 

Candidates miming for 
Republican State 



committee man and 
woman will speak. They 
are: Charles Debreczeni, 

Tom Hamill, Frank 
McCauley, Kathleen 



Cnimpelman, and Kathryn 
Roberts. 

Republicans and 
Independents are invited to 
attend and bring their 
fiiends. 



Lincoln-Hancock Third Graders 
Raise $376 For Third World Students 



Third graders at 
Lincoln- Hancock Comm- 
unity School recently 
sponsored a bake sale, 
raising $376 to send to 
their pen pals in 



developing countries. 

A new component in 
their social service 
curriculum is a teaching 
unit emitled "See Me 
Share My World," an 




James Madison was the puniest of American Presi- 
dents: at five feet, four inches tall and weighing just 1 GO 
pounds, he was dwarfed even by his wife Dolly. 



interdisciplinary approach 
incorporating art, social 
science and language aits. 
The unit focuses on 
artworic and photographs of 
children from several 
developing countries, and 
provides activities to 
heighten global awareness 
and cultural understanding. 
As members of the 
"Worid Citizen Program," 
the third graders became 
sponsors of and pen pals 



with children from Latin 
America, Africa and Asia. 
They met with Jaya 
Saikar, Global Educadon 
coordinator for PLAN 
International in Rhode 
Island, to discuss various 
community projects which 
they can allocate their 
$375. 

The children will vote 
on which projects they 
think will make life better 
for their new fiiends. 



Tlianday, February 13, 1992 Qaincy San Page 5 



Mariano Urges Deletion 
Of MDC Debt Prepayment 



In a letter to both the 
House and Senate Ways 
and Means Committees' 
chairmen, State Rep. 
Ronald Mariano (D- 
Quincy/Weymouth) urged 
the deletion of the 
prepayment of the MDC 
debt by the MWRA from 
their FT 93 budget. 

Gov. William Weld had 
included the prepayment 
of $120 million of debt 



from the MDC in his FY 
93 budget. 

"The prepayment of this 
debt means that the 
MWRA will have to bond 
this money at a cost to 
ratepayers of about 200 
million dollars. The 
MWRA ratepayers will 
receive absolutely no 
benefit for spending an 
additional $200 million," 



Mariano said. 

"This is just another 
example of the governor 
trying to balance his 
budget on the backs of the 
MWRA ratepayers. The 
new MWRA budget calls 

for an average increase in 
rates of about 36 percent 
for FY 93. Residents of 
Quincy and Weymouth 
cannot afford to pay for the 



services they currently 
use, how can they be 
expected to fund the debt 
of the MDC," he said. 

Mariano vowed to fight 
to keep this prepayment 
out of both the House and 
Senate budgets and to 
fight other attempts by the 
governor to pass costs on 
to the ratepayers of the 
MWRA. 



Readers Forum 



We're Minding 
The Store, Too 



Says Pat Buchanan Is 
More Than A Columnist 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 
This is an open letter to 

business owners on the 

South Shore: 

We've all learned a big 

lesson these past couple of 

years. The store doesn't 

take care of itself. 

Of course you have 
competent employees 
thoroughly dedicated to 
doing a good job. Yet, you 
know that your business 
may very well be headed 
for trouble if you dared 
assume that it could "run 
by itself." We all know 
better than to take such a 
chance. 

This is why you're at 
your desk early in the 
morning, well into the 
evening and on weekends. 
If any of us want to be in 
business tomorrow, we'd 
better be on the job today! 

This is why belonging 
to the South Shore 
Chamber of Commerce is 
so important to your and 
your business. That's right- 
-Chamber membership is a 
key to your business 
success. 

While you're doing your 
}ob--we're minding the 
store. While you're 
focusing your attention on 
doing business, we're hard 



at work making sure the 
state legislature doesn't 
make it more difficult for 
you to be in business. 

While you're running 
your operation, we're busy 
getting a better 
transportation system so 
more customers can get to 
your door. 

While you're out 
making sales, we're 
meeting with the mayor, 
the board of selectmen, 
and members of the City 
Council to protect your 
interests. 

While you're busy in 
your shop, we're 
eliminating governmental 
red tape and fighting 
proposed laws that can 
hurt your profits. 

Of course you're busy 
minding the store. That's 
your job. And that's why 
the South Shore Chamber 
is in business. We're 

minding the store, too— for 
you. 

At the South Shore 
Chamber, we're working to 
make sure your store will 
still be open tomorrow. 

Ronald E. Zooleck, 
Executive Vice President 
South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 
Last week one of your 
readers sought fit to 
'caterwaul' our political 
situation especially using 
the term to belittle Pat 
Buchanan. I presume it's 
Pat because he refers to 
the candidate as a 
columnist. Pat is more 
than that~a columnist. 

Anyone who has read 
his book "Right from the 
Beginning" or watched or 
listened to him on 
"Crossfire" or the 
"McLaughlin Group" 
knows he is not a 
caterwauler— that he is 
right to the point and calls 
a spade a spade. There is 
no dilly dallying. This is 
it!! Cost what it may. As 
an example— two weeks 
ago the Boston Herald ran 
a luncheon at the Park 
Plaza honoring Pat. In a 
questionnaire Pat was 
asked about abortion. His 



answer was: "I'll be brief. 
I am a Roman CathoUc. I 
am pro-life all the way." 
Period! No ducking the 
issue with, "Personally, 
I'm against abortion but . . 
." It's issues like this that 
separates this man from 
the boys. And Pat is a 
man! 

I assure our reader that 
his "prayer" will be 
answered as he says-"Still 
there stands our 
incandescent dreams of 
government by someone 
touched by greatness; and 
we can hope that there 
will surface soon some 
faintly flawed (my 
emphasis) but capable 
individual who, next 
November, will provide a 
catalyst to return our 
nation to remembered 
glory"— the answer is Pat 
Buchanan. 

Rev. JOHN J. McMAHON 
Boston 



Feb. 12.1S 

1956 

38 Years Ago 



A 'Thank You' From 
The American Red Cross 



'Winnie The Welder Day' 
Important Event In 1991 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 
Reading the story on 
the "1991 in Review," 
Dec. 31 issue, an 
important event was not 
mentioned, a salute to the- 
female shipbuilders during 
Worid War n at the Fore 
River and Hingham 
Shipyards, "Winnie the 
Welder Day" held on 
March 12, 1991 in the 
Council Chambers in the 
Quincy City Hall. It was a 
history in memory of the 
shipbuilding in Quincy and 
Hingham Shipyards, 
attended by our Mayor, 
Mr. Sheets, city officials, 
school committee and 
other prominent people 
and former employees 
from Fore River and the 
Hingham Shipyards. 

Certificates of 

recognition was awarded 
for their service to all that 
accounted in the research. 

The success of the 



event has to be credited to 
teacher Ron Adams of 
Broad Meadows Middle 
School, who triggered the 
event and the seventh 
grade students for their 
extensive research. 

Alfred Benedetti 
Member of the Fore 
River Long Service Club 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 
The American Red 
Cross-South Area would 
like to extend a loud and 
;lear "Thank You" to all 
who gave in contributions, 
time and handiwork for the 
1991 Holiday Assistance 
Program. Without people 
like you, we would never 
accomplish our goal in 
serving the community. 

The holidays were 
brightened for over 620 
youngsters in Head Start, 
homeless shelters, and 
crisis centers, as well as 
our American Red Cross 
food clients who received 
filled Christmas stockings, 
toys, or knitted goods. 
Recent disaster victims. 



already being aided by the 
American Red Cross, also 
received filled Christmas 
stockings. 

Your heartwarming 
response and continued 
support of programs 
sponsored by the American 
Red Cross enables us to 
better serve your 
community--the South 
Shore area. This was an 
especially difficult year for 
many but because of the 
wonderful response from 
the public, we were able 
to accomplish our goal. 

We wish you all a most 
Happy and Peaceful 1992. 

Jacqueline Gardner 

American Red Cross 

South Area 



A SIMPLE WILL 



Don't leave without one! 

If you do, the state will make one for you. If you have no relatives who 
qualify under the law to inherit your property, it will go to the State of 
Massachusetts. 

Lurking beneath many people's failure to make a will is a superstitious 
fear that thinking at)Out or doing something about a will will hasten death. 
This fear is plainly irrational, but is often the major cause of people's putting 
off writing their will. 

If you are waiting or you are procrastinating about preparing a compre- 
hensive estate plan, you should be sure to at least have a simple will. 
Most people do not plan to fail; they just fail to plan... 

DOC-U-PREP OF NEW ENGLAND, INC. 

1 5 Chauncy Street • South Weymouth, MA 021 90 • (61 7) 337-61 94 

SELF FILING 

LEGAL DOCUMENTS SERVICE 

We are not Lawyers, and do not gh/e Legal Advice 



Quincy's 
Yesterdays 

Bill To Change 

City Council Gets 

House Approval 

The State Legislature ^>proved a bill filed by Rep. Giftoa 
H. Baker (R-Quincy) that would change the makeup of the 
new Plan A Qty Council to si^ 
members from wards and three 
elected at-large. 

The bill, which would place 
the matter before the city's voters 
on the November state ballot, was 
opposed by Rep. Carter Lee (R- i 
Quincy), who objected to any major change in the chatter. 

"I opposed a bill that attempted to change the new charter 
by setting up an assistant mayor on exacUy the same grounds," 
he said. "It mi^t b& a good thing but it was not what the 
people voted for." 

COMPTROLLER BILL DIES 

The State Senate killed a bill, which carried the unani- 
mous endorsement of the City Council, to combine the posts 
of city auditor and director of finance into the single office 
of comptroUer. 

Opposition to the legislation was led by Sen. Charles W. 
Hedges (R-QuiiKy), who said he could find no support for it 
among the people of Quincy. 

"It's too bad," said Mayor Amelio Delia Chiesa. "Under 
the present setup, the city auditor and director of finance 
have to serve two masters, the Qty Council which appoints 
the auditor and the city manager who appoints the director of 
finance." 

HOSPITAL LOSING MONEY 

Director Dr. Joseph P. Leone told a Lions Qub luncheon 
that Qty Hospital was losing $4 a day on each patient and 
ejqwrienced a deficit of $343,000 in 1955. 

But, he added, as hospitals go, Quincy is not in bad shape 
at all. 

GOD VS. COMMUNISM 

"God's Underground" is at woric in the Soviet Union to 
smash communism, the Rev. Oswald A. BlumitofWollastoo 
told the For America Forum, sponsored by the Friends of 
Sea McCarthy, Inc. 

QUINCY-ISMS 

The FBI searched a house on Kendall St., North Quincy, 
on a tip that a missing suspect in the $1,219,000 Brink's 
robbery, was hiding there ... Gertmde M. McGill, personnel 
director of Quincy since 105 1 , resigned to become personnel 
consultant for the Girl Scouts of America ... A 1950 DeSoto 
was on sale for $650 at President Chevrolet, 338 Washington 
St. on 540 Southern Artery ... The search was on in Quincy 
Point for "Billie," a parakeet owned by Mrs. Julia Cain, 28 
Baxter St, which left home on the shoulder of a visitor who 
did not know it was there ... Mrs. WiUiam P. Mullin was 
elected president of the Pocahontas Gub of Squantum ... Jim 
Fleming scored 27 points to lead the Koch Qub to a 93-70 
victory over the North QuiiKy Independents ... Hamburger 
was 19 cents a pound and cube steaks 39 cents a pound at 
Salorio's Meatland, 371 Granite St ... The State Department 
of PubUc Health announced that Quincy school children who 
received Salk polio vaccine in the 1 954 field tests are eligible 
for booster shots this year ... Construction work was started 
on a new Wollaston Yacht Qubhouse to replace the one that 
burned eight years ago ... Gary Coopti was starring in "The 
Court Martial of Bill Mitchell" at the Wollaston Theater ... 
Richard A. Crawford, 16, of 56 French St., Norfolk Downs, 
won an expert riflemen medal, the second highest junior 
award from the National Rifle Association ... The Qty 
Council's Ordinance Committee q^proved the first taxi fare 
iiKrease in 1 6 yeais, 40 cents for the first 3/4 of a mile and 1 
cents for each 1/2 mile thereafter ... Kenneth P. Fallon, Jr., 
was elected chairman of the Quincy Recreation Commission, 
succeeding J. Emest Collins ... Qty Manager Donald H. 
Blattplaced $3,000 in the budget forthe part-time post of dty 
historian ... Grahn's new bakery and food shcp opened at 644 
Adams St ... John Rhodc^hele 's record 28 points led Point to 
the Junior High School League tide with a 65-36 victory over 
Central ... The Qty Council's Finance Committee approved 
$25,000 for architects' plans for the new Atiantic Junior 
High School ... Former commissioner Dr. Richard M. Ash 
and an unidentified out-of-town physician were in the run- 
ning for appointment as commissioner of public health. 



Pag* ( Qulncj Sob Thnnday, Fcbnuiy 13, 1992 



Quincy Hospital Assessing Need 
For Cancer Support Group 



Quincy Hospital is 
assessing the need for 
establishing a Cancer 
Support Group in the 
hospital. 

The group will be led 
by Jane Mudge, RNC, a 
staff nurse in the 
Outpatient Department 
who has been specifically 
trained by the American 
Cancer Society. 

The group offers family 



and friends of cancer 
patients the opportunity to 
talk with others going 
through a similar 
experience, receive 
medical information and 
educational materials 
about cancer. 

Mudge said "The 
Cancer Support Group will 
give family and friends of 
diagnosed cancer patients 



the opportunity to handle 
the disease better through 
educational and medical 
resources and speaking 
with others in the support 
group." 

Those wishing to 
participate in the needs 
assessment for a cancer 
support group are asked to 
call Quincy Hospital at 
773-6100, ext. 3009 or 
4016. 



43 Students On Honor Roll 
At St. Mary School 



St. Mary School, West 
Quincy, lists 43 students 
on its honor roll. 

They are: 

Grade 1 

First Honors: Nicole 
Fabrizio, Matthew 
LaCorte, Joseph Scribi, 
Jessica Sheaban. 

Second Honors: 

Stacey Andrew, Courtney 
Peterson, Brian Rooney. 
Grade 2 

First Honors: Lisa 
Kelly, Elizabeth Kerfien. 

Second Honors: 
Matthew Alleva, James 
Devlin, Francesca 



DiBona, Dennis McNiff. 
Grade 3 

High Honors: Laura 
Clarke, Jennifer Comer, 
Emma March, Joseph 
Moraa 

First Honors: Nora 
Austin, Jillian Baker, 
Christine Kirby, Joseph 
Meehan, Jocelyn Moran. 

Second Honors: 
Nicole Bandera, Eric 
Eleey, Michael Halloran, 
Conrad Leger, Rene 
Lumaghini, Kenny 
Mulstay. 

Grade 4 
Second Honors: 



Michael Carloni, Ryan 
Casey, Charles Clarke, 
James Constas, Paul 
Flynn, Jesse Winter. 
Grade 5 

High Honors: Kathryn 
Kelly, Eileen Mawn. 

Second Honors: Sheila 
Halloran. 

Grade 6 

High Honors: 

Maryellen DiPietro, 
Colleen Gargan. 

First Honors: Mary 
Poplasky. 

Second Honors: 
Russell Corner, Peter 
Godfrey, Kathleen 
O'Donnell. 



Annual Mothers And Others 
Presidents' Day Auction 



The Houghs Neck 
Congregational Church 
Mothers and Others Club, 
with the assistance of Boy 
Scout Troop 6, will hold 
its annual President's Day 
Auction Monday, Feb. 17. 

The auction will be 
held at 6 p.m. at the 
church, 310 Manet Ave. 



Doors will be open for 
viewing at 5:30 p.m. 
Parking is available in the 
schoolyard across from the 
church. 

Among the items to be 
auctioned are: Gift 
certificates from local 
businesses, collectibles 
such as Byer's Carolers 
and bone china cups and 



saucers, furniture, toys, 
glassware, a chandelier, 
and more. For more 
information call 479-5776. 
Donations may be 
dropped off at the church 
between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. 
the day of the auction. 
Those wishing to have 
their donations picked up 
may call 479-9086. 



Parents Without Partners Seek New Members 



An orientation meeting 
for those wishing to join 
Parents Without Partners 
will be held the second 
Sunday of each month at 8 
p.m. at the Knights of 



Columbus Hall, 875 
Washington St., Braintree. 
The group offers many 
activities for single, 
divorced, separated or 
widowed parents including 



family activities, dances, 
discussion groups, sports, 
get-away week-ends, and 
more. 

For information call 
337-6766. 




DAFFODIL DAYS ARE COMING-Ann Cooney, co-chairman Pauline Sweeney, and 
EUeen Cooney, aU of Quincy, prepare order forms for the American Cancer Society's 
annual DaffodU Days fundraiser. The popular event will be held in March. Over 120,000 
of the bri^t, yeUow flowers are expected to be bought in nine South Shore towns this 
year. 

Cancer Unit Daffodil Days 
To Be Held March 24-25 



The South Shore Unit of 
the American Cancer 
Society will stage its 
annual Daffodil Days 
March 24 and 25 to benefit 
the research, education 
and service programs to 
cancer patients throughout 
the area. 

In 1991 sales of the 
daffodils (more than 
120,000) in nine South 
Shore communities 
generated $54,000, making 
the South Shore Unit tops 
in the state. 

"For the past two years, 
the South Shore has set 
state records for support of 



Daffodil Days and we 
know the people will keep 
up the good work this 
year," Pauline Sweeney 
said. 

Sweeney, of Quincy, 
and her husband Dermis, 
are heading this year's 
effort. "It is a wonderful 
way to greet Spring with a 
flower of hope and help 
fight cancer." 

Advance orders will be 
taken until March 10 and 
volunteers will deUver and 
sell them beginning March 
24. Orders may be placed 
by calling Sweeney at 
773-8226 or the South 



Shore Unit office at 341- 
4210. 

A bouquet of 10 cost $4 
and an attractive vase may 
be ordered for $6. A box of 
500 blooms, a favorite of 
many business and 
professional offices, is 
$200. 

The South Shore Unit of 
the Society aids cancer 
patients in Quincy, 
Braintree, Cobasset, 
Hingham, Hull, Milton, 
Norwell, Scituate and 
Weymouth. 

More than $800,000 
was raised state -wide last 
year. 



Pre-Schooi, Kindergarten 
Open House At Beechwood 



An open house this 
week at Beechwood 
Community Life Center, 
225 Fenno St., provided 
parents of young children 
an opportunity to meet 
with teaching and 
administrative staff, view 
classrooms, and learn 
about the center's 
educational programming. 



Barbara Bowery, 
director of the preschool, 
introduced parents and 
children to prospective 
teachers and classrooms. 

"Beechwood has a 
PreSchool Learning 
Center, with both day care 
and part-day nursery 
school components, and is 
licensed by the office for 



children through the City 
of Quincy to serve children 
from 15 months through 
kindergarten," Bowery 
said. "Beechwood's 
kindergarten is fully- 
accredited and offers 
alternatives to families. 
Morning, afternoon, full- 
day, and after school 
offerings are available." 





Sacred Heart School 
Registration Feb. 25 



O • R • Y 



RECEPBON HALLS 



rYLISH120-SEATEF 

DBCOVERBINEAR 

MARMABAY. 

THOUOITTOBE 

AMBIA'S. 

The saaet's out 

function room dt Amelia's! 
has becxxnc one of Boston's 
most popular spots for wed- 

dings, shouicrs, corporate 
meetmgs, and get'togethen 

of aD kinds Wt feature an 
extensive menu at affordable | 
prices. We overlook Marina 
Bay and the Boston skyline 
We'd like to make your next 
function really fly 

I Plea** eaO 617471 14S3. 



FLORISTS 




iOS Vctety Rd. No Qu»>cv. MA 



Flowers by Helen 

367 BILLINGS ROAD 

WOLLASTON. MASSACHUSETTS 02170 

Flowers For All Occasions 

Specializing in Weddings 

471-3772 . 

Certified Wedding Consultants 



Quint's 
Florists 

761 So. Artery 
Quincy 

773-7620 



MUSIC 



Bands too expensive? 
DJs too boring? 
Pm your answer!!! 

Chuck Palmer 

Th« UKimat* one men ahow 
• Weddings • Functions •Clutw 
Call 340-2107 4/3o 



WEDDING GOWNS 



Redesianed Used 

Wedding Gowns 

Custom Designed Veils 

Silk Flowers 

By Miss Rose Ann 

617-335-5005 



HAIR STYLING 



RACHELLE FOX 
HAIR CREATIONS 

591 South St, Quincy 

Call 479-9435 
Wash & Cut $8.00 
Perms $30.00 

Walk Ins or Appointments 4/30 



Sacred Heart School in 
North Quincy will hold 
registration for 

Kindergarten and Grade 1 
Tuesday. Feb. 25 from 
12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in the 
school cafeteria. 

Bring the child, a copy 
of his or her birth 



certificate, immunization 
records, baptismal record 
if the child was not 
baptized at Sacred Heart, 
and a $10 non-refundable 
registration fee. 

For more information, 
call the school office at 
328-3830 between 9 a.m. 
and 2 p.m. 



Quincy/Braintree AARP 
Feb. 16 Meeting Cancelled 



PHOTOGRAPHER 



Photography ^ 

MC" Studio 

679 Hancock Street. Quincy 

(Wollaston) 

479-6886 



BAKERY 



O'BRIEN'S 
BAKERIES 

9 Beale Street 
Wollaston 
472-4027 



JEWELRY 



Poison Rn« Jewelry 

Quality and Integrity a Tradition 

The Coletti Family Al - Dave - Mark 
730 HANCXX5K ST., WOLLASTON 02170 786-7942 



The Quincy/Braintree 
weekend chapter of the 
AARP will meet Sunday, 
March 1 at the Quincy 
Emergency Management 
Agency in the Quincy 
Department of Public 
Works building at 55 Sea 
St. 

Guest speaker will be 
Sharon Gamache, 
executive director of the 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance lo earn 
extra money by building a 
Quincy Sun honw delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



"Learn Not To Burn" 
program of the National 
Fire Protection 

Association. Consultant 
Georgette Simon, AARP 
chapter organization 
specialist, will be in 
attendance. 

Due to the weekend 
holiday, the Feb. 16 
meeting has been 
cancelled. For more 
information call president 
Ernie Aristide at 472-6312. 

All persons 50 and over 
are invited. Literature and 
refreshments will be 
served. 



Thuraday, February 13, 1992 Qulncy S"!!!! Page 7 



Nanci Doherty Hospital 
Employee Of The Month 



Nanci Doherty of 
Quincy has been named 
Quincy Hospital Employee 
of the Month for January. 

She has worked as a 
Nurse Technician in the 
Emergency Department for 
almost two years. She is a 
graduate of the University 
of Massachusetts, 
Amheist. 

Doherty described her 
work as "high stress but, 
rewards are great. It's a 
wonderful environment, 
the caring of the staff 
makes all the difference. 
There's a really strong 
bond in the department 
among all of the people 
who work there." 

Twenty-eight 
employees signed a letter 
in support of Doherty's 
nomination which said: 

"Nanci gives hei all in 
every situation. She is 
always willing to give a 
hand to anyone who needs 
it. Patients who encounter 
Nanci in the Emergency 
Room are reassured by her 




NANCI DOHERTY 

kind words and many 
anxious patients ease their 
minds by talking with her 
while being treated. On 
several occasions, patients 
have asked to see Nanci 
on subsequent visits to the 
Emergency Department 
and some have come back 
when feeling well, simply 
to thank her for her kind 
treatment." 

Doherty is currently 
attending Quincy College 
part-time for an associates 
degree in nursing. She 
hopes to become a nurse 
practitioner and would like 
to serve in the Peace 
Corps. 

Quincy Alliance To Hear 
Dr. Sheldon Bennett 

Ripley Keating, treasurer, 
and Mrs. Thomas Wiggin, 
vice president. 

Program speaker will be 
Dr. Sheldon W. Bennett, 
who will present slides and 
talk of the Northwest. 



The United Quincy 
Alliance of United First 
Parish Church will meet 
Wednesday, Feb. 19 at 1 
p.m. in the parish hall for 
coffee and dessert. 

Hostesses will be Mrs. 



Ann McNally Named 
College Scholar At Middlebury 



Ann McNally of Quincy 
has been named a College 
Scholar at Middlebury 
(Vt.) College for the Fall 
term. 

This is the highest 
recognition of academic 
achievement at 



Middlebury. Students must 
have a grade point average 
of 3.5 or better with no 
grade lower than B- for the 
semester. 

McNally is the daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
McNally of Quincy. 



Two Residents On Dean's List 



Two Quincy residents 
have been named to the 
Dean's List at American 
International College in 
Springfield. 

They are: Kevin Daly, 3 
Montilio St., a sophomore; 



57 



and Debra Panaro, 
Phillips St., a junior. 

Students who qualified 
for the Dean's List are full- 
time undergraduates with a 
grade point average of at 
least 3.0 out of a possible 
4.0 points. 



Social 



Wollaston Garden Club 
To Meet Feb. 20 



M^^HHM^^^^^^Ift, ^ 



Nick Popovich of New 
England Wildlife will be 
the guest speaker at the 

monthly meeting of the 
Wollaston Garden Club, 
Thursday, Feb. 20 at noon 
at the Wollaston 



Congregational Church. 

Popovich will present a 
program following a noon 
coffee hour. Floral 
arrangements will be by 
Mrs. Marion Berger and 
hostess is Mrs. Eleanor 
Sbattuck. 



Lauren Bina 
Northeastern Grad 



Lauren Bina of Quincy 
recently graduated, cum 
laude, from Northeastern 
University. 

Bina received a B.S. 
degree in nursing. She is a 
member of Sigma Theta 
Tau-Gamma Epsilon 
Chapter, the international 
honor society of nursing. 



She previously earned a 
B.S. degree in 
management science from 
Bridgewater State College 
in 1987. 

Bina is a staff nurse at 
Massachusetts General 
Hospital. 

She is the daughter of 
Alfred and Celia Bina of 
Quincy. 



Mr. Mrs. John Flaherty 
Parents Of A Daughter 



Mr. and Mrs. John 

Flaherty of Braintree, 

MICHELE DELVECCHIO and FRED BICKFORD formeriy of Quinqr, are the 

(Mclntyre Studio) parents of a daughter, 
Siobhan Geraldine, bom 
Jan. 27 at St. Margaret's 
Hospital, Boston. Mrs. 



Michele DelVecchio Engaged 
To Fred Bickford IV 



Flaherty is the former 
Joanne Mahoney. 

Grandparents are Mr. 
and Mrs. John Mahoney, 
Sr., of Quincy and Mrs. 
Mary Flaherty of 
Braintree. 



Mr. and Mrs. Leo 
DelVecchio of Quincy 
announce the engagement 
of their daughter, Michele, 
to Fred Bickford IV, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Bickford 
of Braintree. 

Miss DelVecchio is a 
graduate of Quincy High 
School and Northeastern 
University. She is 
employed as a physical 

CoDA Meetings 
At St. John's 

Co-Dependants 
Anonymous will meet at 
St. JohnVSchool, Rm. 3A, 
Phipps St., Tuesday at 8 
pjn. 

CoDA groups apply to 
the principles of the 12 
steps and 12 traditions of 
AA and are composed of 
two or more individuals 
whose purpose in meeting 
is a desire for healthy 
relationships. 



therapist at South Shore 
Sports Therapy in 
Weymouth. 

Mr. Bickford is a 
graduate of Braintree High 
School and Massasoit 
Community College. He is 
employed by Mack Boring 
& Parts Co. of Braintree. 



A May 
planned. 



wedding is 



LOVE IS ... a perfect wedding at the 
Golden Lion Suite 



Sp«ik lo Rlla -- •'n't our rtnlal agcnl 
•paclalUIng In compitt* wadding 
package plans and all olhar occaaiont. 
Tha Gotdan Lion Sullt accomodalaa up 
to 300. Th* Venetian Room up to 140 
guatta. Gl«a Rita a call tor an 
appointment tor your reterratlon. New 
Ivocliuret are a«allal>la 

(Air Conditioned) 

CAM. 

Quincy Sons of Hal) Social Center 

120 Quarry Sireel. Quincy. MA 02169IJ 

NEW NUMBER is 472- SWO 




37TH ANNUAL SOUTH SHORE AT QUINCY 

ANTIQUES SHOW and SALE 



MEASURABLE 
ADVERTISING! 



SPONSOR 



Welcome Wagon directs 
prospective customers to 
your door with personal- 
ized, measurable adverti- 
sing to: 

• Engaged Couples 

• New Parents 

• Moving Families 

We reach them in their 
homes, usually by request, 
when they're in a buying 
mood We tell them all 
about your business. 
Interested'' Call tor more 
details; 

Barbara Nawrot Mendez 
479-2587 



^^?}^f^^- 






Winfield 
Gift Emporium 

Yankee Candles 
Lilliput Lane 

Maud Humphrey 
Pauline Dolls 



Hours: Tucs-Sat. 10:00 am-5:00 pm 

Open Sunday 12-5 pm 

Closed Mondays 

853 Hancock St, Quincy 479-9784 






SNACK BAR 

Opens at 

5 p.m. Saturday 

1 1 a.m. Sun. -Mon. 



FEBRUARY 1992 


SAT 


SUN 


MON 


15 

5 p.m. -9 


16 

12 p.m. -6 


17 

11 Lin -S 



MASONIC TEMPLE, 1170 Hancock Street, Quincy 

Reduced Admission with this card 2 25 per person 



Spotisor 

WOLLASTON CHAPTER 
No. 15«, O. E. S. 




ALL ITEMS 
FOR SALE 



Show Telephone 
472-9638 






Commg gemday, Febroary 16th 



Children's Clothing Sale 



11 am - 2 pm 

at the 

Knights of Columbus Hall 

Hancock Street 



North Quincy, MA 

omTheTS 



I from 1 



, Station) 



featuring: 




Buster Brown, Ocean Pacific, Gerber 

Boys and Giils Sizes 

Newborn. Toddler - Up to Oiildren's Size 10 

Npw Sprinf & Summer '92 Fashions 

All at 50% Off! r.ixh A Checksum 



MONDAY SPECIAL 

WASH • CUT • BLOWDRY 

HERS »20 



TUES. & THURS. 
BLOW CUT SPECIAL 

HIS $1 3 . 



Long hair 
slightly higher 



Includes Shampoo 



WEDNESDAY SPECIAL 
PERM SPECIAL a 



PERM bKtl.lAL jk m g\(\(\ Sli 

UNIPERM *42°° 



GOLDWELL 
FOAM PERM 

All specials perlormed by one of Russell's staff 



Long hair 

slightly higher 

Complete 



r 


^ 




jj** 


I'll 


i 


IL 


» 


' ^ 

^ 


W ^ 




Sm 


m 




a' 



Russell Edward's 



Complete 
slightly higher Nail Tipping and Overlay S60 
for longer hair Sculptured Nails $60 

( Pedicures 525 

"Body and Facial Waxing Available " 



^irUu^/riC€ &^/i^' am/ ^Jfi'^ 



OPEN 9-5 DAILY AND WED & THURS EVENINGS 

Corner Hancock, Chestnut Sts , 1 Maple St , Quincy 



472-1060 



Face 8 Qulncy Sun Thursday, February 13, 1992 



Arts/Entertainment 



Feb.23AtNQHS 

•Voice Of The Turtle' 
To Open Multi-Cultural Festival 



Beechwood Community 
Life Center, 225 Fenno 
St., WoUaston, has been 
identified as recipient for a 
Foundation for the Arts 
grant award. 

The award was given 
for the upcoming Quincy 
Multicultural Festival and 
will partially fund the 
festival's opening night 
Sunday, Feb. 23. 

The opening program, 
"Voice of the Turtle," to 



be held at North Quincy 
High School Sunday, Feb. 
23 at 3 p.m. will feature 
Jewish musical traditions. 

"Voice of the Turtle" is 
a Cambridge-based, four 
person ensemble that 
specializes in Sephardic 
music. The Sephardim, 
Jews who had lived in 
Spain for 1,500 years, 
were expelled from that 
country in 1492. Travelling 
to safer harbors in the 



Ottoman Empire, North 
Africa and Eastern Europe, 
the Sephardim 

incorporated the sounds of 
their adopted homes into 
their music. The ensemble 
performs on ancient and 
modem instruments. 

The 1992 Multicultural 
Festival extends through 
March 14. 

For more information 
call 471-5712 or 328-9200. 



Eastern Star Antiques Show, Feb. 15-17 



The 37th annual South 
Shore at Quincy Antiques 
Show will be held Feb. 15- 
17 at the Masonic Temple, 
1170 Hancock St. 

The show, sponsored by 
the Wollaston Chapter 
#156, Order of the Eastern 
Star, will be open 
Saturday from 5-9 p.m.; 
Sunday from noon to 6 
p.m.; and Monday fix>m 11 
a.m. to 5 p.m. 

The show is the oldest 
in continue -o operation in 



Northern New England and 
features antique furniture, 
accessories and art. 
Several new dealers have 
been added and will 
display about $350,000 
worth of antique fiuniture. 



china, accessories, dolls 
and jewelry. 

Admission is $2.50. The 
snack bar, featuring home- 
cooked food by the Ladies 
of the Star, opens one hour 
before the show each day. 



/ Buccini's/Mister Sub ^ 

62-64 Billings Rd., No. Quincy 02171 
328-9764 

COMBO SPECIALS 
Steak/Cheese $3.80 

Chicken Broiler $4.30 

Chicken Parmigiana $4.35 

Meat Ball $3.55 

Turkey Club $3.90 

Italian $3.25 

Tuna $3.50 

Includes: Small Sub or Syrian 

Medium Size Fountain Drink 

Small Size Boyd's Chips 
Store Hours: Mon-Fri 10-10 

•Sat. 10-8 'Sun 11 -8 



QHS Girl's Basketball 
Game On QCTV Ch. 3 

Quincy Community will cover the Quincy High 
Television, the local School girl's basketball 
programing channel for game against Barnstable, 
Continental Cablevision, an Old Colony League 

rival. 

The game will be 
shown on QCTV Channel 
3 Tuesday, Feb. 18 at 8:30 
p.m. and Wednesday, Feb. 
19 at 8:30 p.m. 



WOLLASTON 
THEATER 



14BEALEST 773-4600 



Held Over 2nd Week 

Robert DoNiro-Nick l^te 

"CAPE FEAR" (R) 

An Adult Thriller 

Wed & Thurs 7:00 Only 

Fri & Sat 6:55 & 9:20 

Sun-Thurs 7:00 Only 

Mon&Tues Dollar Night 



ALL SEATS $3.00 




214 Washington Street • Quincy, MA • 847-3940 
Formerly Brittany's 

Recession Breakers 

Grilled Chicken Teriyaki over Rice $2.95 

American Chop Suey with Rolls $2.50 

Bowl of Soup & 1/2 DeU Sandwich $2.50 
Monday-Friday 11-4 

With This Coupon 
other specials also available 



$1.00 10" Cheese Pizza $1.00 

$1.00 Basket of BBQ'd Wings $1.00 

Served Every Sunday 12-9 
(Take Out Excluded) 



OUR HOURS ARE: 

8:00 AM - 1 :00 am MONDAYS-SATURDAYS 
NOON - 1 :00 am SUNDAYS 

Full Menu Always Available 




OLIVER '--St. Mary's School students recently presented the play Oliver. From I to r, 
Kerrl Do'herty, Russell Comer, William Fitzpatrick, Mike Baker, Dan DiPaolo, Marge 
Kelson, Mary Poplasky and (kneeling) CoUeen Gargan as Oliver. 

(Qutncy Sun photo by lorn Gorman j 



Trumpet Recital At 
First Presbyterian Church 



Steven Emery will 
present a trumpet recital 
Sunday, Feb. 23 at 6:30 
p.m. at First Presbyterian 
Church, 270 Franklin St. 

He will be 

accompanied by his wife, 
freelance pianist Deborah 
DeWolf Emery. 

Music by Alexander 
Arutunian, Herbert L. 
Qaik, and Igor Stravinsky, 
among others, will be 



featured in the program. 
This is the second of four 
concerts in the church's 
"Artist Series 1992." 

Admission is free and 
child care is available. A 
reception with the 
musicians will follow in 
the church's fellowship 
hall. A free-will offering 
will be taken to further the 
concert series. 

"Artist Series 1992" 



will also present a recital 
by BSO violinist Bonnie 
Bewick and Timothy 
Steele, piano, March 22. 
An evening of diverse 
composer and instrument 
combinations featuring 
three very talented couples 
and culminating with a 
world premier by 
bassist/composer Larry 
Wolf April 26. 

For more information 
call 773-5575. 



Heritage Programs 
At Beechwood Center 



Elders in Quincy are 
celebrating the differences 
and similarities of their 
personal histories and 
family origins at 
Beechwood Community 
Life Center. 

Each Friday throughout 
February and March, Elder 



"^CINEMAS 

Quincy Fair Mall 
2/13-2/19 



HAND THAT ROCKS 
THECRADLErR 

11140- 2:10-4aO-730-10*0 



PRINCE OF TIDES-R 



FATHER OF 
THEBRIDE-PG 

11;4S- 2:08-4a>-7:30-»A) 



Action is sponsoring 
Friday "Heritage" 
programs. 

"The first program 
focused on Finland," said 
Mary Centola, Director of 
Elder Action at 
Beechwood. "Tyyne 
Williams, Emily Snell, 
and Miriam Dibble shared 
their Finnish heritage with 
us through personal stories, 
descriptions of life and 
travels, and a display of 
their personal 

memorabilia." 

The programs, following 
the elder lunch each 
Friday, are free and open 
to all interested persons. 



Those interested in 
attending the lunch, 
however, should call for 
reservations by 

Wednesday morning each 
week. The Heritage 
Programs are scheduled to 
begin at 12:30 p.m. 

This Friday "St. 
Valentine," a native ot 
Italy, will visit Beechwood 
to tell various legends that 
surround bis life. 
Upcoming programs 
scheduled include Canada 
Feb. 21 and China Feb. 28. 

For more information 
call Mary Centola or 
Virginia Mitchell at 471- 
5712. 



Suzanna Sifter Selected An 
Adjudicator For Jazz Festival 



HOOK-PG 

12:10-3:15 



Ishinmgthrough-r] 

12:10- 3:10 -7M-0M 



1 2:15 -3:18- 7:10 -tM 



RNALANALYStS^I 

12:10-3M-7M-»-.48 



THE GREAT 
MOUSE DETECnVE-G 

111:40- 1:18-2>4S-4:30-7«l-MsJ 



INBAKPRCVKW 

RADIO FLYER 

SATUROAY 7:18 



Bargain Matinees 

First Three Shows 

$3.75 

773-5700 



Pianist Suzanna Sifter, 
a Quincy resident and 
Berklee College of Music 
professor of ear training, 
has been selected as an 
adjudicator for the 
college's 24th annual High 
School Jazz Festival, to 
be held Saturday, Feb. 22 
at the Hynes Veterans 
Memorial Auditorium, 



Boston. 

The day-long festival, 
which attracts thousands of 
high school musicians and 
educators, will showcase 
120 bands from throughout 
the Northeast vying for 
best band trophies, citation 
plaques and Berklee 
Tuition Scholarships 
amounting to $70,000. 




"Rockin into the 90's" 
D.J. STEVE KAVANAGH 
Music for all Occasions 



"Af a»ic for people who 

take their fun seriouslyT 

773-4936 



Thonday, February 13, 1992 Qulncy Son Page 9 



Miller Takes Out Papers 
For State Representative 



(Cont'd from Page I) 

district covers parts of 
Quincy and Weymouth. 

Miller also said he took 
papers out early to get a 
jump on fundraising. To 
have a shot at unseating 
Mariano, he said he would 
need to raise at least 
$25,000. 

In bis bid for counciUor- 
at-large. Miller finished 
fifth behind eventual 
winners Tim Cahill, 

Michael Cheney and 
Patricia Toland and the 
nearest challenger, former 
Mayor and Councillor 
Joseph LaRaia. Miller 
polled 5,422 votes while 



LaRaia bad 6,850. 

Miller said bis 
campaigning style is better 
suited for a state rep race 
because there is only one 
incumbent. The 

councillor-at-large race 
featured three incumbents. 
With one incumbent, he 
said he'll try to "extract 
the issues." 

"I think I can run a 
much better (state rep) 
race," be added. 

Other candidates who 
may enter the Third 
Norfolk District state rep 
race are John "Jack" 
McGlone and Jack Carey, 
both of Weymouth. 

McGlone lost to 



Mariano by 223 votes in 
the Democratic primary 
last September. Carey is a 
Weymouth selectman. 

To appear on the ballot 
for state senator or state 
representative, candidates 
must take out nominating 
papers and return them 
with the signatures of at 
least 150 registered voters 
in the district which the 
candidate hopes to 
represent. 

Deadline to submit 
papers is April 29. The 
state primary is Tuesday, 
Sept. 15 and the final 
election is Tuesday, Nov. 
3. 




Health Care Proxy, Home Fire 
Safety On Senior Beat Tonight 



QUINCY FIREFIGHTERS LOCAL 792 Installed its new officers at a recent dinner held 
at the George F. Bryan VFW Post. New officers are, from left, John Barber, vice 
president; Hank Lynch, treasurer; Bob Perry, president; and Bill LaRaia, secretary. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 

Lion's Club Establishes 
Wilfred Nolan Memorial Scholarship 



This month's edition of 
Senior Beat, Quincy 
Community Television's 
monthly senior affairs 
program, will premiere 
today (Thursday) at 7:30 
p.m. on Channel 3. 

Senior Beat is hosted 
by John Noonan, Quincy 
Council on Aging 
chairperson. 

With President's Day 
observed this month, 
February's program 
features a visit to the 
Adams Library where a 
representative of the 



those 



National Park Service communicate 

talks about the former decisions, 
president, the library and in addition, Sharon 

'"°'^- Gamache, a representative 

Senior Beat also looks from the National Fire 

into the new health care Protection Agency, talks 

proxy law and how it about fire protection in the 



effects seniors in Quincy. 
The provision is a simple 
legal document that allows 
a persuu to name someone 
they know and trust to 
make health care 
decisions for that person if, 
for any reason and at any 
time, the person becomes 
unable to make or 



home. 

This month's program 
will be replayed Friday, 
Feb. 14 at 9:30 a.m. and 
Monday, Feb. 17 at 1:30 
p.m. on QCTV Ch. 3. 



The Quincy Lions Club compassion and interest in 
has established a fellow students and 
scholarship<s) of $1,000 in members of the Quincy 
memory of Wilfred A. community. 
Nolan, a longtime Quincy *An active participant 
educator. in school and/or 

community affairs. 

The Scholarship Specific examples should 
Committee of the Lions be cited. 



Club will 
recipients. 



determine the 
Basic criteria 



are: 



student with 



•Academic excellence. 
Junior and senior year 
extracts of marks should 
be submitted. 



Any blind or sighted- 
impaired student(s) may 
be given special 
consideration. 

In order to be 
considered, all data should 
be submitted by March 16 

to George C. Smith, Jr., 16 
Anderson Rd., Wollaston, 
MA 02170. Smith may be 
reached at 479-1445 to 
answer any questions. 



Central School Assn. 
To Offer $200 Book Award 



AT SOUTH SHORE BUICK . 

NO SHUU PRINT! 



The Central Middle 
School Home and School 
Association will offer a 
$200 book award to a 1992 
graduating senior who 
attended Central and is 



planning to continue his or 
her education. 

Deadline is March IS. 
For an application call the 
school office at 984-8725. 




Enlarged to show detail 



O J & Ferrara Co., Inc. 



HEARTS & DIAMONDS 

Exquisite double hearts 

in 14 Karat Gold and 

sparkling diamonds 
Beautifully designed and 
crafted byJ&C Ferrara 

LeColson 
Jewelry 

730 Hancock Street 
Quincy, MA 02170 



MODEL 



l992SKYUyW 






24Mes 36 m. 




imCEIITUIYSEMN 




imcDimYWAeoN 




ItMtfMlCOiKISMII 




1992 LESABRE 




1992 KIVIERA 




imMANUSTBWIiON 




1992raKAVL/UlTRA 




m m i% 



m m m 



m 



m m m 



m Mfk m 



2.9!i 



\,%i% 



m m m 



m 4.911 m 



4.9!i6.}!i 




Sine* 1903 



USED CARS 



WLBABwrrDsOIL. 

FuNpiiir..1 
owntf, Qny 
#12-317 



BRCLTD80N.X 

<9995 • 



'87 BUICK REQAL • 

ETWOO 



'89 PARK AVE. 

Fl.pHr..3800 
ve. loiHwr. 
#11-276 



$9800 S 



'88 BUICK LESABRE LTD. 

ClMn,txc. 
nlwl#1-5 



$7995 : 



'88 BUICK LESABRE 

Fully 



dwt. #6178 



<85952 



9it6V6TAe6RdLU 

4dr.idn.. 
wlo.. 1.115 
mi. #1-1 



»TA COROLLA* 

<9350t 



■17 BUICK CENTURY 

af" $6995 

#9-216 ^0 m m n0 



DOZENS OF OTHER 

SIMILAR USED CAR 

VALUES AVAILABLE. 



WE SERVICE ALL Q.M. CARS 

Service Dept. Open Tues. A Thurs. Evening Until 8 PM - By Appointment Only 



SOUTH SHORE BUICK 

50 ADAMS ST., QUINCY 

770-3300 



MTH8-8 
FRI8-6 
SAT 9-5 



Page 10 Qnincy Son Thursday, February 13, 1992 

The Foolishness Of God' 
Bethany Sermon Topic 



"The Foolishness Of 
God" will be the sermon 
topic of the Rev. Roger 
Ketcbam Ketcbam Sunday 
at the 10 a.m. worship 
service at Bethany 
Congregational Church, 
Spear and Coddington Sts. 

Family Sunday will be 
observed with children 
from the Church School in 
attendance for part of the 
service. 

Scripture reader will be 
Amy Chenette. The 
Chancel Choir will sing 
under the direction of 
organist Gregory Flynn. 
Greeters will be members 
of the Friendship Team. A 
fellowship hour will be 
held in the Allen Parlor 
following the worship 
service. 

Rev. Ketcbam will 



conduct the weekly Bible 
study in Room 3 of the 
parish house Sunday at 
8:30 a.m. 

The Finance 

Committee will bold a 
budget meeting open to all 
church members at 11:30 
a.m. in the chapel. The 
meeting is to serve as a 
preparation for action on 
the budget to be voted at 
the annual church meeting 
Sunday, March 1 following 
the regular morning 
worship service. 

Bethany Church offers 
Dial-A-Prayer service, 24 
hours a day at 773-4500. 
For more information 
concerning church 
programs call the church 
office Monday through 
Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 
4:30 pjn. at 479-7300. 



'Chaos' Sermon Topic 
At First Parish 



"Chaos: In The Cosmos 
And Every Day" is the 
title of the sermon topic to 
be given by Dr. Sheldon 
W. Bennett, minister, 
Sunday during the 10:30 
a.m. worship service at 
United First Parish Church 
(Unitarian Universalist). 

Based on recent 
scientific discoveries 
about chaos and order in 
the cosmos and the natural 
world. Dr. Bennett will 
consider the fact of 
disorder and confusion in 

everyday living and how to 
make order out of chaos. 
The church choir. 



directed by Norman Corey, 
will sing anthems by Shaw 
and Hovhaness. Corey will 
also play organ selections 
by Frescobaldi and 
Palestrina. 

The women's group and 
the men's group will meet 
at noon following the 
social hour. 

Historic First Parish, 
"Church of the 
Presidents," is located at 
1306 Hancock St. in 
Quincy Square, opposite 
City Hall. Church School 
and child care are 
provided, with Brenda 
Chin director. For more 
information call 773-1290. 



SHARE Information Meeting 
At Star Of The Sea Church 



Star of the Sea Church, 
107 Bellevue Rd., 
Squantum, will host an 
information and 




United Way 



organization meeting 

Monday, March 9 at 7 p.m. 

Information will be 

provided by a SHARE 

New England 

representative. Members of 
the community who want 
to be involved will be able 
to ask questions and learn 
how they may benefit and 
help suppoit the program. 



■ ■■■■■■■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■ !■■■■■■■■■■■■ ■■ 



I I ■■■■■■■■■■■• ■■ 

■■■■■a I '■■■■■■■■■■■' ■ ■■■■■■■■■■■ ■ ■■ 
■■■■■■ II ■■>■■■■■■■■ tiBBaBBaaaBa i ai 

^■*p-- inaaarr— *»-r ii ia«BP--"^ -- c »■ 
-■ak«a-«Baa jaaaa..- 



■aaaaaaai i 

■aaaaaaa n 



Medical Watch 

Thursday, February 13, 7 pm 

Friday, February 14, 9 am 

Tuesday, February 18, 7 pm 



aBBBaaaaaaaBaaaaaBBaaaaaBaaaBaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaai 



mnnmiim 

Communicating Your Future 

Health Core Wishes 

Learn about Health Care Proxies, and how they can 
be used to communicate your preferences about 
medical treatment to your health care providers. 
Dr. Nell Berman, cardiologist at Heart Care Medical 
Center, and Mary Sweeney. Quincy Hospital ad- 
ministrator talk with Llbble Payne about how you 
can create this important document. 









Quincy Hospital 
I QCTV 



ro«t tONT«« HKK (jmtvm0m 



^ 



Community Television Channel 3 
Quincy-Mllton-Randolph 



■■■■■■■•■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■a 
!•■■■■■■■■■■■•■■•■•■■■•■■■■■■•■ 
■■•■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 

!■■■■■•■■■■■■■■■•■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 



Religion 



Quincy Catholic Parishes Offer 
Adult Confirmation Series 



St. John the Baptist 
Parish, 21 Gay St., will be 
the site for eight weeks of 
instruction for Catholics 18 
years and older who wish 
to receive the Sacrament 
of Confirmation. 

The sessions will be 
held at St. John's Adult 
Education Center for eight 
consecutive Tuesdays, 
beginning March 3, from 
7:30 to 9 p.m. A $20 
registration fee is 
requested for textbook and 
program expenses. 

Rev. Richard Moran 
and Bobbie Saunders of St. 
John's Adult Education 
Center will coordinate the 
program. They and staff 
from the other Quincy 



parishes will provide 
instruction and prepare 
candidates for the 
Confirmation Liturgy 
which will be celebrated 
Saturday, April 25, by 
Most Rev. Daniel A. Hart, 
Auxiliary Bishop of 
Boston, Brockton Region. 

Quincy adults who are 
interested are urged to 
contact their parishes first: 
St. Boniface, Most 
Blessed Sacrament, St. 
Mary's, St. John's, Sacred 
Heart, Star of the Sea, St. 
Joseph's, St. Ann's, Our 
Lady of Good Counsel. 

For more information 
call the coordinators of St. 
John's Rectory at 773-1021 
or the Adult Education 
Center at 770-1586. 



Rev. Alden Johnson Guest 
Speaker At Covenant 



At the 10:45 a.m. 
worship service of the 
Covenant Congregational 
Church, Whitwell and 
Granite Sts., the sermon 
will be preached by Rev. 
Alden Johnson. He is the 
former pastor of Waltham 
Covenant Church. 

Richard Smith, minister 
of music, will direct and 
accompany the choir in an 
introit and two anthems. 
He will also play an organ 
prelude, offertory and 
postlude. 

Sunday School, with 
classes for all ages, 
nursery through adults, will 
begin at 9:30 a.m. During 
the service, an attended 
nursery is available for 
children age four and 
younger. For children up to 
age 12, there is junior 
church. 

Following the service. 



coffee will be served in 
the fellowship hall 
downstairs. A list of 
available volunteer duties 
will be posted on the 
bulletin board. All 
members are urged to sign 
up and do their part. 

Activities for the week 
are: Choir rehearsal at 7 
p.m. Thursday and the 
men's breakfast at 8:30 
a.m. Saturday at Newcomb 
Farms. 

Coming events include: 
Covenant Women's 
Ministries Sunday on Feb. 
23 and the beginning of 
the interim ministry of Dr. 
James Lindgren, one of the 
chaplain's of the New 
England Seamen's 
Mission. 

For more information 
about any of the church's 
activities, call the church 
office at 479-5728. 



'The Plain Sermon' At 
Point Congregational 



"The Plain Semion" 
will be the sermon topic of 
the Rev. Carol Atwood- 
Lyon Sunday at the 10 
a.m. worship service at 
Quincy Point 

Congregational Church, 
Washington St. and 
Southern Artery. 

Acolyte will be 
Christopher Brokmeier, a 
member of the 1992 
Confinnationa] class. 

Dr. Herman Weiss, 
church organist and choir 
director, will play "We All 
Believe in One True God" 
by J.S. Bach and "Gloria" 
by Palestrina. The Chancel 
Oioir will sing "Take My 
Life, And Let It Be" by 
Williams and soloist 
Donna Baione will sing 
"There Is A Savior" by 
Gaitber. 



<f 



American Heart 
Association 



The church provides off- 
itreet parking, designated 
parking spaces for the 
disabled, a chairlift to the 
sanctuary, large print 
Sunday bulletins and 
hearing aids. Child care is 
provided each Sunday 
from 9:45 a.m. to 11:15 
p.m. in the Crib Room to 
enable parents of young 
children to worship with 
the congregation. 

Church School classes 
at 10 a.m. are taught for 
nurseiy age through grade 
nine. Parents interested in 
registering their infants, 
children and young people 
into the church may do so 
by calling the church 
office cr by speaking with 
superintendent Debbie Tait 
any Sunday morning. 

Sunday worship 
services are telecast on 
Continental Cablevision 
Cha. 3 Sundays at 8 a.m. 

and Wednesdays at 11 
ajn. 



Tlip For Kids' Breakfast 
At United Methodist Church 



A "Flip for Kids" 
pancake breakfast will be 
held Sunday from 8:30 to 
9:30 a.m. and sponsored by 
the Chri.stian Mission and 
Outreach Committee of 
Quincy Community United 
Methodist Church, 40 
Beale St., WoUaston. 

Cost is $3 for adults and 
$1 for children under 12. 
Profits will be donated to 
the Protestant Social 
Service Bureau's adoption 
program. 

At the 10 a.m. worship 
service Sunday the Rev. 
Harry Soper Jr.'s sermon 
topic will be "Place Your 
Trust In God." Greeters 
will be Russell and 
Mildred Peterson. Ushers 
will be Kay and Susan 
Little. Lay reader will be 
Robert Blair. 

Sunday School will 
follow the pastor's Young 
Disciples message. Church 
facilities are handicapped 
accessible and child care 



is provided. Hosting the 
fellowship hour will be 
Helga Strong, Adele 
Hamilton, Arlene Wickens 
and Marion Cross. The 
junior high fellowship 
meets at 6 p.m. with Derek 
Schmitt. 

Events for the week 
include: 

The Christian Serenity 
group will meet at 7 p.m. 
and the Committee on 
>Iissions and Christian 
Outreach at 7:30 p.m. 
Monday. 

The senior high 
fellowship will meet at 7 
p.m. and the United 
Methodist Women at 7:30 
p.m. for a Valentine Swap 
Party and business 
meeting Wednesday. 

The Wesley Bell 
Ringers will rehearse at 6 
p.m. and choir rehearsal 
will be at 8 p.m. Thursday. 

A special recipe 
chowder supper is planned 
by the Finance Committee 
for 6 p.m. Friday. 



'If God Is Everywhere' 

Sermon Topic At 

Houghs Neck Congregational 



Dr. Peter V. Corea will 
explore the question, "If 
God Is Everywhere, Where 
Is He?" during the 10:30 
a.m. worship service 
Sunday at the Houghs 
Neck Congregational 
Church, 310 Manet Ave. 

The choir will sing 
under the direction of 
Arden T. Schofield. 
Suzanne Dennis will sing 
an offertory solo. 

Rod Hicks will be the 
greeter. Craig Bentley and 
Frank Catrambone will 
serve for the Diaconate. 

At the 9 a.m. service, 
the Rev. M. Alicia Corea 
will deliver the sermon 
"Riders On The Earth 
Together." Diaconate 
members serving will be 
Martin Gordon and David 
Taylor. Greeter will be 
Carole Sargeant. 

The coffee hour 
between the services will 
be hosted by Suzanne 



Dennis. 

The Pilgrim Fellowship 
will meet at 1 p.m. with 
Rev. M. Alicia Corea and 
Gail Freel. The group will 
be working on gifts for 
nursing home residents and 
will also be making plans 
for future meetings. All 
young people in grades 6- 
12 are invited to attend. 

The annual church 
auction will be held 
Monday, Feb. 17 at 6 p.m. 
in fellowship hall. Call 
479-5776 for more 
information. 

The church is equipped 
for the physically 
challenged. Bring 
donations for the baskets 
in the vestibule for Fr. 
Bill's Place and the PSSB 
Pantry Shelf. Every 
Sunday is "Welcome 
Sunday" at the Houghs 
Neck Congregational 
Church. 



'Source Of Wine' Sermon Topic 
At First Church Of Squantum 



"The True Source Of 
The Wine" was the title of 
the sermon topic delivered 
by the Rev. Gene 
Langevin Sunday at the 
First Church of Squantum, 
164 Bellevue Rd. 

Scripture readers were 
Tom Klock and Barbara 
Walter. 

Dore Klock, who led 
the Chancel Choir, sang 
and the congregation was 
accompanied by Mary 
Ruth Scott on the organ 
and Janet Williamson on 
the piano. 

Greeters were Luther 
and Ruth Swenson. Ushers 
were Earl Taylor and 
Roberta Sheehan. The 



fellowship hour after the 
service was hosted by Dm 
Warnes and Deborah 
Stohlberg. 

The Bible study group 
continues its study of The 
Acts of the Apostles every 
Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. 
Sunday School begins at 
9:30 a.m. Sunday. The 
Sunday morning worship 
service begins at 10:30 
a.m. 

Child care is available 
for children during the 
service. A group for 
teenagers. The Way Up, 
meets Sunday afternoons 
from 2 to 6 p.m. and at 
various other times during 
the week. 



fc 



U.S. SAVINGS BONDS 




Thursday, February 13, 1992 Quincy Sun Page 11 



Ward 2 Democrats 
To Caucus Feb. 29 



Registered Democrats 
in Ward 2 will hold a 
caucus on Saturday, Feb. 
29 at 2 p.m. at the Fore 
River Clubhouse, 16 
Nevada Rd., Quincy, to 
elect delegates to the 1992 
Massachusetts Democratic 
convention. 

Ward 2 will elect 11 
delegates and four 
alternates equally divided 
between men and women, 
to send to the convention. 
The apportioned number of 
delegates has been 
allocated on the basis of a 
formula giving equal 
weight to the Democratic 
Party registration and the 
average voter for 
Democratic candidates in 
the last gcr-'al elections 
for governor and president 
for wikich figures were 
available at the time 
delegate tabulations were 
prepared. 

Ronald Mariano, 
chairman of the Ward 2 
Democratic Committee, 
will call the caucus. 



The caucus is open to 
all registered Democrats, 
persons ineligible to 
register and media 
representatives. The only 
persons eligible to 
participate in any portion 
of the caucus are those 
who are registered 
Democrats in Ward 6 as of 
Dec. 31, 1991. There will 
be no absentee or proxy 
voting. 

Candidates for 

delegates and alternates 
must also be present, 
voting and give his or her 
written consent to be 
nominated and that 
nomination must be 
seconded by two persons 
present at the local 
caucus. 

All ballots will be 
written and secret. Those 
candidates receiving the 
greatest number of votes 
on the first ballot will be 
elected. 

Each candidate will be 
allowed to make a two- 
minute speech and to 



distribute on his/her behalf 
one sheet of paper listing 
qualifications and ideas. 

Slate making is 
allowed, but no special 
preference shall be given 
to slates. There is no 
quorum requirement for the 
caucus. 

There will be no 
admission or expense 
charge at the caucus, 
although donations may be 
solicited. 

Discrimination on the 
basis of race, sex, age, 
color, creed, national 
origin, religion, ethnic 
identity, philosophical 
persuasion or economic 
status in the conduct of the 
caucus is strictly 
prohibited. 

Challenges to the 
delegate selection process 
can be filed in writing with 
the Compliance Review 
Commission, c/o The 
Massachusetts Democratic 
Party, 45 Bromfield St., 
Boston, MA 02108 no 
later than March 2. 




QUINCY POLICE OFFICERS recently played Atlantic Middle School sixth graders in a 
basketball game which kicked off the D.A.R.E. (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) 
program). Front row, Amanda McCloy, Kristin Oneto, Kerry Skehan, Rebecca Surrat, 
Stacey Doung, Miranda Bohl, Danielle LIkas, Rally Papadopoulos. Middle row, Yhen 
Nguyen, Jennifer Nielson, Megan O'Donnell, Kelly Myers, Julie Au, Nicole 
Cappelluzzo, Rachel Leschernier, Kristina McManus, Kristin Puckett. Back row, 
officers, BlUy Brabazon, Jack Haines, Leo Coppens, Gerry O'Rourke, Danny Mlnton 
and John Ryan. 

D.A.R.E. Program 
Expands To Middle Schools 



Tickets For Celtics' 
Basketball Clinic Available 



Recreation Director 
Barry Welch announces 
that for the second year, 
the Quincy Recreation 
Department is 

participating in the 
distribution of tickets to 
the Boston Celtics' 
Basketball Clinic to be 
conducted at the Boston 
Garden. 

This year's event is 
sponsored by the Boston 
Globe and the Red 
Auerbach Fund. 

The free clinic will 
feature current Boston 
Celtic players and 
coaching staff. It will be 
held Sunday, March 1 at 4 
pjn. 

Tickets are free and this 
is an excellent opportunity 
to learn tips on 
rebounding, shooting and 
defense from the pros. Any 
Quincy residents or youth 



organizations interested in 
obtaining tickets can call 
the Quincy Recreation 
Department at 376-1394. 

Tickets are limited and 
requests will be filled on a 
first come, first served 
basis. Family groups are 
encouraged to attend this 
event. Tickers requests 
should include a request 
for an adult for each four 
tickets requested. 



Participants are 
responsible for their own 
transportation. The Red 
Auerbach Fund is a 
permanent endowment to 
promote recreational and 
youth development 
opportunities and athletic 
events throughout 
Massachusetts. 

For more information 
call the Quincy Recreation 
Department at 376-1394. 



Quincy's Drug Abuse 
Resistance Education 
program (D.A.R.E.) 
recently held a Kick-Off 
Event at Atlantic Middle 
School. The program, 
which has worked with 
fifth graders for several 
years, has been expanded 
to work with sixth graders. 

The party was 
sponsored by D.A.R.E. and 
included entertainment by 
Ivory Soul, a singing and 
dancing group of four 



South Shore girls; a 
basketball game against 
members of the Quincy 
Police Department; relay 
races with T-shirts for the 
winning teams from the 
Quincy Police Athletic 
League; and dinner, 
prepared by the police, 
under the supervision of 
officers Bob Edgar and 
Bob Haiina. 

Parents, students, 
Atlantic staff and Officer 
Edgar will meet for three 



Tuesday evenings in 
February. Guest speakers 
will appear to share 
experiences and initiate 
discussion on building self- 
esteem and resisting peer 
pressure. 

The D.A.R.E. program is 
a partnership between the 
Quincy Public Schools and 
the Quincy Police 
Department. It is being 
paid for by a 
Commonwealth Inservice 
Grant. 



Tax Specialist To Address 
Mayor's Women Commission 




The Mayor's 

Commission on the Status 
Of Women will sponsor a 
program "Tax Survival in 
the '90s" Wednesday, Feb. 
26 fi-om 7:30 to 9 p.m. in 
the City Hall Council 
Chambers, 1305 Hancock 
St, Quincy Center. 



The program will 
feature Tax Specialist 
Sharon Lemoff who will 
offer tax tips for women, 
widows, single women, 
elderly, college students 
and retirees. 

The program is fi-ee and 
open to the public. 



HANCOCK 




TREAT YOUR CAR TO 
SOMETHING SPECIAL 



All Day - Every Day 

$18.95 Oil Change 

Premium Quality Lube, Oil, Filter 
14 Point Inspection 

At Petar's Automotive, of course! 





"THE BLUE AND WHITE BUILDINGS" 



It's the new North 

Quincy branch address 

of the South Boston 

Savings Bank. 

• STRONG • CONSERVATIVE 
•RELIABLE •PROFITABLE 

HOURS 

MON - TUBS - WED - FRI - 9 AM to 5 PM 

THURSDAY 9AM to 7PM 

SATURDAY 8:30AM to 12 NOON 

Telephone 773-8100 



PETARS ..^r^'X^ 

AUTOMOTIVE AUTO B( 

(617)786-9080 {617)472-( 

Mon-Fri 7-7 Sat 8-3 Mon-Frl 8-5 

324-330 QUINCY AVE., QUINCY 



ERICS 
AUTO BODY 

(617)472-6759 
Mon-Frl 8-5 Sat 8-3 



Visit our other 
Quincy branch 
office located at 
690 Adams St. 
Lakin Square 



South Boston 
Savings Bank 

^ ALWAYS THE LEADER- ^ 



Page 12 Qnlncy Sun Thonday, February 13, 1992 




Russell D. Fitzgerald, 53 

Senior Travel Consultant 



A pro-burial Mass for 
Russell D. Fitzgerald, 53, of 
Quincy, was celebrated Feb. 
8 at Sacred Heart Church. 

Mr. Fitzgerald died Jan. 
26 in Boston after a long ill- 
ness. 

He was a senior travel 
consultant at the Thomas 
Cook Travel Agency in Bos- 
ton. 

He was a lifelong resident 
of Quincy and was a 1957 
graduate of North Quincy 
High School. 



He is survived by his 
mother, Alice M. McLaughlin 
of Braintree; two brothers, 
John J . Fitzgerald of Gu^poit, 
Miss., and Robert V. 
Fitzgerald of Braintree, a 
nephew and two nieces. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St., 
Wollaston. 

Donations may be made 
to the AIDS Action Com- 
mittee, 131 Clarendon St., 
Boston, MA 02116. 



Harold T. Hatch, 79 

Manufacturing Machinist 

A private funeral service in Boston and lived in Quincy 

for 17 years. 



for Harold T. Hatch, 79, of 
Quincy, was held recently. 

Mr. Hatch died Feb. 2 at 
Quincy Hospital after a long 
illness. 

He was a machinist with 
the former Walworth Manu- 
facturing Co. in Braintree. 

He was bom and educated 




United Way 



Husband of the late Ruth 
E. (Young) Hatch, he is sur- 
vived by three sons, Thomas 
Hatch of Tokyo, Japan. Wil- 
liam Hatch of Nashua, N.H., 
and Steven Hatch of Deny, 
N.H.; two daughters, Chris- 
tine Gibbons of Kansas Gty, 
Kaa, and Marion Cameron 
of Brockton; and seven 
grandchildren. 

Burial was private. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by die Farley Funeral 
Home, Stoughton. 




D. Scott Oeware 



A THOUGHT FOR THE WE£K 

VaUntIn*'* Day la for 
childran, lov*ra and 
romantics. Wall, 

•saantlally, yas, but whan it 
comaa to affaira of the 
haart, avaryona la includad. 



Valantlnaa n—d not ba axpenaiva. A happy 
nota writtan In your own handwriting ... a 
talaphona call to aomaona who might not 
oiharwiaa racalva a call. 

Soma paopla find It hard to aay "I lova 
you," but on valantlna's Day thay expraaa 
that aantimant with apaclal ramambrancaa or 
glHa. It Is also a day that "mushy" aanllmanta 
on brightly colored paper are not really taken 
'seriously (I.e. Valentines exchanged by 
children at achool). There, the Important tnmg 
Is the number of valentlne'a receh/ed, not the 
sentiment. As people mature, the aentlment 
becomes more Important than the numl>er. 

It takea only a little time to aend a 
valentIrM, or a note, or to make a telephone 
call to aomeoiM, eapeclaiiy someone who is a 
ilttle "out of circulation" theee daya. A little 
aurpriae gift will make that aomeone feel 
special, and you'll feel good tool 

Deware Funeral Home 

576 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 

472-1137 

Member of the "New England Funeral Trust 

and your Suburban Boston Pre- Need 

funeral specialist 

Serving All Religious Faiths 

Services Rendered To Any Distance 



Howard A. Hollis, 78 

Owned Hancock Moving And Storage Co. 

A funeral service for sional baseball league as a 



Howard A. Hollis, 78, of 
Quincy, was held Feb. 8 at 
the Sweeney Brothers Home 
for Funerals, 1 Independence 
Ave. 

Mr. Hollis died Feb. 5 at 
Quincy Hospital after a brief 
illness. 

He was the former owner 
of the Hancock Transfer 
Moving and Storage Com- 
pany of Quincy. 

He previously worked 25 
years as a chipper and caulker 
at Fore River shipyard for 
Bethlehem Steel and then 
General Dynamics. 

In the 1930's, he played in 



catcher. 

Bom in Quincy and edu- 
cated in Braintree schools, he 
lived in Quincy for 55 years. 

He is survived by his wife, 
SteUa H. (Suslovich) Hollis; 
two sons, Howard A. Hollis, 
Jr. of Brockton and William 
D. Hollis of Boston; two 
daughters, Elaine S. 
Chiocchio of Quincy and 
Virginia Nancy Fleming of 
Braintree; a brother, Richard 
L. Hollis of Quincy; 11 
grandchildren, and three 
great-grandchildren. He was 
the father of the late Dorothy 
C. HoUis. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 



the Cape Cod semi-profes 

Helen C. NicoU, 86 

American Trial Association Secretary 

A funeral service for Helen Shrewsbury. She was also a 



C. (Irving) NicoU, 86, of 
Quincy, was held Monday at 
Deware Funeral Home, 576 
Hancock St. 

Mrs. Nicoll died Feb. 5 at 
home after a brief illness. 

She wo±ed as a secretary 
for several years for the 
American Trial Association 
in Boston. 

She was a past president 
of the United District As- 
sembly of New England 
Scottish Qans of Boston. 

She was a past matron of 
the Sabatia Chapter 124 of 
the Order of the Eastern Star 
and a member of the Artemas 
Ward Chapter 220 of the Or- 



Luigi 



Jer of the Eastern Star in 

;i Farias, 77 

A funeral Mass for Luigi 
Farias, 77, of Quincy, was 
celebrated Feb. 7 in Our Lady 
of Mount Carmel Church in 
East Boston. 

Mr. Farias died Feb. 4 at 
Quincy Hospital after a brief 
illness. 

He was a former tailor in 
the textile industry. 



member of the Scottish Aux- 
iliary of Cambridge. 

Bom in Dundee, Scotland, 
she lived in Scotland before 
moving to Quincy in 1983. 

She is survived by her 
husband, Allan Nicoll; a son, 
Irving Thompson NicoU of 
Hudson; two grandchildren. 
Deputy Sheriff Bruce A. 
Nicoll of Qaricsville, Tenn. 
and Matyann H. Abasciano 
of Charlton; and four great- 
granddaughters. 

Burial was in Scotland. 

Donations may be made 
to the Eastern Star Home, c/o 
Grand Chapter of Massachu- 
setts, O.E.S., P.O. Box 325, 
Newtonville, MA 02160. 



Bom in Italy, he lived five 
years in East Boston before 
moving to Quincy 35 years 
ago. 



He is survived by his wife, 
Philomena(Cieri) Farias; and 
many nieces and nephews. 

Burial was in Woodlawn 
Cemetery, Everett. 



MONUMENTS 


QUINCY 
MEMORIALS Inc. 




Cemetery Lettering 






Cleaning 








Vases 
Vigil Lights 




iSWillardSt. 




Sculpturing 
Rose Quartz 




Quincy 02169 




Mausoleums 








Markers 




"On The Expressway" 




Colonial Tablets 
Stant Markers 




Exit 9 Near E. Milton Sq. 


J 


Bronze Markers 


L 




|617-471-0250| 


Free Illustrated Catalog 
Budget Terms Available 



George E. George, 73 

Former Postal Worker, Beautician 

School. He lived in Quincy 
most of his life. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Frances (Mignosa) George; a 
son, Robert A. George of 
Duxbury; two step-sons, 
Anthony Centrella of Quincy 
and Paul Centrella of 
Hanover, two stepdaughters, 
Cheryl Centrella of Taunton 
and Patricia DiTullio of 
Quincy; two brothers, Philip 
George of Tyngsboro and 
Nickolas George of Florida; 
a sister, Rose Lowe ofDracut; 
and seven grandchildrea 

Burial was in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Bolea-Buonfiglio 
Funeral Home, 116 Franklin 
St. 

Donations may be made 
to the Hospice of the Quincy 
Visiting Nurses Association, 
1354 Hancock St., Quincy, 
MA 02169. 

Katherine F. Condon 

A funeral Mass for Quincy; two nieces, Elizabeth 

Horaska of Dorchester and 
Eleanor Coghlan of Hanson; 
and a nephew, Charles 
Martindale of North Easton. 
She was the daughter of the 
late Maurice J. and Kristine 
(Campbell) Condon. 

Burial was in St. Patrick's 
Cemetery, Abington. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney Funeral 
Home, 326 Copeland St. 

Doris Beattie, 90 

A funeral service for Doris ijved 65 years in Quincy . She 

was a 1919 graduate of Avon 
High School and attended the 
Burdett School in Boston. 

Wife of the late C. Morton 
Beattie, she is survived by a 
nephew, Bernard E. Lawson 
of North Easton. 



A funeral Mass for George 
E. George, 73 , of Quincy , was 
celebratedFeb. 8 at St. John's 
Church. 

Mr. George died Feb. 5 at 
Quincy Hospital after a brief 
illness. 

He was a former postal 
woricer at the John F. Kennedy 
Post Office in Boston. He was 
also a former beautician at 
Marvel's of Quincy. 

A veteran of World War 
n, he served with the Army's 
68th Coast Artillery. He took 
part in the landing at Anzio, 
Italy, in January, 1944 as the 
Allies gained control of Italy 
from the Nazis. 

He was a member of the 
Veteran of Foreign Wars and 
the Disabled American Vet- 
erans Post Office Ch^ter of 
Boston. 

Bom in Boston, he was 
raised in Lowell and was a 
1 937 graduate of Lowell High 



Katherine F. Condon of 
Quincy was celebrated Feb. 7 
at Sacred Heart Church. 

Miss Condon died Jaa 5 
at Milton Hospital after a brief 
illness. 

She was a former book- 
keeper for Welch & Forbes in 
Boston. 

She was bom in Boston. 

She is survived by a 
brother, Joseph Condon of 



(Crane) Beattie, 90, of 
Quincy, was held Monday at 
the Hamel, Wickens and 
Troupe Funeral Home, 26 
Adams St. 

Mrs. Beattie died Feb. 6 at 
the Braintree Manor Nursing 
Home after a brief illness. 

She was a 50-year mem- 
ber of the Order of the East- 
em Star. She also a member 
of Bethany Congregational 
Church and its Evening 
Group. 

Bom in Avon, Mrs. Beattie 



Burial was in Mayflower 
Hill Cemetery, Taunton. 

Donations may be made 
to the General Fund of 
Bethany Congregational 
Church, 1 8 Spear St. , Quincy, 
MA 02169. 



Margaret M. Malone, 85 

A ftineral Mass for Marg- she was bom in Boston. 



CHRISTIAN D'CR • GOPiliA LGRtN • JOAN i,OLLINS • VUAHNET • PIEflHE CARDIN 



Fashion 

Eyewear 

SAVE 

*35 



JW% OPTICAL -- 

• D« HEARING AIDS, 

1361-AHancockSt.,QuincySq. Jl 
773-3505 • 773-4174 

"r^ $499 

Complete 

30 Day Trial 2 Yr. Warranty 



$499 



2 Yr. Warranty 



FREE VALIDATED PARKING 



1 YEAR WARRANTY 
ON ALL FRAMES 

HAISTON • AVAMTGARDF • OSrABPELARENTA t WES SAINT lAllBfNT 



¥1 ^ 



aret M. Malone, 85, of 
Quincy, was celebrated Feb. 
8 at St. Ann's Church. 

Miss Malone died Feb. 4 
at Quincy Nursing Home af- 
ter a long illness. 

She was an employee for 
many years in the state Divi- 
sion of Employment Security . 
»« »« » « >t - 



She is survived by many 
nieces and nephews. She was 
the sister of the late Catherine 
C. Malone. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane Funeral 
Home, 785 Hancock St. 

>« w — » 



Sweeney JSroikers 



, 



HOME FOR FUNERALS 

RICHARD T. SWEENEY, JR. 
JEFFREY F. SWEENEY 

1 INDEPENDENCE AVENUE • QUINCY, MASS 

472-6344 



=»#= 



. 



J 



Daniel P. Collins, 91 

Retired Bank Of Boston Supervisor 



A funeral Mass foi 
Daniel P^ Collins, 91, of 
Quincy, was celebrated 
Monday at St. John the 
Baptist Church. 

Mr. Collins died Feb. 7 
at the Elihu White Nursing 
Home, Braintree. 

He was a retired 
supervisor for Bank of 
Boston. He worked in the 
bank's general settlements 
department for 40 years 
before retiring 27 years 
ago. 

He was a member of 



He is survived by his 
wife, Mary F. (Mclnnis) 
Collins; two sons, Edward 
J. Collins of Braintree and 
Daniel F. Collins of 
Quincy; two daughters, 
Eleanor C. Kelsey of 
Midlothian, Va., and Jean 
C. Collins of Quincy; 10 
grandchildren and four 
great-grandchildren. 

Burial will be in Blue 
Hill Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for 
Funerals, 1 Independence 
Ave. 



the Holy Name Society at 
St. John's Church. 

Anna E. Tantillo, 67 

Worked For Purity Supreme 

A funeral Mass for moved to Quincy 41 years 



Anna E. (McSweeney) 
Tantillo, 67, of Quincy, 
was celebrated 

Wednesday at Sacred 
Heart Church. 

Mrs. Tantillo died Feb. 
8 in Quincy Hospital after 
a long illness. 

She was a meat 



ago. 

She is survived by a 
son, James F. Tantillo Jr. 
of Braintree; a brother, 
John J. McSweeney of 
Milton; a sister, Margaret 
G. Marshall of Quincy; and 
a grandson, Jayme Tantillo 
of Braintree. 

Burial was in St. Mary's 



wrapper for Purity 

Supreme supermarkets for Cemetery, Randolph 

36 years before retiring in P^^ej^^ arrangements 

1935 were by the Keohane 

Funeral Home, 785 

Hancock St. 



Bom in Randolph, she 



Mary J. Jordan 

Worked For Bargain Center 

funeral Mass for lived in Quincy for 50 



A 

Mary J. "Mae" (Rynn) 
Jordan, 79, of Quincy, was 
celebrated yesterday 
(Wednesday) at Sacred 
Heart Church. 

Mrs. Jordan died Feb. 8 
in Quincy Hospital after a 
long illness. 

She was a saleswoman 
for the Bargain Center for 
36 years before she retired 
in 1980. 

Bom in Boston, she 



years. 

Wife of the late James 
J. Jordan Sr., she is 
survived by a son, James J. 
Jordan Jr. of Dorchester; 
five grandchildren and 
three great-grandchildren. 

Burial was in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 333 
Hancock St. 



Iva A. Megna, 75 



A ftineral service for Iva 
A. (Charboneau) Megna, 
75, of Quincy, was held 
Monday at the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 

Mrs. Megna died Feb. 7 
at Quincy Hospital after a 
brief illness. 

Born in Providence, 
R I., she lived in 
Dorchester before moving 



to Quincy 35 years ago. 
She was a graduate of 
Girl's High School in West 
Newtoa 

She is survived by her 
husband, Vincent J. 
Megna; a brother, David 
Alger of Florida; and two 
sisters, Claire Curreri of 
Quincy and Barbara 
Goodwin of Randolph. 

Burial was in Fairview 
Cemetery, Scituate. 




\N( lAlriiil .III iii\ il.iliiHi 111 iiu'iiilni^ 111 
llii ili'ii;\ III llu' ,111.1 III MMl tvilh ii-<. 
M(» mil l;Kilillrv. .111(1 IxiiiiMc lirlUi 
M t|iKiJnU'(l (t ilh Hill liiiu'i .il hiiiiK . mil 
^l.ill .111(1 (lii't'ilms. Il .iImi lu'iiMiu's ,111 

|>|I|MII|||||||\ III (liMI|v>. lino »»II.IMMIM 

iiiiiK .i|i|>i'ii|ii'iiili'l\ MINI iiiiiurru^ilioiiN 
Irmii ,1 i( li'jiniis mcmikhiiI 

I lliv iiiv il.itimi iv ,iImi I Mciuli'd l<> dm 
liiiN ,111(1 iiiiiM'N. liii^|Hl;il sIjIN. till 
mu Is. Mm jsis. ell .. In ihiisc t\|iii iiiiulil 
In lu'iK'UlU'd l)\ mil •■ii|)»ii limisr" >i>.il. 
I'K.iM plimic III ,id\,iiu( Ml tic 1,111 |Hi 
M>ii.ill\ v|)('iid lliis liiiK tulli tmi 



Hamel, Wickens & Troupe 
Funeral Home, Inc. 

26 Adams Street • Qumcy, MA 
:RogerG Hamel 617-472-5888 

Funeral Di'eclof 



FUNERAL PRE-NEED SPECIALISTS 



Kathryn Riley 

Co-owned Furniture Store 



Thanday, February 13, 1991 Quincy Sun Pag* 13 

Paul J. McCarthy, 58 

Truck Driver, Union Member 



A funeral Mass for 
Kathryn (Maguire) Riley 
of Quincy was celebrated 
yesterday (Wednesday) at 
St. Ann's Church. 

Mrs. Riley died Feb. 9 
at home after a brief 
illness. 

She was co-owner, with 
her husband, of Riley 
Wayside Furniture in 
Weymouth for 30 years. 
They retired from the 
fijmiutre business in 1959. 

In her younger years, 
she was secretary to 
Clement Norton, a Boston 
poUtician. 



She enjoyed playing 
bingo. 

Bom in Boston, she 
graduated from Jamaica 
Plain High School. She 
moved to Quincy in 1931. 

She is survived by a 
niece, Alice Hardin of 
Quincy; and several 
grandnieces and 

grandnephews. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Hamel, 
Wickens and Troupe 
Funeral Home, 26 Adams 
St. 



A funeral service for 
Paul J. McCarthy, 58, of 
Quincy, was held Tuesday 
in the Sweeney Funeral 
Home, 74 Ebn St. 

Mr. McCarthy died Feb. 
8 at home. 

He was a truck driver 
and a member of the Local 
82. 

He is survived by a 
friend, Janice Walsh of 
Quincy; two sons, Paul 
Walsh of Wisconsin and 
Joseph McCarthy of 
Bridgewater; two 
daughters, Caron 



McCarthy of Bridgewater 
and Diane McCarthy of 
New Jersey; four brothers, 
James McCarthy of 
Quincy, Eugene McCarthy 
of Chelmsford, Robert 
McCarthy of 

Pennsylvania, and 
Lawrence McCarthy of 
Brockton; three sisters, 
Leola O'Toufe, Louise 
Gray and Maureen Lyons, 
all of Quincy; and a 
grandchild. 

Burial was in St Mary's 
Cemetery. 



Margaret Goyette, 90 

Manager At Bargain Center 



Eric Johnson, 89 

Retired Mechanic 



A funeral Mass for 
Margaret (Egan) Goyette, 

90, of Quincy, was 
celebrated yesterday 
(Wednesday) in Most 
Blessed Sacrament 
Church. 

Mrs. Goyette died Feb. 
8 in Quincy Hospital. 

She was manager of the 
men's department at the 
former Bargain Center 
store in Quincy for 39 
years. 

Bom in Roxbury, she 
lived in Quincy for 50 
years. 



Wife of the late Henry 
F. Goyette, she is survived 
by a son, Roy Goyette of 
Florida; two daughters, 
Peggy Eriksson of North 
Carolina and Jean Urbanus 
of Norwood; a sister, Vera 
Gorman of Stoughton; nine 
grandchildren, 26 great- 
grandchildren and a great- 
gieat-grandchild. 

Burial was in Fairview 
Cemetery, Hyde Park. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 



A funeral service for 
Eric Johnson, 89, of 
Quincy, was held 
yesterday (Wednesday) at 
the Chapman, Cole & 
Gleason Funeral Home, 
Milton. 

Mr. Johnson died Feb. 8 
after a long illness. 

He was a retired 
automobile mechanic at 
Merit Autobody Shop in 
Boston. 

Bora in Sweden, he 



lived in Dorchester until 
moving to Quincy many 
years ago. 

He is survived by bis 
wife, Esther M. Benson; 
two sons, Paul E. Johnson 
and Robert H. Johnson, 
both of Abington; a 
daughter, Doris E. Johnson 
of Sudbury; and two 
grandchildren. 

Burial was in Cedar 
Grove Cemetery, 
Dorchester. 




United Way 

of Massachusetts Bay 



For those times 

when the 
darkness lingers 



With the loss of a loved one through death, il is helpful to be able to 
share the feelings and emotions which we all experience. 

^^mF "'^^^I^V^ ^^'^ '"^^^ of us. there are family members. 

v. ^/miAW clergy, and friends who are ready to listen in a 
caring way. 

Yet, there are those who find it helpful to 
share their grief with someone outside their 
immediate circle of support. 

Because of our continuing commitment to 
the families we serve, Keohane Funeral 
Service is pleased to announce that Dr. 
Sherry Johnson has joined our staff as a Grief 

Counselor. Her educational background, professional experience and 

understanding manner can be particularly helpful. 

We are the first funeral home in New England to offer the service of 
a Grief Counselor. 




^onanoTi 




unerai c>crvico 



KEOHANK FUNKRAI. IIOMK. 

7I«> lUncnck Sirrrt 

Quincy. MA 02170 

6I7-77.1.MM 



INC. 



PYNE FUNERAL HOME, INC. 

21 Emerald Street 

Min(ham. MA 0204] 

617-749-OJIO 



KEOHANE FUNERAL HOME. INC. 

.UJ HaneiKk Street 

Qyincy. HA 02171 

6I7-77J.JJ5I 



Page 14 Qttlncy Son Thursday, February 13, 1992 



Sun Sports 



Basketball 



North Shocks B-R 



The North Quiocy boys' 
basketball team turned in 
its finest performance of 
the season last Friday to 
shock Bridgewater- 
Raynham, 75-55, and 
knock the Trojans (14-2) 
out of sole possession of 
first place in the Old 
Colony League. The win 
improved North to 12-5 
(10-3 in the league). 

Ted Stevenson's Red 
Raiders played at 
Barnstable Tuesday, will 
host Fahnouth Friday night 
at 7 and will complete the 
regular season next 
Monday at Weymouth at 
7. 

"Although the Eastern 



Mass. tournament is open 
to anyone this year, 
regardless of record, we 
wanted to win 12 games, 
the minimum needed to 
qualify in the past," 
Stevenson said. "Now we 
know we would have 
qualified if the tournament 
wasn't opened up to 
everyone." 

Matt Flynn equaled his 
career high 23 points, 
scored earlier in the week, 
to spark the upset win over 
B-R. Five North players 
scored in double figures. 
Bo Smith having 14, 
Desmond Bellot 13, Tim 
Johnson 11 and Sean 
Donovan 10. 



Justin Moscardelli led 
B-R with 16 points as the 
Trojans fell into a top fie 
with Silver Lake in the 
league. 

Earlier in the week 
Mike Morris hit a jumper 
with two seconds 
remaining to five Silver 
Lake a 48-46 decision over 
North Quincy. 

Flynn hit his career- 
high 23 points to pace the 
Raider offense. 

In their previous game 
North defeated Taunton, 
56-38, led by Donovan's 14 
points. Chris Olsen had 10 
and nine rebounds and 
Bellot and Luke Sheets 
added eight points apiece. 

■-TOM SULLIVAN 



Bad Night For Quincy 



The Quincy boys' 
basketball team had its 
worst shooting night of the 
season last Friday and the 
Presidents lost to Taunton, 
57-50, dropping their 
record to 7-9 (7-7 in the 
Old Colony League). 

Quincy faced Silver 
Lake Tuesday and will 
play at Barnstable Friday 
night 



Joey Crespi paced 
Quincy against Taunton 
with 14 points and Dave 
Jolley, who had moved 
into first place in league 
scoring, had 13. 

The Presidents fell 
behind. 28-18, at halftime 
as Taunton captured only 
its fourth win of the 
season. 



Earlier in the week 
Jolley had a big night with 
19 points and 12 rebounds 

to lead Quincy over 
Plymouth, 79-67. 

Crespi had 15 points, 
Robbie Kane added 14 and 
Steve Loud had a fine two- 
way game and contributed 
nine points. 



North Girls Bow 



The North Quincy girls' 
basketball team lost to Old 
Colony League-leading 
Bridgewater-Raynham, 49- 
45, last Friday, dropping 



its record to 12-5 (10-3 in 
the league). 

The North girls hosted 
Barnstable Tuesday, will 
play at Falmouth Friday 



Quincy, North Winter 
Home Sports Schedule 



Feb. 12 Through Feb. 18 



Wednesday, Feb. 12 

•NQHS Freshman Girls Basketball vs. Weymouth 
at Atlantic, 4 p.m. 

•QHS Hockey vs. Barnstable, Varsity 5:30 p.m. 
•NQHS Wrestling vs. Rockland, 6:30 p.m. 
•QHS Wrestling Dual vs. Billerica, 7:30 p.m. 

Thursday, Feb. 13 
•No Home Games Scheduled. 

Friday, Feb. 14 
•NQHS Boys Basketball vs. Falmouth, JV 5:30 
p.m., Varisty 7 p.m. 

•QHS Girls Basketball vs. Barnstable, JV 5:30 
p.m., Varsity 7 p.m. 
•NQHS Hockey vs. Marshfield, Varsity 3:30 p.m. 

Saturday, Feb. 15 
•QHS Freshman Boys Basketball vs. Wareham, 
10 a.m. 

•QHS Hockey vs. Taunton, Varisty 6:40 p.m. 
•Boys and Girls Track Allstae Meet at Harvard. 
•NQHS Quad Meet, NQ, Braintree, Waltham and 
Cohasset, noon. 

Monday, Feb. 17 
•NQHS Girls Basketball vs. Weymouth, JV 5:30 
p.m.. Varsity 7 p.m. 

Tuesday, Feb. 18 
•No Home Games Scheduled. 



night and will be home to 
Weymouth next Monday. 

North, which will be in 
the Eastern Mass. 
tournament for the eighth 
time in 12 years, was 
leading late in the game 
but B-R's Kerry Holmes hit 
a three-pointer and two 
free throws in the final 
minute for the victory. 

Cindy White led North 
with 13 points, while 
Regina Murphy added 10. 

Although the 

tournament this year is 
open to everyone, 
regardless of record. North 
would have qualified 
anyway as the 12 wins 
marked the minimum 
qualifying figure in the 
past. 

Earlier in the week 
North Quincy defeated 
Silver Lake, 43-37, after 
trailing, 21-19, at the half. 

Murphy led North with 
nine points, Tricia Hughes 
and White had eight points 
each and Maureen 

McCarthy came off the 
bench and had five key 
points. 

In its previous game 
North defeated Taunton, 
51-32, with Hughes and 
White having 10 points 
apiece. 

Murphy scored six of 
her eight points and had 
all of her .six steals early 
in the second half as North 
extended a 25-16 halftime 
lead. Nicole Sapienza 
contributed seven points 
off the bench. 



Succeeds Finnegan March 1 

Walker Hopes To Add 

More Sports As 
New Athletic Director 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

When Bill Walker 
takes over as Quincy's new 
athletic director March 1, 
he not only wants to retain 
all sports despite budget 
cuts, but he hopes to add 
new sports, including 
lacrosse. 

"1 know this is a tough 
rime to be thinking of 
adding sports the way 
other schools are cutting 
theirs due to budget cuts, 
but I do hope to add a few 

new ones," said Walker, 
who was unanimously 
appointed by the school 
committee last week to 
succeed Manin Finnegan, 
who retires Feb. 28 after 
41 years in the Quincy 
school system. 

"1 also plan to institute 
an extensive intramural 
program in the middle 
schools, which I feel is a 
necessity." 

Walker, who has been 
in the Quincy system for 
more than 20 years, is 
working with Finnegan 
until he takes over on 
March 1. 

He was appointed on an 
interim basis and the 
position will open up again 
after the school year ends 
in June. 

I definitely will apply 
again for the permanent 
position," he said. 

Walker has been 
swimming instructor, 
supervisor of the Djerf 
Pool at the Lincoln- 
Hancock School and 
coach of the North Quincy 
boys' and girls' swim 
teams for 17 years. He 



Swimming 




BILL WALKER 

began his teaching career 
at the Squantum School 
before being named pool 
supervisor and swimming 
instructor. 

There was no swimming 
in the high schools while 
Walker was a student at 
North Quincy High where 
he played football and 
baseball. He attended 
WoUaston School and 
Central Junior High. He 
began his swimming 
career at Huntington Prep 
and continued at 
Northeastern and 
Bridgewater State team 
and was recently inducted 
into the Bridgewater 
Athletic Hall of Fame. 

He has been honored 
twice during the past year, 

first as Girls Coach of the 
Year by the Eastern Mass. 
Swim Coaches 

Association and more 
recently as Coach of the 
Year by the Boston Globe. 
Walker has led both the 
girls' and boys' teams to 
several outstanding 
seasons and last fall the 
girls finished in second 
place in the Pilgrim 



Conference and 15th out of 
56 teams in the MIAA 
State Swimming and 
Diving championships. 
Seven of his girls were 
named to the conference 
all-star team. 

In the past two seasons 
his girls' teams posted an 
impressive 23-3 record, 
winning the conference 
title in 1990. In the past 
two years North swimmers 
have earned the MIAA's 
academic award for 
maintaining a cumulative 
grade point average of 
over 3.5. Walker has 
coached 14 Academic All- 
Americans the last four 
years. 

His current boys' team 
has another excellent 
record as it prepares for 
the sectional and state 
championships. 

Several coaches 
decided not to apply for 
the athletic director's post 
as it is a part-time 
position. 

Some School 

Committee members tried 
to expand the job into a 
full-time position but were 
unsuccessful. 

Walker will continue 
his teaching and his duties 
as supervisor of the pool. 
His director's job pays a 
$6,385 stipend in addition 
to his teaching salary. He 
will earn a total of $47, 
451, almost $7,000 more 
than Finnegan. 

The school department 
will save money with 
Walker's appointment, 
however, because he will 
continue supervising the 
pool without extra pay. 



North Defeats Westwood 



The North Quincy boy's 
swim team finished its 
dual meet season with a 
106-76 victory over 
Westwood, to finish with a 
9-0 record. The team hosts 
the Pilgrim Conference 
Championships this Friday 



Bowling 



at the Lincoln-Hancock 
School pool. 

Finishing first against 
Westwood were Mike 
Ploof, Dan Reilly, Barry 
Canavan, Erik Delorey and 
Alan Morse. 

Taking second places 



were Dennis Reichert, Jim 
Flaherty, Teemu Louvila, 
Dan Bermingham, Nader 
Sidahmed and Jacky Lei. 

Placing third were Greg 
MacKay, John Aliberti, 
Tom Meade and William 
Lee. 



B. Saluti Rolls 352 High In St. John's League 



Bob Saluti rolled the 
season's high three of 352 
in St. John's Holy Name 
Bowling League play. 

Jim Mastrantonio had 
322. Saluri also had the 
high A'cekly single of 124 
and Joe Zaccheo rolled 
116. 

Bud McA]li.ster's team 
had the high single of 397 
and Aldo Saluti's team had 
395. Saluti's team had the 
high three of 1151 and 



McAllister had 1 140. 

The Top Ten: John 
Grande, 104; Bob Saluri, 
103.83; Mastrantonio, 
102.43; Dave Nolan, 96.33; 
Mike Hart, 95.76; Don 
Gilliland, 95.67; Dan 
Dieso, 95.06; Rich 
Warner, 93.41; McAllister, 
93.37; Duey DiCesare, 
92.71. 

The Team Standings: 
Aldo S:duti, 22-2; Grande, 
16-8; McAllister, 12-12; 



Mastrantonio, 8-16; Karl 
Vonhartenstein, 8-16; Joe 
Matarazzo, 6-18. 




The first basketball player 
to score 100 points in a 
game was Wilt Chamber- 
lain, star of the Philadel- 
phia Warriors. It happened 
in a game against the New 
York Knicks on March 2, 
1962. 



Kelleher Double Winner 



nwiday, Fabrmry 13, 1M2 Qiriacy Su Pag* IS 



Bellot Major North Boosters* Award Winner 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

Desmond Bellot, who 
has accepted a scholarship 
to Northeastern University, 
was the major award 
winner at the annual North 
Quincy High School 
Football Boosters Club 
awards night held at the 
Quincy Sons of Italy Hall. 

Bellot, an outstanding 
wide receiver and 
defensive back, won the 
Laroy "Curly" Rogers Most 
Valuable Player award, 
presented by the longtime 
North teacher-coach, and 
also received the Jack 
Donahue Memorial Award 
as the best North player in 
th Quincy game, presented 
by Pete Zoia, who played 
for Donahue's first three 
North teams in 1933, '34 
and '35. 

Another double winner 
was Mark Kelleher, tight 
end and linebacker, who 
was awarded the Pete Zoia 
Award as best offensive 
player and the Hall of 
Fame«scholarship. 

The usual capacity 
crowd attended the 
banquet. Booster Club 
president Wayne 
McCulley welcomed the 
guests and introduced the 
head table and turned 
proceedings over to coach 
Ken McPhee. 

The other award 
winners were: 

Mark Coccuzo, Rev. 
Cornelius Heery 

Sportsmanship Award, 
presented by Fr. Heery. 

Chris McCallum, 
William J. Schaetzl 
Unsung Hero Award, 
presented by Dr. Allan 
Yacubian. 

Scott Prouty, 

Firefighters 12th Player 
Award, presented by 
Daniel Polvere. 

Robert F.X. Schaetzl 
Award, Chris Campbell 
and Willie O'Donnell, 
presented by Mis. Schaetzl 
and son Richard. 

Brendan O'Connell, Dr. 
Allan Yacubian Best 
Defensive Player Award, 
presented by Zoia. 

Brian Raftery, Ted 
Sadowski Best Offensive 
Lineman Award, and Scott 
Kohler, Best Defensive 
Lineman Award, presented 
by former longtime coach 
Sadowski. 

Mark Taylor, John 
Muldowney Scholarship, 
presented by Muldowney's 
daughter. 

Chris Peck, Peter J. 
Zoia Jr. Scholarship, 
presented by Zoia. 

Bill McCallum, Special 
Teams Award, presented 
by Joe Ruscio. 

Mark Zych, lineman, 
and Chris Murray, running 
back, Hall of Fame 
Awards for being the best 
players in the Quincy 
game, presented by Tom 
Kiley. 

Josh Gott was named 
the junior MVP, Brian 
Raftery the sophomore 
MVP and Shawn Nee, 
freshmen MVP. 

Special awards went to 
Curiy Rogers, Peter Zoia 
and his wife, Elaine, a 



strong supporter of the 
football program since 
Pete's playing days. 

A plaque was presented 
by the Boosters Club to 
North giris' volleyball 
coach Jim Rendle, 
saluting the girls' second 
state championship last 
fall. 

Recognized were Erin 
Duffy, football queen; 
Mike Christopherson, Mr. 
Yakoo; and Jenn Murray, 
Mrs. Yakoo. 

McPhee introduced his 
assistant coaches, Tom 
Carter, Peter Chrisom, Jr., 
Earl Metzler, Zoia, Chris 
Morton and Billy Pitts, 
trainer Michelle Conley 
and video cameraman 
Chris Dolan. 

Flowers were presented 
to the cheerleader 
coaches, Lynn Sheeban 
and Betty Ballum. 

Last fall's captains, 
Bellot, Kelleher, Zych and 
McCallum, introduced 
next fall's captains, Pat 
Shea, Dave Reinhart, 
Liam Higgins and Mark 
Sinclair. 

The principal speaker 
was Charlie Ross, who has 
done the play-by-play 
broadcasts of North Quincy 
and Quincy games for 19 
years for radio station 
WJDA. 

He traced bis career as 
a broadcaster and 
mentioned the best teams 
and players he has 
covered. 

Also speaking briefly 
were Mayor James Sheets, 
acting Supt. of Schools 
Eugene Creedon, principal 
Peter Chrisom, assistant 
principal Eileen Feeney, 
retiring athletic 

coordinator Martin 
Finnegan and Fr. Heery, 
pastor of Sacred Heart 
Church and team chaplain, 
who offered the invocation. 
Jackets and other 
awards went to the 
following players: 

SENIORS: Serge 
Belcastro, Bellot, 
Campbell, Coccuzo, Chris 
Galvin, Kelleher, Paul 
Kerr, Kohler, Chris 
McCallum, Bill 

McCallum, Sean Moran, 
Murray, O'Connell, Peck, 
David Raftery, Taylor, 
Patrick Surratt, Brian 
Toland, Matt Walsh, 
Zych, Prouty, Mark 
Makarewicz and John 
Emma. 

JUNIORS: James 
Campbell, Erik Delorey, 
Ken Duddy, Josh Gott, 
Higgins, Keith Lentini, 
Peter Licciardi, Mike 





TROPHY WINNERS at North's awards banquet were 
Chris Peck, left, Mark Cocuzzo and Desmond Bellot. 
Bellot was the MVP and winner of the Jack Donahue 
Award as best player in the Quincy game. 



NORTH QUINCY players receiving best player trophies 
at the annual football awards banquet were, left to li^t, 
Chris McCallum, Chris Murray, Mark Zych and Mark 
Kelleher. 





NORTH QUINCY'S coaches are shown at the recent 
Football Boosters Club awards banquet. Left to right, 
Pete Zoia, Tom Carter, Earl Metzler,head coach Ken 
McPhee, Peter Chrisom, video cameraman Chris Dolan 
and Chris Morton. 



AMONG THOSE enjoying the North Quincy football 
awards banquet were LaRoy (Curly) Rogers, long time 
teacher-coach, left. Recreation Director Barry Welch and 
former longtime assistant coach Ted SadowskL 

(Pete Zoia photos) 



Linnane, Jamie Malanu 
Nick Mastrogiacomo, 
Chris McCulley, Jamie 
O'Connell, Steve Rayne, 
Reinhart, Shea, Sinclair, 
Bill Skutul, Sean Skeban, 
Brian Strout and Andy 
Kenney. 

SOPHOMORES: Fran 
Bellotti, Will Crosby, 
Keith Deschler, Justin 
Dilks, Dan Duncan, Peter 
Fitzpatrick, Jeremy Gott, 
Nathan Gott, Sean Halpin, 
Tony Licciardi, Mike 
McGregor, David Pacino, 
Jason Picardi, Robert 
Picciano, Brian Raftery, 
Jim Sapienza, Kevin Ross, 
George Wirtz, Tom Buike, 
Brian Whalen, John 
Downey, Mike Koski, 
Branden McCarthy, Martin 
Shield, Mateo Solano, Jeff 
West and Duane Liotti. 

FRESHMEN: Keith 
Kabilian, Keith Kersey, 
Brian Littlewood, Rick 
Macura, Rick 

McLaughlin, John Millett, 
Bill Ngutter, Fred Perry, 
Glen Peterson, Dan 
Reynolds, Pat Sweeney, 
Bob Callow, Joe Renzi, 
Jim Karvelis, Mike 
Manganaro, Dave Carney, 
Jeremiah Smith, Eric 
Zimmerman, Brendan 
Welch, Pat Callahan, Neil 



Kiley, Sean Mahoney, 
Tom Brosnan, Matt 
Hourin, Bob Ragusa, 
Shawn Nee, Jay Baker, 
Joe Brown, Ken Burke, 
Mike Coner, Greg 
DiBella, Sean Dolbeare, 
Derek Epps, Jeff Groom, 
Jeremy Conley, Tobby 
Odem and Rich Ballo. 



Cheerleader Awards 
went to Esther Alexander, 
Carol Blaikie, Andrea 
Carinci, Lynne Carter, 
Kerry Connolly, Shaimon 
Craig, Amy Echelle, Kara 
Feeney, Kelli Gott, Amy 
Grasso, Leanne Morris, 
Jenn Phillips, Jackie 
Pelliteri, Lauran 



Rodriguez, Kim Sheeban, 
Tricia Stanton, Anne 
Marie Swan and Irene 
Yalch. 

The other Booster Club 
officers are treasurer Bill 
Earley, secretary Danielle 
Duncan and concession 
stand coordinator Dan 
Duncan. 



MEASURABLE ADVERTISING! 

Welcome Wagon reaches prospective customers you'd 
like to meet. Our personalized advertising is measurable 
and introduces your business to: 

• Engaged Couples 

• New Parents 

• Moving Families 

We reach them in their homes, usually by request. We 
tell them about what you have to offer when they're 
making buying decisions and direct them to your door. 

Interested? Call me for more details: 

Barbara Nawrot Mendez 
479-2587 




WORLD GYM 

Fitness and Aerobic Center 
North Quincy 




95 Holmes St. 
North Quincy 

1 block from N. Quincy T 




Aerobics Included 



Call For Info: 

472-9525 



m'-i':>»i-::ie.ik.i^ Hea'::Ni-::MC-«'i> :mwMrm: 



^FF a Silver Membership^ 
Enrollment Fee 

^Redeemable at World Gymi 
1st Time Visitors Only ' 

472-9525 • ^ , 

2/19/92 c!. 



C45C 
7 ^o*. 



Expi 



inn <»:vi:iirT:s»iti-:i»»<»xj^\uM >«« 



$$ JOIN TODAY AND SAVE! $$ 



Page It Qalncy Son Thursday, Fcbrnary 13, 15^2 



Hockey 



Track 



North Too Much 
For Quincy, 7-2 



The North Quincy 
hockey team moved to 
within three points of 
qualifying for the state 
tournament by handing 
Quincy its seventh straight 
defeat, 7-2, last Saturday 
night at the Youth Arena. 

The Red Raiders 
improved to 8-3-5 overall 
(6-2-5 in the Old Colony 
League). They played at 
league-leading Plymouth 
last night (Wednesday), 
will host Marshfield in a 
non-league game Friday at 
3:30 at the Youth Arena, 
will play at Taunton 
Monday at 5 o'clock and 
finish the regular season 
hosting Taunton next 
Wedr^sday at 6:40 at the 
Youth Arena. 

Quincy, after a 



promising start, fell to 4-9- 
4 (3-8-3 in the league). 
The Presidents hosted 
Barnstable last night 
(Wednesday), will be 
home to Taunton Saturday 
at 6:40 at the Youth Arena 
and will finish the season 
at Revere in a non-league 
game Monday at 2:30. 

North Quincy broke a 
close game open with four 
goals in the last period 
against Quincy. 

Mike Christopherson 
and Chris McCallum 
scored two goals apiece 
and John Gladu, Sean 
Vermette and Steve 
O'Brien one each for the 
Raiders. 

Bob Fitzpatrick had 
three assists, O'Brien two, 
Andrew Vermette two and 



Sean Vermette, Matt 
Riley and Aiden 
O'Donoghue one each. 

Dennis Ruggere had 
another spectacular night 
in goal with 37 saves. 

Dave Mullen and Jeff 
Craig had the goals for 
Quincy and junior Scott 
MacPherson and Jamie 
Schatzl had assists. 

Earlier in the week 
North came from behind to 
tie Bridge water-Raynham, 
4-4, with two goals in the 
final period. 

Andrew Vermette 
scored the tying goal with 
three minutes left in the 
game. 

Quincy lost to 
Weymouth, 5-1, with 
Schatzl scoring the only 
goal for the Presidents. 

--TOM SULLIVAN 



50 Teams To Compete 
In Kiwanis Tourney 



Fifty teams from four 
divisions will compete in 

the 19th annual 
International Youth 
Hockey Tournament 
sponsored by the Kiwanis 
Club of Quincy. 

Proceeds from the event 

will support the Kiwanis 

Pediatric Trauma Center 

at the New England 

Medical Center in Boston. 

"In addition, proceeds will 

provide funding for 

scholarships, camperships 

and financial assistance to 

families in need who are 

recommended by Quincy 

school guidance 

personnel," said Ralph 

Yohe, president of the 

Quincy Kiwanis. 

The week-long charity 
event will take place 



Wrestling 



during the February school 
vacation week, Feb. 17-23, 
at the Quincy Youth 
Hockey Arena on Murphy 
Memorial Dr., Quincy. 

'Teams wiU be coming 
from as far away as 
Newfoundland, California, 
Michigan and New York," 
Yohe noted. "Many 
families in the greater 
Quincy communities are 
voluntarily opening their 
homes to the young 
competitors and their 
traveling companions who 
have had to incur travel 
costs to come such a 
distance to compete in the 
tournament." 

Greater Boston and 
South Shore teams 
scheduled to compete in 
the tournament represent 



Medford, Wobum, Milton, 
Quincy, South Boston, 
Arlington, Framingham, 
Walpole, Scituate, Hull, 
Cohasset and Weymouth. 
The Division 1 American 
Hockey Association- 
sanctioned event will 
feature competition is four 
divisions: bantams, pee 
wees, mites and squirts. 

A full, week-long 
tournament admission pass 
costs $5 and can be 
purchased at the door or 
from any Kiwanis member. 
Single admission at the 
door is $3 for adults and $1 
for students age 12 to 18. 
Children under 12 are 
admitted free of charge. 

For specific times, 
contact Beverly Reinhardt 
at the Quincy Youth 
Arena, (617) 479-8371. 



North Edges Quincy 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

Records don't mean a 
thing when Quincy and 
North Quincy teams meet 
in any sport, and this was 
borne out last week when 
the North Quincy wrestling 
team (9-9) just managed 
to edge Quincy (1-16), 37- 
34, by virtue of North 
senior Brian Mannering's 
win by pin over Quincy 
senior Gary Collins at 189 
pounds. 

A large crowd was 
treated to an outstanding 
meet as North got off to a 
28-4 lead as junior Matt 
Colantonio (103), James 
O'Connell (112) and Capt. 
Chris Nickerson (130) 
pinned their Quincy 
opponents. Billy Chu (119) 
won by forfeit and junior 
Jeff PUlard (135) took an 
8-0 decision. Quincy's lone 
win was a 16-6 decision by 
Peter Penwarden (125). 

The Presidents staged a 



comeback as Ashley Davis 
(140), Greg Souza (145), 
Ally Sleiman (152) and 
CUnt Currie (160) pinned 
their opponents to tie the 
score at 28-28. 

Mark Nutley of Quincy 
lost to Rik MacVarish, 10- 
3. After Mannering's win, 
Quincy senior heavyweight 
Keith Norris pinned Andy 
Schwendenmen in the 
meet's final bout. 

Both squads head into 
another week of dual 
meets, pointing toward the 
sectional tournament 
which will be held Feb. 21 
and 22 at Randolph High. 

Quincy's team has had 
rough times and lost tough 
decisions in its last four 
meets. 

The Presidents, in 
adcition to their tough loss 
10 North Quincy, dropped a 
heartbreaking 34-33 
decision to Duxbury's 
powerhouse and lost to 
Whitman-Hanson, 37-29, 



and Cohasset, 39-27. 

Quincy hosted its 
annual homecoming meet 
at the Vo-Tech gym and 
Greg Souza's name was 
added to the Quincy 
Sectional Championship 
banner is ceremonies 
preceding the quad meet. 

Capt. Souza, despite 
nagging injuries, is having 
a sensational year with a 
15-0 dual meet record and 
Sleiman is 2-0-0 in dual 
meets and 31-1 overall. 
Both must be considered 
strong favorites for South 
Sectional and state 
championships. 

Other Quincy wresUers 
having fine seasons are 
sophomore Davis, who has 
won four of his last five 
matches, sophomore 
Penwarden, with four wins 
in a row, and junior 
Nutley. The addition of 
football stars Collins and 
Norris has helped 
strengthen the team. 



Quincy, North Shine At 
State Championships 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

Several Quincy and 
North Quincy trackmen 
turned in excellent 
performances in last 
weekend's state class 
championships. 

In the Class A meet 
Saturday Quincy's Chris 
Walker, who has accepted 
a football scholarship to 
Boston University, capped 
an excellent season by 
scoring all 14 points for 
the Presidents, who placed 
eighth out of 29 schools. 
He took second in the high 
jump at 6-6 and placed 
third in the 60-yard high 
hurdles. Shot putter Mike 
Kavanaugh finished ninth 
in that event. 

In Sunday's Class B 
meet North Quincy placed 
several athletes as nearly 
all turned in seasonal 
bests. 

Amy Wong placed third 
in the 60-yard dash. 
Heather Rendle tied for 
fifth in the high jump with 
a personal best 5-2, the 
4X800 relay team took 
fourth and Suzanne Lewis 
won the two-mile with a 
last-second finishing kick, 
just edging Lincoln- 
Sudbury's Robyn Art in 
11:31.2, also a personal 



best. The girls placed sixth 
out of 32 schools with 21 
1/2 points. 

The boys also turned in 
a fine performance as John 
O'Donnell placed sixth in 
the high jump at 6-1 and 
the 4X800 relay team of 
Eric Torvi, Greg Buck, 
Jeremy Gott and Josh 
O'Donnell placed fifth. 

The top six in each 
event qualified for the all- 
state championships this 
Sunday at noon at Harvard. 

In the Old Colony 
League championships, 
the North girls placed third 
with 52 points. North boys 
took third with 48 points 
and the Quincy boys took 
fifth with 33 points. No 
Quincy girl scored. 

North girls' winner was 
Wong in the 50-yard dash 
(6.4). 

Finishing second were 
Erin Duggan, two-mile 
(12:55.7) and Rendle, high 
jump (4-10). 

Taking thirds were 
Melanie Gaziano, 1000 
(3:08.7), and the 4X400 
relay team. 

Finishing fourth were 
Jennifer Nutley, 300 
(43.6), Katie McNamara, 
mile (6:07.4) and the 



4X176 relay team. 

In sixth place were 
Kristy Kabilian, two-mile 
(13:45.8) and Trish 
McNamara, shot put (25-8 

3/4). . ^ 

The only winner m the 
boy's competition was 
Quincy's Walker, who won 
the high jump at 6-7. He 
also took second in the 50- 
yard hurdles (6.5). 

Quincy's Kavanaugh 
took second in the ^hot, 
(42-2), Calvin White was 
sixth in the 300 (36.0) and 
Quincy's 4X176 relay 
team was third. 

Placing second for 
North were Tony Licciardi, 
50 (5.8); John O'Donnell, 
who tied the school record 
in the high jump set by 
Jack Leone in 1981 at 6-4; 
and Gott, 600(1:22.1). 

North's 4X400 relay 
team placed third. 

Finishing fourth were 
Torvi, mUe (4:55.3); «cott 
Kohler, shot put (40-9), 
and the 4X176 relay team. 

Taking fifth places were 
Mark Sinclair, 600 
(1:24.3); and Mike Yee, 
50 hurdles (7.0). 

Placing sixth were Josh 
O'Donnell, 600 (1:24.4), 
and Marc Larson, 50 
hurdles (7.3). 



Youth Hockey 



Reichel's Hat Trick 
Paces Purdy's, 6-2 



Ken Reichel's hat trick 
paced Purdy's Ice Cream 
over Neponset Valley 
Survey, 6-2, in Mite House 
League action. 

Billy Ryan, John 
Segalla, Steve Segalla, 
Jamie Chiocchio and Tom 
Maloney had a goal 
apiece. Ryan had four 
assists, John Segalla two 
and Shane Newell and 
Reichel one each. John 



Walsh and Shawn Lynch 
scored for Neponset Valley 
and Tom Piscatelli and 
Mike Sullivan had assists. 

Samoset Pharmacy 
blanked Lydon-Russell, 6- 
0, with goalie Pat 
O'Donnell recording the 
shutout. Mark Gibbons and 
Paul Flynn scored two 
goals apiece and Ryan 
Doyle and Martin McGrath 
one each. 

The Paul Harold Club 



edged Balducci's, 5-4, as 
Ryan Graeber and Danny 
Randall scored two goals 
each and Adam Smith one. 

Steve Kelley, Mike 
Campanale and Randall 
had assists. Jeremiah 
Hasson scored twice and 
Joe Thoriey and Rick 
Bonvie one each for 
Balducci's. Brian Stock 
had three assists and 
Bonvie one. 



Johnson, Sun Tie; 
Burgin, Green Win 



Johnson Motor Parts 
still holds a seven-point 
lead in the Squirt House 
League after tying the 
Quincy Sun, 4-4. 

Billy Norris had two 
goals and Jeff Glynn and 
Kevin Cellucci one each 
for Johnson. Cellucci had 
two assists and Glynn, 
Norris, Scott Mattson and 
Jon Bertucci one each. 
Mike Carloni had two 
goals and Pat Grogan and 
Steve McGonagle one 
each for the Sun and 
Jamie Parisi, McGonagle, 
Carloni, Sean Garvey, 



Quincy's Squirt B 
hockey team, sponsored by 
Quincy Cable, edged 
Parkway, 4-3, with John 

Bertucci and Pat Kenney 
scoring two goals apiece. 



Joey Ardagna, Tom Gaeta 
(two) and Joe Doyle had 
assists. 

Burgin Platner ouUasted 
Granite Auto Electric, 7-6, 
with Didier Alther, Mike 
Sullivan and Ron Gamel 
having two goals each and 
Paul Markarian one. Dom 
Papile had three assists, 
Sullivan and Gamel two 
each and Scott 
MacDonald and Tommy 
Sullivan one apiece. Kevin 
Regan had two goals and 
Andrew Nestor, Chris 
Petit, Mike Hastings and 
Shane Kabilian one each 
for Granite Auto. Nestor 

Squirt B's Win 

Chad Fitzpatrick, John 
Barron, Sean Haidul and 
Jimmy Sullivan had 
assists. 

Goalie Jeff Langille had 
a fine game, Sean 
Slattery, Paul Markarian, 



and Matt O'Connell had 
two assists apiece and 
Kabilian, Chris Carthas, 
Jim Sullivan, Kevin Shaw 
and Sean LeFebvre one 
each. 

Green Environmental 
topped Doran & Horrigan, 
3-1, as John Barron scored 
twice and Matt Holt once. 
David Germain and Jesse 
Winter had assists. Ryan 
Krueger scored for Doran. 

The standings: Johnson 
Motor, 11-3-2; Doran & 
Horrigan, 8-7-1; Quincy 
Sun, 7-6-3; Green, 7-7-2; 
Burgin Platner, 6-8-2; 
Granite Auto, 4-12-0. 



Brian Nolan and Steven 
Ford played strong defense 
and Ryan Barrett, Mike 
Welch, Joey Ardagna and 

Kevin Regan did some 
excellent fore checking. 



Thursday, February 13, 1992 Qnlncy Son Page 17 



Police Log Hot Spots 



Sunday, Feb. 3: 

Attempted Break, 9:51 am, 145 Willard St. 
Resident reports someone attempted to gain entrance 
through balcony earlier. 

Attempted Break, 11:52 pm, 325 Newport Ave. 
Suspect used a knife to try to pry window. 

Attempted Break, 4:10 pm, 14 Bayview St. 
Suspect described as a white male, with dark hair, 
wearing blue jeans, dark jacket and sneakers. 
Monday, Feb. 4: 

Break, 1:55 pm, 73 Bicknell St. Apartment broken 
into. Cash and food taken. 

Bresk, 5:05 pm, 38 Water St., apartment break, 
under investigation. 

Break, 5:32 pm, 45 Morton St., apartment break, 
under investigation. 

Break, 5:59 pm, 38 Water St. apartment break, 
second unit broken into today. 
Tuesday, Feb. 5: 

Break, 2:20 pm, 263 S. Central Ave. Under 
investigation. 

Break, 4:59 pm, 112 Elm St Under investigation. 

Break, 7:08 pm, 22 Carlmark St. under 
investigation. 

Break, 7:46 pm, 30 Water St. under investigation. 
Wednesday, Feb. 6: 

Break, 7:07 am, 1354 Hancock St., Quincy Visiting 
Nurse Assn., under investigation. 

Break, 1:17 pm, 17 Estabrook Rd. under 
investigation. 

Armed Robbery, 5:37 pm, 495 Sea St., South 
Shore Bank. Suspect is a white male, 25 years, dark 
hair, dark complexion. Suspect fled in vehicle with first 
three digits of registration of 71 1-??? 



Youth Hockey 



Drug arrests, 6:20 pm, 20 Gordon St. After an 
investigation by the Quincy Police Dnig control Unit 
two suspects were arrested at the above location. Two 
men, one 22 the other 23 years of age, were arrested 
and charged with trafficking in cocaine and distribution 
within 1000 feet of a school. Off. McKusker and 
letectives Cole, Glynn, McKim and Savard made the 
arrests. 
Thursday, Feb. 7: 

Break, 11:12 pm, 34 Madison Ave. under 
investigation. 
Friday, Feb. 8: 

Break, 4:24 am, 76 BilUngs Rd., North Quincy 
Donut Shop. Under investigation. 

Break, 10:49 pm, 90 McGrath Highway, under 
investigation. 

Attempted Break, 1:05 pm, 145 WiUard St. 
s^aitment unit, under investigation. 

Attempted Break, 2:57 pm, 145 Willard St., 
second apartment unit. 

Break, 11:28 pm, 43 Merrymount Rd., apartment 
ransacked. 
Saturday, Feb. 9: 

Break, 12:14 pm, 43 Lafayette St., under 
investigation. 

Break, 6:23 pm, 29 Monmouth St. Under 
investigation. 

Services for week: Total Calls for Service 1194; 
Stolen cars-15; Total Arrests-52. 

If you have any information on any of the above 
crimes, or any crime, please call the Quincy Police 
Detective Bureau at 479-1212 ext. 312. You will not be 
required to identify yourself, but it could help. 

Squirt C's Win Pair 



Colonial 
Holds 



Federal 
Lead 



Colonial Federal still 
holds a six-point lead in 
the Pee Wee House 
League after tying 
Keohane's, 5-5. 

Justin Whitman had two 
goals and an assist to lead 
Keohane's. Brian Beaton, 
Mike Balducci and Andre 
Nagy also scored goals 
and Mike O'Brien had an 
assist. 

Mike Martin netted two 
goals for Colonial Federal 
and Chris Knox tallied a 
goal and three assists. 
Billy Graney and Scott 
Shepherd also scored and 
Chris Brundage had an 



ELEMENTARY 
LUNCH 



Feb. 24-28 

Mon: pizza, fruit juice, 
fruit cup, chocolate chip 
cookies, mUk. 

Tues: No Lunch 

Wed: cheese ravioli 
with sauce, vegetable, 
fresh baked Italian roll, 
milk. 

Thurs: grilled hot dog 
on a roll, vegetarian 
beans. Emit juice, milk. 

Fri: apple sauce, 
golden brown pancakes, 
sausage links, maple 
syrup, fruit cup, milk. 



Sun 

Classified 

Ads 

Get 

Results 



assist. 

Marina Bay Taxi 
blanked New England 
Deli, 3-0, on goals by 
Chris DiMattia, Matt 
Radzevich and Matt 
Langille. Tim Lewis and 
Radzevich had assists. 

The Standings: 
Colonial Federal, 10-2-4; 
Marina Bay, 9-7; 
Keohane's 6-8-2; N.E. DeU, 
3-11-2. 



SECONDARY 
LUNCH 



Feb. 24-28 

Mon: pizza, green 
beans, apple crisp, milk. 

Tues: Early Release 
Day-Middle School- 
hamburger on a roll, cole 
slaw, fruit juice, jello, 
milk. 

Wed: stuffed shells 
with sauce, vegetable, 
fruit juice, fresh baked 
Italian roll, milk. 

Thurs: barbeque 
chicken, mashed potato, 
vegetable, fresh baked 
wheat roll, milk. 

Fri: grilled cheese 
sandwich, tater tots, fruit 
juice, milk. 



Crime 
Watch 



By ROBERT HANNA 
Crime Prevention Officer 
Quincy Police Department 




Quincy's Squirt C 
hockey team won two 
more games on its way to 
the state playoffs. 

In a wide open game 
against the Cape Cod 
Canal team, the team was 
paced by the relentless 
fore checking of Joe 
Vallanuni and Ron Gamel, 
both of whom scored two 
goals in a 6-5 victory. 

Mike Hastings and 
Kevin Cellucci also had 
goals. Cellucci had two 
assists and Jamie Parisi, 
Joshua Silverman, Paul 



Burke, Joe Watson and 
Jeff Glvnn one each. 

Quincy, in its third and 
final playdown game, 
squeezed by a new and 
improved Randolph 
Mohawks team, 1-0, on 
Burke's goal just minutes 
into the game. 

Sean Fitzgerald and 
Jacob Fleming kept 
Randolph at bay with their 
outstanding defense. 

The win assured the C 
team a spot in the state 
tournament to be held later 
this month in Springfield. 



Child Sexual Assault 
Myths Or Facts? 

More than 100,000 children are reported as sexually 
abused in the United States every year. Even so, 
experts estimate that most assaults go unreported, and 
so even more children are hurt. 

Reports are sometimes not made because of what 
people believe they know about the sexual assault of 
children. Some of those beliefs are contained in the 
following statements. Are they true or false? 

1. Children usually lie about being sexually 
assaulted 

2. Children deserve to be molested if they continue 
contact with the molester. 

3. The sexual abuse of children' is not a crime in all 
50 states. 

4. Infants are never sexually assaulted. 

5. Children always tell someone about their assault. 

6. The majority of victims are abused by people they 
don't know. 

7. Young children forget about dieir victimization. 

8. Children always hate someone who assaults them 
sexually. 

9. Children are better off if they don't talk about 
their assault. 

10. Child molesters are not a danger to society. 

11. Child molesters usually get caught the first time 
they commit an assault. 

12. Once a molester is convicted, he or she will not 
commit a sexual offense again. 

All of the above statements are FALSE. 

QHS Students To Compete 
In State Science Olympics 



Mite C's Avenge 



Quincy's Mite C 
hockey team defeated 
Milton, 8-3, to avenge an 
earlier defeat. 

Matthew Holt and Mark 
Gibbons scored two goals 
apiece and Brian Lewis, 
Sean Richardson and John 
and Stephen Segalla one 



each. 

Stephen Segalla had 
three assists and Sean 
Raherty, Joe Callahan, 
Holt, Billy McKeon, 
Richard Bonvie and 
Richardson one each. 

Pat O'Donnell had an 
outstanding game in goal. 



Quincy High School 
will send a team of 
students to compete in the 
State Science Olympics 
Saturday, Feb. 29 to be 
held at Boston University. 

The competition will 
include a number of events 
ranging from balancing 
chemical equations, 
solving genetic problems, 
or making precise 
measurements to building 
an ideal bridge or device 
to transport an egg. 

The event, attended by 



a number of high schools 
throughout the state, is 
intended as both a learning 
and fun experience. 

The Quincy team, 
headed by physics teacher 
Katherine Kittredge, 
includes: Peter Damiano, 
Chuong Diep, Va Diep, 
Isabella Fung, Michael 
Hughes, George Job, Brian 
LaRoche, Dean Morris, 
Mealy Ou, Linda Sutanto, 
Quong Tran, Louise Wang, 
Marilag Warrick and Hong 
Zeng. 



Blessed Sacrament Girls 



Hospital Boards Meetings Feb. 18 j^ ^^ Exhibition Game 



The Quincy Hospital 
Board of Managers 
Finance Committee will 
meet Tuesday, Feb. 18 at 
6:30 p.m. followed by a 



Board of Managers 
meeting at 7:30 p.m. in the 

Education Center 
McCauley Building. 



$20 Gift To Animal Shelter 



The City Council 
Monday night accepted a 
gift of $20 to the Quincy 



Animal Shelter. 

The money was donated 
by Robert J. Friese. 



The Most Blessed 
Sacrament Church girls' 
CYO (cadet level) 
basketball team has been 
invited to play an 
exhibition game during 
halftime of the Boston 
CoUege-Villanova 



women's game Saturday at 
4 p.m. at B.C.'s Conte 
Forum. 

The Quincy girls will 
face Holy Family Church 
of Duxbury. Tickets may 
be purchased at the door. 



^__ II SUBSCRIPTION FORM 

FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAIL TO 



^u.±zB.car 



^SW 



1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY. MA 02169 



NAME 



STREET 
CITY 



.STATE 



ZIP- 



CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 



L 



( ) 1 YEAR IN QUINCY 

( ) 1 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY 

( ) 1 YEAR OUT OF STATE 



$12.00 
$14.00 
$17.00 



( ) CHECK ENCLOSED 
( ) PLEASE BILL ME 



PUBLIC 
NOTICE 



J 



The annual report of the Dunkin' Donuts 
Charitable Trust is available at the address 
noted below for inspection during normal 
business hours, by any citizen who so 
requests within 3 years after publication of 
this notice of its availability. 

Dunkin' Donuts Charitable Taist 
14 Pacella Park Drive 
Randolph, MA 02368 

The principal manager is Jack Laudermilk 
Telephone (61 7) 961 -4000 

2n3M 



Page 18 Qnlncy Son Thonday, February 13, 1992 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 92P001 SGI 

NOTICE OF GUARDIANSHIP ol 
MENTAUYHX 

To MARY E. BAILEY of 
QUINCY in said County 
and all persons interested 
in the estate of MARY E. 
BAILEY and to the 
Massachusetts 
Department of Mental 
Health, a petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that FRED V. BAILEY of 
QUINCY in the county of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
guardian of mentally ill with 
surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court 
at Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
February 26, 1992. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham this twenty-first 
day of January, in the year 
of our Lord one thousand 
nine hundred and ninety- 
two. 

THOM AS PATW CK HUOHES 
RBQBTER OF PROBATE 

2/13/92 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS THE 

TRIAL COURT THE 
PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT DEPARTT^eiT 
Norfolk Division 
Docket No. 88P0370T1 
NOTICE OF 
FIDUCIARY'S ACCOUNT 
To all persons 
interested in the estate of 
Helen E. Mitchell late of 
Quincy, in said County, 
deceased. 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. 
P. Rule 72 that the third 
and final account(s) of 
James F. ReynokJs, Jr. as 
Trustee-(the fiduciary) 
under the will of said 
deceased for the benefit of 
Robert W. Mitchell have 
been presented to said 
Court for allowance. 

If you desire to 
preserve your right to file 
an objection to said 
account(s), you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court 
at Dedham on or before the 
fourth day of March, 1992, 
the return day of this 
citation. You may upon 
written request by 
registered or certified mail 
to the fiduciary, or to the 
attorney for the fiduciary, 
obtain without cost a copy 
of said account(s). If you 
desire to object to any item 
of said account(s), you 
must, in addition to filing a 
written appearance as 
aforesakl, file within thirty 
days after said return day 
or within such other time 
as the Court upon motion 
may order a written 
statement of each such 
item together with the 
grounds for each objectbn 
thereto, a copy to be 
served upon the fiduciary 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. 
P. Rule 5. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court, this 
thirty-first day of January, 
1992. 

THOMAS PATTCCK HUOHES 



2/13/92 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSEHBTHE 

TRIAL COURT THE 
PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT 
Docket No. 92P01<9E1 
Estate of CATHERINE M. 
RINTAMAKI late of 
QUINCY In the County of 
NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that 
ELIZABETH A. ASKER of 
E\STON in the County of 
BRISTOL be appointed 
executrix named in the will 
without surety on the 
bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in sakj 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on March 4, 
1992. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 2A. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-eighth 
day of January in the year 
of our Lord one thousand 
nine hundred and ninety- 
two. 

THOMAS PATTVCK HUGHES 
REQSTER OF PROBATE 

2/13/92 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS THE 
TRIAL COURT THE 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT 
Norfolk Division 

DocketNo.91P1569-E1 
Estate of ISABELLE B. 
CHEVERIE late of QUINCY 
In ttie County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 
A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the will of the 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that LOUIS G. 
OULLETTE of QUINCY, in 
the County of NORFOLK 
be appointed executor 
named under the will 
without surety on the 
bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on February 26, 
1992. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within tiiirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may alk>w) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 2A. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at - 
Dedham, the thirtieth day 
of January in the year of 
our Lord one thousand 
nine hundred and ninety- 
two. 

THOMAS PATWCK HUGHES 
RBQBTER OF PROBATE 

2/13/02 



Business 



Ellen Daly Promoted 
To Business Manager 



Ellen Daly of Quincy 
has been promoted to 
business manager at John 
R. Graham, Inc., in 
Quincy. 

Daly is responsible for 
managing all financial 
activities for three 
divisions of John R. 
Graham, Inc.: Graham 
Communications, a full- 
service marketing, public 
relations and sales 
consulting firm; The Ink 

LEGAL NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS THE 

TRIAL COURT THE 
PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT DEPARTMENT 
Norfolk Division 
Docket No. 84P1393C1 
NOTICE OF 
FIDUCIARY'S ACCOUNT 
To all persons 
interested in the estate of 
Florence E. Meda of 
Quincy, in said County, a 
person under 

conservatorship. 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. 
P. Rule 72 that ttie eighth 
account(s) of James F. 
Reynolds, Jr. 

Conservator-(the 
fiduciary) of the property 
of said Florence F. Meda 
have been presented to 
said Court for allowance. 

If you desire to 
preserve your right to file 
an objection to said 
account(s), you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court 
at Dedham on or before the 
fourth day of March, 1992, 
the return day of this 
citation. You may upon 
written request by 
registered or certified mail 
to the fiduciary, or to the 
attorney for the fiduciary, 
obtain without cost a copy 
of said account(s). If you 
desire to object to any item 
of said account(s), you 
must, in addition to filing a 
written appearance as 
aforesaid, file within thirty 
days after said return day 
or within such other time 
as the Court upon motion 
may order a written 
statement of each such 
item together with the 
grounds for each objection 
thereto, a copy to be 
served upon the fiduciary 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. 
P. Rule 5. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court, this 
thirty-first day of January, 
1992. 

THOMAS PATRICK H UGHES 
REQSTER 

2/13/92 



Spot, a commercial 
printing, typesetting and 
graphic services operation; 
and The Bankette 
Company, an advertising 
specialty company. 

Previously, Daly 
managed The Bankette 
Company. 

She received a bachelor 
of science degree in 
marketing from Bentley 
CoUege in 1988. She has 
been employed by Graham 
Communications since 
November, 1988. 

LEGAL NOTici 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS THE 

TRIAL COURT THE 
PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT DEPARTMBJT 
Norfolk Division 
Docket No. 90P1655A1 

NOTICE OF 
FIDUCIARY'S ACCOUNT 

To all persons 
interested in the estate of 
Theodore Henry Anderson 
late of Quincy, in said 
County, deceased. 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. 
P. Rule 72 that the first 
and final account(s) of 
James F. Reynolds, Jr. 
Administrator (the 
fiduciary) of said estate 
have been presented to 
saki Court for allowarKe. 

If you desire to 
preserve your right to file 
an objection to said 
account(s), you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court 
at Dedham on or before the 
fourth day of March, 1992, 
the return day of this 
citation. You may upon 
written request by 
registered or certified mail 
to the fiduciary, or to the 
attorney for the fiduciary, 
obtain without cost a copy 
of said account(s). If you 
desire to object to any item 
of said account(s), you 
must, in addition to filing a 
written appearance as 
aforesaid, file within thirty 
days after said return day 
or within such other time 
as the Court upon motion 
may order a written 
statement of each such 
item together with the 
grourKis for each objection 
thereto, a copy to be 
served upon the fiduciary 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. 
P. Rule 5. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court, this 
thirty-first day of January, 
1992. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
REGKilkH 

2/13/92 



William Hare Physician 

Referral Coordinator 

At Quincy Hospital 



LEGAL NOTICE 



THE CriY OF QUINCY 
DEPARTMENT OF PUBUC WORKS 
NOTICE OF A 
PUBLIC INFORMATIONAL HEARING 

The City of Quincy, Department of Publk: Works will hold a 
public information meeting on Thursday, February 20, 
1992 at 7:30 PM in the City Hall Council Chambers, 1305 
Hancock Street, Quincy, MA 02169 to discuss the 
proposed reconstruction of East Squantum Sti^eet. 

The project limits extend from Quincy Shore Drive/East 
Squantum Street intersection to approximately 300 feet 
west of Heath Street, including modifteation of the East 
Squantum Street/Victory Road intersection. The project 
will entail geometric improvements to East Squantum 
Street and addressing current flooding problems. The 
project also includes upgrading the signalized intersectkm 
witfi Quincy Shore Drive to improve traffic flow conditions 
and publk: safety. 

2/6, 13/92 



WiUiam Hare of Quincy 
has hired by Quincy 
Hospital as the physician 
referral coordinator in the 
public relations 

department. 

Hare will implement 
and manage the 
computerized physician 
referral service system 
which the hospital recently 
purchased. 

He served two years as 
a legislative aide to former 
State Rep. Marjorie 

Frank Barber 
Of Mass. Bar 

Frank T. Barber has 
been named a life member 
of the Fellows of the 
Massachusetts Bar 
Foundation. 

Barber was presented 
with a plaque of 

LEGAL NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS THE 

TRIAL COURT THE 
PROBATE AND FAMILY 
COURT DEPARTMBIT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 89690 
NOTICE OF 
FIDUCIARY'S ACCOUNT 
To the Attorney General 
of Massachusetts and to 
all persons interested in 
the estate of Theodore H. 
Caster late of Quincy, in 
said County, deceased. 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. 
P. Rule 72 that the forty- 
fifth through forty-eighth 
account(s) of Boston Safe 
Deposit and Trust 
Company as Trustee (the 
fiduciary) under tfie will of 
said decea ^"d for the 
benefit of Gertrude 
Schreitmuller, Thomas 
Edward Nicholson, Eugene 
Hengstler and the 
Biberach Hospital of 
Biberach in the state of 
Wurttemburg, Germany 
have been presented to 
saki Court for allowance. 

If you desire to 
preserve your right to file 
an objection to said 
account(s), you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court 
at Dedham on or before the 
fourth day of March, 1992. 
the return day of this 
citation. You may upon 
written request by 
registered or certified mail 
to the fiduciary, or to the 
attorney for the fiduciary, 
obtain without cost a copy 
of said account(s). If you 
desire to object to any item 
of said account(s), you 
must, in addition to filing a 
written appearance as 
aforesakl, file within thirty 
days after said return day 
or within such other time 
as the Court upon motion 
may order a written 
statement of each such 
item together with the 
grounds for each objection 
thereto, a copy to be 
served upon the fiduciary 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. 
P. Rule 5. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court, this 
thirty-first day of January 
1992. " 

THOMAS PATRICK HOCWES 
2/13/92 *°^ 



Clapprood. He graduated 
from Saint Anselm 
College in 1988 with a 
bachelor's degree in 
political science. 

The physician referral 
system, dubbed "The 
Direct Line," will allow 
people to ask for referrals 
to physicians on staff at 
Quincy Hospital based on 
different criteria, including 
physician specialty, type 
of insurance accepted, 
office hours and location 
and languages spoken. 

Life Member 
Foundation 

recognition from 
foundation president 
Charles B. Swartwood III 
at the recent 

Massachusetts Bar 
Association's midyear 
meeting at the Westin 
Hotel at Copley Place in 
Boston. 

PERSONALS 

Thank You 

St. Jude 

For Favors Granted 

D.E.a 2/13 

ST. JUDE'S NOVENA 

May the Sacred Heart of 
Jesus be adored, glorified, 
loved and preserved 
tiiroughout ttie world now 
and forever. Sacred Heart 
of Jesus, pray for us. St. 
Jude, helper of the hope- 
less, pray for us. St. Jude, 
worker of miracles, pray for 
us. Say this prayer 9 times a 
day for nine consecutive 
days without mentioning tiie 
favor. On the eightti day your 
favor will be granted, no 
matter how unobtainable it 
seemed. Publication of ttiis 
prayer must be promised. 

A.M.D. 2/13 

PRAYER TO THE 
BLESSED VIRGIN 
(Never Known to Fail) 
Oh most beautiful flower M 
Ml. Carmel, Fruitful vine, 
splendor of Heaven, 
Blessed Motiier of tfie Son 
of God, Immaculate Virgin, 
Assist me in rny necessity. 
Oh Star of ttie Sea, help me 
and show me herein you 
are my motiier. Oh, Holy 
Mary, Mother of God, 
Queen of Heaven and 
EarthI I humbly beseech you 
from the bottom of my heart 
to succor me in this neces- 
sity. There are none that 
can withstand your power. 
Oh, show me herein you 
are my motiier. Oh Mary 
conceived witiiout sin, pray 
for us who have recourse to 
thee {3x) Holy Mother, I 

Elace this cause in your 
ands (3x) Holy Spirit, you 
who solve all problems, light 
roads so that I can attain my 
goal. You who ^ave me di- 
vine oift to forgive and for- 
get all evil against me and 
ttiat in all instances in my 
jife you are with me. I want 
in ttiis short prayer to tiiank 
you for all tfiirigs as you 
confirm once again ttiat I 
never want to be separated 
from you in eternal gkny. 
Thank you for your mercy 
toward me ana mine. The 
person m ust say this prayer 
3 consecutive aays. After 3 
days the request will be 
granted. This prayer must 
Be published after the favor 
is granted. A.M.D.2/13 



Thnnday, February 13, 1992 Qnlacy San Page 19 




EVERYBOOrs HIARKETPUUIE 



mmm 



liMkUUlUllldwUwiUMUuilU^ 



OFRCE FOR RENT 

Quincy jQSurance Agency 
has 250 sq. ft. induding 
utilities $250 a month. Call 
Carol between 9 am and 5 
pm at 617-770-4700 2«) 




HALL FOR RENT 

(complately rofncxleled) 

Houghs NKk Post No. 380. 

American Legion, III6 Sm Si 

479-6149 

TF 



SEfWIOEt 






HALL FOR RENT 

North Quincy K of C 

Building 

5 Mollis Avenue 

For information please call 

328-S967 



HALLS FOR RENT 

Newly Renovated 
Son* of Italy Social Center 
Golden Lion Suite 
Capacity - 300 
Venetian Room 
Capacity - 140 
Call 472- 



WE 
REPAIR 

LAMPS • WINDOWS • SCREENS 

at 3 Convenient Locations 



370COPELAND ST. 

WEST QUINCY 

472-8250 



53 BILLINGS RD., 

NORTH QUINCY 

773-7711 



190 QUINCY AVE. 

BRAINTREE 

843-1616 



ALL STORES OPEN MON THRU SAT 730^50 • Pterty ol PaWng 



4/30 



HELPWAWTEC^ 



TF 



HALL FOR HIRE 

Weddings. Sttowers. 

Meetings. Banquets 

Elks Home. 440 E Squantum St 

Quincy 

472-2223 

Tf 



2 HALLS FOR RENT 

1 suitable for large functions 
(350+ people); other suited 
for smaller functrions (120 
people). Call the Geirge F. 
Bryan Post 

472-6234 3/s 



TRAVEL FREE or on a 
shoestring. Air couriers 
needed - also overseas 
and cruiseship help 
wanted. Call 1-805-682- 
7555 Ext. F-3844. 3n» 



POSTAL JOBS 
AVAILABLE! 

Many positions. Great 
benefits. Gall 1-805- 
682-7555 ext.P-4029 

3/1» 



WANTED 



GOVERNME^^'JOBS 

NOW HIRING In your 
area. $16,OO0-$68,0O0. 
Cain -805-682-7555 ext. 
J-3865 for current federal 
list. 3/i« 



KAREN'S 
CLEANING 

Honest & Dependable 
328-9378 

Quincy - Milton m7 




WANTED: 

Actors for TV Commer- 
cials; movie extras and 
game show contestants. 
Many needed. Call 1 -805- 
682-7555 ext. T-3806. anu 



WANTED TO BUY 

Old woodworking tools, planes, 
chisels, surplus hand tools; all 
trades. Precision machinist tools. 
Also wanted: old books, paintings, 
frames, antiques, estate lots. 



•POSTAL JOBS* 

Quincy Area. $23,700 per 
year plus benefits. Postal 
carriers, sorters, clerks. For 
an application and exam in- 
formation call 1-219-736- 
9807, ext. P41 43, 9 am to 9 
pm, 7 days 2^7 



1-617-558-3839 



TF 



WANTED 

Junk cars and trucks. Cash 

payed for some. 

Call Dave (508)588-11 61 or 

Lennie (508) 559-7876. 

Fast Service aczs 



AIRUNES NOW HIRING 

Travel Agents, Flight At- 
tendants Mechanics, etc. 
Entry level and up. Sala- 
ries to $1 05K. Call 1 -805- 
682-7555ext.A-3654. 3/i» 

,, : ■-for::salb'^''I:::,, 



FOR LEASE 



FOR LEASE 

Weymouth Landing 3 
stores. Two have 1,000 
sq. ft. Comer store has 
1600 sq.ft. Call 61 7-926- 
3869 after 7 pm 2^0 



SEIZED CARS 

tmcks, boats, 4 wtieelers, 
motortiomes, by FBI, IRS, 
DEA. Available your area 
now. Call 1-805-682-7555 

ext. C-6368 3/i» 



RUBBISH REMOVAL 

Complete cleanouts- 
attics.ceitars-garages-yards. 
Removal of appliances- 
l>oilers-oil tanks-water heat- 
ers. Fast service-reasonable. 
472-0877 3« 



•Tar and Gravel 

•Shingles 

•Gutters 

MEALY ROOFERS 

'Flat Roof Spodallato' 
Jim H—ly 471-2123 4n 



Carpet & 

Upholstry Cleaning 

byJK&K 

Dry Foam Method 
Cleans Deep Down 
Drys faster than steam 
Call anytime 471-6319 3/5 



WALLPAPERING 
Frank MontanI 

Highest Quality Wori<manship 
arid Service. Neat, clean, pro- 
fessional. Reasonable rates; 
ceilings painted; commercial 
papering performed. 

698-9472 s/7 



Tainting & 
^cdlcovtring 

Sy'Ed'Barr 
Tfit (ughtst quaCity zvorfi 
performed neatCy at rea- 
sonaBU rates, fru esti- 
mates, referrtnus avaU- 
oBU, over 18 years e;(pe- 
rienu. 

Ca£[4T9-32S4 
today 3K 



LARRY'S 
HOME REPAIR 

• Carpenters 
• Painters 

• Decorators 
General Contractor 
20 Years Experience 
Licensed • Insured 
Interior-Exterior Painting 
Scroll Ceiling 
All Home Repairs 
Small or Large 

659-7471 328-8735 

TF 

DIGITAL DJ 

Let us entertain you. Mu- 
sic for all ages, includes 
free video. 

Call PJ Lowe 
773-9823 zak) 



A & T Vacuum 

• 14.95 Overhaul Special 
on any vacuum 

• Sewing machine repairing 

• VCR repairing and cleaning 

• Sharpening 

(sclttora. knivM. ate ) 

• Greek XL Vacuums 

• Electrolux w/power nozzle 

$150 
• Used Vacuum's $45 & up 
27 Beale St. 
Wollaston 
479-5066 




EXPERT 

LAMP REPAIR 
ft RfWHtmC 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO. 

472-2177 

755 SOUTHERN ARTERY 
QUINCY TF 



UCENSED #69301 
DAYCARE 

In Quincy. Mother of one, 
EMT, BS in Elementary 
Education will care for your 
child. 

773-9823 2/13 

E.J. TANTILLO 

Plumbing & Heating 

Boilers, Water Heaters, 

Gas Piping, 

Master Lie. #9904. Insured 

479-5667 3.2 

GENERAL CARPENTRY 

Porches, decks, stairs, new 
work or repairs. Roof 
shingles, skle wall shingles, 
windows, etc. No job too 
small. 

Mike 471-1 379 2^3 



Your South Short 

Haadquarttra 

For 



Appliance 
service 

ON ALL 
MAJOR 
APPLIANCES 



HANCOCK TIRE 

& APPLIANCE 

1 15 Franklin St , So Quincy 

4/2-1710 

TF 




TAX RETURNS 
Very Very Low Rates 

Richard C. McDonough, EA 
Professional Service In 

Your Home 
20 Years Experience 
472-2694 4,6 



Handyman and 
General Contracting 

• Siding: 

Vinly & Cladboard 

• Replacement Windows 

• Roofing 

• Porches/Decks 

• Interior & Exterior 
Carpentry & Painting 
472-2118-Martin 2«o 



INSTRUCTION 



WORD PROCESSING IS IN 

I2EMMI21 LEARN K^RE 

QUICKLY AND THOROUGHLY 

wrm PRIVATE INSTRUCTIONS: 

CALL WORD CONNECTIONS 

(617)849-6002 

Leave Message 

All calte promptly returned i/3o 



SULUVAN Lan<tocape 
ATrMSwvIo* 

Pruning, Romovals, brush 
chipping, Bobcat swvice. Fully 
insured. Roaaonabie rates. 

472-3595 4/23 



MISCELLANiC^ 



BINGO 

North Quincy K of C 

Wad., 7 pm - Hard Carda 

Prlzaa-Snacka 

Ralaxad Atmoaphara 

Rafraahmanla. Paricing 

Call 328-9822 2/13 



QUAUTY 
Painting A Paperhanging 

from professional prepara- 
tion to a spectacular finish. 
Neat, affordable & environ- 
mentally safe. 

Jim Foley 328-7151 s/i4 



HOUSE CLEANING 

No job too big or small. 
Let me do the cleaning 
while you enjoy other 
things. Call Sandy 

843-9875 2/13 



FOR SALE 

N.H. Lake's region affordable 2 
bdrm mobil home in new park. 
2 hrs from Boston. Fully fur- 
nished 8x1 shed near sKi area 
& lakes $16,900 

(617)767-2287 2/i3 



i*if^OiPi^ 



Thank You 

St. Jude 

For Favors Granted 



B.M.H. 2/13 



HAPPY VALEfim^S 

to Barbara Jean, 

Jimmy, Michelle and 

Bobby 

Love, Nan 



2A13 



REPOSSESSED 81 IRS 
FORECLOSED HOMES 

availattie at below market 
value. Fantastic savings. You 
repair. Also S&L baWcuA prop- 
eriies. Call 1-805-682-7555 
exL H-6705 for repo list your 
area. *<• 

JNSTRUCtlON 

TUTOR 

English, Liberal Arts; 

College-High School. 

PhD; 15 years teaching 

experience. 

479-2732 2/13 



o 



United Way 

HbrinipaitlhrbeilinjJIotui 




MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN, 1372 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169 
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment must accompany order. 



INDEX 



D Strvlcaa 

D For Sale 

D Auloi 

D Boats 

a For Rani 

O Wanted 

D Help Wanted 

O Pats, Livestock 

D Lost and Found 

O Real Estate For Sale 

n Raal Eftala Wanted 

a Miscellaneous 

O Work Wanted 

□ Antiques 

a Coins A Stamos 

a Rest Homes 

O Instruction 

Day Care 

D Personal 

a Electrical A Appliances 



RATES 
IWECK 
8-7WEIK8 

8-12 WEEKS 

IS WEEKS 
ORMOilE 



a |5.00foronelncartion,upto20words,lOSforaactiaddltlonalword. 
a $4.60 per Insertion up to 20 words for 3-7 Insertions of tlM same ad, 

10s each addlttonal word. 
a $4.30 per Inaertton up to 20 words for 8-12 Insertions of ttwsamead. 

10s mora each additional word. 
a $4.00 per insertion up to 20 words for 1 3 or mora Inaertlons of ttw 

same ad, ^0t aecti additional word. 



D Enclosed is $ 

in The Quincy Sun 



Jor the following ad to run 



.weeks 



COPY: 



NO WFUNO WILL K MAM AT TM« COlSmUCT RATE IN THE EVENT OF CANCELLATION. 
OEAOUNE: MONDAY, ScSS PJH PLEAM mCLUOE YOUR PHONE NUMMN IN AO. 



Pagt 20 Qnlncy Sun Thursday, February 13, 1992 




Transportation Secretary, 

Sheets To Discuss Rail 
Station, Connector Friday 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL seventh graders present a $185 check to Friends of the Unborn, 
an anti-abortion organization. Student John Mazone makes the presentation to Marilyn 
Bimey, director and founder of the organization. The students raised the money ft-om 
bake sales and raffles. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 

Hospital Library Receives $7,220 Grant 



Quincy Hospital is one 
of 12 hospitals to be 
awarded a grant from the 
Massachusetts Medical 
Society Information 
Resources Improvement 
Grant Program. 

The Quincy Hospital 
Medical Library received 
a grant of $7,220. Carolyn 
Rubenstein, MSLS, 
Medical Librarian at the 
hospital, said "The new 
system will enable 
physicians at the hospital 
to directly access the most 
up-to-date medical 
information. Physicians 
and nurses will have 



access to medical data, 
information on drug 
interactions and the latest 
developments in nursing 
information 24 hours a 
day." 

Funds will be used to 
purchase a computer 
workstation with six CD- 
ROM drives and software 
for the Medical Library. 

Massachusetts Medical 
Society President Philip E. 
McCarthy said "Whether 
it's the latest clinical 
trials, a newly developed 
practice parameter, or a 
study on the effect of 
managed care plans. 



changes are the 
information is in a 
computer someplace. 
Getting that information to 
physicians quickly and 
efficiently is critical to our 
ability to continue 
providing quality medical 
care to patients." 

The Massachusetts 
Medical Society is the 
professional association of 
physicians in 

Massachusetts. The 
Society's Information 
Resources Improvement 
Grant Program distributed 
$50,000 among the 12 
hospitals. 



(Cont'd from Page 1) 

State's willingness to 
construct a commuter rail 
station in Quincy. As 
originally proposed, the 
restoration project did not 
call for a Quincy station. 

However, the mayor's 
revitalization plan, which 
Sheets now refers to as 
Quincy 2000, calls for a 
station in Quincy Center 
as a means to boost 
development and 
revitalization. 

"He (Taylor) wants to 
be able to talk 
intelligently about these 
(the connector and rail 
station). Not seeing the 
sites, he's not able to do 
that," Sheets said, 
explaining Taylor's visit. 

"It's not a normal 
procedure for the secretary 
of transportation to get out 
to cities and towns and do 
this. He sees this as an 
important part of the Old 
Colony railroad 

restoration." 

Sheets estimates the 
cost to construct the 
connector and station at 
$35 to $40 milhon. Of that 
figure, the federal 
government would pay 80 



Quality Printing 
at a 

Price. 





We have computerized our 

fypesettmg department 

and we're expanding our 



printing division. 



We Specialize in: 
Program Books, Brochures, Newspapers, 

Newsletters, Political Flyers, Tickets, 
Stationery, Envelopes and Typesetting. 




1372 Hancock St., Quincy Square 

471-3100 



percent and the state 20 
percent. 

The only cost Sheets 
envisions for the city is for 
engineering work. But, he 
adds, that would be 
minimal and perhaps 
picked up by the federal 
govenunent, too. 

Although outside 
funding sources have been 
scarce in recent years. 
Sheets is confident the 
revenue will come through. 
He noted Congress last 
year passed the Surface 
Transportation Bill which 
makes $151 billion 
available to the states for 
transportation projects. 
Both the connector and 
station would be eligible 
for the funding, the mayor 
said, adding money from 
that bill has already been 
earmarked for the Old 
Colony project. 

As far as the station is 
concerned. Sheets said he 
wants it located over the 
existing MBTA tracks and 
the Burgin Parkway. And 
instead of a concrete 
platform station, the mayor 
wants a station 



"historical" in character, 
made out of bricks and 
wood. 

"Any development 
around the station would 
have the same decor, ' he 
said. 

After Friday's meeting, 
Sheet said he hopes to 
hold a followup meeting in 
Washington in March with 
Taylor, Andy Card, Cong. 
Brian Donnelly, Sen. John 
Kerry and Sen. Ted 
Kennedy. 

Card is expected to be 
confirmed as the secretary 
of transportation at the 
federal level soon. 

"The meeting will put 
the projects in perspective 
and put everyone on the 
same page as far as 
Quincy is concerned," 
Sheets said. 

If all goes according to 
plan, the mayor said the 
crossway connector and 
rail station could be up in 
four years. "That's 
reasonable. The track 
beds are already here so 
it's not as much of a 
project as if you didn't 
have that rail bed." 



Surge Of New Voters 



(Cont'd from Page]) 

presidential primaries 
concluded at 10 p.m. 
Tuesday. Asst. City Clerk 
Joseph Shea projected 
approximately 600 new 
voters would register by 
the time the drive ended 
Tuesday evening. Of that 
amount, he figured 400 
would register Tuesday 
alone since the drive was 
on a pace of 50 new voters 



an hour. 

Residents who did not 
register before 10 p.m. 
Tuesday will not be able 
to vote in the March 10 
presidential primaries. 
However, those residents 
who did not register before 
Tuesday's deadline have 
until Oct. 6 to register for 
the final presidential 
election which will be 
held Tuesday, Nov. 3. 



License Board Briefs 



The Quincy Board of 
License Commissioners 
took the following action 
at its meeting Tuesday: 

•Granted a request from 
Papa Gino's of America, 
Inc., 100 Granite St. and 1 
Beale St., for a transfer of 
the corporate ownership to 
Papa Gino's Acquisition 
Corp. 

•Granted a request from 
the Center for Health and 
Development Atlantic 
House, 338 Washington 
St., (Ellen Bruder), for a 
Second-Hand (Thrift Shop) 
license. 

•Continued, for two 
weeks, a request from 
Deno's Pizza & Subs, 686 
Southern Artery, (George 
DeFina) for a Common 
Victualer license. 

•Granted a request from 
Al Zero's Repair (Egan's 
Sunoco), 641-647 Adams 
St., (Albert Zero), for an 
Auto Repair license. 

•Granted a request from 
the American Legion 
Auxiliary, Quincy Unit 
#95, 2 Mechanic St., 

8av« Qat and Monay 
Shop Locally 



(Susan Fahey), for a 
permit to conduct a Poppy 
Drive, April 23-25. 

•Granted a request from 
the North Quincy High 
School cheerleaders, 
(EUzabeth Ballum), for a 
permit to conduct a 
canning drive Feb. 27 and 
28. 

•Granted a request from 
the North Quincy High 
School girls' and boys' 
swim teams, (Ann 
McCarthy), for a permit to 
conduct a canning drive, 
March 5-7. 

•Granted a request from 
the Quincy High School 
hockey team, (Debra 
Smith), for a permit to 
conduct a caiming drive, 
Feb. 21-23. 

•Granted a request from 
the Quincy Youth Baseball 
League, (Greg Hanley), 
for a permit to conduct a 
canning drive, April 3-5. 

•Postponed, for two 
weeks, a hearing regarding 
Kelly's In The Square, 19